Death toll in Japan from quake, tsunami “likely over 10,000″

posted at 3:00 pm on March 13, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

Given the widespread destruction, fires, and flooding, I doubt anyone expected any less than a death toll in five figures in the catastrophe that struck Japan this week.  In fact, it might be a surprise if the figure stays this low, relatively speaking — but it won’t be an accident if it does:

People across a devastated swath of Japan suffered for a third day Sunday without water, electricity and proper food, as the country grappled with the enormity of a massive earthquake and tsunami that left more than 10,000 people dead in one area alone.

Japan’s prime minister called the crisis the most severe challenge the nation has faced since World War II, as the grim situation worsened. Friday’s disasters damaged two nuclear reactors, potentially sending one through a partial meltdown and adding radiation contamination to the fears of an unsettled public.

Personal stories of tragedy like this make the overall figures a misery that is really impossible to conceive:

In Rikusentakata, a port city of over 20,000 virtually wiped out by the tsunami, Etsuko Koyama escaped the water rushing through the third flood of her home but lost her grip on her daughter’s hand and has not found her.

“I haven’t given up hope yet,” Koyama told public broadcaster NHK, wiping tears from her eyes. “I saved myself, but I couldn’t save my daughter.”

So far, Japan has confirmed 1200 deaths, but that figure will rise rapidly as rescue and recovery teams begin their work.  Only 739 are listed officially as missing, an absurd total under the circumstances, but that number will quickly escalate as well.  Power, water, and communications have collapsed in the hardest-hit areas, which means that deaths and disappearances can’t even really be counted reliably at the moment.

Japan had already struggled economically before the quake, but remained one of the world’s wealthiest nations.  That will have a big impact on their ability to recover, according to economic researchers.  Wealthy nations have a better ability to adapt quickly to changing conditions, which allows them to recover fast from catastrophes, as Reuters reports, but the researchers and Reuters may have missed the forest for the trees in their analysis:

But researchers who have studied similar disasters in rich countries reach a reassuring conclusion: human resilience and resourcefulness, allied to an ability to draw down accumulated wealth, enable economies to rebound quickly from what seem at first to be unbearable inflictions – be it the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York or Friday’s 8.9-magnitude earthquake, the worst in Japan’s history.

Japan itself provides Exhibit No. 1 in foretelling the arc of recovery. A 6.8-magnitude temblor struck the western city of Kobe on January 17, 1995, killing 6,400 people and causing damage estimated at 10 trillion yen, or 2 percent of Japan’s gross domestic product.

The importance of Kobe’s container port, then the world’s sixth-largest, and the city’s location between Osaka and western Japan made it more significant for the economy than the more sparsely populated region where the latest quake and tsunami struck. Extensive disruption ensued, yet Japan’s industrial production, after falling 2.6 percent in January 1995, rose 2.2 percent that February and another 1.0 percent in March. GDP for the whole of the first quarter of 1995 rose at an annualized rate of 3.4 percent.

“Despite the scale of the disaster, it is hard to find much evidence in the macroeconomic data of the effects of the Kobe earthquake,” said Richard Jerram, chief Asian economist at Macquarie in Singapore and a veteran Japan-watcher.

Indeed, Takuji Okubo, chief Japan economist at Societe Generale in Tokyo, noted that Japan’s economy grew by 1.9 percent in 1995 and 2.6 percent in 1996, above the country’s trend growth rate at the time of 1.5 percent. Private consumption, government spending and, especially, public fixed investment all grew above average in 1995 and 1996, Okubo said in a report. By analogy, the medium-term impact on growth from the latest quake was also likely to be positive, he said.

The key to faster recovery is wealth and the ability to adapt, says one researcher who has studied the outcomes of disasters in 151 countries over a 43-year period:

But Mark Skidmore, an economics professor at Michigan State University, attaches greater importance to a rich society’s capacity to constantly adapt to the risks it faces. In the case of Japan, prone to regular earthquakes, this means improving its disaster response systems and adopting the latest techniques to help buildings withstand shocks.

Well, the question here is whether wealth allows for adaptation — or whether an economic system’s openness to adaptation leads to the wealth necessary to recover from disasters.  The wealth of Western democracies based on capitalism owes its existence to economic and political environments where capital could flow freely to innovation and adaptation.  Centrally-planned economies do not have that allowance for innovation and adaptation, even the so-called “enlightened” environment in China, where the reins have been loosened on central control but are far from removed.  Furthermore, a system unused to adaptation in normal practice would hardly have the skills or the players necessary to implement that adaptation under crisis conditions.  In fact, those systems tend to punish those with talent for innovation and management of capital outside of an unaccountable bureaucracy, which makes their presence rare in catastrophic conditions in centrally-controlled economies.

Massive application of capital will repair a lot of damage, but only if that capital gets applied wisely, efficiently, and by those used to making those decisions.  It’s the economic freedom that creates the wealthy systems that can apply that capital, and it’s the economic freedom that produces the talent necessary to make massive applications of capital successful.  Let’s not lose sight of the true prerequisite in this equation.

Let’s also not lose sight of Japan’s example of preparation and resiliency.  In most other countries, after an earthquake registering 8.9 on the Richter scale and followed by a series of massive tsunamis, explosions, and nuclear emergencies, the death toll would already be in the high six figures, if not millions.  The Japanese prepared for this eventuality for decades, and spent fortunes in building their nation to survive it.  Those decades of preparation saved hundreds of thousands of lives this past week.  The catastrophe will galvanize them into unity and purpose, and they will emerge a stronger nation for it.


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Over 10,000?

You think?

trapeze on March 13, 2011 at 3:03 PM

And now a volcano eruption. God bless the people of Japan.

Renwaa on March 13, 2011 at 3:06 PM

There have been weaker quakes in China & Pakistan that have killed upwards of a quarter million. 10,000 here would be a “good” number.

rbj on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Have they ever recovered the “hundreds of thousands” of Katrina victims?

Hiya Ciska on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

The wealth of Western democracies based on capitalism owes its existence to economic and political environments where capital could flow freely to innovation and adaptation.

are ya listening dear leader?

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Speechless.

El_Terrible on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Based on those tsunami videos, I don’t see how there are going to be less than 100K that perished in this disaster. They are going to find a lot of bodies in those debris fields. I think an equal number will never be found, they are far out to sea. Haven’t they located only the ruins of 1 of the 3 or 4 missing trains? This is just tragic. Makes us understand better how all of those people perished in that big tsunami back in 05 or 06.

karenhasfreedom on March 13, 2011 at 3:12 PM

Haiti
Japan

Which do you think will recover faster?

Beaglemom on March 13, 2011 at 3:13 PM

Any word yet on those missing trains?

Del Dolemonte on March 13, 2011 at 3:14 PM

are ya listening dear leader?

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

NOpe. He’s been too busy.

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 3:15 PM

Haiti
Japan

Which do you think will recover faster?

Beaglemom on March 13, 2011 at 3:13 PM

obambi’s comedy writers are working on a bit for that as we speak. I’ll bet it’s gonna be really funny!

VegasRick on March 13, 2011 at 3:17 PM

The Japanese prepared for this eventuality for decades, and spent fortunes in building their nation to survive it. Those decades of preparation saved hundreds of thousands of lives this past week.

What? What kind of evidence do you provide to back up such a statement?

What were the specific things done to save these lives you claim were saved?

I mean, it’s nice to say it and it’s a feel good thing to believe hundreds of thousands of lives were saved, but I’m not sure I believe that is the case.

Were there mass evacuations prior to the earthquake and tsunami? Was there a tsunami wall that contained the water in areas populated by hundreds of thousands?

I’m just curious where you came up with this number and what supporting evidence you provide.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 3:15 PM

*shaking the head*

pathetic to say the least…

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM

Man, I wish we had a real American President.

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 3:22 PM

When did an 8.9 earthquake hit Japan?

You aren’t talking about the one ~ 75 miles offshore are you? The one ~ 250 miles away from Tokyo?

mockmook on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Prayers for comfort and condolences for the lost souls and their families.

One thing I could not fathom, (comprehend), is on the day of this disaster, how could our stock market still have a positive gain?

Rovin on March 13, 2011 at 3:28 PM

Prayers continue to ascend for the Japanese. I just cannot wrap my head around all this carnage and devastation.

OmahaConservative on March 13, 2011 at 3:29 PM

Ed, two things:
One, I don’t hink anyone knows the death toll yet. So far they are only counting bodies. And from the pictures I’ve seen it will take many many days to dig through the rubble to find them.
Two, the Japanese are very concerned with public image…”Face.” Am I saying they will cover up? I honestly don’t know. TEPCO has done so before so that wouldn’t surprise me. As for the government it will depend on what’s uncovered about sea wall integrity, etc. Yes I know this was a once in a century quake and tsunami. But if there were mistakes and scrimping on things it may not come out as it would here. That’s why I take all the reports,whether from the media, the government, or the companies, with a cautious wait and see attitude.

Deanna on March 13, 2011 at 3:29 PM

Was there a tsunami wall that contained the water in areas populated by hundreds of thousands?

I’m just curious where you came up with this number and what supporting evidence you provide.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM

That would have to be around the entire coast of Japan.

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 3:32 PM

I’m just curious where you came up with this number and what supporting evidence you provide.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM

You can compare the death toll from the earthquake to what happens in other countries based on the strength of the earthquake and the number of people affected. Seems like a reasonable conclusion. It will take more time to determine how many how many people were able to evacuate from the tsunami.

pedestrian on March 13, 2011 at 3:32 PM

Well let’s see, The casualties in Tokyo alone could have been catastrophic but thanks to decades of earthquake preparedness they got some broken windows. From what I’ve seen asd read tsunami preparation inneven rural areas was effective. People knew what to do. Good Lord, there is no way to prepare to save everyone in the event of every known disaster. So, I’m not positive but it seems to me that it could be a WHOLE lot worse than it is.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 3:33 PM

Considering what these turds did to us on December 7, 1941. The only thing I can say is….Justice Served….again!

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

I’m not in a Socratic mood. Go f*ck yourself.

fiatboomer on March 13, 2011 at 3:34 PM

Instapundit published some correspondents with thrills running up their legs because Tokyo did so much better in the “8.9″ versus Christchurch in a 6.3

Only problem (according to the USGS), Christchurch was hit much harder as it was at the epicenter. Not 250 miles away from the epicenter like Tokyo–the distance from Los Angeles to Las Vegas.

mockmook on March 13, 2011 at 3:36 PM

fiatboomer on March 13, 2011 at 3:34 PM

Ignore it and it will leave. Don’t take the bait…..

sicoit on March 13, 2011 at 3:37 PM

One thing I could not fathom, (comprehend), is on the day of this disaster, how could our stock market still have a positive gain?

Rovin on March 13, 2011 at 3:28 PM

Simple.

Japan will need less oil.

Price of oil fell.

Lower oil = less inflation.

Less inflation = lower interest rates.

Lower interest rates = lower cost of capital for business.

Lower lcc = higher stock values.

angryed on March 13, 2011 at 3:38 PM

I mean, it’s nice to say it and it’s a feel good thing to believe hundreds of thousands of lives were saved, but I’m not sure I believe that is the case…I’m just curious where you came up with this number and what supporting evidence you provide.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM

Here’s a couple:

Seismic vibration control – After the seismic waves enter a superstructure, there are a number of ways to control them in order to soothe their damaging effect and improve the building’s seismic performance…have been studied and installed in high-rise buildings, predominantly in Japan, for a quarter of a century

TSUNAMI Warning System:
In case of an earthquake occurrence, JMA [Japan Meteorological Agency] analyzes the earthquake observational data and quickly issues tsunami warning, if necessary. The warning is automatically transmitted to disaster management authorities and broadcasting media. The earthquake and tsunami information including tsunami warning is used as a trigger of evacuation and urgent operation for rescue and mitigation of disasters

If you still a a non-believer, there’s this new-fangled thingy called Google out there. Feel free to do a little research yourself.

pain train on March 13, 2011 at 3:39 PM

so, with
- corporate tax rate: 30%
-massive infrastructure investment for tsunami/earthquake preparedness
-construction far more expensive due to stricter building code
-Japanese paying among highest income taxes in the world

How is this possible?

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

What a moron you are. My pop was with the 2nd Marine’s on Guadalcanal, Bougainville, Makin, and then on to the 4th on Iwo. He found the hell out of them. Then he came home and went on with his life and let me tell you he admired them greatly for the road they travelled between Nanking and when he passed in 93. Japan has been our total friend. Sure they are quirky. They have a large entitlement society, but it is their country and they pulled it out of the ashes.

All the help and prayers to Japan and her people. 1941 was 1941. This is 2011.

Limerick on March 13, 2011 at 3:40 PM

The Japanese prepared for this eventuality for decades, and spent fortunes in building their nation to survive it. Those decades of preparation saved hundreds of thousands of lives this past week.

What? What kind of evidence do you provide to back up such a statement?

What were the specific things done to save these lives you claim were saved?

I mean, it’s nice to say it and it’s a feel good thing to believe hundreds of thousands of lives were saved, but I’m not sure I believe that is the case.

Were there mass evacuations prior to the earthquake and tsunami? Was there a tsunami wall that contained the water in areas populated by hundreds of thousands?

I’m just curious where you came up with this number and what supporting evidence you provide.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:18 PM
———–
How about you go have a look at their BUILDING CODE
That alone saved tens of thousands of deaths.

Why don’t you watch the f*cking news, where they’re going over the things Japan did to be prepared – OVER AND OVER AND OVER IN CASE YO MISSED IT THE 17TH TIME

There are lots and lots of tsunami walls, floodgates and redirecting channels in many communities.

Why don’t you get your head out of your as* and go find this information yourself instead of accusing someone here of talking out of his?

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:44 PM

I’ve thought since the outset – when there were reports of towns like Kurihara (pop. 77,000) being wiped off the map – that the death toll would surely reach the several tens of thousands here.

If the quake had been centered beneath land and there were no tsunami, Japan’s excellent quake preparations would have been more evident and more relevant. There is no practical way to prepare against a tsunami of this proportion along a coastline such as the one in question, other than leaving it unpopulated and undeveloped.

IceCold on March 13, 2011 at 3:44 PM

- corporate tax rate: 30%
-massive infrastructure investment for tsunami/earthquake preparedness
-construction far more expensive due to stricter building code
-Japanese paying among highest income taxes in the world

How is this possible?

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Lowering the corporate tax burden by 5 percentage points could increase Japan’s gross domestic product by 2.6 percentage points, or 14.4 trillion yen ($172 billion), over the next three years, according to estimates by Japan’s Trade Ministry.

In a survey of nearly 23,000 companies published this month by the credit research firm Teikoku Data Bank, more than 44 percent of respondents cited lower corporate taxes as a prerequisite to stronger economic growth in Japan. That outranked measures to stimulate employment, at 41.9 percent, or further government deregulation, at 21.8 percent.

They learned their lesson. High taxes are a barrier to strong economic growth.

If only twits like you would do the same.

angryed on March 13, 2011 at 3:45 PM

Considering what these turds did to us on December 7, 1941. The only thing I can say is….Justice Served….again!

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

What % of living Japanese do you think are responsible for the attack on Pearl Harbor?

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 3:45 PM

Food production will certainly be affected, as those videos of the seawater surging over what appeared to be farmland showed. What does saltwater do to contaminate the soil, and how long will it take for the soil to be restored? The cost of food will, of course, rise. This is going to be a long road to recovery.

Pazman on March 13, 2011 at 3:48 PM

Sheesh, Rywall. I guess then that all we need to do is make construction more expensive, and raise income tax rates, and ….. what?

Corporate taxes are a fantasy – you understand this, yes? They are simply shifted, amounting to additional taxes on incomes for shareholders and de facto excise taxes for customers, distorting business practices and capital allocation along the way.

Then again, Japan HAS had that rip-roaring growth rate for such a long time, maybe there IS something to high taxes and construction costs being ingenious devices to promoting prosperity …..

IceCold on March 13, 2011 at 3:49 PM

The trolls are worried. If a capitalist country shows how quickly they can recover and do so with innovation, tenacity and free markets their dream will die. Also, this nuclear thing is looking like NOT the catastrophe they need. I’m not saying all is well but, better.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

That has GOT to be one the dumbest effing things I’ve seen here.

I mean, that’s St Olaf dumb.

BallisticBob on March 13, 2011 at 3:52 PM

Poor Drywall. he just figured out that there are some things that a Nanny-State Government can not protect you from.

Prayers for the citizens of Japan.

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 3:52 PM

O/T for hockey fans. Rick Martin of the Sabers’ famous “French Connection” line of the 1970s died. He was 59.

bw222 on March 13, 2011 at 3:53 PM

How about you go have a look at their BUILDING CODE
That alone saved tens of thousands of deaths.

Why don’t you watch the f*cking news, where they’re going over the things Japan did to be prepared – OVER AND OVER AND OVER IN CASE YO MISSED IT THE 17TH TIME

There are lots and lots of tsunami walls, floodgates and redirecting channels in many communities.

Why don’t you get your head out of your as* and go find this information yourself instead of accusing someone here of talking out of his?

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:44 PM

Actually, your estimate of tens of thousands is much more believable and expected to me.

The most deadly earthquake recorded was one in China in the 70′s with an estimated death toll of 300,000. We’re talking 1970′s China technology.

Haiti, which does not build earthquake proof structures because the risk of earthquake is so small, I think the number of deaths was around 250,000.

But we’re supposed to believe Japan did something to save hundreds of thousands of lives? The the normal advancement in technology has saved many lives, regardless of whether it’s in Japan, Australia or any other developed nation with the ability to leverage technology.

To claim Japan did something special that saved as many lives as were lost in the deadliest earthquakes in our history is just not logical.

ButterflyDragon on March 13, 2011 at 3:54 PM

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Does this not rate the ban hammer?

truth2power on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Considering what these turds did to us on December 7, 1941. The only thing I can say is….Justice Served….again!

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

I bet you get up close and personal with lots of turds seeing that you’re an as*hole.

Get lost.

Rod on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Only a jackass liberal can take a thread about 10,000 people dead in a natural disaster and fit it into his political agenda.

conservnut on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Does this not rate the ban hammer?

truth2power on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

I think so. And if I had anything to do with it he’d be history.

Rod on March 13, 2011 at 3:57 PM

This Atlus Shrugs story need to be picked up by the media

Islamic Jew Hatred: **GRAPHIC** Muslims Stab Jewish family of Five to Death

Nearly Nobody on March 13, 2011 at 3:58 PM

Considering what these turds did to us on December 7, 1941. The only thing I can say is….Justice Served….again!

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

With that kind of twisted thinking, do you believe all the white people of today are responsible for slavery?

To rejoice in this kind of tragedy is grossly repugnant.

mrsmwp on March 13, 2011 at 3:58 PM

ButterflyDragon, are you serious with this idiocy you are spouting? Really? Go take your crap elsewhere.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Does this not rate the ban hammer?

truth2power on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

I’d hope it does.

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 4:01 PM

Early warning.

I live in California, and to the best of my knowledge, we have nothing like this here.

BallisticBob on March 13, 2011 at 4:02 PM

needs i mean

Nearly Nobody on March 13, 2011 at 4:02 PM

I saw the pictures and story at atlas. Its awful and in gaza they were celebrating! Handing out sweets and candy. Barbaric.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 4:06 PM

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Does this not rate the ban hammer?

truth2power on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Agreed. Ban him. Lacks the intelligence needed to make reasonable contribuions.

wcarr on March 13, 2011 at 4:07 PM

How is this possible?

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 3:39 PM

You think the Government built all those buildings ?

William Amos on March 13, 2011 at 4:08 PM

Please donate directly to the Japanese Red Cross, and please distribute this information on your blogs and others:

Flag this message
Re: Earthquake donations
Saturday, March 12, 2011 9:07 PM
From:
“JRCS Int’l Dept.”
View contact details
To:

Cc:
s-itoigawa@jrc.or.jp

Dear ,

I thank you for your kind offer of donation. In order to duly utilize your fund, we hereby introduce two options.

If you wish your fund to be distributed directly among the affected population of earthquake and tsunami, please direct your fund to the following bank account. If you need the receipt of your fund, please state so clearly in the comment section of the bank transfer order. All the fund received under this account will be transferred to the Distribution Committee, which is formed around the local government of the disaster-affected prefecture and to administer the distribution of fund.

Name of Bank: Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation

Name of Branch: Ginza

Account No.: 8047670 (Ordinary Account)

SWIFT Code: SMBC JP JT

Payee Name: The Japanese Red Cross Society

Payee Address: 1-1-3 Shiba-Daimon Minato-ku, Tokyo JAPAN

Alternatively, Japanese Red Cross Society can utilize your fund in its relief operation for the same disaster. If you prefer this option, please use the following bank account. Again, if you need the receipt of your fund, please state so clearly in the comment section of the transfer order.

Name of Bank: Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation

Name of Branch: Ginza

Account No.: 8047705 (Ordinary Account)

SWIFT Code: SMBC JP JT

Payee Name: The Japanese Red Cross Society

Payee Address: 1-1-3 Shiba-Daimon Minato-ku, Tokyo JAPAN

Thank you once again for your generous offer. It is surely the source of encouragement for the affected population in Japan.

With best regards,

International Department
Japanese Red Cross Society

AZCON on March 13, 2011 at 4:08 PM

me too. for bad spelling

wcarr on March 13, 2011 at 4:08 PM

For Dave I guess those progressives in San Fran had it made in 1989.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1989_San_Francisco_earthquake

William Amos on March 13, 2011 at 4:09 PM

me too. for bad spelling

wcarr on March 13, 2011 at 4:08 PM

Don’t fret. If that were the rule I think most of us would be gone.

VegasRick on March 13, 2011 at 4:12 PM

The difference between Japan and Haiti (the other island recently hit by an earthquake) could not be more stark. The Haitians have descended into a kind of hell since the teamwork required to rebuild doesn’t seem to be present in their culture. It remains to be seen how the Japanese handle things, but I suspect we shall see far fewer rapes, murders, and looting. Of course, the blame for Haiti’s problems fall on the donors to, not the citizens of, Haiti.

unclesmrgol on March 13, 2011 at 4:13 PM

i am guessing no one really think a tsunami can not go miles inland and uphill?

Please check USGS for pictures of seward alaska, for the 64 earthquake. You will see a tree line they mark for the two waves of the tsunami that they got hit with. The first and most deadly was over 40 ft high and washed in for about 2 miles, up hills and through a mountian pass. The second was 20 ft and took out what was left of what was there. This also happened in valdez.

When it comes to tsunami’s, you either climb higher than the wave or you are screwed. Never underestimate the power of the sea.

upinak on March 13, 2011 at 4:14 PM

Gee,how come no looting and rioting,,,,you think their culture might be a little different. I spent several years in Japan during the 70s. I love the people and the country,,they will survive this and have even better protections when they rebuild. They have grown up with the “earthquake mentality” and have drills all the time. My thoughts and prayers go out to all the Japanese people. I know they are not a Christian culture, but prayers work for everybody.

retiredeagle on March 13, 2011 at 4:23 PM

Japan is one of few countries that is not in danger of losing its national identity.

bw222 on March 13, 2011 at 4:27 PM

Where’s that photo from? Wowwww!!!

Pablo Snooze on March 13, 2011 at 4:29 PM

Considering what these turds did to us on December 7, 1941. The only thing I can say is….Justice Served….again!

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

And you’re responsible for slavery.
Idiot.

itsnotaboutme on March 13, 2011 at 4:30 PM

My Gawd,over 10,000,its a numbing number of biblical
proportions!

Japan has stated that its thee worst since WW2!

And,I agree,I found this last night of
Reuters,and book marked,er,filed this!!

In my opinion,these Before and After shots,are
virtually,comparable,to Nuke Groubd Detonations!!
=====================================================
=====================================================

Japan Earthquake: before and after

(Move your mouse over each image,
and you’ll get your before/after!
***********************************

Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:00pm AEDT

Aerial photos taken over Japan have revealed the scale of devastation across dozens of suburbs and tens of thousands of homes and businesses.

Hover over each satellite photo to view the devastation caused by the earthquake and tsunami.
—————————————–

http://www.abc.net.au/news/events/japan-quake-2011/beforeafter.htm

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Ed Morrisey:

Given the widespread destruction, fires, and flooding, I doubt anyone expected any less than a death toll in five figures in the catastrophe that struck Japan this week.

Really? Really?

So I suppose that you could provide a quote to your own writting at the beginning of this disaster, where you boldly predicted casualties in the five figures range?

I’ll wait for you to provide that link.

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

http://american.redcross.org/site/PageNavigator/ntld_Redcross_text2help_faqs

Text the Red Cross $10 for ‘em.

Easy way to help from way over here!

RedNewEnglander on March 13, 2011 at 4:33 PM

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Who let you and the rest of the refugees from LGF and HuffPo in here this afternoon?

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 4:33 PM

Couldn’t read a word past the story of the mother who lost her little girl’s hand.

I’m sobbing. I know I’m a softie, but I have a sweet young daughter.

There is no word to describe the heartache. Tragic does not suffice. Not even horrific suffices.

Grace_is_sufficient on March 13, 2011 at 4:35 PM

Roughly 1 out of every 101,000 Americans was killed on 9/11.
Nearly 10 yrs later, we still feel the pain in our guts.
Approximately 1 out of every 12,000 Japanese was killed in this tragedy.
And that’s with a ‘low’ 10,000 death toll estimate.
Unimaginable.

itsnotaboutme on March 13, 2011 at 4:36 PM

And you’re responsible for slavery.
Idiot.

itsnotaboutme on March 13, 2011 at 4:30 PM

Patrick’s comment is now gone. Hopefully Patrick with it.

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 4:37 PM

Patrick’s comment is now gone. Hopefully Patrick with it.

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 4:37 PM

Exactly.

ladyingray on March 13, 2011 at 4:38 PM

are ya listening dear leader?

cmsinaz on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

cmsinaz:

Amen cz,this is a time,for Hopey,to step up to the plate
and offer US Assistance,on the scale of US Soldiers,that
should return to Japan,as a 911-WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU
type of WW2,and geared up,as an Invasion Force,

of what America,didn’t have to do,as an assault on Japans
Homeland!!

A bit tongue/in cheeck and the Assault thingy,I think this
is far more than what Japan can handle,they do need outside
help ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!:)

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 4:39 PM

Yeah those troll seem a little worried. Things are not going well for them. I’m truly enjoying the delicious fear and despair they are showing.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 4:39 PM

Patrick on March 13, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Not trying to pile on, so to speak. But you should request that your comment be removed. That’s an extremely insensitive and classless thing to say. Japan is our ally and has been for over many decades.

carbon_footprint on March 13, 2011 at 4:40 PM

carbon_footprint on March 13, 2011 at 4:40 PM

It is gone.

ladyingray on March 13, 2011 at 4:43 PM

Really? Really?

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Yes, “really”, you blithering idiot. What was your estimate? 6 1/2?

Rod on March 13, 2011 at 4:44 PM

I forgot to mention that I use to fly into the Sendai airport as a pilot for Continental. It was truly surreal watching the water cover the ramp area where I use to walk around/taxi. We use to fly to many stations in Japan. Again, the people are lovely, the country beautiful, thoughts and prayers to all.

retiredeagle on March 13, 2011 at 4:46 PM

Really? Really?

So I suppose that you could provide a quote to your own writting at the beginning of this disaster, where you boldly predicted casualties in the five figures range?

I’ll wait for you to provide that link.

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Let me guess………GrowFins mommie?

Knucklehead on March 13, 2011 at 4:46 PM

So,trolls and Progressives are hell bent on more regulation and building codes,

heres a F****** #$%^&*()_)_(*&^%$#%^&* wake up call,

this was the 7th Worst Earthquake in Human recorded
History!

It was actually,closer to 9.2!!!!

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 4:47 PM

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Did you seriously think it was going to be less than 5 figures?

Really? Really?

Idiot.

BallisticBob on March 13, 2011 at 4:48 PM

Only a jackass liberal can take a thread about 10,000 people dead in a natural disaster and fit it into his political agenda.

conservnut on March 13, 2011 at 3:55 PM
——
As opposed to Ed. Right.

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 4:49 PM

Let me guess………GrowFins mommie?

Knucklehead on March 13, 2011 at 4:46 PM

*half sister.

VegasRick on March 13, 2011 at 4:49 PM

EFG on March 13, 2011 at 4:31 PM

Did you really thinks that you would not be challenged for attacking Ed like that in front of the Hot Air regulars?
Really? Really?

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 4:51 PM

Shaken by the prospect of nuclear meltdown, Japanese investors are expected to dump overseas assets on Monday and bring their money home to help finance reconstruction.
**********************************************************

Japan brings money home to rebuild
Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:38pm EDT
—————————-

(Reuters) – Shaken by the prospect of nuclear meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami, Japanese investors will dump overseas assets on Monday and bring their money home to help finance reconstruction.

Positioning for this could send the dollar plummeting versus the yen on Monday and lead to a sharp slide in Treasuries since U.S. government bonds are a favorite asset of Japanese investors, market analysts said.

Stocks also are likely to come under pressure.

Japanese insurers will probably sell some of their most liquid foreign assets such as U.S. Treasuries so they can respond to the worst disaster since World War Two.

The crisis could lead to insured losses of nearly $35 billion, risk modeling company AIR Worldwide said, making it one of the most expensive disasters in history and nearly as much as the entire worldwide catastrophe loss for the global insurance industry.

Traders braced for just such an outcome on Friday, when the yen surged and Treasuries fell. The Bank of Japan probably will add money to the system to limit the liquidation of assets. But the big question remains of how much follow-through selling is yet to come.

Dan Fuss, the vice chairman of $150 billion Loomis Sayles, told Reuters on Sunday that his best guess is that Treasuries will continue to see losses.

Because Japan is the second-biggest holder of U.S. government debt and they have nearly $900 billion in dollar reserves, Fuss said Japan will likely use reserves for rebuilding.

“A big buyer of bonds is taken out of the market,” Fuss said, adding that Japan “will be less able to add to their reserves and less able to buy Treasuries.”

TAKING STOCK

Japan’s crisis may also provide a new reason to press on with the long-awaited retreat in stocks.

A lot will depend on the price of oil, which fell on Friday on concern that the Japanese earthquake would hit global economic sentiment. It came off recent highs reached on the revolts in North Africa and the Middle East, but upheaval in the region over the weekend continued — notably with a protest in Saudi Arabia.

Investors will also engage in the grim exercise of determining which companies will benefit from helping the world’s third largest economy rebuild.

“You could expect to see industrial infrastructure companies do better. As for the overall markets, I don’t see it having any long-term negative impact,” said Paul Hickey, co-founder of Bespoke Investment Group.

“I remember after the last big tsunami in Indonesia there was a widespread view that it would be devastating, but there were no big impacts. Granted this is a much more developed region and certain insurance companies will have bigger exposure than others but outside of that region business will continue to go on.”
(Page 1,more….)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/13/us-markets-weekahead-idUSTRE72A31H20110313

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 4:53 PM

As opposed to Ed. Right.

Dave Rywall on March 13, 2011 at 4:49 PM

You evidently don’t like it here after all your years of p!@sing and moaning, so, don’t post here anymore and just bug the Toronto newspaper. I’m sure they’re as enchanted with you as we are.

kingsjester on March 13, 2011 at 4:53 PM

Patrick’s comment is now gone. Hopefully Patrick with it.

DarkCurrent on March 13, 2011 at 4:37 PM

Good riddance.
His ilk never rail against Germans or Italians that I’m aware of. I think it’s a racial thing more than bitterness over historical grievances.

itsnotaboutme on March 13, 2011 at 4:55 PM

Where’s that photo from? Wowwww!!!

Pablo Snooze on March 13, 2011 at 4:29 PM

It one of the videos here:

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-japan-quake-scene-20110313,0,7985092,full.story

pedestrian on March 13, 2011 at 4:57 PM

The photo on the front of the article I believe is a still taken from the amateur video hosted at Fox News. It is tsunami video of it breaking over a seawall that looks to be about 10′. Watch it for the fate of the ship that is being swept along with it.

ajacksonian on March 13, 2011 at 4:57 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/13/world/asia/satellite-photos-japan-before-and-after-tsunami.html?hp

before after satellite pix

Anti nuke freaks make me puke…taking this to push their freak agenda…to scare everyone. FNC sunday had a antinuke freak on from ploughshares…no education in Engineering, Nuke or otherwise…just a freak and luddite freak

r keller on March 13, 2011 at 5:03 PM

Yes, “really”, you blithering idiot. What was your estimate? 6 1/2?

Rod on March 13, 2011 at 4:44 PM

Two and half men. /

Electrongod on March 13, 2011 at 5:03 PM

My major worry for Japan is that their public spending has put them deeply into debt, something like 2xGDP if memory serves. With that sort of debt load the government will find it difficult to maneuver… with any luck it will have to leave rebuilding up to private concerns which will do it more efficiently.

The amount of public infrastructure that has been built up over the last two decades in Japan is huge, and only some of it going to useful public works like the typhoon water run-off system for Tokyo. Others, like auditoriums and convention centers for rural or fishing towns is… well… wouldn’t local government do that better, if at all? As it is the amount of headroom the National government has may be minimal. As horrific as this series of events are, and they are horrific, they may be the pieces that finally break up the logjam in the National government and get it to realize you cannot public works your way to prosperity.

ajacksonian on March 13, 2011 at 5:04 PM

Tepco
========

Mar 13, 2011
Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of 9pm March 13th)

http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html
=============================
Japan news

http://jen.jiji.com/
========================

Japan earthquake LIVE 9885 watchers

http://live.reuters.com/Event/Japan_earthquake2
==============================

International Atomic Energy Agency

Map,Epicentre

Top Story | 13 March 2011

Japan Earthquake Update (13 March 2011 13:35 CET)
1335 CET 13 March 2011:

Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) that venting of the containment of reactor Unit 3 of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant started at 9:20 AM local Japan time of 13 March through a controlled release of vapour. The operation is intended to lower pressure inside the reactor containment(more…)

http://www.iaea.org/
==========================

Current local time in Tokyo

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=248

canopfor on March 13, 2011 at 5:04 PM

Check out this map regarding the leaked radiation. Nice work Japan./

http://www.theospark.net/2011/03/radiation-pattern-from-japanfrom-rico.html

CWforFreedom on March 13, 2011 at 5:13 PM

Check out this map regarding the leaked radiation. Nice work Japan./

http://www.theospark.net/2011/03/radiation-pattern-from-japanfrom-rico.html

CWforFreedom on March 13, 2011 at 5:13 PM

That map isn’t accurate. It if was everyone in California would be dead at 750 rads.

Its a fake.

sharrukin on March 13, 2011 at 5:16 PM

As horrific as this series of events are, and they are horrific, they may be the pieces that finally break up the logjam in the National government and get it to realize you cannot public works your way to prosperity.

ajacksonian on March 13, 2011 at 5:04 PM

I hope so, but after Kan’s press conference today, his chief cabinet secretary was asked if he had heard about the opposition Liberal Democratic Party’s plan to raise taxes to pay for the disaster response. And the LDP is the center-right party! If it were up to me, I would exempt Miyagi and Iwate prefectures from income tax for two years to make their recovery as rapid as possible. Sendai is the most important city in northern Honshu and must be given every opportunity to regain its footing quickly.

fiatboomer on March 13, 2011 at 5:17 PM

Have they ever recovered the “hundreds of thousands” of Katrina victims?

Hiya Ciska on March 13, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Ah,No! But thanks to the Demrats and political correctness we have squandered hundreds of millions on debit cards for lap dances, Housing allowances for able bodied professional baby makers, quart drinkers, porch sitters and welfare cheats!

Natures law of “survival of the fittest” has turned into “survival of the fat, lazy and corrupt” at the hands of the mommy Govt and confiscation from the fittest!

dhunter on March 13, 2011 at 5:19 PM

CW, that’s for a catastrophic meltdown and they aren’t there yet. Seriously, I get the fear but the media seems to be fearmongering this.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 5:19 PM

Nukes are going nowhere. The lesson here will be that upgrading the nuke facilities to the latest, most advanced technology needs to be a priority.

Operating nuclear plants with 40 year old design technology is inexcusable.

Generation 4 well under way as well as pebble beds (which the Chinese are adapting)

http://web.mit.edu/pebble-bed/papers.htm http://web.mit.edu/pebble-bed/papers.html

http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/22867/?a=f

http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/22867/?a=f

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_IV_reactor

rickyricardo on March 13, 2011 at 5:20 PM

CW, that’s for a catastrophic meltdown and they aren’t there yet. Seriously, I get the fear but the media seems to be fearmongering this.

hboulware on March 13, 2011 at 5:19 PM

Oh, I thought those were for what would happen if we dropped two fission bombs on Japan.

pedestrian on March 13, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Why japan was operating 40 year old nuke technology and design is beyond me.

The Chinese are quickly adapting pebble bed tech.

For an industry so hell bent on becoming relavent, it sure resists staying on top of important technological changes.

Yes, it’s expensive as hell, but it’s much too important for all of our futures to be running nuke plants on old outdated tech.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_IV_reactor

rickyricardo on March 13, 2011 at 5:25 PM

That map isn’t accurate. It if was everyone in California would be dead at 750 rads.

Its a fake.

sharrukin on March 13, 2011 at 5:16 PM

Not sure if it fake or accurate but how many days are we post leak? Look at the map again. So no you are wrong about your comment about the number of dead.

Do you trust the Japanese government?

CWforFreedom on March 13, 2011 at 5:26 PM

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