Burmese Army breaking ranks and supporting Aung San Suu Kyi?

posted at 10:10 am on November 18, 2010 by Cubachi

After 15 years of house arrest, the liberation of Aung San Suu Kyi, the 65-year-old pro-democracy leader of Burma, was celebrated around the world last Saturday. Her steadfast promotion of freedom and liberty against the forces of repression is admirable.

World leaders were not the only ones in jubilance. There are reports that foot soldiers among the Burmese military’s lower ranks, view Suu Kyi as a gateway to changing the oppressive nation for the better.

According to the BBC News service in Burma, several hundred disgruntled soldiers from battalions in Rangoon and Bago divisions, along with their families went to see the release of  Aung San Suu Kyi’s house on November 13, in hopes that Suu Kyi might  be the solution to their woes.

“We went there to greet her because we believe the hardships the lower rank and file are facing can be solved if Ms Suu Kyi and the military commanders work together.

“We have high hopes for Ms Suu Kyi,” a soldier told the BBC Burmese service.

It follows reports in September that soldiers in many areas were refusing to carry out routine tasks in protest at short rations and lack of access to their pay.

A split among the military may be a good sign for Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) party. This can only enhance the movement. But Suu Kyi told supporters not to expect miracles with her release. This is going to be a long process.

Two weeks ago, Burma had elections which most of the world’s leaders agree, was a sham. Suu Kyi filed paperwork to reinstate her party and possibly challenge the legitimacy of these elections, although such a challenge could result in prison time.

The election commission has threatened harsh legal penalties for those filing complaints about the election results deemed fraudulent. Individuals can be jailed for three years and fined up to £200.

Within hours of being released from house arrest after seven years Ms Suu Kyi announced that she would stand with NLD party officials in their investigation of electoral fraud and issue a report into the findings.

Cross-posted at www.Cubachi.com

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Please pray for freedom for the Burmese people.

Ward Cleaver on November 18, 2010 at 10:13 AM

Chebama sending advisors and iPods with his speeches to buck up the Burmese army.

Western_Civ on November 18, 2010 at 10:13 AM

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and Aung San Suu Kyi.

Wait, that’s not for another six weeks…

Bat Chain Puller on November 18, 2010 at 10:15 AM

although such a challenge could result in prison time.

…..

I heard Carter was challenging the results.

Just sayin.

artist on November 18, 2010 at 10:15 AM

Props to Bono/U2 for being on the correct side of something. They’ve been publicly advocating her release for at lest 10 years. “Walk On”

DOOF on November 18, 2010 at 10:28 AM

Excellent news! I just hope she doesn’t end up like Bhutto.

Tony737 on November 18, 2010 at 10:28 AM

Two weeks ago, Burma had elections which most of the world’s leaders agree, was a sham.

Not ALL world leaders. Those that felt this was legitimate were….Obutthead, Chavez, Achman, Jintao.

capejasmine on November 18, 2010 at 10:31 AM

I heard Carter was challenging the results.

Just sayin.

artist

Looks like some dictators didn’t make the right bribes. All they had to do was pay off Carter and they would have gotten the Jimmuh Seal Of Approval.

thekingtut on November 18, 2010 at 10:33 AM

So are we done calling that place Myanmar?

Greek Fire on November 18, 2010 at 10:35 AM

I’ve travelled to many countries, but Myanmar was the one nation where the sense of repression was palpable in the air. People literally looked around themselves (even in cars!) before talking to you. My now-wife and I were on a local bus that got pulled over by the authorities. Every passenger was made to disembark and stand by the side of the bus while their bags were searched. I told my wife to sit still and refuse access to her bag. Probably not a smart thing, but I sat there and glared at the soldiers while they rifled through all the other bags on board. Fortunately, they just passed by us, probably from a lack of English skills. Based on the matter-of-fact reaction of the Burmese on board, I got the impression that this event was not out of the ordinary.

KGB on November 18, 2010 at 10:40 AM

Advice to the Burmese people — don’t look towards this administration for support. Instead, assume that you will receive the same treatment as the Green movement in Iran.

GnuBreed on November 18, 2010 at 10:46 AM

Wow, this girl must be awesome if she won the Nobel Peace Prize just like Obama! Did she write a book too? Bash Bush?

joeindc44 on November 18, 2010 at 11:01 AM

She’s cute, house arrest has worked for her.

Does house arrest mean she can’t leave her house or does she get to walk around her whole compound?

I hope she had a home office because it must be hard to pay a mortgage on that villa without being able to make a living.

It must be a real bear having to send a servant to fetch groceries unless she uses Peapod online or has them delivered.

Alden Pyle on November 18, 2010 at 11:10 AM

Wow, this girl must be awesome if she won the Nobel Peace Prize just like Obama! Did she write a book too? Bash Bush?

I sincerely hope you are being sarcastic. Suu Kyi deserved her Nobel. Seriously look up info on her, you will be impressed.

But anyway to address the post. I agree, any breaks within the army structure can only be good news for Burma. And she may have chosen to challenge the elections results now in light of that fact.

But as Suu Kyi said is just the beginning of a long struggle. Any who can help, please do.

In the end I believe it will be the Burmese people and freedom loving people around the globe who will free Burma from this nightmare. We can not rely on our leaders.

Shogun144 on November 18, 2010 at 11:16 AM

So are we done calling that place Myanmar?

Greek Fire on November 18, 2010 at 10:35 AM

Good for you, I agree. Some of these countries get taken over by illegitimate terrorists or revolutionaries and come up with their own said terrorist or revolutionary names and the leftist media is only too happy to go along with using the new names thinking they’re oh so PC instead of sticking it in their faces and using their rightful names.

Jeff on November 18, 2010 at 11:27 AM

So are we done calling that place Myanmar?

Greek Fire on November 18, 2010 at 10:35 AM

We, the US, have never called it Myanmar. We still call it Burma.

Oldnuke on November 18, 2010 at 11:39 AM

I really hope Alden Pyle’s post above was in jest, because it betrays a complete lack of knowledge about the privations Aung San Suu Kyi’s been subjected to for having the gall to win an election.

As for the name Myanmar, I’m not averse to using it because like the junta or not, they have the right to pick a name for their country. It would be one thing if the word “Myanmar” had no currency within the country, but it does.

KGB on November 18, 2010 at 11:59 AM

As long as China is content to do business with the generals in Burma the people will remain enslaved.

Kenosha Kid on November 18, 2010 at 12:02 PM

It w/b sweet if the change would happen peacefully, with the sons and brothers of the people would just walk to the other side. It w/b the ultimate punishment to the oppressive pigs of the world.

Hate them all, in Burma and in the U.S. and all in between.

Schadenfreude on November 18, 2010 at 12:25 PM

This is good news.

Is the name Burma preferred by the population or the name Myanmar?

Just wondering, cause the name of the country is officially changed.

petunia on November 18, 2010 at 3:29 PM

We, the US, have never called it Myanmar. We still call it Burma.

Oldnuke on November 18, 2010 at 11:39 AM

WE do still call it Burma! That is a surprize to me! I understand the words mean the same thing, I can’t remember what but the media always says Myanmar now. Or I thought they did.

What do they call themselves and why?

petunia on November 18, 2010 at 3:32 PM

What do they call themselves and why?

petunia on November 18, 2010 at 3:32 PM

My daughter in law is Burmese. Born and raised in Rangoon. I’ve always heard her use Burma and she refers to herself as Burmese. Not sure what the majority of the country uses though. Hmmm, her Mother is visiting them I’ll email her and ask what they use/prefer.

Oldnuke on November 18, 2010 at 3:47 PM

What do you call it when a military dictator has a coup on by military (dictator yet to be seen). I knew there had to be a change in the army was the only way that Aung San Suu Kyi was going to get out. but she still can be put in back in at the moment of anti-junta protest.

tjexcite on November 18, 2010 at 3:48 PM

KGB on November 18, 2010 at 11:59 AM

Not in jest, it’s just that I’m not emotionally attached to the flowers and tambourines that people pull out for these situations.

In the end it’s just another 3rd world sh!thole. I’ve lived and operated in enough of them to know that she shouldn’t be surprised with the end results and despite what she says if she did rule I’m pretty sure not much would change for the average Burman. In fact she would have probably fallen right in line with the rest of the corrupt politicians who promise hope and change.

Alden Pyle on November 18, 2010 at 4:03 PM

What do they call themselves and why?

petunia on November 18, 2010 at 3:32 PM

Here’s my Daughter in law’s response.

Most Burmese inside the country use Myanmar, the version the military forced them to use. Burma is a name British gave us when they invaded our country so to show patriotism for their part, the Junta changed it to Myanmar which is a name we use in Burmese. Civilized countries like US and UK don’t recognize the Junta as a legitimate government, they still use the name they have always been. There is no difference for us Burmese because myanmar/bamar is what we say in Burmese. When we mention of our country in English, we use Burma to protest that junta. If you use that word inside the country, you can get arrested for it.

Oldnuke on November 18, 2010 at 4:04 PM

When we mention our country in English, we use Burma to protest that junta.

This is the point I was trying to make in the previous post.

Jeff on November 18, 2010 at 4:24 PM

Wow. I’m as conservative as anybody ever thought about being; but can’t some of you just be happy about some good news, without finding some way to contort it into a slam against Obama? He gives you plenty of credible material to criticize, so why latch onto this?

Seriously, I have no use for Obama, and anxiously look forward to the day he starts collecting his pension; but some of you guys have become seriously consumed by hate. Please, get help. I’m not kidding. This level of hate is dangerous to you, and injurious to those around you, especially children.

RegularJoe on November 18, 2010 at 4:45 PM

We need a bit of cheer, a Velvet Revolution in Southeast Asia.

AshleyTKing on November 18, 2010 at 10:43 PM

Good news… I remain cautiously optemistic…

Khun Joe on November 18, 2010 at 11:34 PM