The Valley That Jobs Forgot

posted at 11:35 am on December 31, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

If one had to guess where unemployment is highest in the US, most would probably suggest Detroit or Michigan as a whole.  Others who paid attention to the midterm elections would know that Nevada surpassed Michigan as the state with the highest unemployment rate about mid-year.  Others might guess Florida.  However, in terms of metropolitan areas with the highest levels of joblessness, a new survey by the Birmingham Business Journal shows that California’s Central Valley is the epicenter for unemployment.

Verum Serum discovered this while analyzing the data and noting the incredible concentration of joblessness in the country:

The first thing that strikes me is how heavily concentrated the worst unemployment is. 22 of the 35 metro areas with the worst unemployment are either in California or Florida. Three of the remaining 13 are in Michigan.

But the concentration within the concentration clearly shows the Central Valley as the worst area for jobs.  Nine of the top 10 metro jobless rates in the nation are California, and seven are in California’s Central Valley:

  • El Centro, CA – 29.3% (east of San Diego near border with Mexico)
  • Yuma, AZ – 26.7%
  • Yuba City, CA – 17.8%
  • Merced, CA – 16.3%
  • Stockton, CA – 16.3%
  • Modesto, CA – 16.2%
  • Visalia-Porterville, CA – 15.9%
  • Fresno, CA – 15.7%
  • Palm Coast, FL – 15.5%
  • Hanford – Corcoran, CA – 15.0%

Four of the next five after that are in central California as well, with #15 being the Riverside-San Bernardino area, not necessarily considered a Central Valley locale but also an area of significant agricultural production in normal times.

Why has California become the epicenter of unemployment?  While Michigan and Florida have a mix of problems, including (in Michigan’s case) a history of bad management decisions on labor contracts, California’s Central Valley woes are entirely a government creation.  As I wrote yesterday, the decision by a federal judge to cut off water supplies to an area that literally fed the world turned the Central Valley from an agricultural export powerhouse to a center of starvation within two years.  Congress has refused to act to reverse this decision, and as a result, almost a quarter of the families in the area now need government assistance to feed themselves while living on some of the most productive land in the world.

John at VS concludes that the federal government can take just three actions to address these concentrations of chronic joblessness: “Control the border, turn on the water in the central valley, and prevent unions from negotiating any more devastating contracts like the ones that almost destroyed the nation’s auto industry.”  Turning the water back on to the Central Valley is the easiest and quickest of the three, and unlike the labor-management relationship in (what used to be) a private industry, falls entirely within the purview of the federal government, thanks to the much-abused Endangered Species Act.  Until Congress turns the water back on to this breadbasket to the nation, nothing they do on joblessness can be taken seriously.


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Comment pages: 1 2

Suck it CA!

ladyingray on December 31, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Blue.

How fitting.

RealMc on December 31, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Congress has refused to act to reverse this decision…

Who are the congress-cretins from these areas? Did they win re-election?

rrpjr on December 31, 2010 at 11:40 AM

We’re not going to bail you out, California.

SlaveDog on December 31, 2010 at 11:41 AM

The real problem in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties (the Inland Empire) is the dependence on new construction for jobs. Housing/land in L.A. and Orange Counties had gotten so high that developers moved into the IE with a vengeance. Then the housing bubble popped.

pugwriter on December 31, 2010 at 11:42 AM

I can not see the feds turning the water back on to help crops feed people or create jobs. They like it just the way it is, cratering our Republic! Can’t have some fish up and die on us now can we? This might upset some environmentalists!
L

letget on December 31, 2010 at 11:43 AM

Why are unions allowed to be monopolies but businesses aren’t?
Break ‘em up into smaller units and make collusion illegal.

zmdavid on December 31, 2010 at 11:43 AM

Oh, knock it off! A federal judge did this to California and a federal judge can do the same or something worse to you yaps gloating over others misfortunes.

Blake on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

There is a sense among other than conservatives, that there is nothing you can do and that the bad times are something that just happens and you have to survive, apparently with handouts.
This does a stunningly good job at pointing out that CA exemplifies what a government has done to it’s people.

ORconservative on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

One of the best things the new congress could do would be to over rule the EPA, endangered species ruling, and restore water to the agricultural areas in California.

The second best thing would be open up oil and gas drilling *everywhere*.

Neither will happen in the next two years.

Skandia Recluse on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

Victor Davis Hanson wrote about the woes of the Central Valley recently.

The anti-human leftists poison everything they touch.

FlatlanderByTheLake on December 31, 2010 at 11:45 AM

All because of a Bait-fish that is inedible.

Mord on December 31, 2010 at 11:45 AM

Palm coast is just down the road south of where I live. It’s kind of a small place that most likely depends on Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Daytona for jobs.

Cindy Munford on December 31, 2010 at 11:47 AM

pugwriter on December 31, 2010 at 11:42 AM

I meant to add that there was/is no alternative. We are regulated and taxed to death out here. If our Riverside City Council would make it easier for businesses to get licensed and and operating than it is in surrounding cities we would get an influx of industrious people and established business.

As it is, their only economic plan is social engineering via the Redevelopment Agency, which is, by the way, the city council.

pugwriter on December 31, 2010 at 11:48 AM

GOOD NEWS!!!! I just got a full time job here in Michigan after almost two years without one!!!! BAD NEWS!! My husband just lost his yesterday after 33 years employed…. oh well, a mixed bag perhaps.

Still thinking positive!!!

shar61 on December 31, 2010 at 11:48 AM

I wouldn’t gloat over Central Valley’s misfortunes. That was due to a liberal judge. I thought that the Valley has traditionally been conservative and for the most part the Coast is where the Left lives.

INC on December 31, 2010 at 11:48 AM

I’m from Florida, and I can easily believe this. Look at the link for the other FL towns.

INC on December 31, 2010 at 11:51 AM

shar61@11:48,
I am happy for you, sad for hubby! I hope he isn’t out of work long. Happy New Year to you.
L

letget on December 31, 2010 at 11:51 AM

There are blue states and Code Blue states. At least Florida took some action–the only statewide-elected Democrat left standing was Sen.Bill Nelson who wasn’t up for re-election. California went from “Bad Ahnold” to “Worse Moonbeam” and kept Boxer. They only had 19 Republicans out of 53? in the 111th and I think fewer in the next.
Anybody up for some very expensive government alchemy to raise the dead?

cartooner on December 31, 2010 at 11:51 AM

The anti-human leftists poison everything they touch.
FlatlanderByTheLake on December 31, 2010 at 11:45 AM

And we all suffer until recognition of this eternal truth seeps more widely into the national political consciousness. But we need leaders to say as much, and the ones we have never will.

rrpjr on December 31, 2010 at 11:51 AM

And for those who will be waiting for soon-to-be-taking-charge Governor Moonbeam to do something about the situation, don’t hold your breath!

He probably doesn’t even know where Central Valley is!

pilamaye on December 31, 2010 at 11:53 AM

Oh, knock it off! A federal judge did this to California and a federal judge can do the same or something worse to you yaps gloating over others misfortunes.

Blake on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

A federal Judge didn’t make the Endangered Species Act.

cartooner on December 31, 2010 at 11:53 AM

The other thing that high state taxes do, besides driving a lot of hard-working people out of the state, is turn every recession into a life-and-death crisis for business. Businesses become fragile and inflexible, because they have no surplus cash available, to reinvent themselves, when conditions change.

RBMN on December 31, 2010 at 11:53 AM

How’s that liberalism workin’ for ya, there Dems! And yet, California just doubled down on stupid…I’m sure the results will be better in 2011!

search4truth on December 31, 2010 at 11:56 AM

You get what you pay vote for.

TinMan13 on December 31, 2010 at 11:57 AM

Suck it CA!

ladyingray on December 31, 2010 at 11:37 AM

We’re not going to bail you out, California.

SlaveDog on December 31, 2010 at 11:41 AM

Unless you folks can come up with some plausible solutions, the “suck its” and “we’re nots” are irrelevant to the problem at hand. Only until California files for chapter 13, (reorganization), can the State begin to bargain with the union’s pension programs, and salary structures that are fiscally killing the State. Will Jerry Brown have the nads to bring this power-structure to the table for serious negotiations? You can’t just tell the 7th largest economy in the world to just “suck it” without causing much of the rest of the nation to do the same.

Rovin on December 31, 2010 at 11:58 AM

California Voter Breakdowns
=============================
October 18, 2010 – Report of Registration

http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/ror/ror-pages/15day-gen-10/
——————————————————————————–

http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/ror/ror-pages/15day-gen-10/supervisorial.pdf

canopfor on December 31, 2010 at 11:59 AM

The left’s leadership does not really care about the Delta smelt. It is just an excuse to steal water and drive the GOP voting population of the Central Valley out so that they don’t influence CA elections anymore. They did not care about the snaildarter either; that was just an excuse to shut down the Clinch River breeder reactor. When no other rational excuse will serve, they rely of bogus claims under the Endangered Species Act.

The Enviro organizations have a different motive–money. people behind these moves raise their livlihoods from donations of “concerned” fools. Just like Al Queda is about raising money to live off of from donations by fools who think they are promoting the Moslem religion. Al Queda gets attention to raise money via terrorism. The enviros get attention to raise money through stuff like this Delta Smelt nonsense.

KW64 on December 31, 2010 at 12:00 PM

Just think of California as the Titanic. Jerry Brown wants to raise taxes here.

http://www.bluecollarphilosophy.com/2010/12/jerry-brown-wants-to-raise-taxes-on-the-middle-class-full-steam-ahead.html

That ought to kick start the economy.

Blue Collar Todd on December 31, 2010 at 12:00 PM

Two things California should do that would change its voting bloc immediately:

1. Break the power of the state unions.
2. Serious, budget-slashing welfare reform.

Until you can break the strangle hold of the unions who want their goodies and the welfare recipients who want their handouts, nothing is going to change in California. Both groups will vote in the Democraps in perpetuity so they can keep receiving their “just due.” The unions out of greed and the welfare recipients out of fear.

Good luck with breaking both. However, if it can be done in California, it can be done across the nation.

theotherone on December 31, 2010 at 12:01 PM

You can’t just tell the 7th largest economy in the world to just “suck it” without causing much of the rest of the nation to do the same. Rovin on December 31, 2010 at 11:58 AM

They need to suck on the sweet milk of capitalism, then they shall be refreshed. Capitalism = freedom.

Mojave Mark on December 31, 2010 at 12:02 PM

Oh, knock it off! A federal judge did this to California and a federal judge can do the same or something worse to you yaps gloating over others misfortunes.

Blake on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

My first thought. If it can happen in Cali it can happen anywhere.

BowHuntingTexas on December 31, 2010 at 12:04 PM

Central Valley is about food. Hence, the rising costs probably in the grocery stores.

But, in any case, CA really does have a bit of a yin-yang thing going with immigration.

The numbers dropped last year, due to the recession. It’s easier to be poor in Mexico than in CA.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:09 PM

This cannot be an accidental series of unfortunate events. It has to be part of a larger plan.

The unions, the open-borders crowd, and the “let’s save the little fishies” crowd all are part of the same scheme…government control and ample rewards for those who espouse more government control.

Sounds like fascism to me…simply a matter of organizing society according to corporatist[union] perspectives, values, and systems, including the political system and the economy.

Community Organizer in Chief…care to tell us it is all Bush’s fault?

coldwarrior on December 31, 2010 at 12:09 PM

Food costs are rising. I couldn’t believe the cost of oranges this holiday season. I just heard today that frosts killed off some of the crop. Really?

Even avocados are silly high here in Texas. Gimme a break. That’s a cheap crop, usually.

And green peppers? Nearly 70 cents apiece!

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:11 PM

coldwarrior on December 31, 2010 at 12:09 PM

*blink*

It’s just how recession hits farming, that’s all.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:12 PM

It’s just how recession hits farming, that’s all.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:12 PM

CA has oil that it refuses to extract.
CA has water that judges say they can use.
These are not the normal paths of a recession. This is planned obsolescence.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:18 PM

..Only until California files for chapter 13, (reorganization), can the State begin to bargain with the union’s pension programs, and salary structures that are fiscally killing the State. Will Jerry Brown have the nads to bring this power-structure to the table for serious negotiations? You can’t just tell the 7th largest economy in the world to just “suck it” without causing much of the rest of the nation to do the same.

Rovin on December 31, 2010 at 11:58 AM

..your main point is excellent. A lot of us in this state wiorked our a**es off trying to forestall the election of that fool Brown — all of the folks in the rest of the country mewling about Whitman not being conservative notwithstanding — and we also busted our keester trying to throw out Boxer who, aside from being dumber than a box of rocks, gets behind all of this bravo sierra.

Even as a Californian, I hope this state is NOT bailed out. The prospect of watching Moonbeam 2.0 and his union flunkies disembowel each other in a steel-cage- death match will be a televisionary feast.

The War Planner on December 31, 2010 at 12:19 PM

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:12 PM

I live in the farm belt, and yes, we have a recession. We also have a state government (due to change tomorrow) that has for the past several years done everything it can to make farming more difficult.

But a recession is not the sole factor in the disaster that has hit California’s agribelt, nor other pockets around the country.

Excessive regulation and lack of common sense prevails.

The lack of common sense seems endemic to those who have never worked a farm or had to meet a payroll, or ever have been part of the farm to market train or hold pie-in-the-sky ideas about how everything would work wonderfully in a perfect world.

The excessive regulation is not at all accidental. It is planned. By whom? Therein lies the answer.

It sure isn’t the farmers and others trying to put food on America’s tables while trying to keep food on their own tables.

coldwarrior on December 31, 2010 at 12:19 PM

Oh, knock it off! A federal judge did this to California and a federal judge can do the same or something worse to you yaps gloating over others misfortunes.

Blake on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

Thank you.

katy the mean old lady on December 31, 2010 at 12:22 PM

live in the farm belt, and yes, we have a recession. We also have a state government (due to change tomorrow) that has for the past several years done everything it can to make farming more difficult.

But a recession is not the sole factor in the disaster that has hit California’s agribelt, nor other pockets around the country.

Excessive regulation and lack of common sense prevails.

The lack of common sense seems endemic to those who have never worked a farm or had to meet a payroll, or ever have been part of the farm to market train or hold pie-in-the-sky ideas about how everything would work wonderfully in a perfect world.

The excessive regulation is not at all accidental. It is planned. By whom? Therein lies the answer.

It sure isn’t the farmers and others trying to put food on America’s tables while trying to keep food on their own tables.

coldwarrior on December 31, 2010 at 12:19 PM

Makes sense to me. But something really changed in CA. And I don’t think it’s all chalked up to regulations.

I still think it has to do with the depression/recession. It’s just not overly lucrative to live here right now.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:27 PM

Coldwarrier……did something change with the water regulations?

That’s the key in the central valley.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:28 PM

I’m mostly just pointing out that the so-called help from DC is not very helpful. I’m reading that the corn subsidies for energy, which are a total flop, are responsible in large part for the increase in prices for basics.

This is helping the middle-class, how?

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:30 PM

Another report I heard today was regarding regulations over meat-packing plants. In the midst of this depression, they have had to revamp operations to meet new regulations.

oy vey.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:31 PM

Makes sense to me. But something really changed in CA. And I don’t think it’s all chalked up to regulations.

I still think it has to do with the depression/recession. It’s just not overly lucrative to live here right now.
AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:27 PM

No water= regulation
No drilling/extracting= regulation
no refineries built= regulation
depression/recession= regulation/taxation

It really is that simple.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:32 PM

Wait wait wait. A huge public works program created that ideal agricultural area. Now, they shut some of it down and conservatives cry for it to return? I though you guys hated public works!

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

•El Centro, CA – 29.3% (east of San Diego near border with Mexico)
•Yuma, AZ – 26.7%

they are next door neighbors, not surprised there…

cmsinaz on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

The lefty sites are blaming it on a drought, but there is clearly just a cyclical repeating pattern.

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/iodir/wsihist

There are combination of factors

* over-subsidization of housing leading to the bubble
* cyclical weather
* extreme measures to preserve supplies of trash fish
* generous welfare payments to keep people where they are
* regulations driving employers to other states

pedestrian on December 31, 2010 at 12:35 PM

No water= regulation
No drilling/extracting= regulation
no refineries built= regulation
depression/recession= regulation/taxation

It really is that simple.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:32 PM

Thanks. Some people can’t see the wall for paint.

Mirimichi on December 31, 2010 at 12:36 PM

Wait wait wait. A huge public works program created that ideal agricultural area. Now, they shut some of it down and conservatives cry for it to return? I though you guys hated public works!

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

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darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:36 PM

One of the best things the new congress could do would be to over rule the EPA, endangered species ruling, and restore water to the agricultural areas in California.
The second best thing would be open up oil and gas drilling *everywhere*.
Neither will happen in the next two years.
Skandia Recluse on December 31, 2010 at 11:44 AM

Yeah, that will be right at the top of our list.
–Mush McConnell, GOP leader

james23 on December 31, 2010 at 12:37 PM

Wait wait wait. A huge public works program created that ideal agricultural area. Now, they shut some of it down and conservatives cry for it to return? I though you guys hated public works!

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

Occasionally there is a public works program that makes financial sense. No often, but sometimes. Roads, airports, police force, military, and water supplies are effective uses of tax money.

pedestrian on December 31, 2010 at 12:37 PM

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:36 PM

Cmon now! Federal money to build dams and regulate water use?? You guys hate this sh*t!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Valley_Project

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:37 PM

I just think it’s a basic fleeing from CA story. Even immigrant workers sort of see that the well has dried up. *haha

Anyway, the water issue hasn’t been solved. Maybe it can’t be solved. It could be that the great heyday of irrigated food crops is over.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

Surprising to me? Texas is facing this same story.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

I never actually bought the “smelt” story that Palin pushes. That minimizes the water problem, in my opinion.

And it actually is part of the reason her poll numbers aren’t that high.

No, it’s as complex as energy is in AK, Sarah.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:40 PM

I just think it’s a basic fleeing from CA story.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

It says that jobs are fleeing faster than the people are.

pedestrian on December 31, 2010 at 12:40 PM

I wouldn’t gloat over Central Valley’s misfortunes. That was due to a liberal judge. I thought that the Valley has traditionally been conservative and for the most part the Coast is where the Left lives.

INC on December 31, 2010 at 11:48 AM

It suits the leftists on the coast quite nicely to ‘punish’ the more conservative area of the state.

trigon on December 31, 2010 at 12:42 PM

The housing boom that brought in all of the illegals from Mexico has burst and now they are just taking the hand-outs that Americans won’t take. If you’d take away the free stuff, housing, food, health care and education they’d just go home.

roux on December 31, 2010 at 12:43 PM

There’s a super-simple solution to this problem: repeal the endangered species act. You guys have congress, go ahead.

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:44 PM

Cmon now! Federal money to build dams and regulate water use?? You guys hate this sh*t!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Valley_Project

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:37 PM

It was a trade off: water for irrigation/power= the ability to prosper from the land that was being taxed.
The CVP was built with taxpayer monies, the federal government has no money that it does not confiscate. Why shouldn’t they expect the govt. not to reneg on their end of the bargain. i.e. water regularion for a fish that has little to no human use.
Your socialist indoctrination has made critical thinking on your part impossible.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:44 PM

The War Planner on December 31, 2010 at 12:19 PM

War Planner,

I couldn’t agree more and was with you thru this disaster of an election that saw California decide, (with the union’s power), to keep the status quo—remain solid blue and stupid.

I’m a native born in Sac, and have resided in Northern Cal most of my life. (Note: NorCal does not end at SF)

I will never condone any federal bailout, and believe it is long past time for this State to “pay the piper” with their own cuts. The days of the unions re-installing the same liberal lackeys running this legislature are coming to a bitter end, but I do fear the fiscal pain will be felt far across state lines before this is over.

Rovin on December 31, 2010 at 12:45 PM

’s just how recession hits farming, that’s all.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:12 PM

Thanks for proving my point.

ORconservative on December 31, 2010 at 12:45 PM

A federal Judge didn’t make the Endangered Species Act.

cartooner on December 31, 2010 at 11:53 AM

A federal judge interprets it and shut down the water for this stupid azz smelt.

Blake on December 31, 2010 at 12:46 PM

It says that jobs are fleeing faster than the people are.

pedestrian on December 31, 2010 at 12:40 PM

Exactly, it’s the natural progression of things.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:47 PM

pugwriter on December 31, 2010 at 11:42 AM

Yep. It seems like Ed assumed the unemployment and agricultural situations were more connected than they actually are. Much of the growth is due to demand for housing for industries centered in the Southland and the Bay Area. As the industries grow, so does employment, not only building houses, but also providing other services in support of technology, entertainment, etc. Housing prices go up, so that when they, the economy, and employment fall — and transport costs rise on the long commute — it’s a death spiral that only a recovery to the core industry can undo. That’s my assumption, anyway; like Ed, I’m only using what I know about the situation, not any actual data indicating a causal relationship.

By the way, Yuma isn’t in California, but it does border the state, so that’s eight of ten, not nine.

calbear on December 31, 2010 at 12:47 PM

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:44 PM

All of a sudden public spending is a trade-off! Every other time an issue like this comes up, you and everyone else here immediately dismisses it as some sort of guaranteed boondoggle. High speed rail? Not a trade-off, just all socialist scheming. Insurance to the uninsured? Not a trade-off, just a socialist scheme. And either way, why can’t California pay for their own dams? You keep telling me that its not the government’s money, why should they take ours to bring water to areas that didn’t have it?

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:48 PM

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:31 PM, et. al.

California’s Central Valley is not a big corn source. But one can see the effects of federal subsidies on corn and for ethanol in this part of the country, easily. Acres and acres that once grew other crops are being turned over to corn, still, because that is where the big money apparently is. Of course, the corporate farms are the big winners, while family farms are gaining far less from this ethanol Ponzi scheme. And every product that has any corn in it…candy bars and soft drinks, corn-fed meats, and a lot of other products have seen a huge price increase…simply because we are using a food source as fuel.

When a society starts buring food for fuel it is already past the point of decline.

We’ve had a few ballot initiatives in the past several years calling for increased regulation of farms around here. Apparently that fresh spring smell is offensive to the suburbanites, and there is fear of animal fecal matter entering the deep aquifers, and heaven forbid farming equipment be allowed to use the same roads. The list is endless and depends on the region.

Water, that is a biggie. Have had a few ideas from Washington put out there to take water from the Great Lakes and distribute it to other parts of the country. A multi-multi-billion dollar crackpot idea. The Russians tried this…the Caspian, the Azov and Balkash were all diverted in some way and the environmental damage was huge, massive, and will long endure.

Imagine the same for the Great Lakes.

No, the overall problem is not the recession.

It runs deeper.

It runs deep among ideologues who actually believe that government can solve everybody’s problems, that government is supposed to take care of all the people all the time, and that government leaders are the smartest people who ever walked the earth, especially if they are liberals/progressives.

Turn the water on in California…now.

Stop the extra-Constitutional production of regulations from federal agencies…now. Regulations are law. Law does not come from an agency. It comes from the representatives of the people…Congress.

Stop the flow of illegals across our borders.

And let’s go after the unions as one would go after organized crime.

Then we can start to clean up the mess of several decades of liberalism and progressive politics that has brought our country to this point.

coldwarrior on December 31, 2010 at 12:50 PM

High speed rail? Not a trade-off, just all socialist scheming. Insurance to the uninsured? Not a trade-off, just a socialist scheme. And either way, why can’t California pay for their own dams? You keep telling me that its not the government’s money, why should they take ours to bring water to areas that didn’t have it?

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:48 PM

You’re equating hi-speed rail to food production? Stalin would be sooo proud.

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 12:53 PM

Grapes of Wrath in reverse.

esnap on December 31, 2010 at 12:55 PM

There’s a super-simple solution to this problem: repeal the endangered species act. You guys have congress, go ahead.

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:44 PM

I wasn’t aware that the Senate switched to the Republican party in the 2010 election.

BTW, you’re not “qualified” to discuss the Central Valley, because you don’t live there.

/s

Del Dolemonte on December 31, 2010 at 12:58 PM

High speed rail? Not a trade-off, just all socialist scheming. Insurance to the uninsured? Not a trade-off, just a socialist scheme. And either way, why can’t California pay for their own dams? You keep telling me that its not the government’s money, why should they take ours to bring water to areas that didn’t have it?

ernesto on December 31, 2010 at 12:48 PM

Can you provide examples of high speed rail success stories here in the US?

Del Dolemonte on December 31, 2010 at 12:59 PM

We’re not going to bail you out, California.

Oh yes you are, the ONE will see to it:

http://waterforfightingpac.wordpress.com/2010/04/25/21/

jfshaughnessy on December 31, 2010 at 1:02 PM

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:40 PM

Considering that the judge used the Endangered Species Act regarding a bait fish to shut off the water to the Central Valley what you believe is not relevant to the argument.

chemman on December 31, 2010 at 1:17 PM

Give a teenager a bottle of Jack Daniels and the keys to the Lexus. What could go wrong?…California. California voters asked for this. They must live with their choices. It is not a matter of hardheartedness rather a matter of justice. But on the other hand it is kind of fun to be able to say,”get bent”.

Mason on December 31, 2010 at 1:17 PM

–Stimulus II, III & IV took money from all Americans and gave it to Democrats and supporters for no ROE.
–GM /Chrysler bailout took money from all Americans and bondholders and gave it to Democrats and union supporters for no ROE.
– Gulf oil ban took money from conservative states and BP and gave it to Democrats and Soros supporters in Brazil for negative ROE.
– Central Valley water ban took water from conservatives and destroyed their investments, livelihood, and living conditions, for a negative ROE.

I’m not liking the “Us or Them” vibe that is setting up. It’s as if the use of government power only punishes people for not supporting Democrats. Conservatives are the new kulaks.

NaCly dog on December 31, 2010 at 1:17 PM

Considering what an absolute disgrace this is, it is amazing how little attention it has gotten. I know Hannity did some stuff on it but in general it’s yet another example of the media yawning.
These psycho enviro-freaks really need to go the way of certain other cults.

Grayson on December 31, 2010 at 1:29 PM

Anyway, the water issue hasn’t been solved. Maybe it can’t be solved. It could be that the great heyday of irrigated food crops is over.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

Do you actually read any sources to form your opinions?

The drought in the San Joaquin is totally man-made. Leftist Greenies in Santa Monica sue, leftist judge forces mass unemployment and billions of dollars lost in state revenue. This decision could have been abrogated at will by Ken Salazar. All the Dems from the local congressman in Los Banos, the Cal senators, Gov. Arnold and on up to the President are sold out to the green lobby. No one has put out beyond lip service to help.

The science is totally phony. There was no hard evidence that the irrigation pumps caused the problem. The judge and the Federal Government assumes the farmers are guilty until proven innocent. The fact there has been no bounce back of the fish population after several years with the propellers turned off proves this has all been totally unnecessary.

The Greens and the Democrat Party are lunatic Watermelons bent on the destruction of America’s standing as a free and prosperous nation.

rcl on December 31, 2010 at 1:30 PM

Considering that the US is to food what Saudi Arabia is to oil this will have a major impact on world food prices. The central valley is one of the largest producers of food in the world and people will suffer because of this foolishness.

Ann NY on December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

•El Centro, CA – 29.3% (east of San Diego near border with Mexico)
•Yuma, AZ – 26.7%
they are next door neighbors, not surprised there…

cmsinaz on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

You know what else El Centro and Yuma have in common? Large populations of illegal aliens.

AZCoyote on December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

I am a Christian. Just because you and I don’t agree on everything doesn’t make me any less of a Christian than you are…unless you can read God’s mind or something.

ladyingray on December 31, 2010 at 10:00 AM

uh huh…

Suck it CA!

ladyingray on December 31, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Matthew 12:36
But I tell you that everyone will have to give account on the day of judgment for every empty word they have spoken.

right4life on December 31, 2010 at 1:46 PM

Suck it CA!

ladyingray on December 31, 2010 at 11:37 AM

We’re not going to bail you out, California.

SlaveDog on December 31, 2010 at 11:41 AM

Classy HA commentators.

jbh45 on December 31, 2010 at 1:53 PM

Classy HA commentators.

jbh45 on December 31, 2010 at 1:53 PM

LOL and in ladyingray’s case hypocritical.

right4life on December 31, 2010 at 1:54 PM

This is the whole smelt thing again. Agriculture in the central valley is all but gone….and with it went the jobs.

As far as the Cali-haters: when this state goes bankrupt, watch other states fail as well. It could knock the country into a deep depression. Now I’m not saying I agree with the politics in Cali, but I am saying is that when Cali fails the rest of the country will suffer.

jbh45 on December 31, 2010 at 1:57 PM

•El Centro, CA – 29.3% (east of San Diego near border with Mexico)
•Yuma, AZ – 26.7%
they are next door neighbors, not surprised there…

cmsinaz on December 31, 2010 at 12:34 PM

You know what else El Centro and Yuma have in common? Large populations of illegal aliens.

AZCoyote on December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

Maybe we should be blaming the illegal alien lobby instead of the environmentalists?

thuja on December 31, 2010 at 1:57 PM

Maybe we should be blaming the illegal alien lobby instead of the environmentalists?

thuja on December 31, 2010 at 1:57 PM

They’re the same group. See the fight against building the fence to save the horny-brested-lounge lizard and the golden crested double breasted mattress thrasher. Or was it some wild cat?

darwin-t on December 31, 2010 at 2:02 PM

I could have told you that a couple of years ago when the foreclosures began at the same epicenter.

Kermit on December 31, 2010 at 2:02 PM

Let’s not beat about the bush–two totally depressed states-California and neighboring Nevada returned virtually all the culprits who created mess in the first place (notably Harry Reid and Barbara Boxer) and the reason was a Mexican vote in the 90+ percentile. Since many of these same Mexicans who voted for Reid and Boxer also carried signs wanting to annex California to Mexico-let’s give them their wish and throw Nevada in on the deal. In this way we raise the collective IQ and standard of people living in the USA. The trouble is it will LOWER the standard of living and collective IQ of Mexico.

MaiDee on December 31, 2010 at 2:08 PM

At least we are polluting the environment here. There was finally an increase in gas consumption after fours years of decline.

http://www.bluecollarphilosophy.com/2010/12/california-uses-most-gas-in-four-years-yes.html

Blue Collar Todd on December 31, 2010 at 2:11 PM

Let’s not beat about the bush

MaiDee on December 31, 2010 at 2:08 PM

AHA!! you’ve hit upon the truth its ALL BOOOOOSSSSHHH’S FAULT!!

LOL

right4life on December 31, 2010 at 2:11 PM

I live in the epicenter, Fresno. When I moved here in 1992 unemployment was 16% and under Clinton, then Bush we moved to around 8%.
We are agriculture based and that is cyclical, dependent on weather and crop rotation.
Right now the “Valley” has gone to Almonds as the primary valley crop. Almonds are harvested by machine unlike peach and nectarine that preceded the almond boom.
Cotton is predominant as well and that is also machine harvested. Some unemployed (illegal) peach pickers have returned to Mexico but not a high percentage. They stay in towns like Mendota and Huron where the unemployment is nearer 60% and everyone is on welfare and food stamps (called CalFresh here, lol).
It did not help either that this president and our dopey senators Feinstein and the Pipsqueek chose the Delta Smelt fish over family farms.
The Valley is used to high unemployment but the agriculture output is consistent no matter.
The stats above do not reflect the foreclosure mess, we lead there too.
As for LadyinGray’s “Suck it CA!”, as a Californian I concluded long ago much of that hate is from simple jealousy. That will never change.

FireBlogger on December 31, 2010 at 2:14 PM

Anyway, the water issue hasn’t been solved. Maybe it can’t be solved. It could be that the great heyday of irrigated food crops is over.

AnninCA on December 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

I’m trying to be more positive for the new year, so in that spirit I’ll say at least you’re TRYING to be thoughtful, unlike another unmentionable reactionary dolt on this thread… you just have a long way to go down that road.

I don’t get what’s so difficult to see about plants needing water. That’s not magic, it’s not mysterious, and it’s not going to change.

You kind of remind me of a detective in a Far Side cartoon where a clock shop owner had been machine-gunned to death and all his clocks broken… “We have the body, we have the weapon, if only we could establish the time of death…”

It’s. Right. There. In. Front. Of. You.

Merovign on December 31, 2010 at 2:15 PM

I have never understood why Meg Whitman spent 150 millions of her own money to try to get the burden of running this turkey of a state. She would have failed, especially as a republican governor, and would have been blamed for everything.

Let old Moonbeam take the fall, and fall he will. But then again, he has no reputation to maintain.

bayview on December 31, 2010 at 2:38 PM

Let old Moonbeam take the fall, and fall he will. But then again, he has no reputation to maintain.
bayview on December 31, 2010 at 2:38 PM

Yep, he is clueless. Blinded by a need for power.

FireBlogger on December 31, 2010 at 2:49 PM

As I wrote yesterday, the decision by a federal judge to cut off water supplies to an area that literally fed the world turned the Central Valley from an agricultural export powerhouse to a center of starvation within two years.

Hmmm… Just having a stop as we drive to visit one of the ‘victims’ of the decision you refer to. Their farm is one of the larger ones in the valley and they also keep cattle at another property farther inland. Starvation and ruin indeed. The owner just bought a new plane and we are working on restoring a WW2 plane at his private airfield. I guess he is planning his escape once the hungry mobs start attacking his property.

California is famous for having a boom & bust economy. It will survive this and will still provide bucks to other states which can’t support themselves (go look at a list) as it has for many decades.

California’s biggest problems are the result of voter initiatives and failure of the two parties to work together to execute needed reform in the state legislature. The blame goes all round rather than in one place as many here seem to think.

lexhamfox on December 31, 2010 at 2:51 PM

It’s. Right. There. In. Front. Of. You.

Merovign on December 31, 2010 at 2:15 PM

Excellent point, but alas, there are none so blind as those that will not see.

Tim Zank on December 31, 2010 at 2:51 PM

The farming areas of CA that are hardest hit all vote Republican in the last elections. Could this be political payback?

DL13 on December 31, 2010 at 2:54 PM

AZCoyote on December 31, 2010 at 1:44 PM

yup

cmsinaz on December 31, 2010 at 2:57 PM

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