Oh boy: Radiation levels soaring at damaged Japanese nuclear plant, pressure out of control; Update: Just hours left to prevent meltdown? Update: Electricity supplies arrive

posted at 6:35 pm on March 11, 2011 by Allahpundit

It’s not a Three Mile Island situation yet, let alone a Chernobyl, and given the fact that the reactors are covered with containment vessels (which Chernobyl wasn’t), it’s unlikely to get quite that bad. But Dow Jones is now reporting that the local electric company says it’s “lost control over pressure in the reactors,” and stories on the wires an hour ago claimed that radiation levels in the control room at the plant have reached 1,000 times their normal level. And so one of the worst days in Japanese history may be about to turn worse still.

This Reuters piece explains the problem concisely. In a nutshell, the reactors are overheating because they can’t pump coolant into them. So massive was the quake that virtually all of the plant’s power sources are offline; no power means no pump means no coolant, which means the cores are going to get hotter and hotter. As you’ll see below, they do have emergency diesel systems available to get some coolant in there, but it sounds like that may succeed only in slowing the pace of the overheating, not reversing it. Potentially, it may get so hot that it melts down; in the near term, the heat in the chamber will produce radioactive steam, which will have to be released into the atmosphere or else the chamber could blow.

Unbelievable:

If the outage in the cooling system persists, eventually radiation could leak out into the environment, and, in the worst case, could cause a reactor meltdown, a nuclear safety agency official said on condition of anonymity, citing sensitivity of the issue.

Another official at the nuclear safety agency, Yuji Kakizaki, said that plant workers were cooling the reactor with a secondary cooling system, which is not as effective as the regular cooling method.

Kakizaki said officials have confirmed that the emergency cooling system — the last-ditch cooling measure to prevent the reactor from the meltdown — is intact and could kick in if needed.

“That’s as a last resort, and we have not reached that stage yet,” Kakizaki added…

“They are busy trying to get coolant to the core area,” Sheehan said. “The big thing is trying to get power to the cooling systems.”

There was some confusion earlier when Hillary declared that the U.S. had sent some emergency coolant to Japan and the Air Force said, er, no we didn’t. But at the moment it’s immaterial — the problem isn’t finding coolant to pump, it’s pumping in the already available supply. Meanwhile, apparently some radioactive material was already released into the sea when the quake hit and four reactors automatically shut down. Japanese officials say it’s not a threat to anyone and insist that they’re not at crisis stage yet, but 3,000 people in a two-mile radius have already been evacuated and those who remain within a seven-mile radius have been told to stay indoors. Gulp.

We’re bound to have updates of some kind on this story later, so watch this space. Exit question: Will Japanese engineering ingenuity prevent a total catastrophe here the same way it did with those swaying skyscrapers in Tokyo? Quote:

Mark Hibbs, a nuclear expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, told Reuters that there is serious concern in Japan whether the cooling of the core and removal of residual heat could be assured. “If that does not happen, if heat is not removed, there is a definite danger of a core melt … fuel will overheat, become damaged and melt down.”

“Even if fuel rods melt and the pressure inside the reactor builds up, radiation would not leak as long as the reactor container functions well,” Tomoko Murakami, leader of the nuclear energy group at Japan’s Institute of Energy Economics, told Reuters.

Update: The emergency cooling system is running on battery power right now, and the batteries are running down. Once all the juice is gone, it’ll be only hours until meltdown.

Officials are now considering releasing some radiation to relieve pressure in the containment at the Daiichi plant and are also considering releasing pressure at Daini, signs that difficulties are mounting. Such a release has only occurred once in U.S. history, at Three Mile Island.

“(It’s) a sign that the Japanese are pulling out all the stops they can to prevent this accident from developing into a core melt and also prevent it from causing a breach of the containment (system) from the pressure that is building up inside the core because of excess heat,” said Mark Hibbs, a nuclear expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

While the restoration of power through additional generators should allow TEPCO to bring the situation back under control, left unchecked the coolant could boil off within hours. That would cause the core to overheat and damage the fuel, according to nuclear experts familiar with the Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania in 1979.

It could take hours more for the metal surrounding the ceramic uranium fuel pellets in the fuel rods to melt, which is what happened at Three Mile Island.

A horrifying quote from a nuclear waste specialist who spoke to ABC: “Given the large quantity of irradiated nuclear fuel in the pool, the radioactivity release could be worse than the Chernobyl nuclear reactor catastrophe of 25 years ago.”

Update: Cliche though it may be, this is indeed a race against time. The batteries powering the cooling pumps can run for about eight hours. After that…

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the U.S. Air Force is assisting in flying in backup generators, and Japanese ground forces are also trucking generators and batteries to the site, according to media reports. Time is critical, according to experts. Once power to the cooling supply is interrupted, all the coolant could boil off in as little as an hour, Kamps said.

If there is a meltdown at Fukushima, “the containment building is the last line of defense,” Kamps added. The reactor is 40 years old and the original ventilation system had to be retrofitted to allow radioactive gasses to be vented so that pressure would not build up and cause an explosion that would spread radioactivity over a much wider area.

Update: Not sure what this means yet for cooling down the reactors, but it’s cause for hope. From the IAEA:

Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) that officials are working to restore power to the cooling systems of the Unit 2 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Mobile electricity supplies have arrived at the site.

Japanese officials have also reported that pressure is increasing inside the Unit 1 reactor’s containment, and the officials have decided to vent the containment to lower the pressure. The controlled release will be filtered to retain radiation within the containment.

Update: Turns out that IAEA alert is six hours old. And yet, I saw no mention of it in the various stories I read fretting about a lack of power supplies at the plant. Very strange.


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Fox just said that the AP quoted it as “possible.”

CrankyTRex on March 12, 2011 at 12:41 AM

I just read the article headlined: “URGENT: Japan Officials Fear Possible Nuclear Meltdowns at Plants”

Same information, nothing changed. Headline hype so far.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:41 AM

We barely have enough of these left in the US to form a small club. We’ve got lot’s of lawyers and ‘community organizers’ though, so we are doubly blessed.

AUINSC on March 11, 2011 at 11:41 PM

Yeah, ever try teaching science and algebra?

Most would rather go tens of thousands of dollars in debt taking on an easy major and end up working at Wal-Mart than apply themselves.

I’d like to take this time to point out the incredible irony that the only people on the planet to have people die at the hands of nuclear weapons are perfectly happy to use nuclear power, and we, the people who invented the stuff, are terrified to build nuclear power plants.

CrankyTRex on March 12, 2011 at 12:27 AM

Hmmm, hadn’t thought of it that way!

Dr. ZhivBlago on March 12, 2011 at 12:41 AM

The general situation is being widely reported by news agencies now (e.g., AP), quoting Japanese nuclear officials. The bit about Cesium was posted to Twitter by “TimeOUtTokyo”:

http://twitter.com/#!/TimeOutTokyo

Purple Fury on March 12, 2011 at 12:41 AM

Associated Press: Japan nuclear safety commission official says meltdown at nuke power plant possible

Voice of America: Japanese media report radioactive cesium detected near Fukushima plant quoting nuke safety commission.

amerpundit on March 12, 2011 at 12:41 AM

It did clarify the pressure level, though. It is 2x normal, not 2x maximum.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:42 AM

Looks like the problem they are having at Daichi plant is they can’t get the vent valve open.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:34 AM

If they can’t vent they can’t cool effectly, also they have a high possibility of serious H2 build up. It’s bound to be a real mess at this point and they are dealing with several units at one time. With the kind of pressures they were talking about, they very likely have already had serious fuel damage.

whbates on March 12, 2011 at 12:42 AM

The same Twitter user also posts this:

Concerning the reactor meltdown, government asks Japanese population not to panic, saying the problem is contained within the facility.

Purple Fury on March 12, 2011 at 12:43 AM

This is the report that is bothering me:

“Kyodo News has quoted a Tokyo Electric Power Co. official as saying that they were having problems opening a valve to release pressure at its Daiichi reactor.”

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:45 AM

amerpundit,

Japanese authorities: If meltdown does occur, humans should be fine. I guess because of the containment.

Okay. Then why did the authorities give the order to evacuate tens of thhousands in the surrounding communities?

Mike Honcho on March 12, 2011 at 12:46 AM

Okay. Then why did the authorities give the order to evacuate tens of thhousands in the surrounding communities?

Mike Honcho on March 12, 2011 at 12:46 AM

Good question. They’re mentioning a “risk zone” of 6km but saying the containment should work.

amerpundit on March 12, 2011 at 12:47 AM

This is where the “meltdown fear” is coming from:

“If temperatures inside the reactor were to keep rising to more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, it could set off a chemical reaction that begins to make brittle the metallic zirconium that sheathes the radioactive uranium fuel.”

So it is one of those “it could” stories.

You “could” get hit by a meteorite while reading this.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:48 AM

“Then why did the authorities give the order to evacuate tens of thhousands in the surrounding communities?”

Because they are having a problem at a nuclear plant. The trains are not running, the roads are torn up, gas pumps aren’t working. It will take days to evacuate that area. If they wait until something does go really wrong, they wouldn’t be able to evacuate people fast enough so just in case, they are getting them out now.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:50 AM

DOW JONES:

Tokyo Electric says managed to stop reactor at another Fukushima plant, no need to expand 10 km evacuation radius around Tepco plants

amerpundit on March 12, 2011 at 12:51 AM

Okay. Then why did the authorities give the order to evacuate tens of thhousands in the surrounding communities?

Mike Honcho on March 12, 2011 at 12:46 AM

Because it would be irresponsible not to, the design should contain the damage but make no mistake about it there will be damage and they have to release to the atmosphere so people need to be removed for the ingestion pathway.

whbates on March 12, 2011 at 12:51 AM

This was the Associated Press urgent alert from four minutes ago:

The core at Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant’s No. 1 reactor may be partially melting, the nuclear safety agency said Saturday.

amerpundit on March 12, 2011 at 12:52 AM

Tokyo Electric:

Fuel rods were exposed to the air by 150 cms at 0355 GMT, more than the 50 cms observed in the morning

amerpundit on March 12, 2011 at 12:53 AM

“make no mistake about it there will be damage”

Other than speculation by individuals, there is no evidence of reactor damage at all.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:53 AM

If they got those rods covered back up before they reached 2000 degrees or so they will be fine.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:54 AM

Press Release (Mar 12,2011)
Impact to TEPCO’s Facilities due to Miyagiken-Oki Earthquake (as of 10AM)

Below is major impact to TEPCO’s facilities due to the Miyagiken-Oki
Earthquake that occurred yesterday at 2:46PM.
*new items are underlined

[Nuclear Power Station]
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station:
Units 1 to 3: shutdown due to earthquake
Units 4 to 6: outage due to regular inspection
* The national government has instructed evacuation for those local residents within 10km radius of the periphery.
* Measurement of radioactive material (Iodine, etc.) by monitoring car indicates increasing value compared to normal level. One of the
monitoring posts is also indicating higher than normal level. We will continue monitoring discharge of radioactive material from exhaust stack and discharge canal, etc.
* Considering the increasing pressure with in the reactor containment vessel of Unit 1, the national government has instructed us to implement measures to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessel (partial discharge of air containing radioactive materials) in order to fully secure safety.

Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station:
Units 1 to 4: shutdown due to earthquake
* The national government has instructed evacuation for those local residents within 3km radius of the periphery and indoor standby for those
local residents between 3km and 10km radius of the periphery.
* At present, we have decided to prepare implementing measures to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessel (partial discharge of air containing radioactive materials) in order to fully secure safety.
These measures are considered to be implemented in Units 1 to 4 and accordingly, we have reported and/or noticed the government agencies concerned.

Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station:
Units 1, 5, 6, 7: normal operation
Units 2 to 4: outage due to regular inspection

[Thermal Power Station]
Hirono Thermal Power Station Units 2 and 4: shutdown due to earthquake
Hitachinaka Thermal Power Station Unit 1: shutdown due to earthquake
Kashima Thermal Power Station Units 2, 3, 5, 6: shutdown due to earthquake
Ohi Thermal Power Station Units 2, 3: shutdown due to earthquake
Higashi-Ohgishima Thermal Power Station Unit 1: shutdown due to earthquake

[Hydro Power Station]
5 stations in Fukushima Prefecture were shutdown due to earthquake.
Power stations in Yamanashi Prefecture have been restored.

[Transmission System, etc.]
5 substations shown below have been shutdown:
- Naka Substation
- Shin Motegi Substation
- Joban Substation
- Ibaraki Substation
- Nishi Mito Substation

[Blackout in TEPCO's Service Area]
Total of about 1 million households are out of power.
Tokyo: 0
Kanagawa Pref.: 5,533
Tochigi Pref.: 214,817
Chiba Pref.: 134,611
Saitama Pref: 0
Gunma Pref.: 0
Ibaraki Pref: 642,657
Yamanashi Pref: 0
Shizuoka Pref: 0 (east of Fuji River)

[Supply and Demand Status within TEPCO's Service Area to Secure Stable Power Supply]
Backup supply from Shinshinano Conversion Station: 600MW
Backup supply from Sakuma Conversion Station: 300MW
Backup supply from Higashi Shimizu Conversion Station: 100MW

Because TEPCO’s facilities have been seriously damaged, power shortage may occur.
TEPCO appreciates customers’ cooperation in reducing electricity usage by avoiding using unnecessary lighting and electrical equipment.

We are taking all measures to restore power, however, we expect extremely difficult situation in power supply for tomorrow as well.
We kindly ask our customers to cooperate with us in reducing usage of power.

Please do NOT touch cut-off electric wires.

sharrukin on March 12, 2011 at 12:54 AM

Other than speculation by individuals, there is no evidence of reactor damage at all.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:53 AM

What’s your take on this talk about Cesium being detected?

Purple Fury on March 12, 2011 at 12:57 AM

Japanese news media:

Another expert on NHK counsels caution, says Fukushima partial nuke meltdown is controllable, current evacuation zone is adequate.

Purple Fury on March 12, 2011 at 12:58 AM

Here is an example of “circular” reporting where you have one news organization “retweeting” someone else’s story:

“Japan authorities: TEPCO plant fuel rods may have melted -Jiji”

And the article basically is more “it could” speculation. Not “it did”.

The article actually says:

“Experts have said that if the fuel rods have been damaged, it means that it could develop into a breach of the nuclear reactor vessel”

Well doesn’t that just put the D in Duh!

This is an example of the reporting we are getting. Speculation being passed off as reporting.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 1:00 AM

One of the questions I’ve been looking at is when do the Japanese start pouring boron solution into the reactors? Doing so would make a permanent mess of the reactors, but could aid in absorbing radiation while cooling the fuel. Stopping the meltdown while rendering the reactor pretty much permanently disabled.

coldwarrior on March 12, 2011 at 1:00 AM

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 12:53 AM

It is normal operating procedure to evacuate when an emergency is declared. And considering that the areas infrastructure is below normal operating standards, the sooner the better.

Hopefully there is no meltdown. And if there is hopefully containment holds. But if there were a meltdown and containment didn’t hold and they didn’t evacuate? You do the math.

NotCoach on March 12, 2011 at 1:01 AM

ANd still more:

“The Fukushima No.1, which is located some 250 kilometers (160 miles) northeast of the Japanese capital, Tokyo, “may be experiencing nuclear meltdown,” Kyodo and Jiji news reported on Saturday.”

So more re-tweeting of news passing as news.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 1:02 AM

So now everyone is copying that report but there is no new real information so far.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 1:11 AM

People have to be real careful with the translation too. Japanese are notorious pronoun droppers and they don’t use certain tenses that we do. It would take very little for someone to interpret a statement to mean something was in progress that they just meant was a possibility.

CrankyTRex on March 12, 2011 at 1:17 AM

One of the questions I’ve been looking at is when do the Japanese start pouring boron solution into the reactors? Doing so would make a permanent mess of the reactors, but could aid in absorbing radiation while cooling the fuel. Stopping the meltdown while rendering the reactor pretty much permanently disabled.

coldwarrior on March 12, 2011 at 1:00 AM

No, it will create a real mess on a BWR but not permanently disable the reactor. Commericial PWR’s commonly use Boron to control reactivity. Fuel damage is due to heat, decay heat in this case, the reactors were already shut down as has been reported by Teppco.

whbates on March 12, 2011 at 1:25 AM

These are all reports on possibility and are meaningless. Of course there’s the possibility for a meltdown. That has been the case since yesterday. More AP hype without facts to back it up.

Wait until it says “we are expecting a meltdown” or “meltdown is eminent” in the Japanese press before wetting yourselves.

Pattosensei on March 12, 2011 at 1:39 AM

Given the average competency of Japaneses engineers, I am confident that the worst will happen is the release of a significant quantity of filtered radio active steam.

If manual adjustments are necessary we can be sure that the man making them will be a volunteer. We are fortunate to live in a world with plenty of people that rush into danger to save others.

Slowburn on March 12, 2011 at 1:42 AM

We just have to wait for the next release of real information.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 1:47 AM

Looks like they got the valves open:

“Japan’s nuclear authorities said on Saturday that radioactive pressure was successfully relieved at the No.1 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power’s Fukushima Daiichi plant by opening valves. ”

Now they can get more water in there.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 1:51 AM

There have been so many reports of numerous reactor problems is there a summary of just how many reactors are seriously at risk, and how many have just been shutdown without problems?

Is this just one reactor vessel that is the main problem?

Skandia Recluse on March 12, 2011 at 1:57 AM

One of the questions I’ve been looking at is when do the Japanese start pouring boron solution into the reactors? Doing so would make a permanent mess of the reactors, but could aid in absorbing radiation while cooling the fuel. Stopping the meltdown while rendering the reactor pretty much permanently disabled.

Yup, it would make a mess. The reactor would need to be completely disassembled if they did that. That is a last ditch emergency measure. Mix some Boraxo in with the cooling water and send it it. But there is really no reason to do that yet. If there was any fuel rod damage, it would be pretty limited to one reactor at one unit and then probably only a few pellets.

It would need to get to about 2000 degrees to for that to happen and being it is now, what, 24 hours or so since the reactor was shut down, it should actually start cooling down fairly quickly at this point. Once they get water flowing through there, the danger of any fuel melt will be gone in several more hours. It could still get pretty hot but not hot enough to melt the core.

Remember that this reactor is shut off. This is residual heat that decreases with every passing hour.

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 2:20 AM

Daini unit 3 is completely shut:

- We decided to prepare implementing measures to reduce the pressure of
the reactor containment vessel (partial discharge of air containing
radioactive materials) in order to fully secure safety. This preparation
work commenced at around 12:08PM and completed at 12:13AM.
- At 12:15PM, the reactor achieved cold shut down.

Fukushima Daini status report:

http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/11031220-e.html

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 2:22 AM

Poor Japanese bastards just had some pretty SEVERE aftershocks

All times UTC

5.0 2011/03/12 07:07:32 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 06:36:00 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.5 2011/03/12 06:18:43 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.5 2011/03/12 06:10:44 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.1 2011/03/12 06:10:23 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.2 2011/03/12 06:00:25 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.1 2011/03/12 05:58:59 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 05:14:51 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.3 2011/03/12 04:52:58 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.1 2011/03/12 04:47:19 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 04:43:04 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.2 2011/03/12 04:06:09 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.5 2011/03/12 04:04:49 NEAR THE NORTH COAST OF PAPUA, INDONESIA
5.1 2011/03/12 03:54:48 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.3 2011/03/12 03:34:46 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.3 2011/03/12 03:29:28 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.7 2011/03/12 03:11:59 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.8 2011/03/12 03:01:49 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.6 2011/03/12 02:47:36 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 02:43:11 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.2 2011/03/12 02:34:05 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.2 2011/03/12 01:59:44 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
6.8 2011/03/12 01:47:16 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
6.2 2011/03/12 01:46:21 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN

5.2 2011/03/12 01:43:20 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
6.0 2011/03/12 01:34:10 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.1 2011/03/12 01:25:04 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
6.1 2011/03/12 01:19:07 TONGA
5.7 2011/03/12 01:17:41 TONGA
5.4 2011/03/12 01:17:02 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.1 2011/03/12 01:03:59 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.5 2011/03/12 00:45:10 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 00:39:37 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 00:25:08 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
5.0 2011/03/12 00:21:25 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN

SgtSVJones on March 12, 2011 at 2:39 AM

“Japanese authorities have successfully released pressure from the quake-stricken Fukushima No. 1 nuclear reactor and thus avert a potentially catastrophic meltdown, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said on Saturday.”

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/article1531579.ece

crosspatch on March 12, 2011 at 3:14 AM

Subsunk,

I agree about civilian nukes. But they do make sense for mil vessels. Until the Navy gets Polywell working.

MSimon on March 12, 2011 at 3:21 AM

http://www.ap1000.westinghousenuclear.com/ap1000_psrs_pcs.html

That is an amazing system. They have eliminated something like 85% of the wiring, pipes, valves, etc. Can operate without outside power or HVAC.

China has ordered about 200 of them. US has exactly none of them.

crosspatch on March 11, 2011 at 10:37 PM

^^This.
And the “bad” publicity about nuke is accelerated…we’re screwed.

Who is John Galt on March 12, 2011 at 8:29 AM

It is so irritating to see ignorant conjecture about nuclear plants. It’s obvious from the TV picture that the containment building DID NOT explode, contrary to talking heads reading the garbage they are fed, or making so called “intelligent” observations which create fear and misconception in the public opinion. A little known fact about Three Mile Island where we DID have a meltdown is that during the height of the accident, you could stand outside the containment building and get less dosage than you would with a chest x-ray. All about sensationalism and less about truth. Also, when they are taling about the nuke plant accident, the morons are showing film footage of the fire at the oil refinery, further stoking misconception and false opinions. There was more intelligence and truth on the accident from Carl Rove than any of the so-called “experts”. Give us all a break, media, and report the TRUTH!

ultracon on March 12, 2011 at 8:37 AM

Explosion at Nuke power plant.

Government to hand out iodine pills.

Evacuation zone expaned to 12 miles.

“All is well”.

BallisticBob on March 12, 2011 at 9:06 AM

Ummmm the stuff I said yesterday… about the Japanese will contain the plants and prove how safe nuclear power is…

I was wrong. Never mind. Oops.

Rethink nuclear.

God bless those in the path.

petunia on March 12, 2011 at 3:02 PM

Ummmm the stuff I said yesterday… about the Japanese will contain the plants and prove how safe nuclear power is…

I was wrong. Never mind. Oops.

Rethink nuclear.

God bless those in the path.

petunia on March 12, 2011 at 3:02 PM

Oh ye of little faith. Sounds like the only folks who were wrong are those who thought the situation was hopeless and believed the media……

Subsunk

Subsunk on March 13, 2011 at 9:27 AM

I am sick to death with GREEN. I can not get a bill from my car insurance provider with out a notice about being GREEN. I am so pissed off that I barely hit the space bar without stuttering.

Just a day ago the preisdent of th U.S. showed his ass as he lied to me. No one thinks that Obama is pro fossil fuel.
Yet he had the gall to say his policies promote energy production.

His best idea is to follow Spain into 15% unemployment.

Now the truly sad part of my post.
Japan’s recent earthquake and the resultant tsunami has become a discource on nuclear energy.

The fact is that more people die each year installing solar panels or working on windmills than have ever been killed from nuclear power plant failures.

TomLawler on March 13, 2011 at 12:20 PM

I never knew Japan had nuclear reactors. What other countries have them that we don’t know about ?

LODGE4 on March 14, 2011 at 10:53 AM

Here’s a list you figure out which ones you were unaware of. If you were unaware of Japan’s nuclear capacity I’d guess you’re going to be really surprised at some the countries on this list.

Oldnuke on March 14, 2011 at 2:37 PM

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