Breaking: Mubarak out; Update: Dem official credits Obama, of course; Update: Military suspends parliament, fires cabinet? Update: Military leaders threatened to quit if Mubarak didn’t

posted at 11:25 am on February 11, 2011 by Allahpundit

That’s the word from Suleiman, as of 15 minutes ago. Live video shows Tahrir Square in ecstasy, Egyptian flags ubiquitous among the crowd. A question for you to chew on as I scramble for updates: Was yesterday’s “I’ll hand over power but won’t leave” speech a trial balloon to see how protesters would react, with the military warning him in advance that he’d have to leave today if the crowds rejected that arrangement? Or did Mubarak fully intend to stay on until September but was forcibly ousted this morning after someone high up got nervous at the size of the demonstrations? I speculated yesterday that there was an eleventh-hour power struggle that saved him; it’d be weird if the dynamics of that struggle shifted so dramatically within just 24 hours.

Here’s Suleiman’s official statement via the Beeb:

Full statement from Vice-President Suleiman: “In the name of God the merciful, the compassionate, citizens, during these very difficult circumstances Egypt is going through, President Hosni Mubarak has decided to step down from the office of president of the republic and has charged the high council of the armed forces to administer the affairs of the country. May God help everybody.”

Says a protester, “We did it. I cannot believe it. Mubarak the dictator has gone. And the Egyptian people will forever be free.” Let’s hope so; most Americans aren’t as confident. Lots of updates coming, needless to say, so stand by.

Update: A new update at the BBC blog linked above notes that the Egyptian constitution doesn’t allow for power to devolve to the military but rather to the speaker of parliament if the president steps down. This is, in other words, a military coup; the question I posed above is simply whether it’s a soft one, with Mubarak agreeing that he has no cards left to play, or a hard one, with the military tossing him under the bus. It sure sounded like a coup this morning, too:

As protesters were swarming into the streets Friday morning for what was expected to be the biggest and most volatile demonstrations in the three-week revolt here, the Supreme Council of the Egyptian Armed Forces issued a statement over state television and radio indicating that the military, not Mr. Mubarak, was in effective control of the country. It was unclear whether the military would take meaningful steps toward democracy or begin a military dictatorship…

The statement Friday by the military’s Supreme Council struck a very different tone and appeared to assert that the military, not President Mubarak, was now in control. The military said that first it would end the 30-year-old emergency law — used to detain without trial— “as soon as the current circumstances are over.” The protesters have demanded that the law be eliminated immediately, before any talks about ending the uprising.

The first test of new reforms will be whether they make good on their promise to lift the emergency law ASAP. The second test will be deciding on a new president. It’s unclear to me what Suleiman’s status is right now: If the military’s high council is formally in charge, is he the power behind the throne making executive decisions? Is he the de facto head of the council itself? Or is he out too along with Mubarak?

Update: Here’s the live feed of Tahrir Square from Al Jazeera Egypt. Updates continue below. Click the image to watch.

Update: After weeks of the White House ineffectually embarrassing itself at every turn, Democrats begin the inevitable spin: Obama did it!

Great news for the administration/president. People will remember , despite some fumbles yesterday, that the President played an excellent hand, walked the right line and that his statement last night was potentially decisive in brining this issue to a close. The situation remains complicated and delicate going forward, but this is a huge affirmation of the President’s leadership on the international stage.

Update: Ah, here’s a great clip from Fox Insider — the reaction in Tahrir Square at the moment of the announcement. Classic.

Update: RCP has CNN video of Suleiman making the announcement. Fox reported earlier this morning that an important statement would be forthcoming from Mubarak himself, but he’s nowhere to be found so far today. (In fact, he reportedly left Cairo this morning for Sharm el-Sheikh.) More evidence, perhaps, that this was a hard coup and not a soft one?

Update: Your Orwellian moment of the day came earlier this morning too in (where else?) Tehran:

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says Egypt’s popular uprising shows a new Middle East is emerging, one that will have no signs of Israel and US “interference.”…

Ahmadinejad says Egyptians have the right to live in freedom and choose their own government.

Update: The “Egyptian people will forever be free” project is off to a bad start:

Middle East channel Al Arabiya reports that the Higher Military Council, which has taken control from Hosni Mubarak, will fire Mubarak’s Cabinet, suspend both houses of Parliament and rule with the head of the supreme constitutional court.

Reuters is quoting a military source as saying Defense Minister Mohamed Hussein Tantawi will be the head of the ruling military council.

Suleiman’s out too, then?

Update: I’m hearing on Twitter that Obama will speak at 1:30 p.m. He won’t take credit for Mubarak’s departure, natch, but that’s only because his spin doctors are already trying to do it for him. As the media conveniently forgets the past 17 days of bumbling statements and shifting demands from our foreign policy braintrust, here’s a vivid reminder from the Times (via Mediaite) of just how lame our “intelligence” wing has been during this episode. In a sane world, Panetta would be out on his ass — along with James “Largely Secular” Clapper:

Mr. Obama watched Mr. Mubarak’s speech on board Air Force One, returning from a trip to Michigan, the press secretary, Robert Gibbs, said. As soon as he arrived at the White House, Mr. Obama huddled with his national security aides. The administration appeared as taken aback by Mr. Mubarak’s speech as the crowds in Tahrir Square. The director of the Central Intelligence Agency, Leon E. Panetta, testified before the House of Representatives on Thursday morning that there was a “strong likelihood” that Mr. Mubarak would step down by the end of the day.

American officials said Mr. Panetta was basing his statement not on secret intelligence but on media broadcasts, which began circulating before he sat down before the House Intelligence Committee. But a senior administration official said Mr. Obama had also expected that Egypt was on the cusp of dramatic change. Speaking at Northern Michigan University in Marquette, he said, “We are witnessing history unfold,” adding, “America will do everything we can to support an orderly and genuine transition to democracy.”

The Journal actually headlined an early-morning story about Egypt, “Crisis Puts White House in Disarray.” Then, mysteriously, that headline was changed to “Crisis Flummoxes White House.” Ben Smith of Politico speculates that the White House might have actually phoned the paper and objected to the earlier hed, accurate though it was. That’s how sensitive they are about how embarrassing this situation has become to them. In fact, I’ll end this update with a choice quote from that Journal story from Steve Clemons, a liberal who’s attended two meetings on Egypt with National Security Council members: “The mystique of America’s superpower status has been shattered.”

Update: One of the cold comforts about military dominance in Egypt is that it makes a Muslim Brotherhood takeover unlikely, at least in the short term. The army simply has too much at stake — especially financially — to let Islamists spoil their racket. The downside of that, though? It has too much at stake to let Egyptian entrepreneurs spoil it either, which means economic stagnation and political discontent for years to come. Fred Kaplan:

As in many undemocratic countries, the military is more than just the military. Egypt’s officer corps is said to own or operate vast networks of commercial enterprises, including water, construction, cement, olive oil, the hotel and gasoline industries—in all, about one-third of the country’s economy—as well as vast chunks of seaside property…

The army’s material interests don’t mesh so well with the premises of a thriving middle-class society. And the absence of such a society—the combination of large numbers of well-educated young people and few jobs to suit their talents—has no doubt fueled these last two weeks of protest.

That same WikiLeaks cable from the U.S. embassy in Cairo reported that the military views efforts at privatization “as a threat to its economic position, and therefore generally opposes economic reforms.” To the extent the military does retain power in Egypt, the people’s “rising expectations” may be frustrated, regardless of the outcome of this current clash. Whatever happens in the coming days and weeks, Egypt, once the emblem of Arab stability, might be locked in the dynamics of revolution for a long time to come.

The above is also entirely true of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, which controls hugely lucrative industries inside that country. The trick for the Brotherhood will be emulating the Iranian model to coopt the military somehow. They’ll have to do it in reverse order from how Iran did it — i.e., instead of starting a la Iran with an Islamist revolt that’s later secured by a de facto military coup (in 2009), they’ll have to follow today’s de facto coup with an Islamist revolt — but it’s not impossible. If the Egyptian military holds on too tightly to power and the public gets restless again, they could strike a deal with the Brotherhood in which the Islamists take formal control in the name of “democratic legitimacy” in return for guaranteeing that the military can keep its business rackets going.

Update: Another fun clip from Fox Insider. More than 90 minutes after the announcement, Tahrir Square is still roaring so loudly that reporters can’t hear themselves.

Update: A hopeful note from an op-ed at Politico. However this ends, and we probably won’t know for years, the successful revolts in Tunisia and Egypt could make peaceful demonstrations the new vogue for political expression in the Middle East for awhile.

Speaking of which, one of Ace’s co-bloggers wondered on Twitter which Arab regime would be next to go. My pick for the last to go: The Saudis. They’ll be more ruthless than Mubarak was and they’ll receive far more western backing in that ruthlessness, partly because of our oil interests there, partly because of the greater risk of a fundie takeover, and partly to avert the ominous symbolism of Mecca being captured by jihadist nutjobs. But even the Saudis are worried now. According to Fox News, Obama’s phone call on Egypt with Abdullah a few days ago was “unusually tense” because we wouldn’t back Mubarak as fully as they’d like.

Update: A depressing piece from Ellis Goldberg at Foreign Policy Affairs makes the same point as Fred Kaplan: The army’s not going to relax its stranglehold on the economy, which means democracy and privatization are dead on arrival.

The practical demands of the protesters seem fairly simple: end the state of emergency, hold new elections, and grant the freedom to form parties without state interference. But these demands would amount to opening up the political space to everyone across Egypt’s social and political structure. That would involve constitutional and statutory changes, such as reforming Egypt as a parliamentary rather than a presidential system, in which a freely elected majority selects the prime minister (who is now appointed by the president). These changes would wipe away the power structure the army created in 1952 and has backed since.

A freely elected parliament and a reconstituted government would weaken the role of the presidency, a position the military is likely to try to keep in its portfolio. Moreover, open elections could hand the new business elites power in parliament where they could work to limit the role of the army in the economy. This would put the army’s vast economic holdings — from the ubiquitous propane cylinders that provide all Egyptian homes with cooking gas to clothing, food, and hotels — in jeopardy. Moreover, the army has always preferred that the country be orderly and hierarchical. It is uncomfortable with the growing participatory festival on the streets and, even if the officers were to tolerate more contestation than their grandfathers did in the 1950s, they would likely try to limit participation in politics to those whose lives have been spent in the military by retaining the system of presidential appointment for government ministers.

Update: Tapper has a useful reality check up in advance of the coming White House spin about how pro-democracy they allegedly are. Which of the last two presidents pushed harder — and provided more funding — for liberalization in Egypt? Hint: Not Hopenchange.

Update: The mullahs who were cheering Egypt’s protesters suddenly get cold feet. As do the Swiss, who were apparently holding his stolen money for him for years.

Update: A mystery solved, maybe: Richard Engel claims that senior Egyptian military leaders expected Mubarak to quit yesterday and were “furious” when he didn’t, going so far as to threaten to resign and join the protests if he didn’t do so today. True, or self-serving spin after the fact aimed at proving that they were on the people’s side all along? The rumor yesterday was that Mubarak’s speech was pre-recorded; if that’s true, then if the military disapproved of it, presumably they could have stopped it from airing. I still like my “trial balloon” theory from way up top in this post better.

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Till the shooting starts. Which will happen moments after the video feed stops.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Goodness, Bob. People have to keep trying to get their freedom.

They can’t just decide since Iran failed or this or that country failed that there’s no hope.

That’s not right.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

Look, the High Council already giving ambiguous messages. Here we go again.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Very good post..She has a good blog..thanks for telling me about her..:)

Dire Straits on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

Ahmadinejad says Egyptians have the right to live in freedom and choose their own government.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

You’ll be proved wrong and I for one(so will many others) will remember who called them animals and terrorists and sided with a dictator. Politics over what this country stands for…democracy.

fastestslug on February 11, 2011 at 11:35 AM

Sorry, but the will of the Egyptian masses striving for Democracy means very little in the eyes of the military establishment, who won’t want to relinquish their newfound power.

Good Solid B-Plus on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

Opinion
February 8, 2011

Five reasons why Arab regimes are falling
*****************************************

The massive protests in Egypt and the Arab world aren’t just about political grievances. Major societal and demographic factors are at play that won’t go away with a new government. Understanding them is key to understanding the unrest and the progress that will hopefully come.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2011/0208/Five-reasons-why-Arab-regimes-are-falling

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

Obama will eclipse Shep; no worries there. Teh Cube will take a break.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 1:58 PM

you don’t know much about our revolution, obviously. The same ruling elites held power in places like Boston in 1777 as did in 1775. they just didn’t have to deal with the British. And as for “unruly masses,” you’ve clearly never heard of Shay’s Rebellion etc., have you?

Grow Fins on February 11, 2011 at 1:35 PM

This is why it would be more apt to call the founding of the US a provincial rebellion. Much of the rights-protecting government was already in place with the states (thus the problem with slavery then and later).

Count to 10 on February 11, 2011 at 1:58 PM

Is it just me, or are others as sick of this story as I am? We all know how this is going to turn out. Eventually the militant islamists are going to seize control and we will have Iran 2.0 on our hands and thus further fulfill the Jimmy Carter 2.0 presidency.

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 1:58 PM

Sorry, but the will of the Egyptian masses striving for Democracy means very little in the eyes of the military establishment, who won’t want to relinquish their newfound power.

Good Solid B-Plus on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

SeeBurma, North Korea, Latvia, Libya, etc.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 1:58 PM

“The situation remains complicated and delicate going forward, but this is a huge affirmation of the President’s leadership on the international stage.”

Doormats are indignant.

Schadenfreude on February 11, 2011 at 1:59 PM

Someone should medicate Shep before he goes on later…

hillbillyjim on February 11, 2011 at 1:55 PM

And a diaper.

a capella on February 11, 2011 at 1:59 PM

commodore on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

Funny. Did you see that the fake Palin got mobbed! LOL*

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

Apparently he said that just before he cut off his country’s TV coverage of the celebration.

Cindy Munford on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM

Exactly. I keep reading these posts and the stupidity is stunning.

Ahmadinejad says Egyptians have the right to live in freedom and choose their own government.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 1:57 PM

Exactly. Freedom and democracy have different definitions in the ME. This in not even remotedly what a revolution means to us. I’m glad I have to leave. I can’t stand reading some of these comments………well one in particular.

ORconservative on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 1:54 PM
=====================
Very good post..She has a good blog..thanks for telling me about her..:)

Dire Straits on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

Dire Straits:No..no..I thank-you,for giving me Theo’s site,
which,in turn,has GreatSatansGirlFriends Blog:)

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM

The Won is going to wait until 3:00 p.m. to speak. Too funny.

Cindy Munford on February 11, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Unintended consequence: Old allies of America suddenly no longer trust us.

a capella on February 11, 2011 at 12:26 PM

Firstly, it is not ‘unintended’.

Secondly, it’s ok, the rest of the world LOVE us because we eleceted Obama./

Sir Napsalot on February 11, 2011 at 2:01 PM

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 1:58 PM

that’s why I am glad to be going to work. I can’t take this anymore.

ORconservative on February 11, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Which of the last two presidents pushed harder — and provided more funding — for liberalization in Egypt? Hint: Not Hopenchange.

I remember reading about that after he first took office and wondered why there wasn’t more outrage. He also cut AIDS funding in Africa.

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Megan Kelly is kind of making me sick. She usually is level headed but she is acting airheaded today. Does she really think this is a good thing.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

How many National Security experts we have in the country? Every time I look at the TV is a new guy/gal. WTF?

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM

I agree Theo is an excellent sight..Lot of good blogs and interesting stuff..:)

PS..Plus the totties!..:)

Dire Straits on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM
I agree Theo is an excellent site..Lot of good blogs and interesting stuff..:)

PS..Plus the totties!..:)

Dire Straits on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

Sorry for the typo..:)

Dire Straits on February 11, 2011 at 2:04 PM

The Won is going to wait until 3:00 p.m. to speak. Too funny.

Cindy Munford on February 11, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Cindy Munford:Putting on my Tin-Foil Hat,at the end of
Rush’s show!!:)

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 2:04 PM

The Won is going to wait until 3:00 p.m. to speak. Too funny.

Cindy Munford on February 11, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Rush lives in his head.

a capella on February 11, 2011 at 2:05 PM

Megan Kelly is kind of making me sick. She usually is level headed but she is acting airheaded today. Does she really think this is a good thing.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

Prior pregnancy was better. Now I think she’s gonna have a girl. Not to diss us chicks, but I was level-headed both times. After Weiner disrespecting her and she didn’t get P.O’d, hormones is playing a role in this.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:06 PM

I don’t feel joy, I feel that the people in Egypt are stupid. They’ll elect the MBs and suffer under tyranny as the Pyramids are blown up by Muslim kooks.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:09 PM

I think Fox needed to adjust the talk fast. They really played up all the negatives about a populist movement for democracy.

That’s rather jarring.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:10 PM

hey, allahpundits tweet appeared on huffpo

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/t/your-orwellian-moment-of-_31428098524184576.html

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 2:11 PM

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 2:11 PM

I couldn’t take it there today. LOL* My gosh, you’d think the Cairo speech brought freedom to the entire world.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:12 PM

Goodness, Bob. People have to keep trying to get their freedom.

They can’t just decide since Iran failed or this or that country failed that there’s no hope.

That’s not right.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 1:56 PM

If a country holds a free and fair election, and votes in a communist regime, are they free? Can they later on vote the communists out?

Get your feet on the ground, Ann. Show me where there is any discussion from the protestors where anything resembling democracy (as we know it to be) is offered as an alternative to the current (most recent) government.

There isn’t. The Egyptian Facebook-ers have no concept of democracy, how to set one up, or how to keep it. I suspect they are lot like you, hoping that everything works out.

They read the brochure on revolution and democracy, but they’ll soon learn there isn’t an owners manual. Striving for freedom is a noble venture. Unfortunately for the average Egyptian, the only groups ready to step in and “take the country forward” are the military (who currently control the country) and Islamofanatics.

Is there any other organized group preparing to step into the limelight besides these two? Any pro-democracy student groups, former elites, scholars, anybody?

What, exactly, are they (and you) resting hope on? All they have succeeded in doing is removing someone they discovered they don’t like.

Tired of being hungry, poor, and living in a third World country. That won’t change by next week.

They have accomplished nothing.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:13 PM

I don’t feel joy, I feel that the people in Egypt are stupid. They’ll elect the MBs and suffer under tyranny as the Pyramids are blown up by Muslim kooks.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:09 PM

I think Fox needed to adjust the talk fast. They really played up all the negatives about a populist movement for democracy.

That’s rather jarring.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:10 PM

Chances are, that isn’t what is going on here. We are looking a a socialist military takeover, done to prevent the market reforms that the previous regime was inching toward.

Count to 10 on February 11, 2011 at 2:14 PM

andy85719@2:09
Sort of like Americans electing Obama, who is blowing up our culture and institutions.

GaltBlvnAtty on February 11, 2011 at 2:15 PM

Populist movements are not always good. If they lead to chaos, that is not good.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:15 PM

Tired of being hungry, poor, and living in a third World country. That won’t change by next week.

On that we agree. They are vulnerable. 60% youth, no jobs, and frankly, nobody with a clue as to how to compete in this global market, either.

They are at risk. I agree.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:15 PM

Gateway Pundit has the goings-on on how Iran has spent their day, today. I still can’t get over the Israel’s Star of David as a lapel pin. Obama would take that out so fast…(insert your personal joke here)

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:16 PM

Ahh, woman on Fox dragging Obama’s race into this.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:17 PM

Populist movements are not always good. If they lead to chaos, that is not good.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:15 PM

I would argue, all populist movements destabilize. But sometimes, that’s what’s needed.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:19 PM

I love to read history. One thing I’ve definitely seen is that all treaties, alliances, do go through change. You can’t stop that.

What you CAN do is dig in and get smart. That helps your nation as much as anything.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:21 PM

Any good movies to go see at the theaters today to get away from all of this coverage?

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

I would argue, all populist movements destabilize. But sometimes, that’s what’s needed.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:19 PM

Mark my words. By this time next year, Egypt will:

still be under the control of the military;

be controlled by a puppet president under the control of the military;

be under the control of the Muslim Brotherhood; or

be a failed state.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

They are at risk. I agree.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:15 PM

You know what they’re gonna get?

A Hopenchanger, just like we got. No experience, no expertise, but a helluva way with a teleprompter.

The Pied Piper of Cairo.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM

Obama handled this crisis almost as well as he handled the Gulf Oil Spill. [/sarc]

How did we ever thrive and survive so long with him?

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM

Any good movies to go see at the theaters today to get away from all of this coverage?

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

A Syriana re-run?

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

I think one could argue that all four options currently exist.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:24 PM

Great post & updates, AP!

KS Rex on February 11, 2011 at 2:25 PM

What, exactly, are they (and you) resting hope on? All they have succeeded in doing is removing someone they discovered they don’t like.

Since you ask, I think the issue is to open up the society. I think that addressing common problems in a democracy can start to really generate solutions and shift dynamics around. People start to think differently. You want to defeat the MB? Then you just help Egyptians find more successful ways of working with others throughout the global community.

Trust me. Those restrictive religious rules will go the same way as our own have gone.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:25 PM

Any good movies to go see at the theaters today to get away from all of this coverage?

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

Iranium…if you emailed to get the movie. That or some gnomes movie, if you got kids.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:26 PM

Any good movies to go see at the theaters today to get away from all of this coverage?

karenhasfreedom on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

Babar Goes To Washington

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:26 PM

Obama’s booty-kisser Colmes is on.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:26 PM

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

OK. I am not big on predictions in situations like this. I have more hope than most of you. I think there’s something truly different. But I can’t nail it down, really.

It’s just a sense.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:27 PM

Way to go tapper

cmsinaz on February 11, 2011 at 2:27 PM

The protesters think they’ve won but what have they really won?

scalleywag on February 11, 2011 at 2:27 PM

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:17 PM

Expand, please, sounds tricky.

Cindy Munford on February 11, 2011 at 2:28 PM

Megan Kelly is kind of making me sick. She usually is level headed but she is acting airheaded today. Does she really think this is a good thing.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:03 PM

This is the New Megyn Kelly, part of FNC’s continuing drift toward stupidity. I’m sure she is smarter than she lets herself appear but that “fair-and-balanced” Kool-Ade (plus, no doubt, a hefty paycheck) has really dumbed her down.

I wonder if Megyn will call up the same hard-edged, deliberate tone to her voice if/when Egypt descends into Muslim-controlled anarchy?

MrScribbler on February 11, 2011 at 2:28 PM

Given the administration’s flawless handling of this situation, I have every confidence that it will be there for the Egyptian people every step of the way, if and when this whole process goes horribly wrong.

Christien on February 11, 2011 at 2:29 PM

The Pied Piper of Cairo.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM

But theirs will be honest and open about his dictatorial aims and Islamic preferences.

MrScribbler on February 11, 2011 at 2:30 PM

That guy talking to Megan expresses alot of my ideas right now.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:30 PM

Ahh, woman on Fox dragging Obama’s race into this.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:17 PM

She said Obama will be influential with the Egyptian people because he is a man of color.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:30 PM

From former allies across the pond.
http://www.spectator.co.uk/melaniephillips/6689945/the-american-debacle-in-egypt.thtml

a capella on February 11, 2011 at 2:31 PM

“MISSION ACCOMPLISHED” – shoutout to Bush?

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:31 PM

Do you guys think that some on Fox News sort of over-focused on the risks here and managed to make conservatives look like they were anti-freedom and anti-Democracy?

I do.

I think that was a political mistake, too. A big one.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Given the administration’s flawless handling of this situation, I have every confidence that it will be there for the Egyptian people every step of the way, if and when this whole process goes horribly wrong.

Christien on February 11, 2011 at 2:29 PM

Speaking of Gulf Oil Spills and other 3 am calls…

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Megan Kelly:

“Ooh, it’s incredible. Look, they are getting freedom. So cute. Look Alan. Isn’t it so cute? Smoochie smoochie smoochie.”

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:33 PM

How many other long time U.S. allies are thinking right now, “With friends like Obama, who needs enemies?”

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:34 PM

Another thought. I find it odd that American media insists there be a personality in charge.

Not an idea.

Interesting, isn’t it?

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:34 PM

Hey ernesto, you sound a lot like a…neocon. You know, the people you railed against so vehemently from 2003-2008 as a “Libertarian” — arguing that it was not our place to export freedom and democracy, or to believe that our way was better than theirs (i.e. dictatorship or theocracy).

Now, you say dictatorship is evil, and anyone supporting it is a fascist. I guess that made you a fascist for supporting Saddam and opposing our efforts to topple him?

The events in Egypt are the Bush Doctrine and neocon policies vindicated. Where does that leave you, new-found Liberty-Lover?

jjraines on February 11, 2011 at 2:35 PM

Cute baby girl. Looks like a soccer p.j.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:35 PM

Kid on Fox criticizing America, trashing America. This is looking bad.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:36 PM

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:22 PM

We’ll see if Obama is still taking credit here if gas is at $5.00 a gallon by June.

tommyboy on February 11, 2011 at 2:36 PM

Oh, fascinating interview. You know what the protesters say?

This was spurred on by the freedom in Iraq. Boy, that’s not going to please progressives. LOL*

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:36 PM

Wow. Egyptians want America’s freedom, and want us to help them with their Democratic process. What say you, Obama?/scrap that speech and start over please…

I am enjoying that interview but I am saddened at the same time.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:37 PM

How many other long time U.S. allies are thinking right now, “With friends like Obama, who needs enemies?”

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:34 PM

I think the entire world leadership clique has him figured out.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:37 PM

Ann,

Here is what hope can get you when dealing with Muslims.

Please also notice you practically have to investigate who the attackers are, because France24 never really says, although they allude to it. In fact, they go so far as to say that Muslims are the victims…not the attackers.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:38 PM

They weren’t praising Iraq. They were criticizing America’s role in Iraq.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:38 PM

HAHAHAHAAHA!!! Flowers!

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:39 PM

Wow. Egyptians want America’s freedom, and want us to help them with their Democratic process. What say you, Obama?/scrap that speech and start over please…

I am enjoying that interview but I am saddened at the same time.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:37 PM

I so don’t get the sad part. I’ve been watching these populist movements lose. This one worked.

I’m just so pleased for Egyptians. Oddly enough, I disliked most grad students I met from most of the ME, except for the Egyptians. They were completely neat.

Well, them and the Pakistani students. I have a fond place in my heart there, too.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:39 PM

They weren’t praising Iraq. They were criticizing America’s role in Iraq.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:38 PM

I am gonna have to back up w/the DVR. That was only one dude, right?

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:40 PM

Given the administration’s flawless handling of this situation, I have every confidence that it will be there for the Egyptian people every step of the way, if and when this whole process goes horribly wrong.

Christien on February 11, 2011 at 2:29 PM

I wonder who’s ass he’s gonna kick when it all goes bad.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:40 PM

NASA starts the healing.

BL@KBIRD on February 11, 2011 at 2:41 PM

Oh, fascinating interview. You know what the protesters say?

This was spurred on by the freedom in Iraq. Boy, that’s not going to please progressives. LOL*

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:36 PM

I caught that too. Interesting. Hopefully they have paid enough attention to know that their work isn’t anywhere close to finished.

stldave on February 11, 2011 at 2:41 PM

I think the entire world leadership clique has him figured out.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:37 PM

Wasn’t Obama supposed to make the world love America again?

Most folks who grew up in dysfunctional, communist oriented blended families have a skewed sense of “love”.

Roy Rogers on February 11, 2011 at 2:41 PM

I am gonna have to back up w/the DVR. That was only one dude, right?

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:40 PM

He says something like:

America needs to stop supporting dictators. We want freedom. Do you think what’s happening in Iraq freedom? We want real freedom. We want America to oppose dictators.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:42 PM

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:39 PM

I agree with those Egyptians that forged their way to be educated, professional and well-expressed. I have a papyrus here on my desk. I had family in Egypt that worked for the Fed. government many years ago.

The saddening part to me, is that I dunno what’s gonna happen next-I am happy and I hope it spreads domino-effect like GWB intended to. Esp. Iran, they tick me off; then the TPN can conquer DC. Heh.

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:43 PM

Bob…I think a lot of the Muslim movement is really a control issue within regions over people. They would be better off with a nomadic, tribal system.

However, that’s gone. This religion has as many forms as Christianity, of course. It’s not the religion itself.

It’s how it’s practiced. Always the same story.

I think beheading, stoning and the practices in Egypt are awful.

I think genocide is awful.

I think murdering your wife to escape alimony is awful.

But you know what? Humans can be darn awful.

I really will never get it. I honestly hope to even die not getting it. I’ve been mad enough in my life to toss a coffee cup, for sure, or tell someone off.

But I’ll never understand violence. I have finally reached an age where I realize that’s a blessing.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:45 PM

NASA starts the healing.

BL@KBIRD on February 11, 2011 at 2:41 PM

President Imadinnerjacket complains to Obama about not having his name on a rocket after overthrowing a dictator in Iran.

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:46 PM

Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood: In Their Own Words
**********************************************
Jonathan D. Halevi
Vol. 10, No. 27 6 February 2011

•The Muslim Brotherhood has taken a greater role in organizing the protest against the Egyptian regime

as it unfolds its independent political agenda. Rashad al-Bayumi,

the Brotherhood’s second-in-command, announced in an interview with Japanese TV that the group would join a transitional government

in order to cancel the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel, as it “offends the Arabs’ dignity

and destroys the interests of Egypt and other Arab states.” He further stressed that Egypt does not need American aid.

http://www.jcpa.org/JCPA/Templates/ShowPage.asp?DBID=1&LNGID=1&TMID=111&FID=442&PID=0&IID=6003
==========================================

Lt. Col. (ret.) Jonathan D. Halevi is a senior researcher of the Middle East and radical Islam at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. He is a co-founder of the Orient Research Group Ltd. and is a former advisor to the Policy Planning Division of the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

canopfor on February 11, 2011 at 2:46 PM

He says something like:

America needs to stop supporting dictators. We want freedom. Do you think what’s happening in Iraq freedom? We want real freedom. We want America to oppose dictators.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:42 PM

We do oppose dictators. And got rid of one of the worst and most dangerous in ’03, with people like you opposed. Oh, and we also stayed at great cost to help create a stable democratic state — which would have been impossible without our support.

jjraines on February 11, 2011 at 2:48 PM

Megan is effete now. Could not even debate Colmes.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:50 PM

He says something like:

America needs to stop supporting dictators. We want freedom. Do you think what’s happening in Iraq freedom? We want real freedom. We want America to oppose dictators.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:42 PM

We do oppose dictators. And got rid of one of the worst and most dangerous in ’03, with people like you opposed. Oh, and we also stayed at great cost to help create a stable democratic state — which would have been impossible without our support.

jjraines on February 11, 2011 at 2:48 PM

Is it just me, or do I think it is better to support American interests and freedoms as opposed to foreign freedoms? Yeah, freedom is good, but if we are putting ourselves in danger so some person in a third world country who can’t read can vote for a thug, why are we supporting this?

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:52 PM

But I’ll never understand violence. I have finally reached an age where I realize that’s a blessing.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:45 PM

Keep this in mind: Violence by Muslims is not a result of oppression or discrimination. Violence is a part of Islam, preached today no different than was done 1500 years ago.

That video was not the result of simmering tensions between two groups. It was the evidence of what Islam is. They were told to do it…apostasy is punishiable by death. (As is everything else)

BobMbx on February 11, 2011 at 2:52 PM

Ah, Colmes is the guy who is saying what I’m saying. Thanks.

AnninCA on February 11, 2011 at 2:53 PM

New hashtag on Twitter under Iran: #NextToFall

ProudPalinFan on February 11, 2011 at 2:54 PM

Well O was supposed to speak at 1:30 but I guess he had to keep shaking his magic 8 ball so he can figure out what position he’ll be taking today.

The stupid cube in the liquid keeps telling him to “Ask Again Later”

Key West Reader on February 11, 2011 at 2:55 PM

Obama and his Marxist friends are getting their way in Egypt and the Middle East.

Now, he says the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt is not a problem. Later he’ll say they won’t get power. After they get power, he’ll say we can work with them. Then he’ll say they’ll never be able to hit us with one of their nuclear missiles.

andy85719 on February 11, 2011 at 2:55 PM

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