The GOP-controlled House passed HR1 last week after plenty of debate and votes on amendments, in what is now a rare open-rules process.  The overall bill passed mainly on a party-line vote, but the amendments got less attention.  Heritage’s Action for America blog drilled down through all of the votes and built a handy tool for constituents to determine exactly how their Representative did on supporting spending cuts:

Heritage Action compiled all of the votes on the amendments that proposed to cut non-security spending.  We excluded amendments that proposed to shift spending from one program to another or sought to block various Obama policies—whether it be the many amendments to defund Obamacare or turn off the EPA’s rule making authority.  For this exercise, we chose to look solely at the unambiguous spending cuts and to see how Congress did.

The data may surprise a few people.  For instance, how many House Democrats refused to vote for any spending cut out of the 21 proposed?  96.  Almost 100 Democrats — one shy of half of their caucus — couldn’t find any spending cuts they could support. And beyond those 96, another 47 could only vote to support one tax cut.  Combined, that means that 143 out of 193 Democrats could only find one or less spending cut to support — or  71% of their caucus. The highest-ranking Democrat on spending-cut votes is Robert Costa of California, who supported 50% of the proposals.

On the other end of the spectrum, how many Republicans voted for every spending cut proposed?  Out of 241 Republicans, that number was … 47. Most Republicans supported most of the cuts, however, although Heritage does list the “most reluctant” GOP spending cutters. The most reluctant? David Reichert of Washington, with a 19% rating, followed closely by Steve LaTourette of Ohio at 24%.

Below is the tool created by Heritage to see the results of Round One in the fight to bring federal spending under control. Which elected officials are in the taxpayers’ corner?