The Pulse of the Axis of Evil

posted at 5:00 pm on March 13, 2011 by Dafydd ab Hugh

Nuclear electromagnetic pulse weapons (NEMPs): In a single explosive EMP flash, detonated 400-500 km above the surface and thus impervious to most of our ballistic missile defenses (BMDs), we could lose nearly the entire communications network — including broadcast television and radio, cable and satellite channels, shortwave and microwave broadcast, and cell phones (which are simply UHF radio phones); all modern unshielded electronic devices — including computer microprocessors, the internet, hard drives, video- and audiotape, televisions, radio receivers, radar installations, missiles that use sophisticated guidance systems, and microprocessor implants in cars, microwave ovens, thermostats, and the like (some vacuum-tube technology would be spared); and even the nationwide power grid.

All it takes is an enemy ruthless enough, and little-enough concerned about retaliation, to get his hands on such a device, mount it on a missile, and “pull the trigger.”

And according to ABC News, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is just this close to developing an NEMP; and North Korea has already used non-nuclear electromagnetic pulse weapons (NNEMPs) against American and South Korean forces in the Korean peninsula… and shows interest in exporting such weapons to radical Islamist countries and organizations:

The North is believed to be nearing completion of an electromagnetic pulse bomb that, if exploded 25 miles above ground would cause irreversible damage to electrical and electronic devices such as mobile phones, computers, radio and radar, experts say.

“We assume they are at a considerably substantial level of development,” Park Chang-kyu of the Agency for Defense Development said at a briefing to the parliament Monday.

Park confirmed that South Korea has also developed an advanced electronic device that can be deployed in times of war.

The current attempts to interfere with GPS transmissions are coming from atop a modified truck-mounted Russian device. Pyongyang reportedly imported the GPS jamming system from Russia in early 2000 and has since developed two kinds of a modified version. It has also in recent years handed out sales catalogs of them to nations in the Middle East, according to South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo.

(This post is dedicated to all those on the Left — and the “Realists” on the Right — who mocked George W. Bush for including North Korea with Iran and Iraq in his original “Axis of Evil” speech.)

Detonating an NEMP high above North America would devastate not only power and communications but the economy (obliterating internet-based financial transactions and electronically stored financial data), transportation (disrupting electronic monitoring and control of everything from traffic signals to freight-train switching to commercial air traffic control), and even our military, much of which relies heavily on GPS navigation and site determination — though United States forces do still train extensively in low-tech navitation and warfare. The electromagnetic pulse would wash across the entire continental United States, plus the southern part of Canada and northern Mexico, like a tidal wave of voltage-lava, melting all the circuits in its path unless specially shielded.

Such a strike would be utterly devastating, resulting in trillions of dollars in damages… and tens or hundreds of thousands of deaths, both direct (from crashes) and indirect, from loss of medical records, the inability of emergency services to respond to life-or-death situations, utility and power shutdowns, and economic dislocation. Recovery would likely take decades. And there is absolutely nothing we can do at this time to prevent or even mitigate it; shielding every electrical circuit in the U.S. heavily enough to resist an NEMP would dwarf the cost of all natural disasters and terrorist attacks of the last century combined.

A nuclear electromagnetic pulse attack starts by detonating a nuclear warhead in the high atmosphere; this produces a burst of gamma radiation, which triggers beta rays — that is, high-energy electrons moving at more than 90% the speed of light — between 20 and 40 km altitude. The gamma radiation is deflected at right angles by the Earth’s magnetic field to create an oscillating electric current in the atmosphere. And this oscillation in turn generates a pulse or burst of electromagnetic energy. [Beta-ray correction per commenter Count to 10. Thanks!]

When this EM firestorm strikes the surface, it will have a peak power density of 50,000 volts and millions of megawatts, easily enough to fry most modern transistors and microcircuits. Since the pulse from detonation to peak value takes only 5 nanoseconds (five billionths of a second), and the entire first component (E1) of the EMP effect is over at about 1 microsecond (one millionth of a second), protection technology — designed for much slower lightning strikes — generally cannot react quickly enough to save the delicate printed circuitry that run our electronic devices these days. Any modern device without thick passive shielding will likely be destroyed or severely damaged.

There are additional secondary effects of an NEMP, dubbed E2 and E3, that are respectively similar to lightning strikes (E2) and electromagnetic storms caused by very severe solar flares (E3); surge-protectors can ordinarily handle those — unless they are compromised, damaged, or destroyed first… which is exactly what phase E1 of a Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse attack accomplishes. Thus the E2 and E3 phases are often much more devastating than are natural lightning strikes and EM storms.

So far, the North Koreans have not detonated any NEMP device; the EM pulses they have used to jam or damage our GPS and other electronic devices are non-nuclear, and their range is much more limited; but the principle is the same. NNEMP weapons (non-nuclear) use a non-nuclear method to generate the initial burst of energy, generally chemical explosives; the energy front is sent through wave-shaping circuits or microwave generators, thence through an antenna:

This is the second time North Korea has sought to interfere with military communications. Pyongyang is thought to have been behind a failure of GPS receivers on some naval and civilian aircraft during another joint military exercise in August.

South Korea’s minister of defense at that time had reported to the Congress, warning that the North poses “a fresh security threat” capable of disrupting guided bombs and missiles by sending signals over a distance of up to 60 miles.

However Russia, which sold North Korea the non-nuclear devices that it has used against South Korea and its allies (including the United States), also has an arsenal of the nuclear version; the only force we have to rely on to safeguard against North Korea getting its hands on an NEMP is the basic “decency” and “good sense” of Putin’s post-Soviet paradise. Color me unreassured.

The effect of an NEMP detonated over the United States would be catastrophic; but what would be our response? More appropriately, what are we doing to prevent it from happening in the first place?

I’m sure nuclear scientists have tackled the technological aspect of the threat; but we could also begin shielding vital systems, switches, and lines; infiltrating our own Korean-speaking and -looking agents into the DPRK to find out how far they’ve gotten, rather than overrelying upon intelligence-sharing from the Republic of Korea (South Korea); and even using backchannel communications to warn North Korea’s sponsors (mainly Russia and China) that if Kim Jong-il actually utilizes one, we will consider it to be a nuclear attack on the United States — and we will respond appropriately, both against North Korea and anyone we believe helped them. Or might have helped them.

Obviously, much of the anti-EMP research is heavily classified, and I have no idea how far we’ve gotten. Is there a wide-area techie defense against an electromagnetic pulse? But I’m far more worried about the political aspect: Simply put, I do not trust the Obama administration to do anything effective on either front. I don’t believe they are taking the threat seriously; President Barack H. Obama surely believes that his peerless “smart diplomacy” with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, coupled with his slavish kow-towing to Red China and Russia, will induce the DPRK dictator to back away from his threats to wipe America out via a nuclear EMP.

And even if Kim — or his looming successor, Kim Jong-un, a.k.a. “Lil’ Kim” — committed the unthinkable against us, what would the Obamunist do about it? He has shown himself incapable of responding to a military threat, incompetent at running a war, and averse to the point of revulsion to defending the United States or retaliating upon our attackers. More than likely the president would issue a very stern diplomatic communique through the proper channels (once radio communications, television broadcasts, word processors, and teleprompters were brought back online); file a criminal and civil complaint in the International Court of Justice at the Hague; and furiously tingle his bell.

And even more likely, that is what Kim believes Obama would do (and not do); which makes it ever so much more probable that North Korea will go right ahead and use the first NEMP they acquire against us… or at least threaten to use it unless Obama capitulates and gives Kim — well, whatever he demands, again and again. Nothing works better than nuclear blackmail, when you have an anti-American coward and weakling in the White House.

If there is a God, and if He believes we’re on His side, then let’s hope He ensures that the DPRK does not get a nuclear electromagnetic pulse weapon; at least not until we have a president who takes seriously the primary duty of the office: to protect American territory, the American people, and America itself from violent attack by foreign princes and terrorists.

Otherwise, “American exceptionalism” will take on a new and very tragic meaning.

Cross-posted on Big Lizards

This post was promoted from GreenRoom to HotAir.com.
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Hans, Hans, Hans! We’ve been frew this a dozen times. I don’t have any weapons of mass destwuction, OK Hans?

Roy Rogers on March 13, 2011 at 5:03 PM

A nuclear electromagnetic pulse attack starts by detonating a nuclear warhead in the high atmosphere

What size of nuclear weapon are we talking about? In the kiloton range or the megaton?

sharrukin on March 13, 2011 at 5:05 PM

Hello Hans,I assume that you are reading my letter about now

yes….good,and I assume Hans,you are reading it,by candle
light…..yes…ah hahahahahah!(snark).

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 5:09 PM

Anyone interested in what surviving (or not) an EMP attack should read One Second After by William Forstchen. It’s a fast read but was, at least to me, incredibly frightening as it details the complete breakdown in society post-attack. God help us if we ever get hit by one of these.

volnation on March 13, 2011 at 5:10 PM

Nuclear Weapon EMP Effects

http://www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/emp.htm

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 5:11 PM

EMP Pt 1
**************

First part of FutureWeapons Series 1 story about the threat of an Electro-Magnetic Pulse weapon.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fvu08Y9XJ0U

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 5:12 PM

Isn’t this a plot point in “Homefront”?

StevefromMKE on March 13, 2011 at 5:15 PM

Probably the only reason NK is still not reunified with the more successful South is because China continues to “aid” them.

Why don’t we just threaten (and we must be willing to follow through with our threat) to give Nukes to our allies in the region (for self-defense).

What would China’s reaction be if Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan all had nuclear weapons? Taiwan alone would cause them to lose face.

MeatHeadinCA on March 13, 2011 at 5:18 PM

I know it was a rhetorical exit question/statement, but I’ll answer anyways: There is a God, he expects us to choose righteous leaders and avoid immoral behavior ourselves in all of its forms. If we do, and honor the God of this land – Christ, he will protect us. I have no doubt.

scotash on March 13, 2011 at 5:23 PM

Anyone interested in what surviving (or not) an EMP attack should read One Second After by William Forstchen.

I read that and couldn’t sleep for *DAYS.* On the plus side, it really made me jump start our food storage and emergency preparedness.

Sarjex on March 13, 2011 at 5:26 PM

common Hot Air. Seriously?

maineconservative on March 13, 2011 at 5:27 PM

There were dozens of high altitude tests in the 50′s and early sixties. There was spotty damage to circuitry here and there. EMP fears are a little exaggerated.

BL@KBIRD on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Fortunately, My dry goods and canned goods will still be edible, my chickens will still lay eggs and the goats will still produce milk, the vegetable garden will still grow, my firewood will still burn and my gun will still fire.

Good luck to the rest of you. Especially the liberals that think government will save you. (Players).

Nostradamus on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM

After the fall of the USSR, we discovered that any type of real nuclear exchange was never even close to happening, and all of our fears at the time were incredibly over-blown. There were even close calls where Russian systems malfunctioned, indicating an American launch, but they chose not to retaliate.

This whole “EMP Pulse” thing will, I feel, end up quite the same way. No ones ever detonated such a device at such an altitude, so we have no idea how it would react. I file this under the same category as the fear that the large hadron collider would open up a black hole.

Rainsford on March 13, 2011 at 5:51 PM

I know it was a rhetorical exit question/statement, but I’ll answer anyways: There is a God, he expects us to choose righteous leaders and avoid immoral behavior ourselves in all of its forms. If we do, and honor the God of this land – Christ, he will protect us. I have no doubt.

scotash on March 13, 2011 at 5:23 PM

… and if we don’t – as we have recently chosen not to do – He will not. I have no doubt.

Midas on March 13, 2011 at 5:52 PM

You can protect electronic devices by keeping them in a Faraday Cage, which is just a metal box that is grounded.

I figure a microwave oven is basically a Faraday Cage. As a last resort you could stuff any electronics in that and hope for the best.

Just don’t turn it on…

Any thoughts from an electronics person out there? Would a microwave oven suffice as a Faraday Cage?

ZenDraken on March 13, 2011 at 5:54 PM

Any thoughts from an electronics person out there? Would a microwave oven suffice as a Faraday Cage?

ZenDraken on March 13, 2011 at 5:54 PM

The list of things you’d forget to stick in a room-sized faraday cage is legion. The number of essential electronic goods that we can’t transport to room-sized faraday cages is frightening. There’s no way to gloss this problem over.

gryphon202 on March 13, 2011 at 6:06 PM

EMP fears are a little exaggerated.

BL@KBIRD on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Right. And so were fears that 19 guys could fly two planes into a twin-tower skyscraper and kill 3000 people.

/sigh

gryphon202 on March 13, 2011 at 6:07 PM

volnation on March 13, 2011 at 5:10 PM

2nd that…everyone should read that book…

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 6:10 PM

There were dozens of high altitude tests in the 50′s and early sixties. There was spotty damage to circuitry here and there. EMP fears are a little exaggerated.

BL@KBIRD on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM

In the fifties most of the electronics in the world were based upon vacuum tubes. Vacuum tubes are mostly immune to the destructive effects of EMPs.

Now all the electronics are based upon transistors, that die when exposed to EMPs.

Thus trains and truck will not move because the electronic fuel injection, and/or ignition no longer will work.

Slowburn on March 13, 2011 at 6:11 PM

Sarjex on March 13, 2011 at 5:26 PM

right behind ya…

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 6:11 PM

A nuclear electromagnetic pulse attack starts by detonating a nuclear warhead in the high atmosphere

What size of nuclear weapon are we talking about? In the kiloton range or the megaton?

sharrukin on March 13, 2011 at 5:05 PM

That often goes unsaid in these sensational articles. For national coverage, or at least half the country you need 1Mt+, and North Korea is nowehere near that. We can’t even confirm that the tiny weapons they have now are anywhere near deliverable. Imagine how big a Nork 1Mt+ would be, if they could make one at all.

Russians and Chinese on the other hand, no doubt have these aimed and ready to go.
Re conventional EMP weapons, we have had these for years. Some were used in the initial invasion of Iraq as I recall, and Popular Mechanics did an article on how they work. They are not that complicated.

slickwillie2001 on March 13, 2011 at 6:11 PM

That often goes unsaid in these sensational articles. For national coverage, or at least half the country you need 1Mt+, and North Korea is nowehere near that. We can’t even confirm that the tiny weapons they have now are anywhere near deliverable. Imagine how big a Nork 1Mt+ would be, if they could make one at all.

Russians and Chinese on the other hand, no doubt have these aimed and ready to go.
Re conventional EMP weapons, we have had these for years. Some were used in the initial invasion of Iraq as I recall, and Popular Mechanics did an article on how they work. They are not that complicated.

slickwillie2001 on March 13, 2011 at 6:11 PM

They have low kiloton weapons and the capacity to deliver them IF the weapons have been mated to the rockets. The Taep’o-Dong-2 which has a throw weight of 1,000-1,500 lbs. That won’t loft a megaton sized weapon, which isn’t to say that a kiloton sized weapon aimed at 5-8 major urban centers wouldn’t be devastating.

sharrukin on March 13, 2011 at 6:20 PM

Probably the only reason NK is still not reunified with the more successful South is because China continues to “aid” them.

Why don’t we just threaten (and we must be willing to follow through with our threat) to give Nukes to our allies in the region (for self-defense).

What would China’s reaction be if Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan all had nuclear weapons? Taiwan alone would cause them to lose face.

MeatHeadinCA on March 13, 2011 at 5:18 PM

Japan, Korea, and Taiwan all have the industrial capability to both extract the necessary fissionables, and to produce the bomb from them.

The idea of the USofA needing to arm them is ludicrous.

Slowburn on March 13, 2011 at 6:35 PM

You are worthress, Arec Barrwin!!

Roy Rogers on March 13, 2011 at 6:38 PM

we will consider it to be a nuclear attack on the United States — and we will respond appropriately

Yeah, another ‘sternly worded memo’ from the Obamassiah.

GarandFan on March 13, 2011 at 6:47 PM

EMP has been billed as the doomsday weapon for many years now. I doubt it is as destructive as it has been billed. If it can destroy electronics hundreds of miles away, North Korea would probably knock out their own electical and communications systems before S. Korea’s. Second why should they take a chance on unproven technology? Why wouldn’t they just launch the weapon at Seoul with a low airburst and use blast (overpressure) effects? Incinerationg the capital city is far more destructive than turning off the lights.

I was stationed at Pearl Harbor at the time of the final atmospheric nuclear tests (1962). I was about 700 miles away from the Johnston Island launch site. One test was designed to test the effects of a 200 mile high nuclear detonation of a 1.4 megatons. I listened in on the short wave countdown from Johnston Island and also tuned to a VOA station in California to do my own EMP test. EMP was well known then. At the time of detonation, there was ZZZZZT sound and “April Weather” the call sign of the countown from Johnston Island continued loud and clear after the detonation. I quickly tuned to the VOA frequency (California, 2,200 miles away) and there was no degradation.

Cars continued to drive by on Kam Highway, nobody stopped. There were reports of some streetlights going off but they soon came back on. They were probably triggered to turn off by their solar control mechanism. There was a bright afterglow (first chartreuse and then fading into a deep crimson) which lasted about 15 minutes.

I would worry more about Seoul being ground zero than EMP.

Corky Boyd on March 13, 2011 at 6:47 PM

Lots of vintage cars driving around looking for a working fuel pump.

Then chaos.

profitsbeard on March 13, 2011 at 6:49 PM

common Hot Air. Seriously?

maineconservative on March 13, 2011 at 5:27 PM

maineconservative:It would affect Canada too,so ya,
seriously,and speaking of the South
Koreans!!
============================

We can, and will, use EMP bomb, says South Korea

YOU jam us, we wipe your grid out.
Mar 9 2011
**************
**************

That seems to be the signal coming from South Korea after a GPS jamming attack on Friday that hit north-western parts of the country.

South Korea laid the blame for the attack on North Korea, but Defense Acquisition Program Administration Kwon O-bong claimed its military was immune, because it had “a special code”.

However, he admitted there were “some weapons” that didn’t carry the code and that it was looking to proof such weapons against further attacks.

Wired reported that the attacks were aimed at disrupting military drills between South Korea and the US.

The attacks were relatively harmless, affecting mainly mobile phones, but Wired claims such jamming attacks had the potential to cut the ability of bombs to guide themselves to targets and cause them to drop out of the sky.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/emp-bomb-ready-for-war-says-south-korea/story-fn7bsi21-1226018432287
===========================================

North Korea Jams GPS in War Game Retaliation
Mar 7 2011

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/03/north-korea-jams-gps-in-war-game-retaliation/
=============================

Seoul ‘Develops Electromagnetic Pulse Bomb’
Mar 14 2011
————

http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2011/03/08/2011030801386.html

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 6:55 PM

Lots of vintage cars driving around looking for a working fuel pump.

Then chaos.

profitsbeard on March 13, 2011 at 6:49 PM

profitsbeard:Yup,points and condensor thingy,and the
oldies have mechanical fuel pumps!:)

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 6:57 PM

Lock up Kim, Sr. in a Faraday cage.

profitsbeard on March 13, 2011 at 7:02 PM

This post is somewhat hysterical.

There is no such thing as “non-nuclear” EMP (see Canopfor’s link above — it’s called the “yeti” ’cause no-one has ever seen one).

Nuclear EMP works because gamma rays from the explosion accelerate electrons in the ionosphere. A megaton weapon means a Hydrogen bomb (I believe) and no-one in the axis of evil is close to getting one of those.

Much of the technical information in this post is in this Wikipedia article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_pulse
which I find a little more coherent.

gh on March 13, 2011 at 7:28 PM

There were dozens of high altitude tests in the 50′s and early sixties. There was spotty damage to circuitry here and there. EMP fears are a little exaggerated.

BL@KBIRD on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Seriously. Have you heard the screams of frustration from people when they lose the Internet at work, or when they can’t get cell coverage? We are not just “used to technology”, we have become completely dependent upon it. And it is not just a superficial dependence like the dude with the bluetooth earbud asking his wife what she told him to buy at the grocery store.

WWCathodeRay on March 13, 2011 at 7:32 PM

Wow. Has Glenn Neck been covering for someone out on vacation or something? Hot Air has pretty much turned in to the Chicken Little Channel the last couple days.
Enough with the doom and gloom crap guys.

KMC1 on March 13, 2011 at 7:47 PM

the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Why ruin an excellent article with a bizarrely comical misnomer?
Democratic?
People’s?
Republic?
We ought to refuse to call it that.
Same with the so-called People’s Republic of China.

itsnotaboutme on March 13, 2011 at 7:47 PM

O/T
====

Sunday, Mar. 13, 2011
‘We celebrate Zac’s life’: O’Fallon honors airman shot to death at German airport
**************************

All stood, abruptly and then silently, as a fallen airman’s family walked down the aisle of an O’Fallon church on Saturday.

Bob Cuddeback gripped the urn that carried the ashes of his son, Airman 1st Class Zachary R. Cuddeback, and Celia “De” Loyet cradled an American flag that, until death, held her son’s allegiance.

Zachary Cuddeback, 21, was killed March 2 by a Kosovo Albanian at a German airport during an attack on a busload of airmen readying for deployment to Afghanistan.
(more….)

Read more: http://www.bnd.com/2011/03/13/1628527/this-is-where-he-called-home-ofallon.html#ixzz1GWiSssZl

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 7:54 PM

Anybody that has ever used a diesel engine knows you shut it off by turning off the fuel – they don’t electronically shut off. You might have some trouble restarting, but a diesal with a generator (not alternator) should be immune. The trucks should do ok until they run out of diesel, but that’s the same problem with any disaster.

Old Country Boy on March 13, 2011 at 7:58 PM

Scenario sound familiar? Check out the story line of the new game out on the 15th called HomeFront.

Mr_Magoo on March 13, 2011 at 8:39 PM

Anybody that has ever used a diesel engine knows you shut it off by turning off the fuel – they don’t electronically shut off. You might have some trouble restarting, but a diesal with a generator (not alternator) should be immune. The trucks should do ok until they run out of diesel, but that’s the same problem with any disaster.

Old Country Boy on March 13, 2011 at 7:58 PM

On newer engines, those that do not constantly blow black smoke, the Electronic fuel injection system contain transistors.

Slowburn on March 13, 2011 at 8:55 PM

Incremental American Disarmament continues…

……..Chavez and Krazy Korean Kim would b proud.

http://azstarnet.com/article_011e7118-8951-5206-a878-39bfbc9dc89d.html

PappyD61 on March 13, 2011 at 9:03 PM

This is the 7 MB .pdf album version of the 2004/2008 EMP Commission Report. It goes into all the scienteriffic details about what does what to what, when and where.

For a shorter version, Google “Frank Gaffney EMP” and you find lots of articles and vids on the subject. Frank, President of the Center for Security Policy, is one of the few people who can out-eeyore me on this.

BL@KBIRD on March 13, 2011 at 5:50 PM
Corky Boyd on March 13, 2011 at 6:47 PM
WWCathodeRay on March 13, 2011 at 7:32 PM

The explosion would be “shaped” in a certain manner that would not be just like the old open-air tests. And, as several have noted above, newer electronics and satellites are far more sensitive today than before (check out “SCADA” in the EMP Commission report).

eeyore on March 13, 2011 at 9:10 PM

If there is a God, and if He believes we’re on His side, then let’s hope He ensures that the DPRK does not get a nuclear electromagnetic pulse weapon; at least not until we have a president who takes seriously the primary duty of the office: to protect American territory, the American people, and America itself from violent attack by foreign princes and terrorists.

I have been taught all my ife that sin blocks prayer. How many a
American prayers get to God? We hae murdered 53 million children while in their mother’s womb. We are allowing hte sins of himosexuality to become normalized and de-stigmatized in society. The vulgarity and promiscuity in our society is exported to other countries via the entertainment that we produce. The greed and sloth and gluttonny , and lust, the anger, the envy and the Pride that causes us to put God on the backburner…I’m not feeling too hopeful. The United States is behaving as they did in the Day’s of Noah…I for one am not to hopeful and this news of a technolgy I wasn’t familiar with just makes me feel worse for us…

CCRWM on March 13, 2011 at 9:20 PM

If there is a God, and if He believes we’re on His side

Not to be argumentative, but a quick review of the last 80 years would convince GOD we are definitely NOT on His side.

[20] ”Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me.”
(Revelation 3:20 ESV)

GOD is a perfect Gentleman, never forcing His presence where He is not wanted. And several generations of Americans have told GOD to go away. We have said we will have the Fedzilla Bureaucracy for our god and no other. When admiring Fedzilla, we have said to GOD,

“Behold, this is our God; we have waited for him, that he might save us.”
Isaiah 25:9 (ESV)

Perhaps GOD is answering our request by giving us what we have demanded for almost 100 years, a GOD-free nation, and REAL separation of GOD and State.

oldleprechaun on March 13, 2011 at 9:35 PM

oldleprechaun on March 13, 2011 at 9:35 PM

You beat me to it.

The United States is behaving as they did in the Day’s of Noah…
CCRWM on March 13, 2011 at 9:20 PM

A friend of mine is always remarking on this. And as in the days of Noe, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.

And so many trudge along completely oblivious to what is happening, or refusing to see it for what it is. I fear we are at least in a time of great chastisement, if not the coming of the Son of man, and they refuse to believe. I can’t imagine seeing everything that is happening (even with all the warning we’ve received through Scripture and the Church)and remaining in such a state of denial. God have mercy.

pannw on March 13, 2011 at 10:10 PM

eeyore on March 13, 2011 at 9:10 PM

Thanks for posting the link. It will take a week to get through it all.

gh on March 13, 2011 at 11:21 PM

You are worthress, Arec Barrwin!!

Roy Rogers on March 13, 2011 at 6:38 PM

Thank you… I was feeling a little “ronery” until I saw your comments…

Khun Joe on March 14, 2011 at 2:05 AM

Lil Kim reminds me of Nick Nack the diminutive villain in the James Bond movie ‘The Man With The Golden Gun’.

MaiDee on March 14, 2011 at 2:17 AM

Japan, Korea, and Taiwan all have the industrial capability to both extract the necessary fissionables, and to produce the bomb from them.

The idea of the USofA needing to arm them is ludicrous.

Slowburn on March 13, 2011 at 6:35 PM

Agreed. Now, do we allow them to arm themselves with nuclear weapons?

MeatHeadinCA on March 14, 2011 at 4:16 AM

MaiDee on March 14, 2011 at 2:17 AM

He’s so “rone-ry”

Roy Rogers on March 14, 2011 at 8:43 AM

If you mishandle a modern circuit card and allow a tiny electrostatic discharge (ESD) from your body into the microscopic circuitry, even one that you cannot feel, it can still be the equivalent of a small lightning bolt inside the silicon-based transistors, destroying them instantly. Computer circuitry is designed for the most part to run on 3v, 5v, or 12v. For reference, an ESD which you can detect (walk across wool carpet then touch metal doorknob) is a minimum of 22,000 volts of free electron transference. Microcircuitry would be severely damaged by less than 2% of that (350 volts) without special self-protection circuits.

Yes, a Faraday Cage will protect electronic equipment under normal circumstances, but against an EMP is must be a 100% shielding, with no gaps at doors or windows, and ventilation ducting makes for a great waveguide to bring that kind of energy into a room. Even then, transmission systems (radio, radar, etc.) have to have antenna/cabling to the outside of the cage for reception, and would still be vulnerable via the transmission lines.

As for a microwave oven protecting something, not very likely against the kind of energy expected by a NEMP detonation. The larger problem is knowing that such an attack is coming before it arrives. And how big is your microwave, to stuff anything more than your cell phones in it? Very likely, your refrigerator, washer/dryer, coffee maker, etc. all have at least one microcircuit card within them, rendering them non-operational following a substantial EMP.

Only pre-1975 American cars will have a chance of still operating. Anything with an electronic ignition, computer controlled fuel injection, or even digital alternators is kaput.

The concerns are absolutely real. Anyone referring to 60-year old tests and the minimal impact is simply not aware of Moore’s Law, and how small circuitry has become.

Freelancer on March 14, 2011 at 8:45 AM

As others have noted, the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. conducted many high-altitude tests in the 50s and 60s, although only five were high enough to be considered in outer space. Starfish Prime was, I believe, the largest such U.S. test, and it was also the only one to have observed effects on the electrical grid in Hawaii.

For an EMP weapon to have substantial effects, it needs to be detonated at very high altitude, but also need to have a large yield. I don’t think that small fission weapons, such as those the Norks have, will do the job.

A summary of high altitude weapons tests is available at Johnston’s Archive. Anyone seriously interested should have a copy of Samuel Glasstone’s The Effects of Nuclear Weapons, a pdf version of which is available online (don’t have the link handy).

Henry Bowman on March 14, 2011 at 9:33 AM

gh

There is no such thing as “non-nuclear” EMP (see Canopfor’s link above — it’s called the “yeti” ’cause no-one has ever seen one).

DOD was experimenting with a non-nuclear EMP project about 10 years ago. It was a bomb that was to be dropped in close proximity to the target. It was a massive capacitor kept at full charge by the carrying aircraft. Energy was released by exploding a charge that would collapse the field almost instantly releasing a pulse of electrons.

It was designed to disable individual targets, not as an area weapon.

Corky Boyd on March 14, 2011 at 10:41 PM

Here’s some literature on non-nuclear emp:
http://www.ausairpower.net/wp50-draft.pdf

As the study points out it is almost impossible to predict kill probabilities with emp. One of the weapons shown is based on the profile of the 2,000 lb Mk 84. The question remains why not just use the HE version with a known Pk, than hoping your target is not hardened against emp. HE is a known.

Corky Boyd on March 14, 2011 at 11:11 PM