Video: The most insane tsunami footage yet

posted at 5:01 pm on March 28, 2011 by Allahpundit

Via Gizmodo, I thought we’d seen the worst a few weeks ago, but no. The clip at the last link looked like a flood turning into rapids transforming into a roaring river. This looks more like what it actually was — an honest-to-goodness ocean spilling into a city and swallowing it whole. By the end of the clip, if not for that lone building on the right edge of the frame, you wouldn’t know civilization had been there.

Today’s deep-breath news from the Fukushima plant is that plutonium’s been found in the soil. Time to panic? Not just yet: Japanese officials say three of the five samples they found were deposited years ago by minute fallout from Chinese and North Korean nuclear tests. The other two probably come from reactor three, which uses plutonium-based “mox” fuel; that’s a big deal if the reactor pops open and there’s a major plutonium release, but right now the levels in the soil are low enough to pose no threat to human health. The main problem right now isn’t in the soil or even inside the reactors. It’s in the tunnels underneath the reactors, where the the water is so ridiculously radioactive that workers can’t get in there to reconnect power lines and restart the reactors’ cooling systems. They’re going to have to pump the water out first — assuming they can figure out a way to do it without contaminating everything in the vicinity. I’m sure they’ll think of something soon. This crisis can’t last more than a few … years, right?


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Hard to believe nature is capable of such things.

Hoodlumman on March 28, 2011 at 5:04 PM

And we think man can “kill the planet.”

As Michael Crichton wrote:

“What an intoxicating vanity.”

blatantblue on March 28, 2011 at 5:07 PM

Watched it last night,this is theee worst one to date!!
==========================================================

New Tsunami vid.
****************

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=3a7_1301163352

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:08 PM

I figured the camera guy would be safe on that ledge. Towards the end of the video I changed my mind.

Electrongod on March 28, 2011 at 5:09 PM

How puny the works of man.

Splashman on March 28, 2011 at 5:09 PM

dude. that’s incredible. That water is like over the top of that first floor window on that other multi-story bldg. Simply incredible.

ted c on March 28, 2011 at 5:10 PM

And we think man can “kill the planet.”

As Michael Crichton wrote:

“What an intoxicating vanity.”

blatantblue on March 28, 2011 at 5:07 PM

yeah, really. The planet reaches up and kills dudes by the scores all the time.

ted c on March 28, 2011 at 5:11 PM

Dancing Buildings in Japan
***************************

Great Japanese Engeneering!
taken 3/11/2011

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=29a_1301215412

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:11 PM

Either the ballsiest move ever standing there taking the vidoe of all that happening, or just too stupid to flee to higher ground. Either way… just.. DAMN!!!!

44Magnum on March 28, 2011 at 5:14 PM

for some reason this reminded me of Obama’s foreign policy.

unseen on March 28, 2011 at 5:15 PM

Damn! What was the videographer standing on? I wanted to cut and run just watching that…

d1carter on March 28, 2011 at 5:15 PM

And we think man can “kill the planet.”

As Michael Crichton wrote:

“What an intoxicating vanity.”

blatantblue on March 28, 2011 at 5:07 PM

All of us educated folk know that global warming causes earthquakes.

/Danny Glover

Dominion on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 PM

for some reason this reminded me of Obama’s foreign policy.

unseen on March 28, 2011 at 5:15 PM

And many American homeowners.

Electrongod on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 PM

Incredible.
I imagine the shooter was in shock, hence he spent so much time focused on the river and mostly IGNORED the town floating away on the right.

3dpuzzman on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 PM

That was remarkable photography. I would have been screaming like Patti Blagojevich the whole time.

Ted Torgerson on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 PM

I think the video guy here was on top of an apartment or office bldg that just so happened to be the safest spot for him as everything else around got fricking wiped the frack out.

ted c on March 28, 2011 at 5:17 PM

the public address guy sounds like an auctioneer.

sbvft contributor on March 28, 2011 at 5:17 PM

If this footage was available at the time, Al Gore would have used it in An Inconvenient Truth as proof of destructive power of melting ice caps.

portlandon on March 28, 2011 at 5:18 PM

And we think man can “kill the planet.”

As Michael Crichton wrote:

“What an intoxicating vanity.”

blatantblue on March 28, 2011 at 5:07 PM

+7%…!

Seven Percent Solution on March 28, 2011 at 5:19 PM

Latest Earthquakes M5.0+ in the World – Past 7 days

Latest Earthquakes Magnitude 5.0 and Greater in the World – Last 7 days
*************

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_big.php
===================

Japan Meteorological Agency
***************************

Earthquakes and VolcanoesTsunami Warnings/Advisories, Tsunami Information

http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/indexe.html

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:19 PM

Any idea what the guy on the PA was saying throughout the video? Other than, “Put your head between your legs and kiss your @$$ goodbye!”

CurtZHP on March 28, 2011 at 5:21 PM

The main problem right now isn’t in the soil or even inside the reactors. It’s in the tunnels underneath the reactors, where the the water is so ridiculously radioactive that workers can’t get in there to reconnect power lines and restart the reactors’ cooling systems.

But WAIT!!

The MSM early on indicted the Japanese for not IMMEDIATELY PUMPING SEA WATER into the reactor! The MSM said that TEPCO, in the early phases of the catastrophe – were TOO CONCERNED with saving the reactors – too concerned with “protecting their investment” to “do the right thing” and pump sea water into the reactors immediately!!

The Drive-By Liberal Arts majors at work again here!

Now we KNOW why the Japanese “did not pass go – did not pump seawater” at the first hint of a problem – and it’s because all this water has to GO SOMEWHERE – and once it touches that reactor core – it’s pretty damn radioactive and – it’s a problem!!

But did we hear any of that from the MSM while they were busy knocking the Japanese?

Nope.

HondaV65 on March 28, 2011 at 5:22 PM

I figured the camera guy would be safe on that ledge. Towards the end of the video I changed my mind.

Electrongod on March 28, 2011 at 5:09 PM

Thats is probably the exact feeling the camera man went through.

sharrukin on March 28, 2011 at 5:22 PM

Ride the Wave!!!!
==================

Damn the tsunami, full speed ahead!

Japanese Coast Guard vessel turns into tsunami and rides the wave. You can almost hear their nutsacks disappear up into their guts as they crest.
Mar 19 2011
*************

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=3e6_1300505578

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:23 PM

I figured the camera guy would be safe on that ledge. Towards the end of the video I changed my mind.

Electrongod on March 28, 2011 at 5:09 PM
==================================
Thats is probably the exact feeling the camera man went through.

sharrukin on March 28, 2011 at 5:22 PM

sharrukin:Fully agree,and I noticed the water rising towards
the end,my nerves would be getting shot,looking fo
r higher ground!:)

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:26 PM

Wish the resolution was a bit better. The depth of field (like how high the water rose) is hard to gauge at times.

ParisParamus on March 28, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Am I the only person having problems with HotAir. I had to go to the vault to find stories posted after 11:36 AM. Headlines are stuck on Carter to Cuba story.

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 5:30 PM

Hello, I’m the Ocean. I’ll be moving in now.

ZenDraken on March 28, 2011 at 5:31 PM

Watching it, I hate the idea that I am seeing people and animals suffering and dying. The noise of everything breaking up and the water gives me the creeps. It must be deafening.

Was the large ship able to sail away to safety?

Blake on March 28, 2011 at 5:33 PM

Wouldn’t you like to see the following 5 minutes of what happened after this video cuts off? The water may have kept rising even more.

mydh12 on March 28, 2011 at 5:35 PM

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 5:30 PM

Seems to be working okay for me. Are other sites working for you?

d1carter on March 28, 2011 at 5:36 PM

If you look closely, there are a bunch of people on top of that hospital looking building thats across the parking lot, where you see a flag waiving.

BVM on March 28, 2011 at 5:38 PM

d1carter on March 28, 2011 at 5:36 PM

Seem to be. I’ll have to go check the pc. I’m on my lap top. It is so weird.

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 5:38 PM

@ ParisParamus on March 28, 2011 at 5:28 PM

REALLY REALLY DAMN HIGH.

TruthBeTold2 on March 28, 2011 at 5:40 PM

Those poor people. The whole town washed away. Scoured away.

ronsfi on March 28, 2011 at 5:48 PM

d1carter on March 28, 2011 at 5:36 PM

It was my laptop and I think I fixed it. We will see.

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 5:49 PM

It rose at least 1 3/4 floors. The building across the parking lot was 5 stories, it almost reached the top of the windows in the 2nd floor.

WoosterOh on March 28, 2011 at 5:52 PM

And we think man can “kill the planet.”

As Michael Crichton wrote:

“What an intoxicating vanity.”

blatantblue on March 28, 2011 at 5:07 PM

People who have never been up close and personal to a huge natural disaster don’t get it.

Having been only a few miles away from Mt Pinatubo when it erupted in 1991, one loses ones ego really fast.

To witness such vast destruction from an event over so large an area, encompassing so much destruction…then having to pick up the pieces, not have things we take for granted…

If it doesn’t humble you, make you aware of your true humanity, how insignificant you are in the face of such things – you really are soulless.

catmman on March 28, 2011 at 5:53 PM

That was remarkable photography. I would have been screaming like Patti Blagojevich the whole time.

Ted Torgerson on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 PM

Much better than all the stupid American videos of crazy, unfolding events…

“OH MY GOD. OH MY GOD. OH MY F*&@KING GOD! HOLY SH&T!”

(I only say American because that’s what I’ve seen. And it’s terrible.)

Abby Adams on March 28, 2011 at 5:54 PM

The main problem right now isn’t in the soil or even inside the reactors. It’s in the tunnels underneath the reactors, where the the water is so ridiculously radioactive that workers can’t get in there to reconnect power lines and restart the reactors’ cooling systems. They’re going to have to pump the water out first — assuming they can figure out a way to do it without contaminating everything in the vicinity. I’m sure they’ll think of something soon. This crisis can’t last more than a few … years, right?

The water rise there was easily over 20 feet. Covered two stories of the large building next door by the end of the clip. And the water was still coming inshore……

As we discussed before, the removal of heat by venting the reactor vessel steam space into the torus portion of the reactor (the tunnels Allah mentions), is the NORMAL way you remove decay heat if you have no electricity available in one of these plants. As HondaV65 notes, the water has to go somewhere….

The most likely source of the contamination in the turbine room is from condensation of this steam and the released fission products (remember, if the core is damaged the fission products get released with the steam) after they are either overflowed from the torus, or when the steam vented overwhelms the quenching water volume already in the torus and escapes into the reactor containment building area. Even if only 5% of this leaks through the building penetrations (i.e. the holes through the concrete building which allow the electrical cables to power the main coolant pumps and other electrical and instrumentation cabling, or the ventilation ducts into and out of the reactor building, if any.) that steam and radioactive particles could condense outside the reactor containment building and cause these puddles of water. It doesn’t take a lot of water on a flat surface to cover a lot of flat territory here. And it could have hidden a lot of problems if the tsunami overwhelmed the barriers and poured lots of ocean into the turbine buildings. After all, the reason the diesels are supposed to have stopped working was the fuel tanks were WASHED AWAY by the tsunami. And we see adequate cause in this video to believe that. If the whole building was flooded and then you put some highly contaminated water in a few areas of this mess, you could easily miss the hot spots.

So removing the water, not all of which is contaminated, maybe, is a problem. You just need to pump it into dozens of water tankers (or maybe the Navy barges we sent them, once the water has been offloaded.. the US Navy can get more water barges), and then store them someplace protected until they can be surveyed and decontaminated. Not difficult or complex….. until you have no roads to drive them there, or tugs to drag them there and move them away….

In the aftermath of a catastrophe to the countryside and infrastructure, not to mention, the need to get fresh water to the population to survive, this just can’t be the absolute first priority for some folks. Only TEPCO. And they will have to make do with the folks they have and the gear available.

You go to war, “and fight emergencies”, with the army (and equipment) you have, not what you wish to have……

Everything these guys are doing right now is three or four times as hard as we think it is from the safety of our electrically powered cocoons with perfect communications, comfort, and sustenance immediately at hand. Heroic doesn’t even begin to cover what these folks are doing to fix their problems. We owe them more help than we are giving….

Subsunk

Subsunk on March 28, 2011 at 5:59 PM

Atlas shrugged. Or was it Poseidon this time?

Geochelone on March 28, 2011 at 6:00 PM

Am I the only person having problems with HotAir. I had to go to the vault to find stories posted after 11:36 AM. Headlines are stuck on Carter to Cuba story.

[Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 5:30 PM]

Clear everything in your cache and try it again.

Dusty on March 28, 2011 at 6:02 PM

I thought the President was going to stop the rising oceans.

elcapt on March 28, 2011 at 6:03 PM

Wish the resolution was a bit better. The depth of field (like how high the water rose) is hard to gauge at times.

ParisParamus on March 28, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Just a guess, but looking at the building across the way I think the water came up about 18′. I would say that the garage in front of the building is 12′ high and the water probably went about 6′ higher than its roof. (middle of the first row of windows. Unreal.

tommer74 on March 28, 2011 at 6:04 PM

Dusty on March 28, 2011 at 6:02 PM

Thank you.

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 6:05 PM

I thought the President was going to stop the rising oceans.

elcapt on March 28, 2011 at 6:03 PM

You win the interwebz today. Your prize is an autographed copy of “The Audacity of My Father” or whatevs from The ONE!

mjk on March 28, 2011 at 6:09 PM

Wow.

At 2:53: ‘Oi oi oi! Hito iru zo. Hito!’

‘Hey hey hey! There’s a person. A person!’

The camera man is pointing his hand at a person or persons in the water.

DarkCurrent on March 28, 2011 at 6:11 PM

Here’s another video of the tsunami coming ashore at Kesennuma: Tsunami Hits Japanese Port Town

It’s 7 minutes long, but stick with it. It features giant ships floating past, quivering power lines, and a really creepy-sounding lady howling near the beginning.

Splashman on March 28, 2011 at 6:21 PM

I thought the President was going to stop the rising oceans.

elcapt on March 28, 2011 at 6:03 PM

Ask King Canute how that went.

By our command, waters retreat,
Show my power, halt at my feet

CaptainNed on March 28, 2011 at 6:21 PM

We have our own “Japan” coming to us if ever a hurricane hits dead on the eastern coast of Florida, called the treasure coast for all the spanish galleons that hurricanes sunk there.

The last major hurrican that hit from the sea was in 1965. I guess I was in the last two. At that time no one build on the barrier islands because they went under ten to twenty feet of water in a hurrican. Boca Raton has an enlet to the ocean thanks to a developer that cleared the land just before a hurricane hit. Over time and no hurricanes and no one under the age of 40 remembering what a hurrican is like, they began building on the barrier islands. Greed for the on the ocean condo followed. Now its common knowledge that when the next treasure coast hurricane hits the first floors are going to be under water, and the second floor will be washed out with the waves. Concrete shatters in hurrican winds. How long with those stand is the question.

The real problem is that a nuclear power plant was built at St. Lucie, out on the barrier island,about half way up the coast. This plant is older than the ones in Japan with original safty systems that worked in theory. It has two reactors and of course, those spent fuel pools on site.

I was already concerned, but more so now that I realize that it takes weeks, not days or a few hours they may have to shut it down, and back up power is going to be just imaginatary out on that island. How well is that plant going to stand up to being buried in a pounding, churning hurrican surf that will be washing over that barrier island? How will they keep it out of the spent fuel containment pool? It gets a bit worse. Between the barrier islands and the main land is a river flowing south at least 35 miles before it dumps into the bay at Stuart Florida. From there it is back to the sea and back up the coast to the plant and beyond. Beyond the river on the main land is Port St. Lucie, a heavily populated town and US-1, one of the main highways south with I-95 and the turnpike being the only other two further inland. All that is needed is a climate change in North Africa that returns it to like it was back in the 50′s and 60′s and those hurricanes will be pounding the treasure coast or a bit of bad luck.

Franklyn on March 28, 2011 at 6:25 PM

We went to Tokyo and surrounding area in 2009 and 2010 at this time of year (cherry blossoms). last december my wife suggested skipping it this year. Now…i never condone listening to your wives..but this time it worked out.
Its a great country with really..really..really great people. Our thoughts and prayers to them especially the innocent kids, many left parentless while they were in schools.

malkinmania on March 28, 2011 at 6:30 PM

The camera man is pointing his hand at a person or persons in the water.

DarkCurrent on March 28, 2011 at 6:11 PM

I thought I saw some bodies towards the end. Very sad.

TexasDan on March 28, 2011 at 6:32 PM

If I had filmed that, the sound track would just be me sayin’
“Muther f&%cker” over and over

esnap on March 28, 2011 at 6:35 PM

Latest Earthquakes M5.0+ in the World

canopfor on March 28, 2011 at 5:19 PM

There’s at least 4 of them > M6.0 here:
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Maps/10/140_40.php

gh on March 28, 2011 at 6:42 PM

Splashman on March 28, 2011 at 6:21 PM

I think you can see the same building from the first video in the distance at about 0:56. If so, you can also see the building the cameraman was on.

gh on March 28, 2011 at 6:45 PM

biblical

Ever heard of Noah? Not even close.

maynila on March 28, 2011 at 6:46 PM

May God Bless them and keep them. Pray for Japan.

Zorro on March 28, 2011 at 7:03 PM

What time we teeing off…uhbuhma

winston on March 28, 2011 at 7:03 PM

At the very beginning of this tragedy there was a person commenting from Tokyo, I think the name was Dongemaharu, have anyone heard anymore from this person? I would love on the ground information about how they are coping.

Cindy Munford on March 28, 2011 at 7:09 PM

If this footage was available at the time, Al Gore would have used it in An Inconvenient Truth as proof of destructive power of melting ice caps.

portlandon on March 28, 2011 at 5:18 PM

Nailed it. The opportunist would pounce like a jackal on raw meat.

Mallard T. Drake on March 28, 2011 at 7:19 PM

WOWZER!!!

Worst one I’ve seen.

PappyD61 on March 28, 2011 at 7:19 PM

I think you can see the same building from the first video in the distance at about 0:56. If so, you can also see the building the cameraman was on.

gh on March 28, 2011 at 6:45 PM

Hard to tell, but you might be right. The size relationship seems right.

What blows my mind is watching the multi-bazillion-dollar ships float by, uncontrolled, like bath toys in a crick.

Splashman on March 28, 2011 at 7:25 PM

Allah, you need to start reading Reddit instead of gizmodo. Cut out the middle man. All Gizmodo does now is repost things they read on reddit or engadget. It will allow you to get videos like this posted a day earlier.

thphilli on March 28, 2011 at 7:25 PM

It amazes me how long the sirens keep going. You would think they would have lost power fairly quickly.

boomer on March 28, 2011 at 7:50 PM

That is the power of a 30′ high wall of water…. coming in for 15 minutes… it is relentless.

Imagine the Cumbre Vieja letting a trillion ton landslide go into the Atlantic. And a 100′ wave coming in along the eastern shore of North America for half an hour or more… and that is a low end estimate… we would be asking ‘where is Florida?’

ajacksonian on March 28, 2011 at 8:00 PM

That river rose what…5-6 stories? The person filming is one of the luckiest people alive.

OxyCon on March 28, 2011 at 8:10 PM

This plant is older than the ones in Japan with original safty systems that worked in theory.

Franklyn on March 28, 2011 at 6:25 PM

There is much wrong with your diatribe about the St Lucie plant but it is not older than the Japanese plants currently having troubles, maybe Turkey Point is (south of there) but not St Lucie (same age vintage a unit 6 at Fukushima actually). I won’t go into the design differences, except to say there not even close to being similar.

Additionally, it had no problem with the sequential hurricanes (Frances and Jeanne) in 2004, and Turkey Point was hit point blank by cat 5 hurricane Andrew in 1992, with very few if any issues.

There is a big difference between a 9.0 earthquake followed by 14 meter tsunami (still have a hard believeing that number) and a hurricane.

As far as safty systems go they are tested constantly (sometimes on a per shift, daily, weekly or monthly basis) and kept ready no matter how old they are.

whbates on March 28, 2011 at 8:28 PM

What nature wants, nature gets. :(

RedNewEnglander on March 28, 2011 at 8:42 PM

I have to wonder why bother with the siren and the announcer? I think by the end of the clip everybody has already figured out that a flood is happening.

capricorn on March 28, 2011 at 9:47 PM

A display of the “weakness of God’s power” … imagine if His full power was unleased. Truly Awesome!

ORrighty on March 28, 2011 at 10:11 PM

Put the hysteria over global warming in perspective. We should not fear man’s power over nature but the God who created it and us. God is still in control even though mankind is trying to deny it.

Blue Collar Todd on March 28, 2011 at 10:27 PM

Water is the most destructive power on Earth. We had one of Colorado’s largest forest fires in 1996, winds were a sustained 60 mph, it was a blow torch. But the floods that came afterward were far more destructive, wiping out anything and everything in their path. Huge boulders and trees, from a creek that’s usually 6 inches deep. The only person to die died in the first flood when his truck was swept away. The flooding didn’t stop for a couple of years, not until enough vegetation regrew to hold the soil and the water.

I can’t imagine seeing the tsunami firsthand like that, incredible. Since we’re seeing the footage, I’m sure the people on that building survived.

Just like modern buildings are built to withstand the earthquake, some more modern buildings can withstand the tsunami. People in Hawaii actually evacuate to the higher floors in the hotel buildings.

Common Sense on March 28, 2011 at 11:17 PM

We have our own “Japan” coming to us if ever a hurricane hits dead on the eastern coast of Florida, called the treasure coast for all the spanish galleons that hurricanes sunk there.

The last major hurricane that hit from the sea was in 1965.

Franklyn on March 28, 2011 at 6:25 PM

TugboatPhil on March 29, 2011 at 12:09 AM

Dang it. I meant to ask, What about Andrew in 93? That came straight off the ocean.

TugboatPhil on March 29, 2011 at 12:10 AM

It is certainly one of the more illustrate clips in terms of showing what is really taking place. It must have been terrifying to be a witness/victim of this. The sea rises… amazing and scary to anyone living along a faulted coastline.

lexhamfox on March 29, 2011 at 1:25 AM

An official perhaps from the townhall repeatedly warns:

This is a tsunami alert! Seek higher ground immediately!

The guy pointing with his finger as he shoots the footage remarks, “I see a person!”

By the way, that MOX fuel stuff is some very nasty stuff. I note here in Tokyo they (domestic news broadcasts) talk about Number Two Reactor most of the time, but do not discuss Number Three as much as I think they should.

Still Tokyo is very very fortunate compared to the disaster initiated by the earthquake.

Met a lady in a supermarket buying Campbell`s soup to send to family in the affected area and she says people aren`t getting enough foodstuffs up there.

This pretty much jibes with what I see in the news.

The US servicemen and women are doing yoeman work over here and I am very proud of our military.

Americans back home buying up sodium iodide do not impress.

Sherman1864 on March 29, 2011 at 2:40 AM

May the Japanese find the inner strength to overcome this disaster.

Geochelone on March 29, 2011 at 4:02 AM

The main problem right now isn’t in the soil or even inside the reactors. It’s in the tunnels underneath the reactors, where the the water is so ridiculously radioactive that workers can’t get in there to reconnect power lines and restart the reactors’ cooling systems.

Sayonara. Kyrie eleison.

Time for robotics? Instead of the Japanese girly-girl “companion” model, use the end of days industrial workers’ model. That leaves the human element redundant.

maverick muse on March 29, 2011 at 6:43 AM

Leaves one feeling a bit insecure… DD

Darvin Dowdy on March 29, 2011 at 7:28 AM

Who owns the cow that farted and caused all of this???

/sarc>

landlines on March 29, 2011 at 10:49 AM

I saw a bush under water at 3:01 in the clip. I didn’t remember seeing it at the beginning, so I watched again.

The “bush” is the top of a 30 foot tree planted near the pier to the fishing vessel berthed at the end.

I think I have seen all of the videos out there and this one is no doubt the scariest.

BigAlSouth on March 29, 2011 at 4:44 PM

those poor people. they didnt have a chance against that thing.

WyoMike on March 29, 2011 at 8:31 PM

Just in case anyone is interested in the on going situation at the nuclear plants:

Latest NEI Updates

UPDATE AS OF 6:30 P.M. EDT, TUESDAY, MARCH 29:
Tokyo Electric Power Co. said that cooling water is being added to the spent storage fuel pools at reactors 2 and 3. Reactor 2 was using a temporary motor-driven pump and reactor 3 was using a truck to pump the freshwater into the fuel storage pools. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that plans are being made to begin pumping freshwater into the fuel storage pool at reactor 4 starting today.

IAEA said that 63 food samples taken March 24-29 in eight prefectures (Chiba, Fukushima, Gunma, Ibaraki, Miyagi, Niigata, Tochigi and Yamagata) were below regulatory limits set by the Japanese government for iodine-131, cesium-134 and cesium-137.

New analyses of seawater about 1,000 feet from the discharge point of reactors 1 through 4 show “a significant decrease” in radiation levels from March 26, IAEA said.

Readings for iodine-131 went from 2,000,000 picocuries (1 picocurie is one-trillionth of a curie) per liter on March 26 to 297,300 picocuries per liter on March 27. Readings for cesium-137 went from 324,324 picocuries per liter on March 26 to 51,351 picocuries per liter on March 27. IAEA said that radiation readings in seawater “will be quite variable in the near future depending on water discharge levels.”

Japan’s National Research Institute of Fishery Science has analyzed five fish samples from the port of Choshi in Chiba prefecture and found concentrations in the fish to be “far below any concern for fish consumption.” Four of five samples showed cesium-137 concentrations below the limit of detection. In the remaining sample, cesium-137 was found to be slightly above detectable levels.

IAEA said the situation was evolving, but that concentrations of radionuclides in seawater would soon drop to lower values by dilution and that the levels in marine food would most likely not reach levels above regulatory limits set for consumption.

In the United States, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s daily data summary from its RadNet radiation air monitors across the United States show typical fluctuations in background radiation levels as of 8:30 A.M. EDT. “The levels detected are far below levels of concern,” EPA said.

No “bad news” is no news to the MSM.

whbates on March 29, 2011 at 9:50 PM

It rose at least 1 3/4 floors. The building across the parking lot was 5 stories, it almost reached the top of the windows in the 2nd floor.

WoosterOh on March 28, 2011 at 5:52 PM

Reports say it was a 10 meter flood surge (32 feet). Don’t forget the “five story building” had a parking garage on the bottom floor. The surge actually rose 2 3/4 stories.

BigAlSouth on March 30, 2011 at 6:45 AM