Prosecutors seek death penalty for Gosnell

posted at 3:35 pm on March 2, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

If a state has to have a death penalty, then a serial killer of newborn infants has to be the gold standard for it, right?  Otherwise, what kind of murderer would ever get a death sentence?

Prosecutors in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania announced today they will seek the death penalty for abortion practitioner Kermit Gosnell, who faces charged related to killing a woman in a botched abortion and killing babies infanticides.

It’s not just Gosnell facing the ultimate penalty, either:

Assistant District Attorneys Joanne Pescatore and Christine Wechsler confirmed to the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper that they are looking at pursuing the death penalty related to Gosnell and former Gosnell employees Lynda Williams, Steven Massof and Adrienne Moton. The three are accusing of assisting Gosnell in the infanticide “abortions” where unborn children late in pregnancy were purposefully birth in order to kill them by using medical scissors to “snip” their spinal cords.

Gosnell himself will likely face a potential death penalty as the prosecutors notified his attorney, Jack McMahon, that they will seek death by lethal injection if a jury finds Gosnell guilty of first-degree murder in the counts he faces. Gosnell faces a third-degree murder charge related to the death of 41-year-old Karnamaya Mongar from a botched abortion Gosnell performed. Mongar died November 20, 2009, after overdosing on anesthetics prescribed by the doctor.

The Inquirer reports that the decision to seek execution for Gosnell’s three co-defendants might be part of a strategy to tighten the proverbial noose around Gosnell’s neck, although prosecutors so far deny it … or mostly deny it:

The prosecutors, however, said they had agreed with the defense attorneys for the three to postpone a final decision on the death penalty for 60 days while both sides continue investigating the case.

Pescatore said the delay was not an indication that prosecutors were trying to negotiate a guilty plea in which they would testify against Gosnell.

“We didn’t know enough and they might want to tell us more things,” Pescatore said, referring to the 60-day extension.

Presumably, delaying in case the defendants tell the prosecutors “more things” suggests that those “things” might impact their decision on the penalty to seek.

Hot Air readers know that I oppose the death penalty in normal criminal proceedings, but this is the kind of case that can certainly cause one to question their opposition.  Gosnell murdered living babies fully born and separated from their mothers, and did so in a crude and cruel manner.  He kept trophies of his victims on shelves in his clinic.  If anyone doubts the cruelty and horrors visited upon these helpless infants and the women in the community, please be sure to read the grand jury report from start to finish, if you can stomach it. If the death penalty has any meaning at all, then Gosnell has to qualify for it.

Still, this may end up creating a cottage industry of Gosnell as a martyr, if previous death-penalty cases provide any track record at all.  We’ll be subject to numerous media pieces on Gosnell’s “service” to the community, a religious conversion or two, and probably even his artistic je ne sais quoi.  Free Kermit rallies will pop up all over Pennsylvania.  Inevitably, someone (or a whole bunch of someones) will play the race card, even though Gosnell made a fortune in his butchery and exploited the poor of his own community.

Give prosecutors credit: they know all of this, and probably better than anyone. After all, Mumia Abu Jamal got prosecuted in Philly, as did Ira Einhorn, who fled to France for decades and eventually avoided the death penalty.  They’re still determined to do what they believe is right for the victims and the community.

Update: The Anchoress prays that Gosnell takes the opportunity for redemption that this trial will give him, and believes living the rest of his natural life behind bars will at least allow him that opportunity:

If you remain unaware of what investigators (who were actually looking for evidence related to drug trafficking) found when they entered Gosnell’s abattoir-for-humansread the Grand Jury’s Report, if you can take it.

Nevertheless, I would defend this man’s right to live his life out in prison, rather than watch the state take his life. His life is not anyone else’s to take. For pro-lifers, this is a no-brainer.

And he may need many years and much time, in order to understand the enormity of what he has done, and allow his heart to be turned. He may need time for conversion and salvation.


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He’s just a slightly larger clump of cells…

darclon on March 2, 2011 at 3:38 PM

Why don’t we stick him inside a large, fluid filled baggy, and then abort him with his own procedure?

Whats good for the goose is good for the Gosnell…..

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 3:38 PM

Whoa. I actually did not see that coming.

Abby Adams on March 2, 2011 at 3:38 PM

Yesssssssssss.

IronDioPriest on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM

They should also prosecute the “mothers” of these children. An eye for an eye…..

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Great News. He is a monster.

OmahaConservative on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM

May I suggest a D&E execution

Stout on March 2, 2011 at 3:40 PM

Still, this may end up creating a cottage industry of Gosnell as a martyr, if previous death-penalty cases provide any track record at all. We’ll be subject to numerous media pieces on Gosnell’s “service” to the community, a religious conversion or two, and probably even his artistic je ne sais quoi.

And at midnight, when the lights flicker at the death house and cameras leave, the protestors will go home and get stoned. 72 hours later, nobody will remember Gosnell.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 3:41 PM

Not if Eric “my people” Holder has anything to say about it.

katy on March 2, 2011 at 3:42 PM

helpless infants – outside – the body..

How quaint.

exsanguine on March 2, 2011 at 3:42 PM

and former Gosnell employees Lynda Williams, Steven Massof and Adrienne Moton

This is to get them to turn states evidence and testify against Gosnell.

Knucklehead on March 2, 2011 at 3:43 PM

Hey I can’t wait for some idiot to claim that those seeking the death penalty for him are morally equivalent to what he did.

sharrukin on March 2, 2011 at 3:44 PM

He’ll be tortured first, though, right?

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:44 PM

Inevitably, someone (or a whole bunch of someones) will play the race card, even though Gosnell made a fortune in his butchery and exploited the poor of his own community.

Apparently, it is racist to point out that 60% of all abortions in the city of New York are black babies, so I wouldn’t put it past the violent, bigoted left to play the race card here.

CurtZHP on March 2, 2011 at 3:44 PM

Gosnell murdered living babies fully born and separated from their mothers, and did so in a crude and cruel manner.

Well, jeez, what manner wouldn’t have been cruel and crude, Ed, really?

Perhaps Gosnell could be hit with a huge suction machine and torn limb from limb? Or carved up with a huge scalpel? Or, there’s always a huge scissors in the cervical spinal cord.

DaydreamBeliever on March 2, 2011 at 3:45 PM

No doubt the pro-abortion crowd will be crying about how this prosecution will force women into those “back-alley” abortions. /

katiejane on March 2, 2011 at 3:45 PM

Hot Air readers know that I oppose the death penalty in normal criminal proceedings

My opposition to the death penalty his increased over the years rather than softening … which I think is counter to the usual trend for that opinion … That being said when you say:

If the death penalty has any meaning at all, then Gosnell has to qualify for it.

I have to say that if the death penalty is to have meaning it must also have a deterrent effect. I don’t believe our current executions have much deterrent effect at all. They are barely acknowledged and largely off the public radar long before the execution happens. No record of the execution is made, displayed, or distributed. On top of that I’m not sure anyone else capable of performing acts like this would have enough cylinders firing in alignment to be deterred.

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely venegeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

Nope. No death penalty. IMO and that of the Church, he can be locked up for life which will prevent him from ever being a threat to life or limb.

Bastard will get his in the afterlife. We don’t need to have his filthy blood on our hands.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

No doubt the pro-abortion crowd will be crying about how this prosecution will force women into those “back-alley” abortions. /

katiejane on March 2, 2011 at 3:45 PM

They’ve been crying that cr@p since the GOP started discussing defunding PP. Now, they’ll just cry louder.

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:48 PM

Abso-f**king-lutely. I propose the gas chamber. No needle. No electricity. Those are too quick.

MadisonConservative on March 2, 2011 at 3:48 PM

…Gosnell’s “service” to the community…

Somewhere, Margaret Sanger is smiling in spite of the flames…

karl9000 on March 2, 2011 at 3:48 PM

They should also prosecute the “mothers” of these children. An eye for an eye…..

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Really? Just a bit over the line, maybe? Don’t wanmt to walk that back even a tiny bit?

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:49 PM

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely venegeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

Execution should be used when no other reliable method can prevent the miscreant from causing further harm. It should not be vengeance, and it doesn’t matter if it is a deterrent. The point is that if we can’t guarantee that the person will be taken completely out of circulation, with no chance of him revisiting his deed, then he should be executed for the sake of society.

Otherwise, no matter what, it is just vengeance, which is not ours to take.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Wow. I did not see that coming.

I do not generally support the death penalty because there are too many flaws in our criminal justice system. But the facts of this case fits the bill, though I am shocked that prosecutors were willing to drop the hammer.

I would note, however, that the pressure exerted on potential witnesses–in the form of threatening to impose the death penalty on them, is one of the flaws in our system. How can you really trust the testimony of someone who is testifying to literally save thier skin.

RedSoxNation on March 2, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Prosecutors seek death penalty for Gosnell

Poetic justice would be his death by using medical scissors to “snip” his spinal cord .

That said, he might be punished more by rotting in jail.

rukiddingme on March 2, 2011 at 3:51 PM

The Unborn Victims of Violence Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-212, 118 Stat. 568-570) provides that persons who commit certain federal violent crimes and thereby cause the death of, or bodily injury to, a child who is in utero shall be guilty of a separate offense.

It requires the punishment for that separate offense to be the same as provided under federal law for that conduct had that injury or death occurred to the unborn child’s mother (or in the case of a Uniform Code of Military Justice violation, to be such punishment as a court-martial may direct, which shall be consistent with the punishments prescribed by the President for such conduct had that injury or death occurred to the unborn child’s mother).

It declares that such a separate offense does not require proof that: (1) the person who committed the offense knew or should have known that the victim of the underlying offense was pregnant; or (2) the defendant (or accused) intended to harm the unborn child. It prohibits imposition of the death penalty for such an offense.

It bars prosecution under this Act: (1) of any person for conduct relating to an abortion for which the consent of the pregnant woman (or a person authorized by law to act on her behalf) has been obtained or is implied by law or for conduct relating to any medical treatment of the pregnant woman or her unborn child; or (2) of any woman with respect to her unborn child.

Roy Rogers on March 2, 2011 at 3:53 PM

The purpose of the death penalty?

To get rid of bad people.

Works every time.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:54 PM

Execution should be used when no other reliable method can prevent the miscreant from causing further harm. It should not be vengeance, and it doesn’t matter if it is a deterrent. The point is that if we can’t guarantee that the person will be taken completely out of circulation, with no chance of him revisiting his deed, then he should be executed for the sake of society.

Otherwise, no matter what, it is just vengeance, which is not ours to take.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 3:50 PM

That’s a sound Catholic opinion on the matter (Don’t know if you are or not…) That being said, there is absolutely no reason we couldn’t construct a justice and prison system capable of ensuring that this person and others such as him were never able to roam free as threats to others. The fact that we either fail or decline to do so does not relieve us of the moral obligation to do so and refrain from execution.

It’s at least a bit reassuring that somebody else on here is even more restrictive on executions than I am given that I made allowences for a deterrent effect.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:54 PM

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely venegeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

In instances as clear as this I’m comfortable with the concept that the punishment fits the crime rather than it being a deterrent.

katiejane on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Otherwise, no matter what, it is just vengeance, which is not ours to take.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 3:50 PM

I respectfully disagree. My problem with the death penalty is that our system is too flawed to carry out the ultimate punishment. When you wrongly convict someone and inflict grave damage on them, you can always provide some remedy even if this remedy is inadequate. Death can never be remedied.

If, however, you could ensure that the system got it right all the time, I think death is justice that can be imposed by mortals. And it does provide a deterence. How many abortion providers are watching this case very closely? If this doctor is executed, are you willing to bet that it will not affect the behavior of other doctors?

RedSoxNation on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

I would note, however, that the pressure exerted on potential witnesses–in the form of threatening to impose the death penalty on them, is one of the flaws in our system. How can you really trust the testimony of someone who is testifying to literally save thier skin.

RedSoxNation on March 2, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Very chilling indeed.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

They should also prosecute the “mothers” of these children. An eye for an eye…..

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM
Really? Just a bit over the line, maybe? Don’t wanmt to walk that back even a tiny bit?

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:49 PM

*sigh*..OK, my point is that the “mothers” of these children, fully aware of the (prenatal)age of their child went ahead anyway and committed murder as well. They too should be prosecuted. If they had given birth to their child and then smothered them with a pillow, would that make a difference? I think not….I’m stating my opinion/feelings about this.

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

The purpose of the death penalty?

To get rid of bad people.

Works every time.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:54 PM

And sometimes it even gets rid of people not guilty of murder!

Bonus!!!/

Abby Adams on March 2, 2011 at 3:56 PM

Death penalty is too kind to this piece of sh*t.

Dave Rywall on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

And keeping Gosnell alive on this earth isn’t torture. The real torture is sending him to hell, which was created for Satan and his angelic followers, as soon as possible. Life in a maximum security prison is cutting the monster a break.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

Still, this may end up creating a cottage industry of Gosnell as a martyr, if previous death-penalty cases provide any track record at all. We’ll be subject to numerous media pieces on Gosnell’s “service” to the community, a religious conversion or two, and probably even his artistic je ne sais quoi. Free Kermit rallies will pop up all over Pennsylvania. Inevitably, someone (or a whole bunch of someones) will play the race card, even though Gosnell made a fortune in his butchery and exploited the poor of his own community.

Please let them try to martyr the guy. That’ll allow us to remind the public about his crimes and push the pro-abortionists on the left further out of the mainstream.

Doughboy on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

this may end up creating a cottage industry of Gosnell as a martyr

If it does, it’ll be the worst decision made by both the Pro-Choice and Anti-Death penalty camps.

I remember the Tookie Williams protests before his execution here in CA. I had never heard of him before, but regardless of where you stand on the issues, the protests put his crimes back in the spotlight.

30 years from now, as Gosnell faces lethal injection (assuming conviction and death sentence), when the protesters come out, these crimes will be relayed to people who had forgotten, and who had never known.

And the death penalty advocates will argue again, “Doesn’t this deserve death?”

And the Pro-Choice groups will have to explain again that he was bad, but the system is good.

They are both better off keeping quiet, to keep the media coverage of his execution as minor as possible.

dcman98 on March 2, 2011 at 3:58 PM

My God. I downloaded and read the grand jury report. It was like watching the Daniel Pearl beheading video — immediate regret afterwards. It’s so hard to know such evil lives among us. So, so hard.

If we want to put an end to this — this being the natural extension of the culture of death that is the American abortion industry to this kind of evil, deranged psychopathy — we need to make it unprofitable. So the Supreme Court has made abortion legal. Fine. Not much to be done about that. But make profiting from it illegal. If all of these so-called “medical professionals” feel so strongly about a “woman’s right to choose,” let them provide the service for free. And make the punishments steep. Life in prison for a single offense of profiting from abortion. That ought to shutter most of these death mills.

Rational Thought on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Expect the race card in 3….2…..1..

Bevan on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

If, however, you could ensure that the system got it right all the time, I think death is justice that can be imposed by mortals.

A justice system – devised by mortals – that was right all of the time would seem to require more resources than actual mere falliable mortals have… The ability to read minds to discern intent, completely untainted witness statements, etc. etc.

And it does provide a deterence. How many abortion providers are watching this case very closely? If this doctor is executed, are you willing to bet that it will not affect the behavior of other doctors?

RedSoxNation on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

This really only applies if you think this sort of behavior is par for most abortion facilities. There are a lot of really hellish facilities out there due to failure or inability of state regulators but this seems like an especially rare case.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

The purpose of the death penalty?

To get rid of bad people.

Works every time.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:54 PM

And sometimes it even gets rid of people not guilty of murder!

Bonus!!!/

Abby Adams on March 2, 2011 at 3:56 PM

Nuthin’s perfect.

Seriously, I do understand and honor your sense of compassion. The world needs people like you to prevent people like me from leveling the place.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Abso-f**king-lutely. I propose the gas chamber. No needle. No electricity. Those are too quick.

MadisonConservative on March 2, 2011 at 3:48 PM

I suggest execution, followed by a resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation.

portlandon on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

Seriously, I do understand and honor your sense of compassion. The world needs people like you to prevent people like me from leveling the place.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Don’t for a minute think that most of us would not like to see this guy slowly roasted and flayed alive. We are human, after all. That’s why we listen when God says otherwise.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely vengeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

In his case I am comfortable with vengeance.

OmahaConservative on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

Abso-f**king-lutely. I propose the gas chamber. No needle. No electricity. Those are too quick.

MadisonConservative on March 2, 2011 at 3:48 PM

I suggest execution, followed by a resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation.

portlandon on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

I enjoyed that exchange.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely venegeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

I respect your position re: vengance.

If you haven’t examined the death penalty as a defensive measure for society at large, and not one to punish, deter, or exact revenge, I ask you to do so.

When a bear comes into a campground and consumes a human being or two, we hunt it down and kill it. Not for revenge, or a deterrent to other bears, but because that bear is now a clear and dangerous threat to anyone who enters that campground. It is not done with malice, but to protect everyone else.

From time to time, a human will choose to become a threat to the rest of us and I certainly believe I have every right to protect myself and others from a known threat.

I don’t want to kill this guy because I truly hate him and what he does, rather, I believe he has vacated his right to exist with the rest of us.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

In his case I am comfortable with vengeance.

OmahaConservative on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

Vengeance and justice are almost always mutually exclusive.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:05 PM

A justice system – devised by mortals – that was right all of the time would seem to require more resources than actual mere falliable mortals have… The ability to read minds to discern intent, completely untainted witness statements, etc. etc.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

So how do you square that elevated demand with allowing people to have guns, armed police officers, and military force? All of these are also mortal and mistakes will be made and the innocent will die.

sharrukin on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

If all of these so-called “medical professionals” feel so strongly about a “woman’s right to choose,” let them provide the service for free. And make the punishments steep. Life in prison for a single offense of profiting from abortion. That ought to shutter most of these death mills.

Rational Thought on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Or, just obtain video evidence and then drop them and the tape into the nearest Jihadi enclave and let nature take its course.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

Seriously, I do understand and honor your sense of compassion. The world needs people like you to prevent people like me from leveling the place.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Don’t for a minute think that most of us would not like to see this guy slowly roasted and flayed alive. We are human, after all. That’s why we listen when God says otherwise.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

Umm…I’ve spent many, many hours reading my bible, and…uhh…let’s just say that we come to different conclusions on this matter.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

By this standard, we should arrest each and every abortion provider and seek the death penalty against them.

For all intents and purposes, this man is being prosecuted because he ran a messy office and had a curious habit of putting his trophies in little jars.

The same thing is being done at Planned Parenthood clinics in a “perfectly legal” way – and the results are exactly the same – dead babies.

And we turn a blind eye as a society to PP because they have better janitors.

I don’t think that God cares about the difference.

turfmann on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

where unborn children late in pregnancy were purposefully birth in order to kill them

it is philadelphia and all….

ted c on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

I suggest execution, followed by a resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation.

portlandon on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

Excellent combination, since resuscitation from the breathing of hydrogen cyanide means a lot of pain. Poor thing.

MadisonConservative on March 2, 2011 at 4:07 PM

It’s at least a bit reassuring that somebody else on here is even more restrictive on executions than I am given that I made allowences for a deterrent effect.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:54 PM

There are others.

a capella on March 2, 2011 at 4:08 PM

can we stuff these 4 through a 6″ wide piece of pvc pipe for about 24-48 hours, then either drill a hole in their head and shopvac the contents out or, conversely, take a pair of pruning shears to their spinal cord? from the front?

I mean, it’d be something they’re familiar with….

ted c on March 2, 2011 at 4:08 PM

I think he should just have to listen to Obama and Michelle babble all day. A fate worse than death.

search4truth on March 2, 2011 at 4:09 PM

Umm…I’ve spent many, many hours reading my bible, and…uhh…let’s just say that we come to different conclusions on this matter.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

That’s why I listen to the Church as well as the Bible. Helps to have a little guidance.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:09 PM

Defense lawyer Jack McMahon says that given the defendant’s age — Gosnell turned 70 last month — and the fact that no one has been executed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania since 1999, it was a waste of resources from a practical standpoint to pursue capital punishment in this case.

McMahon disclosed for the first time an outline of Gosnell’s defense, contesting large portions of the grand jury’s gruesome report. McMahon indicated he will challenge the presentment, saying, “Gosnell did not execute viable babies after the legal 24-week period.”

KYW news.

Defense: “We’ll drag this out for years at the taxpayers’ expense. Those babies…ooops…fetuses would have died anyway…oops….I mean weren’t born alive.”

Wethal on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

I think he should just have to listen to Obama and Michelle babble all day. A fate worse than death.

search4truth on March 2, 2011 at 4:09 PM

Now THAT’s just nasty.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

Excellent combination, since resuscitation from the breathing of hydrogen cyanide means a lot of pain. Poor thing.

MadisonConservative on March 2, 2011 at 4:07 PM

What say you to a hydrogen peroxide IV drip?

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

And we turn a blind eye as a society to PP because they have better janitors.

I don’t think that God cares about the difference.

turfmann on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

Perfect! May all abortion be declared first degree murder and let’s kill the killers.

I. Have. No. Problem. With. That.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

Defense lawyer Jack McMahon says that given the defendant’s age — Gosnell turned 70 last month — and the fact that no one has been executed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania since 1999, it was a waste of resources from a practical standpoint to pursue capital punishment in this case.

Send him to Virginia. We don’t care about those things.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:11 PM

It is unfortunate that when he is convicted and sentenced to death, he can and will appeal 12 times, keeping him alive and happy, alone in his cell, dreaming of his atrocities. All that time and money wasted when a bullet only costs a buck.

Spectreman on March 2, 2011 at 4:11 PM

Why Lethal Injection, I think snipping his spinal cord much more appropriate.

Tim Burton on March 2, 2011 at 4:11 PM

Good…

Gohawgs on March 2, 2011 at 4:12 PM

What say you to a hydrogen peroxide IV drip?

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

or Drano….with lots of air.

ted c on March 2, 2011 at 4:12 PM

I have this sick feeling that he will die of old age in prison whilst awaiting the latest round of appeals…

Seven Percent Solution on March 2, 2011 at 4:12 PM

The state is seeking a late-term abortion in his case, huh? He clearly poses a threat to the life and health of mothers everywhere, so we’ve cleared the Supreme Court’s hurdle.

JohnJ on March 2, 2011 at 4:13 PM

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

I will give your questions more thought but after brief consideration I think I would say that the bear does not get a trial because it is not a creature of reason – this fellow is not merely and animal but an animal that knows and knows that he knows – that makes him a creature of reason. Thus he gets a trial and he is not hunted like an animal. The necessary end of a hunt is death – this does not have to be the case for a trial.

I don’t want to kill this guy because I truly hate him and what he does, rather, I believe he has vacated his right to exist with the rest of us.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:03 PM

Locking him in the black hold of Calcutta would seem equally effective at preventing him from exisiting with the rest of us without having to kill him.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:13 PM

Free Kermit rallies will pop up all over Pennsylvania. Inevitably, someone (or a whole bunch of someones) will play the race card, even though Gosnell made a fortune in his butchery and exploited the poor of his own community.

nice preemption, ed.

ted c on March 2, 2011 at 4:14 PM

Dress him up as a missionary and drop him in Somalia or any of the other muzzie nests

they will fix him good

Sonosam on March 2, 2011 at 4:14 PM

I have this sick feeling that he will die of old age in prison whilst awaiting the latest round of appeals…

Seven Percent Solution on March 2, 2011 at 4:12 PM

I have a feeling he will, indeed, die in prison, but probably not of old age. These things do tend to take care of themselves once the prisoner crosses over into general lockup.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:14 PM

Defense: “We’ll drag this out for years at the taxpayers’ expense. Those babies…ooops…fetuses would have died anyway…oops….I mean weren’t born alive.”

Wethal on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

This guys whole defense rests on the definition of the word “viable”.

I encourage everyone to purchase the latest Funk and Wagnalls, or Websters Dictionary and bone up.

Lets see our current president knows what definition is. A recent office holder had a problem with the word “is”. Lets hope it’s not a pattern.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:14 PM

how about merely sentencing him to max security prison in with the general population. I hear that pedophiles, and child killers get the worst end of it in the slammer.

ted c on March 2, 2011 at 4:15 PM

Umm…I’ve spent many, many hours reading my bible, and…uhh…let’s just say that we come to different conclusions on this matter.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

That’s why I listen to the Church as well as the Bible. Helps to have a little guidance.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:09 PM

I was born into the Catholic Church and discovered simple Christianity. House churches, just like they did in the first century. Plenty of wise council to be had that way, without all of the man-made extras. I don’t mean to bop you over the head with it, just that you shouldn’t assume one cannot understand God’s word without “a little guidance.”

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:15 PM

Death penalty is too kind to this piece of sh*t.

Dave Rywall on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

I agree.

Missy on March 2, 2011 at 4:16 PM

I thought his only crime was to perform the “medical procedure” 12 inches south of the normal location. And to have unsanitary conditions or something. Surely this is no more than a misdemeanor, right?

joe_doufu on March 2, 2011 at 4:16 PM

“Is my Surgeon General position already filled?”
 
- President Barack H. Obama

rogerb on March 2, 2011 at 4:17 PM

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:15 PM

No assumptions. Just said what I do.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 4:17 PM

So how do you square that elevated demand with allowing people to have guns, armed police officers, and military force? All of these are also mortal and mistakes will be made and the innocent will die.

sharrukin on March 2, 2011 at 4:06 PM

And in all of those cases individuals can be charged with crimes, evidence that can be falsified is presented, and we have standards about reasonable doubt. The fact that we bake reasonable doubt into the very foundation of the system acknowledges that we are incapable of perfection in our justive – and anything less than perfection in executions ultimately means that you are killing innocents.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:17 PM

I’ll stick the scissor in the bottom of his skull if someone else will hold the vacuum.

SouthernGent on March 2, 2011 at 4:19 PM

Perfect! May all abortion be declared first degree murder and let’s kill the killers.

I. Have. No. Problem. With. That.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM

I would be perfectly satisfied if they all walked free if it meant that no baby would ever again have to face being sucked out of its mother’s womb.

Atoning for a sin as large as that can be deferred until after they shed their mortal coils. We humans can only lock them up in a box for a few years. Crimes like that should be paid for on a whole different level.

turfmann on March 2, 2011 at 4:20 PM

This is my church body’s stance on the issue:

http://www.lcms.org/results.asp?q=statement+on+capital+punishment

The Death Penalty

Q. What is the official stance of the Missouri Synod on the death penalty?

A. In 1967, The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod stated its position “that capital punishment is in accord with the Holy Scriptures and the Lutheran Confessions.” Resolution 2-38 of the New York convention of the Synod reads as follows:

“Whereas, Various church bodies have condemned capital punishment in recent years; and

“Whereas, God’s Word supports capital punishment (Gen. 9:6; Lev. 24:17; Ex. 21:12; Num. 35:21; Deut. 19:11; Rom. 13:4; Acts 25:11); and

“Whereas, The Lutheran Confessions support capital punishment:

“Therefore neither God nor the government is included in this commandment, yet their right to take human life is not abrogated. God has delegated His authority of punishing evil-doers to civil magistrates in place of parents; in early times, as we read in Moses, parents had to bring their own children to judgment and sentence them to death. Therefore what is forbidden here applies to private individuals, not to governments. (Large Catechism I, 180 to 181 [Tappert, p. 389])

“Therefore be it Resolved, That The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod declare that capital punishment is in accord with the Holy Scriptures and the Lutheran Confessions.”

This does not mean that everyone who belongs to the LCMS or is a member of an LCMS congregation is conscience-bound to support the death penalty. Individuals within the LCMS may, for various valid reasons, object to the usefulness and fairness of the death penalty as it is being used or considered within a particular governmental system. Although it is clear from Scripture that the government has the God-given right to use the death penalty, the LCMS has not taken the position that the government must use this right if it determines that some other form of punishment would better serve society at large at a particular time and place.

OmahaConservative on March 2, 2011 at 4:20 PM

…you are killing innocents.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:17 PM

That’s what he did. Don’t you agree that abortion ends an innocent life?

kingsjester on March 2, 2011 at 4:21 PM

And every time I visit the issue of executions it I creep uncomfortably closer to the conclusion that executions without deterrence are merely venegeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

Vengeance performed by the state can keep the peace. Would it be that much better if the Monger family hired a hitman?

Sekhmet on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

Defense: “We’ll drag this out for years at the taxpayers’ expense. Those babies…ooops…fetuses would have died anyway…oops….I mean weren’t born alive.”

Wethal on March 2, 2011 at 4:10 PM
This guys whole defense rests on the definition of the word “viable”.

I encourage everyone to purchase the latest Funk and Wagnalls, or Websters Dictionary and bone up.

Lets see our current president knows what definition is. A recent office holder had a problem with the word “is”. Lets hope it’s not a pattern.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:14 PM

I think one point of squeezing the co-defendants to cut a deal is to get some to say the babies were born alive, breathing and crying.

At that point, Gosnell had an obligation to get the infants to a neonatal ward as soon as possible. The “ok, so it was alive, but wouldn’t have survived” defense won’t fly.

If they do have the remains, of course, an autopsy would show the lungs had inflated, and a pediatrician could also testify that the babies would have survived with prompt medical care.

Wethal on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

I’ll stick the scissor in the bottom of his skull if someone else will hold the vacuum.

SouthernGent on March 2, 2011 at 4:19 PM

Death penalty is too kind to this piece of sh*t.

Dave Rywall on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

I suggest execution, followed by a resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation.

portlandon on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

All these statements (and more) are good reasons to question whether or not execution is justice or vengeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

They should also prosecute the “mothers” of these children. An eye for an eye…..

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:39 PM
Really? Just a bit over the line, maybe? Don’t wanmt to walk that back even a tiny bit?

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 3:49 PM

*sigh*..OK, my point is that the “mothers” of these children, fully aware of the (prenatal)age of their child went ahead anyway and committed murder as well. They too should be prosecuted. If they had given birth to their child and then smothered them with a pillow, would that make a difference? I think not….I’m stating my opinion/feelings about this.

sicoit on March 2, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Regarding your pillow argument, I hear where you’re coming from, but unfortunately the brainwashing of today’s society (it’s just a clump of cells) leaves these mothers confused and scared: abortion clinics WANT the mothers to believe they have no “choice” except for THEIR choice (abortion), forcing the mothers under duress to choose abortion.

I think the burden the mothers must carry for the rest of their lives post-abortion is punishment enough. Better to pray the mothers find forgiveness and can turn their lives around.

http://www.hopeafterabortion.com/

j6p on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

Nope. No death penalty. IMO and that of the Church, he can be locked up for life which will prevent him from ever being a threat to life or limb.

Bastard will get his in the afterlife. We don’t need to have his filthy blood on our hands.

tcn on March 2, 2011 at 3:47 PM

Respectfully, sir/madam, I submit that Romans 13:4 runs counter to this.

There is no blood on our hands for executing justice as commanded on violent, murderous men.

KinleyArdal on March 2, 2011 at 4:23 PM

I’ll stick the scissor in the bottom of his skull if someone else will hold the vacuum.

SouthernGent on March 2, 2011 at 4:19 PM

Imagine the effect on the jury when the DA first holds up the scissors and describes how the infants were killed.

Wethal on March 2, 2011 at 4:24 PM

Locking him in the black hold of Calcutta would seem equally effective at preventing him from exisiting with the rest of us without having to kill him.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:13 PM

Conflating the two comments, how many bears can you stick into zoos?

Locking someone away “for life” generally never turns out that way. We seem far too eager to let them out when they turn old and gray (no longer a menace to society…wait…Gosnell is already old and gray, and he was a murder machine up to the day he was caught), or are told we are required to keep them alive as long as possible, even if that means treating terminal or otherwise fatal diseases.

Taking his life, which is something he did to others as a living, provides 100% assurance that the rest of us are that much safer. If, by chance, it deters others then thats a bonus. But that plays no part in my opinion.

BobMbx on March 2, 2011 at 4:24 PM

Vengeance performed by the state can keep the peace. Would it be that much better if the Monger family hired a hitman?

Sekhmet on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

The role of the state is not to seek or legitimize vengeance – it is to ensure that justice is carried out.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:24 PM

..that makes him a creature of reason. Thus he gets a trial and he is not hunted like an animal. The necessary end of a hunt is death – this does not have to be the case for a trial.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:13 PM

And the fact that he is a creature of reason and is prosecuted in accordance with the criminal laws of society is why sentencing him to death is punishment/justice, not vengence. People hunting him down like a mad dog in the street would constitute vengence.

He knew what the laws were regarding abortion and he chose to break those laws. One of the legal consequences for murder is the death penalty.

katiejane on March 2, 2011 at 4:24 PM

and anything less than perfection in executions ultimately means that you are killing innocents.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:17 PM

Yeah, that would be the point. If ‘anything less than perfection’ is your standard for not acting then you must oppose military action that will see the death of innocents. There has never been a war where that hasn’t happened. Bombs go astray and artillery shells don’t always land where we might wish.

If ‘anything less than perfection’ is your standard then the second amendment should be disposed of because we know that mistakes with firearms will happen and again the innocent will die.

sharrukin on March 2, 2011 at 4:25 PM

Conflating the two comments, how many bears can you stick into zoos?

We have no obligation to cage bears to prevent rampages – we hunt them on the edges of society and wisely stay away from wilds that they roam in. (Or live with them and have a documentary made about how they ate you.)

Locking someone away “for life” generally never turns out that way. We seem far too eager to let them out when they turn old and gray (no longer a menace to society…wait…Gosnell is already old and gray, and he was a murder machine up to the day he was caught),

Failure to keep people locked up does not excuse us from the moral obligation to keep them away from society.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:30 PM

All these statements (and more) are good reasons to question whether or not execution is justice or vengeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

It’s pretty hard to separate justice from anger and disgust, especially in cases such as this. Who among us does not feel rage, thinking about what this bastard did to those helpless, trembling children, who had committed no misdeed at all – they merely made the mistake of reaching out for warmth and a hug upon being birthed, or curling up to attempt to stay warm, before this son of a ***** cracked their spinal column with a pair of scissors.

The deeds are reprehensible. The doer is vile beyond understanding. What is desired here? To lock him away forever? To claim that God does not approve of the death penalty for murderers is to ignore the whole of God’s justice.

And yes, it sounds a lot like vengeance. That doesn’t mean that the man oughtn’t be executed at all. None of the posters above (whose feelings I share to no small degree) will be cutting the man down themselves, so what then is the issue?

Men like Gosnell are an abomination upon society. To claim that we must care for them for the rest of their lives, after the things that they have done, is madness.

KinleyArdal on March 2, 2011 at 4:31 PM

If we want to put an end to this — this being the natural extension of the culture of death that is the American abortion industry to this kind of evil, deranged psychopathy — we need to make it unprofitable. So the Supreme Court has made abortion legal. Fine. Not much to be done about that. But make profiting from it illegal. If all of these so-called “medical professionals” feel so strongly about a “woman’s right to choose,” let them provide the service for free. And make the punishments steep. Life in prison for a single offense of profiting from abortion. That ought to shutter most of these death mills.

Rational Thought on March 2, 2011 at 3:59 PM

This idea has a lot of merit. In Virginia they were complaining that requiring abortion clinics to maintain the same standards as hospitals would put them out of business due to cost of compliance. What they are not stating is that it is the abortions that are the moneymakers. Merely offering health services and contraception (which would allow them to operate without conforming the clinic to hospital standards) would not bring in enough $ for them to stay open. You would think that if it was all about women’s health, they would be overjoyed to comply.

perries on March 2, 2011 at 4:31 PM

I’ll stick the scissor in the bottom of his skull if someone else will hold the vacuum.

SouthernGent on March 2, 2011 at 4:19 PM

Death penalty is too kind to this piece of sh*t.

Dave Rywall on March 2, 2011 at 3:57 PM

I suggest execution, followed by a resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation. Execution. resuscitation.

portlandon on March 2, 2011 at 4:02 PM

All these statements (and more) are good reasons to question whether or not execution is justice or vengeance.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:22 PM

Which is why, here in the good ole USA. The police, the attorneys, and the judiciary are three separate entities. Or do you think that the detectives assign to murder cases never desire vengeance on the scum they turn over to the DA?

Now, if the police took their vengeance out on the bad guys, that would be wrong, but they would have to be robots not to desire ultimate vengeance. “Vengeance is Mine, says the Lord” That does not preclude the recognition that ultimate vengeance is warranted.

pugwriter on March 2, 2011 at 4:32 PM

The role of the state is not to seek or legitimize vengeance – it is to ensure that justice is carried out.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:24 PM

The role of the state is to use force in the keeping of the peace, within the boundaries established by its founding documents or ruling families (depending on the form of governance). It’s like saying you play no part in killing animals for food because you buy your meat in a grocery store.

Sekhmet on March 2, 2011 at 4:33 PM

And the fact that he is a creature of reason and is prosecuted in accordance with the criminal laws of society is why sentencing him to death is punishment/justice, not vengence. People hunting him down like a mad dog in the street would constitute vengence.

Vengeance is not constituted solely in wild mobs – trial and conviction does not mean that vengeance was not a driving force or that it played no part in the conviction. Merely having the forms of justive does nothing to ensure that there is actual justice.

dieudonne on March 2, 2011 at 4:33 PM

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