If there is something we learned this year, it’s that anything Palin tweets or writes on Facebook becomes international news and the talk of the nation, especially when it comes to politics.

Two nights ago on his program, Lawrence O’Donnell decided to rant on New Oxford American Dictionary for their decision to include Sarah Palin’s word “refudiate” into the English language.

Palin’s typo in a tweet about the Ground Zero mosque was the talk on twitter. Palin called it “Shakespearean.” The result: she popularized the word and it is now part of the lexicon.

New Oxford wrote about their decision:

An unquestionable buzzmaker in 2010, the word refudiate instantly evokes the name of Sarah Palin, who tweeted her way into a flurry of media activity when she used the word in certain statements posted on Twitter. Critics pounced on Palin, lampooning what they saw as nonsensical vocabulary and speculating on whether she meant “refute” or “repudiate.”

From a strictly lexical interpretation of the different contexts in which Palin has used “refudiate,” we have concluded that neither “refute” nor “repudiate” seems consistently precise, and that “refudiate” more or less stands on its own, suggesting a general sense of “reject.”

Lawrence O’Donnell got wee-wee’d up with the decision, and lashed out against the dictionary for allowing Sarah Palin to ruin the English language, or something. He is also annoyed that for a woman, who he claims will not run for president, gets this much attention. Then why talk about her if she is so irrelevant?

“No doubt Sarah Palin and her supporters will take this honor and run with it; next they will be demanding that cartographers actually move Russia even closer to Sarah Palin house.”

Cross-posted at www.Cubachi.com


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Tags: Sarah Palin