Video: Doctors handing out fake medical excuses at WI union protest

posted at 4:30 pm on February 19, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

Via Drudge, one of the more hypocritical moments of the union protests in Madison gets committed to videotape by MacIver Institute. Why hypocritical? Well, imagine what these same teachers would say if their students got doctors to sign notes en masse at the mall to teenagers that play hooky from their classes.  Great lesson these teachers are giving their students, especially the ones they brought in tow to Wisconsin’s capital:

“I asked this doctor what he was doing and he told me they were handing out excuses to people who were feeling sick due to emotional, mental or financial distress,” said Christian Hartsock. “They never performed an exam–he asked me how I was feeling today and I said I’m from California and I’m not used to the cold, so he handed me a note.”

Another woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said they were handing out excuses like they were leaflets.

“I asked if they were handing out doctors’ excuses and a guy said yes and asked me if I needed one,” she said. “When I told them I needed one for February 16 and 17th, he wondered if I wanted to come back here for the protests next week.”

What happened next?

“I said, ‘sure,’ and I received a doctor’s note for the 16th through the 25th of February, without a medical exam.”

Don’t miss the doctor who scolded the cameraman because he doesn’t hang out at the capital every day for a year before asking questions about aiding and abetting fraud.  Perhaps the state might want to look into these cases of inadequate examination and potential misdiagnosis by the “doctors” who issued those notes, too.


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Unreal. I’d like to know if anyone in the private sector could even contemplate keeping their job if they pulled half this s…

Dash on February 19, 2011 at 9:11 PM

Fake is as fake does as fake is.

Coronagold on February 19, 2011 at 9:20 PM

Even if, and that’s a big if, these notes were considered legit by a judge, they only cover you if you stay home, are visiting a doctors office or are in the hospital, not on the street protesting. It is still violation of your contract and abuse of the sick time benefits. Sometimes people get too cute and thing they have found a way around the law when it just ain’t so.

Kissmygrits on February 19, 2011 at 9:24 PM

DOCTOR-GATE! The union backers are in a panic, as they are beginning to understand the ramifications of this stunt — and the fact that citizen journalists have uncovered it. Other Americans are working on filing complaints of fraud and misconduct on these doctors.

Mutnodjmet on February 19, 2011 at 8:51 PM

Yeah, of all the stunts they’ve pulled up there, this one was truly a jump the shark moment. Putting aside the union issue, this outraged lots of other physicians who realize the credibility problem it creates. I’m glad to see it so widely publicized. So, in the space of a couple of dys the protestors have managed to taint the education and medical professions as both being willing to lie for political purposes.
Cuz it’s the right thing to do!

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 9:25 PM

No, but you can bet you’d get a visit from Child Protective Services. And they’d check that “doctor’s note” if you got a fake one for your kid.
DrAllecon on February 19, 2011 at 7:42 PM

Nah, not in Georgia. At least not until your 6th birthday, when it’s mandatory to attend school in GA. It’s a long way from the People’s Republic of Wisconsin.

Buy Danish on February 19, 2011 at 9:29 PM

Yeah, of all the stunts they’ve pulled up there, this one was truly a jump the shark moment.

If it gets legs, it’s a PR disaster for the union and the teachers. People’s eyes tend to glaze over about buget figures and health plans and deficits, but they do recognize dishonesty when they see it.

Everyone of those teachers has been outed as a liar and a cheat and if they feel justified in lying when they call in “sick” and commit fraud to cover up their actions, why should they be trusted in anything else they say and do?

PackerBronco on February 19, 2011 at 9:34 PM

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 9:25 PM

I can’t believe these people are delusional enough to say these WI doctors writing notes were BREITBART PLANTS. rotflmbo The note recipients AND the doctors are all part of a vast right-wing conspiracy to make the union supporters look bad.

hoosiermama on February 19, 2011 at 9:38 PM

So, in the space of a couple of dys the protestors have managed to taint the education and medical professions as both being willing to lie for political purposes.
Cuz it’s the right thing to do!

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 9:25 PM

And Barry O owns it. WTF…

Yoop on February 19, 2011 at 9:47 PM

I hope these shameless liar doctors face severe professional consequences for this cute little stunt, including losing most of their patients.

Christien on February 19, 2011 at 10:05 PM

And Barry O owns it. WTF…

Yoop on February 19, 2011 at 9:47 PM

Heh. He still hasn’t figured it out, has he? Unintended consequences bites him in the a$$ every time.

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 10:08 PM

And Barry O owns it. WTF…

Yoop on February 19, 2011 at 9:47 PM

Heh. He still hasn’t figured it out, has he? Unintended consequences bites him in the a$$ every time.

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 10:08 PM

Yep, whether it’s a football team or a Mideastern country, he can’t seem to figure out that he has a reverse Midas touch.

slickwillie2001 on February 19, 2011 at 10:12 PM

The teachers who bring in the fake medical note are committing frauds, and those should be firing offense.

bayview on February 19, 2011 at 10:22 PM

And Barry O owns it. WTF…

Yoop on February 19, 2011 at 9:47 PM

Heh. He still hasn’t figured it out, has he? Unintended consequences bites him in the a$$ every time.

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 10:08 PM

Yep, whether it’s a football team or a Mideastern country, he can’t seem to figure out that he has a reverse Midas touch.

slickwillie2001 on February 19, 2011 at 10:12 PM

It couldn’t be any more clear that if he had wrestled a Wisconsin milk cow to the ground and put his brand on it.

He is really going to regret having decided to get involved in this rodeo.

Yoop on February 19, 2011 at 10:31 PM

Some doctors need to be brought up on whatever charges can be eh em… ‘doctored up’ around this. The AMA should look poorly on this type of activity IF they want their notes to actually mean something.
-
Also, the doc going on about private health care consultations er… what not… as in, on a public street? For real? I doubt it, and he may indeed be the one breaking patient doctor confidentiality with his behavior.
-

RalphyBoy on February 19, 2011 at 10:36 PM

A few more legs, small ones, but I sense rapid mitosis. Magic word here is stress.
http://punditpress.blogspot.com/2011/02/physicians-betraying-their-oath-and_19.html

a capella on February 19, 2011 at 10:52 PM

Can complaints be made to the Licensing Boards of those doctors for committing fraudulent medical acts? They should be disciplined for abusing their medical license. There is no difference between what the are doing and some hack doctors certifying phony back injuries for fraudulent claims of worker’s compensation.

bayview on February 19, 2011 at 11:02 PM

It would be a shame if these docs were sued out of medicine through bogus malpractice lawsuits–because that would be wrong–but, oh, the irony!

Christien on February 19, 2011 at 11:02 PM

Can complaints be made to the Licensing Boards of those doctors for committing fraudulent medical acts? They should be disciplined for abusing their medical license. There is no difference between what the are doing and some hack doctors certifying phony back injuries for fraudulent claims of worker’s compensation.

bayview on February 19, 2011 at 11:02 PM

…or police and firefighters feigning disability in their last year of work in order to add a disability bonus to their already lucrative pensions.

(Oh my, did I just criticize cops and firefighters?)

slickwillie2001 on February 19, 2011 at 11:23 PM

slickwillie2001 on February 19, 2011 at 11:23 PM

There’s a way to end that- the city that pays those pensions should have the right to a 2nd medical opinion of the injury at a doctor of the city’s choosing and if it is found that it is a false claim the firefighter’s/policeman’s pension is based on the salary he made his FIRST year on the force.

journeyintothewhirlwind on February 19, 2011 at 11:29 PM

http://punditpress.blogspot.com/2011/02/physicians-betraying-their-oath-and_19.html

As a third year resident, Patrick A McKenna, M.D., is apparently not licensed to practice outside his residency program. His unprofessional practicing medicine in the streets without maintaining proper medical records may give him trouble now and when he wants to get a license after finishing training.

http://online.drl.wi.gov/ApplicationStatus/CheckList.aspx?appId=323354

Anne Eglash MD, Hannah M Keevil MD, Lou Sanner MD, MSPH, and James H Shropshire MD should all be charged with unprofessional conduct and disciplined.

http://drl.wi.gov/category.asp?linkcatid=16&linkid=16&locid=0

slp on February 19, 2011 at 11:34 PM

MG…LMAO.. Andrew Breitbart got a doctor pass too!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQRcNBWTOr8

Conservalicious on February 20, 2011 at 12:02 AM

Ehhh perhaps I am crazy but isnt that illegal. Falsefying medical records? isnt that a felony?

ColdWarrior57 on February 20, 2011 at 12:25 AM

Nah, not in Georgia. At least not until your 6th birthday, when it’s mandatory to attend school in GA. It’s a long way from the People’s Republic of Wisconsin.

Buy Danish on February 19, 2011 at 9:29 PM

Well it’s good to know there are some places where a kindergartener can stay home a day or two without calling in the marines.

The teachers don’t have any excuse though.

DrAllecon on February 20, 2011 at 12:26 AM

A page taken straight from the Obama whitehouse playbook.

HHS waivers for unions = doctor waivers for teachers

TN Mom on February 20, 2011 at 12:31 AM

wait, this IS FRAUD, yes? I mean, handing out medical excuses is the same thing as diagnosing someone without seeing them?

So, if someone were to sue someone else for an injury that never occurred, and they needed a doc to “confirm” said injury, that’s illegal, yes? They could get their license revoked.

How is this any different?

Jewels on February 20, 2011 at 1:07 AM

but but Barry O’s a “Christian!!” And so are all the helpful doctors!!

leftnomore on February 20, 2011 at 5:19 AM

slp on February 19, 2011 at 11:34 PM

Alinsky their fraudulent butts! Two can play this game. “Joe the Plumber meets Patrick/Hanna the Doctor!”

hoosiermama on February 20, 2011 at 7:38 AM

Other Americans are working on filing complaints of fraud and misconduct on these doctors.

Mutnodjmet on February 19, 2011 at 8:51 PM

Sure hope so. Hold those doctors accountable.

And how about those teachers who took their students out of class to march the streets as protesters, or called in sick to do a wildcat strike. IMV, that’s even more reprehensible than the doctors’ fraud.

petefrt on February 20, 2011 at 7:54 AM

as usual FNC is the ONLY station reporting this….

cmsinaz on February 20, 2011 at 8:28 AM

I can’t think of any reason why a doctor who did this should be allowed to keep a license to practice medicine.

Has anyone forwarded this video to the WI board that licenses physicians?

morganfrost on February 20, 2011 at 8:32 AM

If any of these assclowns had happened to have been my family physician, I’d walk right up to him or her, tell them to take their practice and shove it where only a proctologist could locate it and then go find a better doctor elsewhere.

pilamaye on February 20, 2011 at 8:39 AM

Mother nature is about to put a damper on the protests.
.
Foot of Snow, Ice to Wallop Midwest…

Col.John Wm. Reed on February 20, 2011 at 8:52 AM

The teachers don’t have any excuse though.
DrAllecon on February 20, 2011 at 12:26 AM

Of course not. That was the point of citing Wisconsin law about Kindergarten truants.

Buy Danish on February 20, 2011 at 8:56 AM

“Make them live up to their own rules”~Alinsky

File a license complaint on those doctors. Minimal defense costs $50K. Sometimes covered by malpractice insurance,sometimes not. Burn, Baby.

SurferDoc on February 20, 2011 at 8:57 AM

File a license complaint on those doctors. Minimal defense costs $50K. Sometimes covered by malpractice insurance,sometimes not.

The 3rd yr resident’s insurance is likely provided by the state of Wisconsin. My understanding is that if you, as a physician, knowingly commit fraud, then the issue becomes criminal, and thus not covered by the malpractice insurance. It will be very interesting indeed to see if they do defend him.

humdinger on February 20, 2011 at 10:01 AM

I thought the purpose of the scam is to not let the people you are scamming know what’s going on. These fools have no qualms with stating on camera the fraud they are pulling. Unbelievable!

mizflame98 on February 20, 2011 at 10:11 AM

one word: astroturf.

stevezilla on February 20, 2011 at 11:05 AM

And how about those teachers who took their students out of class to march the streets as protesters, or called in sick to do a wildcat strike. IMV, that’s even more reprehensible than the doctors’ fraud.

petefrt on February 20, 2011 at 7:54 AM
.
Sure hope if a teacher took the kids they have good insurance and a permission slip from momma, cause it sure could get messy if a parents files suit.Some of the kids might also get molested by the bussed in seiu thugs and then it would hit da fan.

Col.John Wm. Reed on February 20, 2011 at 11:08 AM

On second thought, nothing will happen to those doctors at the Medical Licensing Board. The Board in PA took no action against Gosnell, a butcher with immediate and real danger to patients’ life and health, for years, so I am not holding my breath for the WI Board to take action against those doctors. At the most, they will get a warning and talking to.

bayview on February 20, 2011 at 12:53 PM

File a license complaint on those doctors. Minimal defense costs $50K. Sometimes covered by malpractice insurance,sometimes not. Burn, Baby.

SurferDoc on February 20, 2011 at 8:57 AM

Those riders are expensive. ;)

gryphon202 on February 20, 2011 at 1:45 PM

These fools have no qualms with stating on camera the fraud they are pulling. Unbelievable!

mizflame98 on February 20, 2011 at 10:11 AM

They act as if they have done it before. Cocky?

CWforFreedom on February 20, 2011 at 2:20 PM

Unethical behavior. From the top down.

kingsjester on February 20, 2011 at 2:24 PM

As a doctor (DDS) of over 30 years in the practice, no medical people of any self respect would engage in this sort of fraudulent behavior.

This is willful fraud and malpractice by the (so-called) doctors and medical staff involved. Furthermore this behavior is quite possibly NOT COVERED BY THEIR MALPRACTICE, which may NOT cover willful misuse of one’s medical license and expertise. It’s like knowingly handing out pain meds to druggies who then sell the (taxpayer paid for) pain meds on the black market.

Medical staff convicted of such crimes or practices may not only end up paying any related fines and expenses themselves, but they may put their medical licenses in jeopardy, as well as hinder their ability to obtain malpractice coverage in the future. It’s quite possible that health care insurance companies may toss any such medical staff off their preferred provider lists because of their propensity to commit fraud.

From a carrier’s perspective, there’s no guarantee that anyone willing to commit this sort of fraudulent behavior restricts this sort of fraudulent activity to this particular event. It could be part of a much larger pattern of fraudulent diagnoses and treatments costing carriers, employers and taxpayers millions, if not billions.

drfredc on February 20, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Sorry about the off-topic here but the Wisconsin matter seems to have totally overshadowed the Republican sell out on the recently passed continuing resolution.

It’s almost like it never happened.

What prompts this comment is that I’m just now watching Fox News Sunday and Chris Wallace just told me that the upcoming segment was about the “HUGE” cuts. That’s not true, Mr Wallace, and you should know better than to slant your news to such a degree.

People like Mr. Wallace are part of the ruling class problem, it’s sad to say.

FloatingRock on February 20, 2011 at 2:44 PM

Read my lips, $100 billion!

FloatingRock on February 20, 2011 at 2:47 PM

Holy cow: Now Chris Wallace is asking Coburn about whether or not there should be a continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown. Why would they need that? The House has already sold out for only 60 billion. If they’ve sold us out on that why wouldn’t they sell us out on everything else?

What a joke. But we can all be grateful for the “HUGE cuts”, huh Mr Wallace? A pathetic 60 billion for the opening bid? Get real, Mr. Wallace.

FloatingRock on February 20, 2011 at 2:53 PM

Chris Wallace and Coburn have NO credibility between the two of them. They are talking about a tiny drop in the bucket like it’s meaningful and Coburn is painting people who support balanced budgets as extremists.

Coburn also points out it’s good to talk about government shutdown but then dismisses it. Why is it good, Coburn, please explain. I could but Coburn can’t because he’s a liar. He’s part of the problem too.

I’m grateful for his help on earmarks but now he’s changed sides and needs to go.

FloatingRock on February 20, 2011 at 2:59 PM

McCaskill agrees with Coburn. Isn’t that great? They’re all one big happy family, Coburn and his Democrat buddies.

FloatingRock on February 20, 2011 at 3:01 PM

as usual FNC is the ONLY station reporting this….

cmsinaz on February 20, 2011 at 8:28 AM

No it was on other morning political shows, only mentioned by Repubs. They are getting press on this one. Milwaukee Journal online had a small piece on it. The thread was real fun to read. Many are quite upset.

wi farmgirl on February 20, 2011 at 3:24 PM

I just can’t believe they gave one to Breitbart. Guess they spend too much time on Huffpoo and didn’t recognize him.

wi farmgirl on February 20, 2011 at 3:26 PM

Mother nature is about to put a damper on the protests.
.
Foot of Snow, Ice to Wallop Midwest…

Col.John Wm. Reed on February 20, 2011 at 8:52 AM

It’s snowing like crazy. If there down there, they aren’t getting back home till Tuesday and if they were planning on traveling down to Madison they are in for a slow, slow drive. Nasty out.

wi farmgirl on February 20, 2011 at 3:28 PM

Heh.
http://punditpress.blogspot.com/2011/02/university-of-wisconsin-department-of.html

a capella on February 20, 2011 at 3:45 PM

From the article,

Don’t know who Kathy Oriel is? She happens to be the Madison Residency Program Director!.

She could very easily have jeopardized the entire Residency Program, not to mention busting the budget for malpractice insurance for the program. Not that an academic physician, who is basically a government employee, would care since she is not paying for overhead.

txmomof6 on February 20, 2011 at 4:08 PM

txmomof6 on February 20, 2011 at 4:08 PM

I’d like to be a fly on the wall at her emergency meeting with her supervisors today or tomorrow. Should be smokin’!

a capella on February 20, 2011 at 4:14 PM

a capella on February 20, 2011 at 4:14 PM

agreed, assuming they weren’t there as well! It might have to go up to the Chancellor of the University, or whoever is in charge of the University system that runs the Residency Program up there.

txmomof6 on February 20, 2011 at 4:26 PM

One other thought that is slightly OT, but this whole nasty affair brings it to mind. Up in Canada where they have government run healthcare, they also have unionized doctors, nurses and other health professionals. They can and do strike attempting to shut down hospitals etc. Coming ultimately to a location near you with the imposition of ObamaCare.

txmomof6 on February 20, 2011 at 4:32 PM

To the “doctor” on the red sweatshirt, you can try to shield yourself by claiming privacy to a consultation (didn’t see much of any there) in the open right in the middle of a street surrounded by people then you are going to loose. My consultation with you might be private at your office or my home, but not within earshot of 1000 people. That the left has used and abused the excuse of a non existent “right to privacy” is shameless. (And , to clarify, we have a right to property and thus get privacy from having the right to refuse people from our property).

This demonstration by these so called “doctors” is just infuriating. Not only they are promoting “fighting the system” by cheating and lying but they are disgracing their oath to integrity. Showing young people as well how you can gain the system by not working. What a great example.

in WI it is more than clear what we have known for a long time: the left can’t debate ideas nor are they willing to learn.

ptcamn on February 20, 2011 at 5:23 PM

I’m a teacher with a chronic health condition. After I was hospitalized last month, I begged my doctor to let me go back to work. That’s how ashamed I was to be away from my job.

Needless to say, these videos disgust me. I hope none of those snide, chuckling teachers are every really sick. Doctor’s notes are not laughing matters. To some of us, they mean another week we’re too sick to cross our own bedroom.

Grace_is_sufficient on February 20, 2011 at 8:47 PM

As a physician… this type of behavior disgusts me…

Then perhaps they should be the ones working for free under Obamacare rules.

Because some of the worst liberals you will ever find are physicians, academic > private practice, simply due to the prevalent academic culture.

But doesn’t surprise me. Because these idiots are the types of people that say… “Well, I don’t mind paying taxes…” They are also the same ones who advocated Obamacare’s passage – and perpetuated the lie of cost hoping to get the “Doctor Fix” passed after the damage was done… over & over again.

A good place to start to identify some of these physicians committing fraud is to start screening faculty databases of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine Department Directories.

So help me doing some legwork… looking at names… and faces of faculty from local academic medical centers – to identify these embarrassments to the profession of medicine. Then, if made public nationwide, they will receive the discipline that is warranted for this behavior.

Danny on February 20, 2011 at 11:30 PM

Consider the physician who states that she is there working on their own behalf, not necessarily representing their workplaces…

If their white coats have an identification patch or name for the Medical Center where they work, I believe that she is sorely mistaken…

If so, perhaps the hospital where they work may not like that very much.

Danny on February 20, 2011 at 11:35 PM

A copy of the “sick excuse” note being handed out to protesting teachers (see link http://maciverinstitute.com/2011/02/fake-doctors-notes-being-handed-out-at-wisconsin-gov-union-rally/):

“Feb 19, 2011

Patient’s name______

Date of birth ____/_____/_____

To Whom it May Concern:

This is confirm I have seen and evaluated the above named patient.

Please excuse from work/school due to a medical condition from

____/____/____ through

Please contact me at badgerdoctors@gmail.com if additional information is needed. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Physician Signature:

Physician Name

WI license number”

Regardless of what these physicians are saying about representing themselves… if they say that these notes are the same that they give out in their own clinics at the University of Wisconsin… and the note provides an e-mail to contact the physician that is related to the University of Wisconsin… have they contradicted that statement and involved the University of Wisconsin?

Danny on February 21, 2011 at 12:22 AM

From the following link an interesting comment (http://punditpress.blogspot.com/2011/02/university-of-wisconsin-department-of.html?showComment=1298266226307#c6377747217682659929):

” Anonymous said…
Anonymous Physician,

Fraud on the government is a much broader legal term than fraudulent billing. Fraud on the government includes wrongful acts done with the intent to aid someone else’s fraudulent claim.

Persons who agree to act in concert to commit a wrongful act (fraudulent sick leave claim) form a civil conspiracy, which here is fraud on the government.

Posters indicate that Wisconsin has a “qui tam” statute allowing taxpayer suits to sue persons making fraudulent claims against the State of Wisconsin. See:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qui_tam

This means that any citizen of Wisconsin can file a class action against the teachers making fraudulent sick leave claims, and against the physicians who wrote their sick leave excuses.

The physicians involved who did not make contemporaneous written records of their examinations of the teachers they wrote sick leave excuses for will have a very difficult time escaping a finding of liability here.

And all conspirators are liable for the acts of each other member of the conspiracy, i.e., the physicians found liable as civil conspirators with the teachers making false claims, would (each separately) be liable for the ENTIRE amount of wrongful sick leave payments made by the State of Wisconsin to the striking teachers

My major point, however, is that it might not be necessary for any official Wisconsin state entity, other than a civil trial court, to do anything to wreck the medical careers of these physicians. Lawyers, judges and juries can do it without any official medical being involved.

Here is how that works. A trial court finding that a physician is civilly liable for fraud on the government might (I’m not familiar with Wisconsin law) be useable as a sort of presumption (the legal term is collateral estoppel) by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services to the same effect – the doctor made a fraudulent claim which disqualifies him/her from receiving MedicAid payments.

If this is indeed so, Wisconsin taxpayers could als bring qui tam suits to recover any future MedicAid payments to the physicians fourd liable for fraud on the government.

Tom Holsinger
February 20, 2011 5:08 PM “

Danny on February 21, 2011 at 12:34 AM

Also, worth reading, and using the following information, again taken from comments from the following link (http://maciverinstitute.com/2011/02/fake-doctors-notes-being-handed-out-at-wisconsin-gov-union-rally/):

” Louis A. Sanner says:
February 20, 2011 at 9:43 PM
James H. Shropshire, MD
Louis Sanner, MD
Anne Eglash, MD
Hannah Keevil, MD
Patrick McKenna, MD
Kathy Oriel, MD
Bernard F. Micke, MD

[Reply]

Louis A. Sanner Reply:
February 20th, 2011 at 9:45 PM

Conspiracy to commit a crime….

Definition: two or more people knowingly conspiring to commit a crime and then committing an overt act in furtherance of that crime, providing that one or more of the conspirators have the ability and opportunity to commit the crime contemplated. The crime of conspiracy commonly converts an otherwise simple misdemeanor into a felony.

The crime contemplated: payroll fraud. The overt act: issuing and accepting a knowingly fraudulent document under the authority of a medical license. The ability to commit the crime: being employed by the state or local government as a teacher who is required to submit a doctors affirmation to justify paid time off. There is no requirement that the employee actually submit the false document, only that they could do so. The elements of the crime of conspiracy have already been committed.

A conviction for the crime of conspiracy should cause the loss of the Doctor’s MD. license for some period and the loss of the Teacher’s teaching credentials for some period at the very least. Certainly dismissal of the teacher is called for. A suspended jail sentence would be appropriate as well for both the Teacher and the Doctor so that a subsequent criminal act would send them directly to jail. “

Danny on February 21, 2011 at 12:41 AM

Danny on February 21, 2011 at 12:41 AM

I see what you’re saying, Danny, but most of these teachers probably have a personal sick bank accumulated. Therefore, the district won’t technically have lost payroll, since those days are, by contract, “owed” teachers.

Grace_is_sufficient on February 21, 2011 at 8:29 AM

If it is going to cost the state that much money then it should come from the teachers’ pockets for the fake sick leave. Also those doctors need to be sued for malpractice for issuing the “excuses” when they knew the teachers were not truly ill.

Carl on February 21, 2011 at 9:36 AM

What are the medical laws in WI? I think in TX, if a doctor helps in fraud he can lose his license.

Any teacher caught on tape should be fired, because if they are truly sick, they should be home.

With my luck I would try to go to work, and really get the flu and have to stay home. Then I would get fired for skipping work, lol.

jeffn21 on February 21, 2011 at 10:45 AM

Folks,

Due to teachers unions laws, practices and strict HIPPAA compliance – you will never , ever hear or see a process by which they validated these Dr’s notes and or a teachers illness.

Now the rest of us schmucks would be fired, warned or docked pay for the fraud… but not a Teachers Public Union.

Odie1941 on February 21, 2011 at 11:37 AM

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