Wikileaks servers under DOS attack ahead of diplomatic document dump; Update: Times reveals documents; Update: Hillary ordered spying at the UN; Update: Iran obtains advanced missiles from North Korea? Update: Wikileaks posts intro to documents

posted at 1:29 pm on November 28, 2010 by Allahpundit

It’s probably not the feds who are responsible, simply because knocking the servers offline at this point achieves nothing. Wikileaks gave the documents to newspapers weeks ago; the first stories about the contents are set to drop this afternoon at around 4:30 p.m. Unless they’re being DOS’d purely out of spite, why bother?

I’m not sure what the point of this is either:

In a highly unusual step reflecting the administration’s grave concerns about the ramifications of the move, the State Department late Saturday released a letter from its top lawyer to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and his attorney telling them that publication of the documents would be illegal and demanding that they stop it

The letter from State Department legal adviser Harold Koh was released as U.S. diplomats around the world are scrambling to warn foreign governments about what might be in the secret documents that are believed to contain highly sensitive assessments about world leaders, their policies and America’s attempts to lobby them…

The State Department said Koh’s message was a response to a letter received on Friday by the U.S. ambassador to Britain, Louis Susman, from Assange and his lawyer, Jennifer Robinson. The department said that letter asked for information “regarding individuals who may be ‘at significant risk of harm’ because of” the release of the documents.

“Despite your stated desire to protect those lives, you have done the opposite and endangered the lives of countless individuals,” Koh wrote in reply. “You have undermined your stated objective by disseminating this material widely, without redaction, and without regard to the security and sanctity of the lives your actions endanger.”

Again, the Times has had these documents for ages. No doubt they’ve got a giant front-page feature about them set to publish tonight. Assange probably couldn’t stop them at this point even if he wanted to, in which case releasing the letter is really just the feds doing PR. I’m intrigued, though, that it’s Koh who signed it and not some lower-level functionary. Partly that’s to signal how seriously State is taking this, but possibly it’s also an attempt by the Obama administration to trade on Koh’s leftist credibility in rallying U.S. public opinion against Wikileaks. He’s been a liberal shortlister for Supreme Court vacancies since The One took office, notwithstanding his legal defense of drone strikes in Pakistan. Having him publicly warn Wikileaks about the damage they’re doing to U.S. interests might temper progressive enthusiasm for Assange from three cheers to, say, one.

Needless to say, Assange has already rejected Koh’s demands. And just to make sure that he wrings every drop of media attention he can get out of this, he’s arranged for the documents to be released in waves, ensuring a week’s worth of buzz for him and his group instead of a mere 48 hours. What sort of bombshell revelations can we expect? Well, apparently, there’s nothing “top secret” in the files; six percent qualify as “secret,” 40.5 percent are “classified,” and the rest aren’t confidential at all. Which doesn’t mean that they won’t be embarrassing:

A journalist with Britain’s Guardian newspaper said the files include an unflattering US assessment of UK PM David Cameron.

Simon Hoggart told the BBC: “There is going to be some embarrassment certainly for Gordon Brown but even more so for David Cameron who was not very highly regarded by the Obama administration or by the US ambassador here.”

More here, including a reference to Ahmadinejad as “Hitler,” and here, teasing the possibility that Turkey might have facilitated weapons smuggling to Al Qaeda in Iraq(!). Until today, one could argue (unpersuasively) that Wikileaks isn’t so much anti-American as it is anti-war; releasing secret docs about Iraq and Afghanistan supposedly would speed an end to the conflicts, forcing a U.S. withdrawal and leaving Iraqis and Afghans to enjoy a thousand years of kite-flying, occupation-free peace, etc. That’s moronic, but it’s more or less in line with traditional leftist policy priorities. What’s the “anti-war” motive, though, in releasing a few hundred thousand diplomatic cables? Progressives are forever telling us that we need to rely less on Defense and more on State, and yet it sounds like today’s leak will do much greater damage to the latter than the previous leaks did to the former. Not only will it strain U.S. diplomatic relationships, but the paranoia it’ll engender among U.S. diplomats about future communiques being exposed will cripple their ability to be candid. In fact, depending upon how sensitive the revelations are and which countries they involve, Wikileaks is potentially increasing the risk of war in the Middle East, on the Korean peninsula, or who knows where else. As Glenn Reynolds likes to say: They’re not anti-war, they’re just on the other side.

Just as I’m writing this, the Times has gone live with its news package about the documents. I’m off to go read. Back later with more.

Update: Spiegel and the Guardian have also released their document packages.

Update: Here’s a fun one from Spiegel. Let the outrageously outrageous progressive outrage begin!

US diplomats are alleged to have been requested by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to spy on the diplomats of other countries at the United Nations. That was the purpose of the “National Humint Collection Directive,” which has been seen by SPIEGEL. The document was signed by Clinton and came into force on July 31, 2009.

The information to be collected included personal credit card information, frequent flyer customer numbers, as well as e-mail and telephone accounts. In many cases the State Department also required “biometric information,” “passwords” and “personal encryption keys.” In the US, the term biometric information generally refers to fingerprints, passport photos and iris scans, among other things.

Hasn’t every country at the UN attempted to spy on every other country there since the day the building opened? C’mon.

Update: Someone on Twitter points out that the Times’s stories on the leaks contain the subhead “State Secrets — Day 1 of 9.”

Update: The Times claims it’s taken precautions to protect sources, including agreeing to some — but not all — redactions proposed by the White House: “The Times has taken care to exclude, in its articles and in supplementary material, in print and online, information that would endanger confidential informants or compromise national security. The Times’s redactions were shared with other news organizations and communicated to WikiLeaks, in the hope that they would similarly edit the documents they planned to post online.”

Update: One of the questions before the leak was whether there’d be any real news here or whether, like the war leaks, it’d fall into the “confirmation of stuff most people suspected anyway” category. Here’s an example of real news and an illustration of my point about how the leak will make war more, not less, likely. Given the fragility of the situation in North Korea, is now the moment to make bombshell public accusations against them?

Secret American intelligence assessments have concluded that Iran has obtained a cache of advanced missiles, based on a Russian design, that are much more powerful than anything Washington has publicly conceded that Tehran has in its arsenal, diplomatic cables show.

Iran obtained 19 of the missiles from North Korea, according to a cable dated Feb. 24 of this year. The cable is a detailed, highly classified account of a meeting between top Russian officials and an American delegation led by Vann H. Van Diepen, an official with the State Department’s nonproliferation division who, as a national intelligence officer several years ago, played a crucial role in the 2007 assessment of Iran’s nuclear capacity…

The missile intelligence also suggests far deeper military — and perhaps nuclear — cooperation between North Korea and Iran than was previously known. At the request of the Obama administration, The New York Times has agreed not to publish the text of the cable.

Other cables reveal King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia repeatedly urging the U.S. to bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities, which does fall into the “stuff everyone suspected” category but isn’t going to help Sunni/Shiite relations, especially if things come to a head in Lebanon over the findings of the Hariri tribunal. Among others urging action: Jordan, Bahrain, and Abu Dhabi.

Update: More rocking of the North Korean boat: The Times’s overview article mentions that the U.S. and South Korea have discussed how to bring about reunification on the peninsula. That’s firmly in the “stuff everyone suspected” category too, but if North Korea’s looking for a new pretext to justify a further provocation, an alleged foreign “plot” to dissolve the DPRK could be useful.

Also in that overview piece, here’s a way to further destabilize an already unstable country:

For instance, it has been previously reported that the Yemeni government has sought to cover up the American role in missile strikes against the local branch of Al Qaeda. But a cable’s fly-on-the-wall account of a January meeting between the Yemeni president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, and Gen. David H. Petraeus, then the American commander in the Middle East, is nonetheless breathtaking.

“We’ll continue saying the bombs are ours, not yours,” Mr. Saleh said, according to the cable sent by the American ambassador, prompting Yemen’s deputy prime minister to “joke that he had just ‘lied’ by telling Parliament” that Yemeni forces had carried out the strikes.

Yemenis surely already suspect that the U.S. is working against jihadis inside the country, but it’s one thing to suspect it and another to have hard evidence of Saleh merrily lying to the public to protect American interests. AQ will get a lot of propaganda mileage out of that.

Update: The point of leaking government documents, ostensibly, is to expose matters of urgent public interest. Sometimes that means revealing state crimes, sometimes it means exposing state disinformation, sometimes it simply means that something so important is going on that citizens need to know about it notwithstanding the value of secrecy. That said, what’s the “urgent public interest” in revealing this?

The US diplomats’ verdict on the NATO partner with the second biggest army in the alliance is devastating. The Turkish leadership is depicted as divided, and Erdogan’s advisers, as well as Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, are portrayed as having little understanding of politics beyond Ankara.

The Americans are also worried about Davutoglu’s alleged neo-Ottoman visions. A high-ranking government adviser warned in discussions, quoted by the US diplomats, that Davutoglu would use his Islamist influence on Erdogan, describing him as “exceptionally dangerous.” According to the US document, another adviser to the ruling AKP party remarked, probably ironically, that Turkey wanted “to take back Andalusia and avenge the defeat at the siege of Vienna in 1683.”

Breaking news: Turkey is trending towards Islamism and looking to increase its regional influence. That’s not even a “stuff everyone suspects” item; it’s a “stuff everyone knows for a fact” item, adorned here with a few dark suspicions — which may or may not even be meant seriously — about the foreign minister. Is the public interest in knowing that Davutoglu isn’t to be trusted worth the strain this will put on U.S.-Turkish relations at a moment when we’re desperate to keep Turkey oriented towards the west and secularism? That is to say, what’s the ratio among the leaked documents of those that expose “urgent public matters” to those that simply embarrass the American diplomatic corps and alienate their foreign counterparts? If it’s important for the public to be informed of foreign relations down to the level of which international diplomats we do and don’t trust, then Congress should simply pass a law requiring all diplomatic messages to be made public immediately. See how that works out.

Update: Guardian contributor Simon Jenkins helpfully, and conveniently, obliterates the “urgent public interest” standard. Turns out everything, save for naming sources and details that might jeopardize military ops, is a matter of public interest now:

Anything said or done in the name of a democracy is, prima facie, of public interest. When that democracy purports to be “world policeman” – an assumption that runs ghostlike through these cables – that interest is global. Nonetheless, the Guardian had to consider two things in abetting disclosure, irrespective of what is anyway published by WikiLeaks. It could not be party to putting the lives of individuals or sources at risk, nor reveal material that might compromise ongoing military operations or the location of special forces.

And in case you’re wondering what his agenda is, he offers this: “America’s foreign policy is revealed as a slave to rightwing drift, terrified of a bomb exploding abroad or of a pro-Israeli congressman at home.”

Update: Ben Smith calls the revelations “a moment of remarkable impotence” for American diplomacy but finds a silver lining in the fact that it happened on Obama’s watch instead of Bush’s. True enough: The One’s international influence ain’t what it used to be, as his trip to Asia demonstrated, but he doesn’t draw the sort of venom abroad that the Bushitler did. That ought to make damage control marginally easier. On the other hand, it gives true anti-American factions ammo to persuade the Bush-haters that the problem isn’t Bush, it’s America. Under Dubya, this sort of mega-clusterfark could be spun internationally as further evidence of his personal incompetence, recklessness, malignancy, etc, but under Obama — who famously framed his foreign policy as, er, “smart power” — it’ll be proof that, as a systemic matter, U.S. national security isn’t nearly as secure as it should be. If you’re a foreign diplomat of whatever level, but especially among the higher ranks with political exposure at home, I don’t know how you’d trust the State Department to keep your confidence after this. Remarkable impotence indeed.

Update: Wikileaks is back online and armed with a characteristically smug, self-serving introduction to the documents:

This document release reveals the contradictions between the US’s public persona and what it says behind closed doors – and shows that if citizens in a democracy want their governments to reflect their wishes, they should ask to see what’s going on behind the scenes.

Every American schoolchild is taught that George Washington – the country’s first President – could not tell a lie. If the administrations of his successors lived up to the same principle, today’s document flood would be a mere embarrassment. Instead, the US Government has been warning governments — even the most corrupt — around the world about the coming leaks and is bracing itself for the exposures.

Ah, hypocrisy, the all-purpose excuse. We see that as a defense whenever some conservative sex scandal is exposed too: The aim, transparently, is to embarrass the target, but since that’s too petty a reason to justify so vicious a tactic, the exposure is unfailingly dressed up as some sort of high-minded attempt to make the target “live by his principles.” If you take this argument seriously, any confidential communication between government officials should be fair game for leaking so long as it somehow contradicts or questions, however glancingly, state policy. (Hypocrisy!) But of course, they’re not limiting publication to only those documents that undermine official State Department positions; as noted above in the context of Turkey’s foreign minister, a lot of this stuff will simply be bits of intelligence about various international actors and speculation about their motives. Nothing “hypocritical” about it — but mighty embarrassing. In fact, there’s nothing “hypocritical” about arguably the biggest revelation thus far, the report of North Korea shipping missiles to Iran. That sort of cooperation goes straight back to Bush’s “axis of evil” speech; theories about collaboration between the two are a staple of proliferation analyses. There’s no U.S. government “lie” that needs to be exposed there, in other words. It’s simply a case of Wikileaks trying to weaken America’s hand by revealing some of the cards that it’s holding.

Two other points. One: Note that they don’t say they wouldn’t have published the documents if the crucial hypocrisy component was missing. On the contrary, in their sonorous meditation about George Washington, they suggest that they would have done so anyway even though the damage to U.S. interests would have been greatly diminished. That’s further evidence that it’s confidentiality itself that they object to, not hypocrisy, and it follows Simon Jenkins’s lead in ignoring the usual balancing act when weighing the merits of a leak between the sensitivity of the information and the public’s interest in knowing about it. Wikileaks would have you believe that confidential government communications are so inherently anti-democratic that exposing them is virtually always in the public interest, no matter what collateral damage might result. No country in the world has ever followed that standard and no country ever will. Two: To the extent that they do take the hypocrisy standard seriously, does that mean that less democratic nations aren’t fair game for leaks because, hey, at least they’re living by their principles? Wikileaks’s lack of interest to date in revealing state secrets of, say, China is mighty conspicuous given that cracking Beijing’s culture of secrecy would be a far greater intel coup than publishing U.S. diplomatic cables and might even have major political repercussions for the Chinese regime. But then, China isn’t “hypocritical,” you see. And of course China also isn’t likely to tolerate damaging leaks like this the way liberal western nations are.

I’ll leave you with this thought, via Danger Room:

Ronald Neumann, who served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2005 to 2007, tells Danger Room he fears the impact of forced candor on U.S. foreign relations. “A man might say things to his wife about his mother-in-law that he would be horrified to hear her repeat to her mother and the doing of which might even put great strain on his marriage,” Neumann says. “That is what a lot of classification is about. I believe it serves the public. There is always an argument for publicizing malfeasance. I do not believe there is one for making more difficult just getting on with the nation’s diplomatic business.”

Update: If there’s a big winner thus far from the leaks, the emerging consensus is that — irony of ironies — it’s Israel. The JPost is crowing about vindication, pointing to the urgency of Sunni demands in private chats with the U.S. to do something about Iran’s nuclear program. Says Eli Lake, “Wikileaks cables suggest actually that Israel was less bullish on bombing Iran than most Arab states.” And Omri Ceren takes it a step further, wondering why it is that Sunni Arabs seem so focused in the cables on hitting Iran when American leftists are forever insisting that (a) the Iranian threat is overstated and (b) a Palestinian state is the true key to regional peace and eventual Iranian disarmament. Good question.


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Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 4:31 PM

There is someone living in the WH that could lead by example by eating salad. But we shan’t speak of such things. Photos speak when we will not :o)

http://www.michellesmirror.com Enjoy, Cin!

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:02 PM

Knott Buyinit on November 28, 2010 at 4:53 PM

Assange appears not to have the necessary love for The Won to be blind to his inadequacies as the rest of the press.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:02 PM

US diplomats are alleged to have been requested by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to spy on the diplomats of other countries at the United Nations.

NYT props up meme of HRC ’12 campaign that Hillary is serious on foreign relations…

phreshone on November 28, 2010 at 5:04 PM

The little puke who leaked all of this stuff should be hanged, drawn and quartered, and his head left on a pike in front of Capitol Hill.

CatoRenasci on November 28, 2010 at 5:06 PM

Bradley Manning needs to be put against a wall and shot.

Boxy_Brown on November 28, 2010 at 5:06 PM

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:02 PM

I’m still trying to get the second coming of Jackie thing. She would be well served to buy a bigger size and have it altered than what she does. That will be the extent of my cattiness on this thread.(About FLOTUS) One day at a more appropriate time I will find the picture of India.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:07 PM

The little puke who leaked all of this stuff should be hanged, drawn and quartered, and his head left on a pike in front of Capitol Hill.

CatoRenasci on November 28, 2010 at 5:06 PM

Is this guy who leaked this information still in the military? They show pictures of him in uniform but I’m not sure if he is still active. We as military families have been told that we are NOT ALLOWED to access this web site even from home. He needs to be charged with treason.

milwife88 on November 28, 2010 at 5:09 PM

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 4:58 PM

Waterboard him for days first, and then the firing squad.

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 5:09 PM

When that democracy purports to be “world policeman”

So the Brits are taking pot-shots at American foreign policy? Really?

That’s rich.

reaganaut on November 28, 2010 at 5:09 PM

Isn’t it about time Julian Assange was mysteriously found dead in a hotel room?

Django on November 28, 2010 at 5:11 PM

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 5:09 PM

I think this is the first time I could endorse a public, televised execution. After a fair trial, of course. Oh, sorry, I was channeling Obama and Holder there for a minute.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:13 PM

A non American committing treason against America?

Yeah. Good luck with that.

NoStoppingUs on November 28, 2010 at 4:54 PM

Technically this would be the case of a “spy and saboteur“, which, if it gravely endangers national security, is a crime punishable by immediate military tribunal in the field and summary execution.

Assange needs to be sent to visit other spies and saboteurs… like the Rosenbergs.

profitsbeard on November 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM

reaganaut on November 28, 2010 at 5:09 PM

I figured that was a trick to through all this back on W.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM

Hey RAE!

You are an asshole for supporting this piece of sh!t.

Just wanted you to know that.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM

[Django on November 28, 2010 at 5:11 PM]

No, it’s way past time.

Dusty on November 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM

That is mind boggling, we can’t even get a frickin college grade transcript leaked.

Tim Zank on November 28, 2010 at 4:59 PM

Patience is a Virtue. As stated, knocked in the polls, knocked in public, knocked in funding, knocked in the jaw and now knocked …again… embarrassingly, on the world stage.

This is Soros. He warned him.

The US won’t bleed for this. The WH will.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:19 PM

If the government wasn’t doing anything nefarious, it should not care about someone shining a light on its activities.

Tyranny is carried out in the dark, in secret. Keep the leaks coming and keep the pitchforks sharp.

shawk on November 28, 2010 at 5:20 PM

Chaos, confusion, disruption, turmoil. Grievances, poverty, anarchy, anger. Disrupt, dismantle, disparage, dismay. Oh what he gets when he gets his way.

Soros.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:22 PM

Honestly, I like this document dump.

* It’s revealed that Iran got 19 missiles from North Korea before February 2010, and Obama didn’t say or do anything about it. This is what Bush meant by “Axis of Evil.”

* It’s revealed that King Abdullah is a neocon hawk.

* It’s revealed that Obama is a helpless putz.

It’s Obamageddon.

What’s the problem?

Emperor Norton on November 28, 2010 at 5:23 PM

NoStoppingUs on November 28, 2010 at 4:54 PM

I believe Life Trek is speaking of the provider of the information to Assange and I agree completely.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 4:58 PM

Exactly what I meant — someone or ones had to leak the documents to begin with.

LifeTrek on November 28, 2010 at 5:23 PM

shawk on November 28, 2010 at 5:20 PM

I think we could reasonably expect a higher standard of discourse to be used in official government documents.

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:24 PM

I figured that was a trick to through all this back on W.

That too.

I was just thinking back on all the years of Empire building and British exploits in every corner of the globe. World policeman is in quotes, and the sarcasm is dripping off of the letters.

Somehow, colonizing half the globe is better?

reaganaut on November 28, 2010 at 5:26 PM

Which department did The Won recently decided doesn’t fall under the Freedom of Information Act anymore? How’s that going to work if Mr. Assange decides he is interested?

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:26 PM

Tyranny is carried out in the dark, in secret. Keep the leaks coming and keep the pitchforks sharp.

shawk on November 28, 2010 at 5:20 PM

Tyranny bears its teeth at you, it openly despises you. It has for many years. Nothing is in the dark, nothing is in secret. It is borne in the open for you to plainly see through the speeches of the betters through the actions of the elite.

Unwilling pawns are hardest to defeat.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:26 PM

What sort of bombshell revelations can we expect?
====================================================

Confirmation,of what most of Hot Air knew about Hopey all
along,going back to the early revelations of Obama’s con
ections to Lefty nutjobs.in the early start of the Liberal
nominee’s selection,on through to the Presidential election!

And,all of the narrational damage control of Obama’s atti
tde to world leaders,the besmirchments of Israel,the UK,
and every other country that Hopey/Changey has insulted
and p*ssed off!!!!

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:26 PM

What’s the problem?

Emperor Norton on November 28, 2010 at 5:23 PM

Off the top of my head?

Foreign governments will be less likely to share important information with us out of fear that it will be leaked.

Yemen will be less likely to cooperate on drone attacks.

The DPRK has an excuse for more aggression.

More anti-Americanism is fueled.

Sources and individuals who provide the US with valuable info can be found out by their governments.

Not worth confirming that Obama is a putz.

amerpundit on November 28, 2010 at 5:27 PM

Forced Transparency on Team Liberal.

Ya just got to love da karma!

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:28 PM

alwyr on November 28, 2010 at 4:33 PM

Understood… I know the basics of encryption, and the role of private keys vs. public keys vs. encryption algorithms.

pedestrian also mentioned that having plaintext and encrypted reduces the amount of text that has to be searched. I understand that point too.

So with that in mind, here’s my next question:

The encryption algorithm is independent of both the private key and the public key, in the sense that one can feed into the encryption algorithm any private key one wants. Provide the recipient with your public key, and they can decrypt any encoded text you send them.

So as a practical matter, isn’t it accurate to say that any communication made subsequent to the release of these WikiLeaks documents, could simply use a different private key, such that the benefit of having so much plaintext and encrypted text is effectively eliminated as a means to decrypt future communications for which they are not provided a public key?

greggriffith on November 28, 2010 at 5:29 PM

So Wikileaks are okay with some of you as long as it hurts Obama?

Cause that’s the basic message I’m getting from some of you.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 5:30 PM

Everybody knew that Scooter was a putz already. That’s why his trips to Asia and Europe were massive failures. God protect us.

kingsjester on November 28, 2010 at 5:30 PM

Keep the leaks coming and keep the pitchforks sharp.

I don’t see anything nefarious in these leaks. Not even close.

reaganaut on November 28, 2010 at 5:31 PM

The question was asked over at Ace: “How in the world does an Army PFC get access to this material?
.
The rather obvious speculation is that he doesn’t, at least not by himself.
.
Raw data rarely ever flows down the information gathering system. Raw battlefield reports appearing at a CIA office, or even a Consulate or the State Department seems routine, but why would a State Department cable (sent to another State office) be available to (or at) any CIA office, let alone a military intelligence unit?
.
My guess is still that Manning either didn’t know that what he gave to Assrange would be cover for something very much larger, or thought that only a couple more documents would be added.
.
Tool late now for Manning; he’s holding the burning brown paper bag, and the only name he can give is Assrange, the name of the fool who’s publicly doing the document release ….
.
The CIA being the source of these documents seems unlikely; they’ve been taking beatings since the mid-70s, so this sort of stunt seems unhelpful to them.
.
The State Department is a different story. I doubt that Hillary! is involved in any of this; it would end her career. Doubtless, Soros is offering encouragement, but I doubt he has this sort of reach. I suspect a few diplomats, with some sort of ‘leet sense of entitlement.
.
Rooting out the leaks should be simple; cross-index document ID and subject matter with departments, staff, etc. How long do the State servers maintain e-mails? What about backups? How about internet access logs?
.
Time for the State Department and Diplomatic Corps to experience an investigation witchhunt Church Committee action.
.
What is Ken Starr doing these days?
.

Arbalest on November 28, 2010 at 5:31 PM

Online Streaming Fox News,crack another window open,
turn the volume down a tad,and presto,eavsdrop,on in
coming possible wiki-leak tidbits!
==================================

http://atdhe.net/4371/watch-fox-news

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:32 PM

Homosexuality was seen as a drawback in many classified positions not only because they could be blackmailed but because of the vengeful hissy fits they have when their ‘boyfriends’ break-up with them…

flameofjudah on November 28, 2010 at 5:33 PM

What’s the problem?

Emperor Norton on November 28, 2010 at 5:23 PM

The “problem” is that Our Nation was Founded
By Principled Men Whos Faith Stood Firm

There are a lot of peeps who don’t be likin dat chit, nah, heah?

/We’ll be just fine. I do enjoy typing ebonics at time. (sic). I had to be learnnin’ dat biatch shiatch on the streetch of dem Homeboyz oawwwe yeah”.

/Not. I’m just a notcopt

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:33 PM

Is this ranking a joke, or is the whole article a satire?
http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/130839-obama-ranked-no-3-on-foreign-policys-global-thinkers-list

onlineanalyst on November 28, 2010 at 5:38 PM

Hey RAE!

You are an asshole for supporting this piece of sh!t.

Just wanted you to know that.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM

not to mention paulnut and a Traitor.

had he lived in days of the founders, he’d be hung

jp on November 28, 2010 at 5:40 PM

Chaos, confusion, disruption, turmoil. Grievances, poverty, anarchy, anger. Disrupt, dismantle, disparage, dismay. Oh what he gets when he gets his way.

Soros.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:22 PM

Key West Reader: Yup,its BIMBO ERUPTION Clinton Part Deux,

Distraction OverLoad Clusterfark!!:)

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:41 PM

Has any one wandered over to the opposition (HuffPo, Kos, CJ) to see how they are taking all of this?

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:43 PM

Tune Theme/Serendipity
==================================

Dirty Dirty Laundry

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrTMHiAD0ro

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:44 PM

Has any one wandered over to the opposition (HuffPo, Kos, CJ) to see how they are taking all of this?

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:43 PM

Cindy Munford: Not yet,I’m on a Hopey Communication wiki-
leak Intel Hunt Mission!:)

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:47 PM

Is there any chance that the NYT is being so obliging because this actually reflects worse on the State Dept. (Clinton) than Obama?

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 5:49 PM

How did Wikileaks get these documents? Does anyone know?

Dhuka on November 28, 2010 at 5:49 PM

So Wikileaks are okay with some of you as long as it hurts Obama?

Cause that’s the basic message I’m getting from some of you.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 5:30 PM

Harry Reid was rooting for a loss in Iraq as long as it hurt Bush. What’s good for the goose…

angryed on November 28, 2010 at 5:52 PM

If the government wasn’t doing anything nefarious, it should not care about someone shining a light on its activities.

Tyranny is carried out in the dark, in secret. Keep the leaks coming and keep the pitchforks sharp.

shawk on November 28, 2010 at 5:20 PM

All secrets aren’t nefarious. You understand that, don’t you?

BierManVA on November 28, 2010 at 5:56 PM

Foreign governments will be less likely to share important information with us out of fear that it will be leaked.

OK, but how will the US know they’re not sharing any more?

Yemen will be less likely to cooperate on drone attacks

Yemen can still do it, and then lie about it. That’s what they were doing up to now, anyway.

The DPRK has an excuse for more aggression.

They never needed an excuse before!

More anti-Americanism is fueled.

They all hate us anyhow.

Sources and individuals who provide the US with valuable info can be found out by their governments.

With enough of a payoff, you can always find a source.

Emperor Norton on November 28, 2010 at 5:57 PM

Emperor Norton on November 28, 2010 at 5:57 PM

EGGstacly.

angryed on November 28, 2010 at 6:01 PM

Dhuka on November 28, 2010 at 5:49 PM

This is one popular theory.

http://minx.cc/?post=304232

Cindy Munford on November 28, 2010 at 6:03 PM

I haven’t read very many of the comments so maybe well this has already been said. I certainly hope so. The greatest threat to American security revealed in all this is that apparently we have a current intelligence establishment that is beyond even monumentally incompetent. To have set things up and controlled (or lack of same) things such that one low level enlisted man could have what seems like unfettered access to so much that is called secret is beyond unbelievable. Has such incompetence ever existed before in all of recorded history?

Luka on November 28, 2010 at 6:05 PM

So basically, what Jenkins is saying is that he reserves the right to aid in or cause whatever damage could possibly be done based on nothing more than his own skewed and inherently negative perceptions of Americans.

What an asshole.

Ryan Anthony on November 28, 2010 at 6:10 PM

Honestly, I like this document dump. …

For me, as a bearded left-winger who feels betrayed by this publication, the very idea of secret American diplomatic documents being “dumped” in public is a contradiction of terms that speaks to jaw-dropping malfeasance.

No matter how you feel about Obama or the wars or previous “leaks,” this one is an attack on America itself — not its policy, not its wars — but a stab in the heart of everyday people. Whether Bush-era diplomatic secrets or Obama-era diplomatic secrets, this material should be sacrosanct.

bifidis on November 28, 2010 at 6:13 PM

Harry Reid was rooting for a loss in Iraq as long as it hurt Bush. What’s good for the goose…

angryed on November 28, 2010 at 5:52 PM

I disagree. That is all.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 6:13 PM

So as a practical matter, isn’t it accurate to say that any communication made subsequent to the release of these WikiLeaks documents, could simply use a different private key, such that the benefit of having so much plaintext and encrypted text is effectively eliminated as a means to decrypt future communications for which they are not provided a public key?
greggriffith on November 28, 2010 at 5:29 PM

_____________________

Greg: ‘private key’ encryption doesn’t even enter into the equation here. The U.S. government (i.e the NSA) allows anybody to encrypt messages using a public encryption key such as Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) which offers military-grade (128 key) encryption. The only reason the NSA would conceivably allow the use of a 128 private encryption key is because the NSA can solve that level of encryption in ‘real time’. In other words, it can solve such message in minutes/hours instead of days.

Unfortunately, the messages divulged by Wikileaks are derived from U.S. encryption schemes orders of magnitude more sophisticated than any PGP 128 key “private” schemes.

alwyr on November 28, 2010 at 6:13 PM

So Wikileaks are okay with some of you as long as it hurts Obama?

Cause that’s the basic message I’m getting from some of you.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 5:30 PM

Machiavelli Hobbes:Obama has a distain for world leaders,
it is Obama and is brilliant “Smart Pow
er” that is putting America in danger!

If Obama was concerned of America first,
then he should of thought ahead about wh
at if his communications became compromi
sed!!

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:15 PM

Ok, regardless of whose watch this occurred upon (and isn’t it a bit unsettling that we’d *care* when national security is question?) has this not passed well into ‘treason’ territory? Why is this wikileaks guy allowed to continue to live?

Midas on November 28, 2010 at 6:16 PM

http://www.michellesmirror.com Enjoy, Cin!

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 5:02 PM

Key West Reader:Tee hee,ahem,heres the song!:)
=====================================================

David Bowie – Fashion

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA27aQZCQMk

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:19 PM

Daniel Ellsberg would be proud. Actually, he probably is.

JeffinOrlando on November 28, 2010 at 6:21 PM

I don’t know how you’d trust the State Department to keep your confidence after this. Remarkable impotence indeed.

where’s that reset button?

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:22 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA27aQZCQMk

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:19 PM

excellent :)

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:22 PM

I disagree. That is all.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 6:13 PM

And this attitude is so typical of Republicans. You will never win a fight when you bring a slingshot and your opponent brings an Abrams tank to the battle.

angryed on November 28, 2010 at 6:23 PM

Obama – Too Much Media Is Ruining Our Democracy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rB0Paw-bNSg

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:23 PM

Whether Bush-era diplomatic secrets or Obama-era diplomatic secrets, this material should be sacrosanct.

bifidis on November 28, 2010 at 6:13 PM

I agree – all governments should have the ability to keep some of their documents/dealings classified.

katiejane on November 28, 2010 at 6:24 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 5:26 PM

+1

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:25 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA27aQZCQMk

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:19 PM
===============================
excellent :)

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:22 PM

cmsinaz:)
=============================================

Marvin Gaye – I Heard It Through The Grapevine

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hajBdDM2qdg

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:26 PM

on the one hand I think a lot of this stuff is known (like the Saudi fear of Iran)…and the backstabbing that goes on in any venue

but clear the agit/prop value is high. From Der Speigel

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,731583,00.html

The leak of over 250,000 American diplomatic cables could prove highly embarrassing for the US State Department. The documents reveal what US diplomats really think of other countries, and their worldview is incredibly dark at times. Relations with several countries are likely to suffer as a result.

this kind of of stuff can be used in direct ways by people like this:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703572404575635053157718986.html?KEYWORDS=judith+miller

to sow anarchist violence against the machine is a favorite tactic of the hard left and Islamic extremists.

It confirms their view that the local government is a tool of the big Satan.

Most of the time, these things peter out after the initial burst of hype…which is mainly about getting eyeballs on your paper/webpage.

but we’ll see

r keller on November 28, 2010 at 6:28 PM

where’s that reset button?

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:22 PM

cmsinaz:LOl,how about a time-machine,to go back and keep
Assagey busy,while sobatagy his wiki-leaky files!
:)

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:30 PM

And this attitude is so typical of Republicans. You will never win a fight when you bring a slingshot and your opponent brings an Abrams tank to the battle.

angryed on November 28, 2010 at 6:23 PM

And your attitude is typical of those who more about partisan BS than doing the right thing. If you seriously believe that someone with a D after their name is more of a threat than someone who fly’s planes into buildings than we have nothing to talk about.

Have a nice day.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 6:31 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:30 PM

yepper :)

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:33 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:26 PM

a little MG goes a long way…nice

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:33 PM

If you seriously believe that someone with a D after their name is more of a threat than someone who fly’s planes into buildings than we have nothing to talk about.

Have a nice day.

Machiavelli Hobbes on November 28, 2010 at 6:31 PM

Is there a distinction? They both have the same goal.

Inanemergencydial on November 28, 2010 at 6:36 PM

Some are forgetting: Obama is temporary.

But allowing this kind of espionage anarchy causes permanent damage to our national security.

It cannot be permitted.

profitsbeard on November 28, 2010 at 6:37 PM

Homosexuality was seen as a drawback in many classified positions not only because they could be blackmailed but because of the vengeful hissy fits they have when their ‘boyfriends’ break-up with them…

flameofjudah on November 28, 2010 at 5:33 PM

Very nice try. Did you ever hear the phrase that Life is not a Rehearsal?

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:40 PM

Insight!
===============
=================

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Commentary in support of Julian Assange and WikiLeaks
by Bob Levin
***************

Julian Assange is a true humanitarian brother. The genocidal terrorist groupthink entity andpentagon integrated false government of the United States is only afraid of having their blatantlies exposed as a duplicitous signatory of the U.N. protocol and convention that allows the jackalsof the CIA to torture with immunity. The continuing criminal enterprise orchestrating the “deepstate”, cringes when their conduits for money laundering corporatist dollars are closed downthrough criminal prosecutions like those involving Republicans’ Jack Abramoff and Tom DeLay ortheir Democratic shills.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/44258697/Commentary-in-Support-of-Julian-Assange-and-WikiLeaks

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:41 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:26 PM
====================================
a little MG goes a long way…nice

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:33 PM

cmsinaz:)

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:42 PM

Julian Assange is a true humanitarian brother. The genocidal terrorist groupthink entity andpentagon integrated false government of the United States is only afraid of having their blatantlies exposed as a duplicitous signatory of the U.N. protocol and convention that allows the jackalsof the CIA to torture with immunity.

I smell give gays prancing.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:45 PM

FLASHBACK
============
============
Thursday 16 April 2009

Obama releases Bush torture memos

Insects,sleep deprivation and waterboarding among approved techniques by the Bush administration

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/apr/16/torture-memos-bush-administration

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:46 PM

I don’t see any big deal so far. The only people likely to be surprised or upset must be very naive, or actually believe their own mythology. A big media orgy, that’s all.

Fortunata on November 28, 2010 at 6:48 PM

Picture this:

In a room… in Fwance

/eh.. Nevermind. It ain’t worth it. Nice job, Jewels. pfft.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:48 PM

I smell give gays prancing.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:45 PM

Key West Reader:That guy needs to be hired as a PR spokemen,
or,propaganda shill for AQ/Hezbolla,Iran,NK!
:)

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:49 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 6:46 PM

ahhhh yes, dear leader had no problem spilling the beans about W…

cmsinaz on November 28, 2010 at 6:50 PM

Awe, yeah. I gotchoo Amuricuns.. I gotchuu good! Don Don Don meg wid meah! I godu. I godayougood

Julian Asshaholeangesknifesindebuttole.com

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:52 PM

Why hasn’t Assange “accidentally” fell from a helicopter yet?

Caper29 on November 28, 2010 at 6:53 PM

So a fag launches a website and….

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:54 PM

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:54 PM

Shhhh! You might offend JetBoy.
/

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 6:56 PM

Question the timing… Happens the same time that the feds are seizing domains… Which came first the intention of doing a lock down… or the reason?
-

RalphyBoy on November 28, 2010 at 6:59 PM

Shhhh! You might offend JetBoy.
/

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 6:56 PM

I own det boy. He don’t say so, but he knowz itz. See how qviet I make it ven I say shaddup yetboy, shaddup ya putzbot. Yes?

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:59 PM

I don’t see any big deal so far. The only people likely to be surprised or upset must be very naive, or actually believe their own mythology. A big media orgy, that’s all.

Fortunata on November 28, 2010 at 6:48 PM

It is not what is “leaked”, it is that it can be “leaked”.

Anarchists undermining our national security is the point, not the specific details involved.

Freelance spies need to be crushed.

Or you have no further security.

profitsbeard on November 28, 2010 at 7:01 PM

Question the timing… Happens the same time that the feds are seizing domains… Which came first the intention of doing a lock down… or the reason?
-

RalphyBoy on November 28, 2010 at 6:59 PM

ech. Ye kevetz when there is no kevetz to be had. Schtop wit de lock down dread. Shhhtoop. Vwatch. Yevetich! Funny, eh!

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 7:02 PM

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 6:59 PM

lolz!
You are a real hoot, darlin’

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 7:02 PM

• Germany’s Der Spiegel said the U.S. had referred to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as “Hitler” while President Nicolas Sarkozy of France was called a “naked emperor” in U.S. documents released by WikiLeaks; and

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/WikiLeaks+documents+expose+diplomatic+secrets+infuriate+White+House/3896444/story.html#ixzz16cowvU3l

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 7:04 PM

Some are forgetting: Obama is temporary.

But allowing this kind of espionage anarchy causes permanent damage to our national security.

It cannot be permitted.

Absolutely. I despise actual GOP policies (for the most part) and most GOP politicians, but the damaging publication of secret diplomatic communications (no matter how trivial the subject of those cables) shatters the trust other governments put in our State Department. If there’s a President Romney or President Palin (please, no, please!), this person’s toolbox has been diminished by this leak. Goddamnit –I don’t give a frak about party when it comes to the survival of my country!

bifidis on November 28, 2010 at 7:05 PM

lolz!
You are a real hoot, darlin’

OmahaConservative on November 28, 2010 at 7:02 PM

Funny, eh! Das Chutzpah neithz hoot.

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 7:06 PM

Powerlineblog’s Scott Johnson offers an intriguing observation with several links that blow the Left’s claim that Israel is fanning the flames of ME objections to Iran’s belligerence.

In an email message, Josh Block writes that “one of the most interesting overall themes” in the stolen cables obtained by Wikileaks “is the restraint seen to typify the Israelis on Iran, in contrast to the typical Brzezinski, Scowcroft, Walt/Mearsheimer, Glenn Greenwald-Neo-prog, netroots claims Israel is trying to prod us to fight and bomb Iran for them.” Josh writes that “in the end, one of the most obvious takeaways from these Wikileaks [documents] is devastating to the whole Left/Realist narrative about Israeli manipulation. The Israelis come off as cool customers, while the Arabs are totally freaking out and literally demanding the US bomb [Iran].”

Josh cites the summary of the Israel-related cables at Israelly Cool. Omri Ceren’s summary at Mere Rhetoric is also must reading

onlineanalyst on November 28, 2010 at 7:07 PM

Me thinks,Hopey should get a WW2 German Enigma machine,
muzzle Gibbsy,and put a 5 minute delay mouthpeice gizmo
on Hopey,

so that,they can edit out Obamas besmirchments,and
muzzle TOTUS as an extra precaution!!!!

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 7:09 PM

Is it just me or would the world be a much better place for freedom and democracy if little Jules Assange had been beaten up a little less in High School? And little Barry Obama a little more?

Kaisersoze on November 28, 2010 at 7:11 PM

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 7:04 PM

mit Respekt

Herr Obama dach fail. Everyone sees

Key West Reader on November 28, 2010 at 7:11 PM

Loose lips sinks ships,oh wait,Liberals think
War on Terror is over-hyped!!!

canopfor on November 28, 2010 at 7:12 PM

I don’t see any big deal so far. The only people likely to be surprised or upset must be very naive, or actually believe their own mythology. A big media orgy, that’s all.

Fortunata on November 28, 2010 at 6:48 PM

It is not what is “leaked”, it is that it can be “leaked”.

Anarchists undermining our national security is the point, not the specific details involved.

Freelance spies need to be crushed.

Or you have no further security.

profitsbeard on November 28, 2010 at 7:01 PM

Bingo. An assault on State is an assault on our future as a nation, on all our children and their children, whether Dem, GOP or whatever.

I was once naive enough to believe Julian Assange might actually possess a principled position against the Iraq war. Now we see that this rapist is only out to attack average Americans. He needs to be “renditioned” immediately.

bifidis on November 28, 2010 at 7:13 PM

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