Closed market’s valediction ironically explains its failure

posted at 11:36 am on November 12, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

There are few things more annoying than people blaming their failures on others.  There are few things more ironically humorous than watching a clueless person publicly scold people and in the process reveal his or her own ignorance.  And since examples of both at the same time come along so rarely, we have to take a good look at the Boston Herald’s report on the closing of Don Otto’s Market, a niche food market in Boston’s South End, where the management briefly posted a tirade against its customers for failing to buy what the owners demanded:

The manager of Don Otto’s – a recently shuttered food market in the South End – is blaming neighborhood patrons for its untimely demise, cooking up an angry message to fair-weather fans of the Tremont Street eatery.

“Don Otto’s Market wants to say we had few customers that understood customer loyalty and its importance to our business,” a message on its Web site reads, later adding: “If you came in only for baguettes, the occasional piece of cheese, the occasional dinner . . . you can not tell yourself you were a supporter of our market.”

The scalding remonstrance was written by Erin McLaughlin, 28, who ran the shop and is engaged to the owner, Michael Otto, 31.

“It was quite frank,” she acknowledged yesterday. “People don’t understand their purchases make a difference, and that by buying something that wasn’t exactly what you want, it gets you closer to what you want. It’s an investment.”

Actually, it was more revealing than McLaughlin realizes.  Perhaps she has spent too much time in Barney Frank’s district (he was a customer), but businesses don’t succeed by telling customers what they should want to buy.  Customers have this annoying tendency to know how they want to spend their own money, and businesses succeed by adapting to demand, not demanding that customers adapt to the owner’s own tastes in supply.  And if people wanted to “invest” in Don Otto’s, they would have bought stock in it rather than food they don’t want at prices that discouraged sales.

In a way, though, this is an allegory of elitism in general.  McLaughlin couldn’t pass laws to make sure that people could only buy her $28-per-pound steak, but she certainly sounds as if she would have done so if given the opportunity.  Her contempt for her customers is not dissimilar to the contempt shown by those in political office who pass laws barring restaurants from using saturated fats in their cooking, who ban Happy Meals, and who overhaul entire economic sectors because they believe people can’t make their own choices.

It looks as though McLaughlin at least learned that blaming customers for not surrendering to her diktats in the name of “investment” makes for bad public relations.  The valediction has disappeared from the website, replaced by a simple notice that Don Otto’s is closed.

Update: It looks as though arrogance really was the business plan, and it only took six months to fail.  Lee Doren sent over a Boston Globe story from May reporting on the new ownership and its goals:

Prepared foods include duck leg confit and a popular veggie lasagna. Otto and Lundberg are continuing to smoke bacon in house. All of the meats sold at the shop are local; prices are high but Otto says customers are coming in regularly with weekly meat orders that top $400.

Otto’s mission is to help shift people’s thinking about what food should cost, especially non-manufactured, non-processed foods. Although pricey eggs may not be for everyone, salsa, made in nearby Jamaica Plain, is a bit more accessible for the everyday shopper. The same goes for a jar of cider jelly from Springfield, Vt., that Lundberg has incorporated into pork dishes.

Eggs, from free-range chickens, are $8.50 a dozen. When asked whether people will balk at the cost, Otto shrugs and explains these chickens’ laying routine. “Their lay cycles rely on the sun, not on artificial lamps that distort production,’’ he says.

And customers’ shopping habits rely on how much things cost in relation to value as they perceive it, a lesson Otto learned the hard way.  There is nothing wrong with trying a business model and failing; that’s how innovation works.  But it’s beyond arrogant to blame customers for not paying exorbitant amounts of money for items they didn’t perceive as valuable just to support a failing business model.

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Comment pages: 1 2

AZfederalist on November 12, 2010 at 12:48 PM

Bingo.

swamp_yankee on November 12, 2010 at 1:22 PM

i.e. is the fact that she is the owner’s son’s fiance an aberration in that area?

AZfederalist on November 12, 2010 at 12:48 PM

Not that there’s anything wrong with that…..

roy_batty on November 12, 2010 at 1:25 PM

The term “free ranging chickens” is a bit of a mis-nomer. If a chicken is truly “free-ranging” then it is probably dead, via the local dog or coyote. These “free-ranging chickens are fenced, but not necessarily in cages. Sans fence = sans chicken. By the way, would you rather have a chicken fed on corn, egg shell, and chicken feed (that aint chicken feed, you know) than fed on bugs, chicken droppings,and any seed that blows into the pen. You know, chicken droppings in a cage go right through the bottom. Free range droppings stay right there to be walked in and eaten by the chicken.

It would be interesting, to me, if a group of highly touted food channel gurus could pass a true blind test on free-range vs cage chicken, partcularly if prepared the way they like it with one-pound of spice for each pound of chicken.

What a con job!

Old Country Boy on November 12, 2010 at 1:27 PM

Here’s Erin’s extensive corporate experience here:

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/erin-mclaughlin/6/879/a81

As I said, quite impressive

Miss_Anthrope on November 12, 2010 at 1:31 PM

Perhaps she has spent too much time in Barney Frank’s district (he was a customer),

I’m surprised Barney didn’t find a way to slip them some TARP funds.

djm1992 on November 12, 2010 at 1:32 PM

Eggs, from free-range chickens, are $8.50 a dozen.

Meanwhile, the eggs from the unionized chickens are $19.50 a dozen.

Emperor Norton on November 12, 2010 at 1:33 PM

Here’s Erin’s extensive corporate experience here:

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/erin-mclaughlin/6/879/a81

Miss_Anthrope on November 12, 2010 at 1:31 PM

The punchline -

Adept at outreach and community engagement strategies
.

roy_batty on November 12, 2010 at 1:38 PM

Sorry, pal, but we don’t need your social engineering.

molonlabe28 on November 12, 2010 at 1:40 PM

Typical Liberal, completely disconnected from any semblance of knowledge of economics.

Maybe she can spend her suddenly-found free time reading “Atlas Shrugged.”

glockomatic on November 12, 2010 at 1:49 PM

This story is priceless. You could not fabricate a more clueless main character.

She would have been a sterling manager for the defunct GUM department store in the former Soviet Union.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 1:51 PM

Eggs, from free-range chickens, are $8.50 a dozen. When asked whether people will balk at the cost, Otto shrugs and explains these chickens’ laying routine. “Their lay cycles rely on the sun, not on artificial lamps that distort production,’’ he says.

Someone’s been selling Otto a line of horse-pucky.

My grandma’s “free range” chicken’s LOVED to be inside the henhouse in the winter. They could have gone outside if they wanted to, the door was open, but they stayed inside. They may have been chickens, but they weren’t stupid. Sure the light was on in there all winter long, that’s how they heated the place, with a couple of 100 watt light bulbs. Did the chickens lay more eggs in the winter with the light on then they would have with it off? Sure. But they also didn’t freeze to death either.

If only someone would have gone in and explained to the chickens how artificial light was distorting their laying cycles, they probably would have rioted and demanded the lights be turned off.

Lily on November 12, 2010 at 1:53 PM

“Their lay cycles rely on the sun, not on artificial lamps that distort production,’’ he says.

You should see the futures on artificial food snobbery. You’re gonna need a bigger lamp.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 1:55 PM

I can see why they were shocked that their business model failed. They figured a community dumb enough to re-elect Barney Frank over and over and over and….where was I? Oh, they figured those same folks would be dumb enough to overpay for food.

olesparkie on November 12, 2010 at 1:56 PM

Ley’s just hope she restricts her efforts to local food and doesn’t try to pursue her “Interests”

Erin McLaughlin’s Interests:
International development and conflict resolution in the Middle East and Africa,

Alden Pyle on November 12, 2010 at 2:01 PM

It is to laugh. Hahahahahaahaha

Blaise on November 12, 2010 at 2:01 PM

Honestly, I can’t get over this… the fool of an owner of Don Otto’s thought people came in not for food but to be “a supporter of (her) market.”

Liberals… Not selling goods but good feelings. Or not, as the case may be.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 2:02 PM

olesparkie on November 12, 2010 at 1:56 PM

That’s probably what they thought. The only problem is that those folks weren’t spending other people’s money to buy $8.50/doz eggs. It was their own money so they opted for the Wal-Mart option.

Oldnuke on November 12, 2010 at 2:05 PM

“Their lay cycles rely on the sun, not on artificial lamps that distort production,’’ he says.

“The customers buying cycles rely upon price, not on owner arrogance”

PatriotRider on November 12, 2010 at 2:05 PM

prices are high but Otto says customers are coming in regularly with weekly meat orders that top $400.

Dude, that ain’t a grocery budget, that’s a cocaine habit. Addicts are not your most reliable customers in the long run.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 2:06 PM

Erin McLaughlin’s Interests:
International development and conflict resolution in the Middle East and Africa,

This woman is a walking caricature of the smug, clueless, self-infatuated Leftard. While I’d love to hear her views on how conflict in the Middle East could be resolved, I already know that she regards St. Pancake as a martyr to a glorious cause.

Cicero43 on November 12, 2010 at 2:07 PM

Erin McLaughlin’s Interests:
International development and conflict resolution in the Middle East and Africa
,

You might want to concentrate on developing conflict resolution with your customers. Apparently this thing called “prices” is a very important issue in the customer culture. Perhaps you can take a class at MIT on this.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 2:10 PM

$8.50 for a dozen of eggs? I wouldn’t pay that much to see a pissant eat a bale of hay!

ladyingray on November 12, 2010 at 2:14 PM

When I shopped at the hoity-toity Don Otto’s, I insisted on free-ranging arugula, and flounced out when they said theirs spent its life growing in one place,(and on the ground at that).

fulldroolcup on November 12, 2010 at 2:23 PM

Eh, they should have done mail order and internet, they might have made it. There is no way a business like that can survive with such a small demographic they’re targeting if they stay with a mortar and brick strategy.

The young lady that wrote that missive is a perfect example of Generation Me. It’s not a liberal thing. It’s a generational problem with many of the kids now. Their entire childhood they’ve been told how special they are and given a trophy for just trying hard while failing miserably. It’s the sense of entitlement with a splash of victim status thrown in when they don’t get what they want.

So, don’t believe this is just a one-off scenario of some liberal who failed. It’s Generation Me.

ButterflyDragon on November 12, 2010 at 2:23 PM

And guess what?

Erin & Michael created real victims of their arrogance.

Chances are high that lenders and equipment leasing companies will lose all their INVESTMENT since these snobs will not have the funds to pay back the loans given to this mess of a “business”

Opposite Day on November 12, 2010 at 2:28 PM

prices are high but Otto says customers are coming in regularly with weekly meat orders that top $400.

Dude, that ain’t a grocery budget, that’s a cocaine habit. Addicts are not your most reliable customers in the long run.

George Orwell on November 12, 2010 at 2:06 PM

OK. I confess. If we had a shop near where I live that had dry aged buffalo or venison or just generally non- steroid meat that was killed during hunting season with the proper tags – when you factor in how much the right gun and ammo cost and the cost of the hunt and everything … I would have sprung for a few hundred there every month on meat. Did they have that? Because I think there’s a market for that. For $8.50 a dozen, though? We have chickens running wild all the hell over the Keys. Just eat a lot of roosters and keep tabs on the egg laying areas and it’s the same for free.

Thank god my husband and son are going hunting in two weeks. This thread is making me crave.

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 2:47 PM

The father is hoping no one notices that his idiot son and his fiance opened up a ridiculously overpriced market 12 months into a terrible economy that has steadily gotten worse and worse. It was a bad economy 6 months ago when they opened.

These 2 not only deserve each other, they deserved to lose all their money, which is what happened. between the 2 of them they don’t have 2 brain cells to rub together. Dumb bimbo bride to be has made sure any future business that contains the name “Ott” in it that may open, no matter what it is, will fail thanks to her Hugo Chavez business style.

it’s highly amusing these 2 morons went broke lol

Niteowl45 on November 12, 2010 at 2:54 PM

Enjoy funemployment, scrunt.

Coronagold on November 12, 2010 at 2:57 PM

So, don’t believe this is just a one-off scenario of some liberal who failed. It’s Generation Me.

ButterflyDragon on November 12, 2010 at 2:23 PM

I understand what you’re saying, but I don’t think it’s right. I’m technically of their generation, if a couple of years older (I’m 34), and no one I know my age is this, well, stupid. I know people who’ve started businesses and succeeded, started businesses (or undergone certain ventures within their same business) and failed, and the one thing they all had in common was that, at no point, did they ever pin the responsibility for their success or failure on their customers or clients. I have never in my entire life heard anyone my age take this woman’s stance that their business failed because the customers weren’t educated enough to keep them open. Never. Never never never.

I’m not saying that there may not be a general undercurrent of selfishness running through my generation, but in no one I’ve ever known have I seen it advanced to such a ridiculous stage. You have to be seriously deluded and neck-deep in self-denial to believe what the morons in this story believe. This is not garden variety youth dumbness—this is high-level, programmed-from-birth kind of stuff.

WesternActor on November 12, 2010 at 3:02 PM

wth is a “scrunt”? lol! Never heard that one. Don’t tell me. I don’t want to know. In the photo the place looks charming but terribly inconvenient.

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 3:04 PM

Eggs, from free-range chickens, are $8.50 a dozen.

Apparently the egg supplier knew a good mark when he/she saw one, and took them for as much as they could before they went out of business.

“Yes, they came from free range chickens, you can tell by the small size, mottled look and the strong smell. We’ll give you a deal and sell them to you for only $4 a dozen…”

taznar on November 12, 2010 at 3:06 PM

Otto’s mission is to help shift people’s thinking about what food should cost, especially non-manufactured, non-processed foods

I don’t even … they just said they sell Duck Leg Confit and Vegi Lasagna. That didn’t come out of a cows ass or from the ground. They “manufactured” it – or am I terribly uninformed about the origins of packaged\prepared food?

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 3:07 PM

This story has stuck a particularly strong chord with me. I’m just utterly amazed. There are places in this country where a woman can live 28 years and be capable of expressing this sort of utter disconnect between assumptions and reality. Even after reading the daily parade of liberal silliness posted on Hot Air virtually from it’s beginning, I’m still wowed by this. Jeez! Come witness the profound cluelessness inherent in the system!

mugged on November 12, 2010 at 3:13 PM

“Yes, they came from free range chickens, you can tell by the small size, mottled look and the strong smell. We’ll give you a deal and sell them to you for only $4 a dozen…”

taznar on November 12, 2010 at 3:06 PM

..sounds like a hippie chick I used to date at UCLA.

The War Planner on November 12, 2010 at 3:21 PM

Actually, it was more revealing than McLaughlin realizes. Perhaps she has spent too much time in Barney Frank’s district (he was a customer), but businesses don’t succeed by telling customers what they should want to buy.

Just the other day, while standing in line at the post office, a retired auto worker informed me that the country would be in a lot better shape if we just restricted the number of choices people have in buying cars. “See,” he explained, “if we only let ‘em make Fords, everybody’s got to buy a Ford.”

The young don’t have a corner on the stupid market.

2L8 on November 12, 2010 at 3:22 PM

Just the other day, while standing in line at the post office, a retired auto worker informed me that the country would be in a lot better shape if we just restricted the number of choices people have in buying cars. “See,” he explained, “if we only let ‘em make Fords, everybody’s got to buy a Ford.”

The young don’t have a corner on the stupid market.

2L8 on November 12, 2010 at 3:22 PM

I like Ford. I have one. I drive a Mazda, which Ford owns a 13% interest in. I actually own two Mazdas and a Ford Truck. So. I’ve been assimilated and did not even know it.

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 3:27 PM

..a retired auto worker informed me that the country would be in a lot better shape if we just restricted the number of choices people have in buying cars…

The young don’t have a corner on the stupid market.

2L8 on November 12, 2010 at 3:22 PM

..wondering if he retired from the Jeep plant in Michigan?

The War Planner on November 12, 2010 at 3:30 PM

Hey Erin, Start up another store with daddy’s money and this time refuse service to anyone not driving a hyrid or electric vehicle. That should draw the customers you want and need.

Move fast before this idea is snapped up by someone else in your area!

RJL on November 12, 2010 at 3:47 PM

Erin McLaughlin’s Interests:
International development and conflict resolution in the Middle East and Africa

That is, the next time she makes the news headlines she’ll be on a flotilla, trying to break the Gaza blockade.

Will she use the store’s old baguettes as weapons when the IDF drops in?

Tak_Bulgogi on November 12, 2010 at 3:48 PM

Like I said this morning, she has a bright future in Massachusetts Democratic politics. She’ll be Governor or even a Senator before too long. As Ed hints, she’s learned the lessons they have taught her very well and articulated them perfectly. Substitute the subject and it could have been written by Barney Frank, John Kerry, Deval Patrick…or even Nancy Pelosi.

TheBigOldDog on November 12, 2010 at 3:50 PM

If there was only one health plan, everyone would have to use it.

roy_batty on November 12, 2010 at 3:55 PM

We featured local, high quality foods both raw and prepared. Unfortunately our products were expensive both at our cost and because we had a storefront to maintain at your cost as well. In some parts of the world people are accustomed to spending a higher percentage of their income on food, but in America we suffer from sticker shock because of Wal Mart and other discount vendors.

The reality is we pay for what we eat. Some are informed enough to know what that statement means. For those that don’t I am not going to elaborate here there is plenty of information out there if you are looking.

Don Otto’s Market wants to say we had few customers that understood customer loyalty and its importance to our business. Thank you for those that came in regularly and bought what we had though it may not have been exactly what they wanted. If you came in only for baguettes, the occasional piece of cheese, the occasional dinner, or something specific you were very disappointed we did not have, you can not tell yourself you were a supporter of our market. We hope that people that say they support small local businesses actually do support small local businesses. You may not always get what you want but you will get what you need.

Thanks to our patrons and we are sorry we couldn’t educate more people in the time we needed to for such a business to work.

This is so sanctimonious I don’t even know where to start. How about the business failed because the business model failed.

So go on and buy some organic, locally-produced Humble Pie.

Rightwingguy on November 12, 2010 at 4:06 PM

From the title of the post, I expected it to be about Al Gore’s Chicago Climate Exchange failure.

I read the whole thing thinking, ‘What do these expensive-egg-selling liberals have to do with the CCX?”

LASue on November 12, 2010 at 4:18 PM

Rightwingguy said (about the owner’s statememt), “This is so sanctimonious I don’t even know where to start. How about the business failed because the business model failed.”

I think it’s far simpler — the business failed because the owner is an a$$hole.

JerseyJeff on November 12, 2010 at 4:32 PM

JerseyJeff on November 12, 2010 at 4:32 PM

Couldn’t have said it better myself.

Rightwingguy on November 12, 2010 at 4:34 PM

roy_batty on November 12, 2010 at 3:55 PM

You know….OT and all that… It’s times like this I wish I went with something like “Rick Deckard” instead of “Rightwingguy”. Except there’s the whole subtext of “is he or isn’t he”…….a replicant.

Rightwingguy on November 12, 2010 at 4:37 PM

Market Hours: Mon-Fri 10a-8p, Sat 8a-7p & Sun 8a-6p

O.k. News Flash #2…if you want your business to succeed, you have to be open at reasonable times. I’m not waiting until 10 a.m. for my organic, free-range, locally-produced Eggs Benedict, thank you very much.

Rightwingguy on November 12, 2010 at 4:43 PM

“If you came in only for baguettes, the occasional piece of cheese, the occasional dinner . . . you can not tell yourself you were a supporter of our market.”

Is this a business or a charity case?

Count to 10 on November 12, 2010 at 4:45 PM

Out here in Road Kill Country…
Baby possums is cheap.
But, you can’t hardly give the damn things away.

OkieDoc on November 12, 2010 at 4:52 PM

Hmm….I buy cage free organic eggs from time to time. They are about $1.50 more than a regular dozen of eggs. Around here, a dozen eggs is generally about $1.80-$2.25 for large AA, and the cage free organics generally are priced around $3.50 to $4.00 a dozen.

Now I also buy eggs from friends who raise chickens for around $2.50 a dozen. They are also organic, cage free, but the supply is more sporadic and it tends to be a first come first served deal.

Anyone asking $8.00 for eggs though, I can think of absolutely no justification for those kinds of prices, except maybe they are greedy S.O.B.s hoping to get rich on the cash flush psuedo-greenies. No self-respecting hippy farm would ever charge that much.

flyfishingdad on November 12, 2010 at 4:56 PM

Out here in Road Kill Country…
Baby possums is cheap.
But, you can’t hardly give the damn things away.

OkieDoc on November 12, 2010 at 4:52 PM

Yeah but Aramdillo (aka possum on the half-shell) is much fancier so you can charge more. I saw possum in a can once. I bought it. Still have it actually.

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 4:57 PM

Chinese build a 15 story hotel in six days with less than 48 hours for erection. You couldn’t get an appointment with the building inspector in this country in six days. The environmental impact study would take three years.

“A construction crew in the south-central Chinese city of Changsha has completed a 15-story hotel in just six days. If nothing else, this remarkable achievement will stoke further complaints from American economic pundits that China’s economy is far more accomplished than ours in tending to such basics as construction.

The work crew erected the hotel — a soundproofed, thermal-insulated structure reportedly built to withstand a magnitude 9 earthquake — with all prefabricated materials. In other words, a crew of off-site factory workers built the sections, and their on-site counterparts arranged them on the foundation for the Ark project.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ps0DSihggio

Viator on November 12, 2010 at 5:00 PM

This reminds me of some of the morons on the show “We Mean Business” who are about ready to close up because they have no idea what they are doing, have the cast of the show come in and completely redo their business, give them a workable business plan and the equipment to succeed and then a week later, go back to the same ill-conceived ideas that got them to the brink of failure to begin with. Some people just can’t be taught and should never be in business for themselves.

flytier on November 12, 2010 at 5:04 PM

I wouldn’t pay that much to see a pissant eat a bale of hay!

Apparently from the South?

flytier on November 12, 2010 at 5:12 PM

One less liberal pipe dream predicated on the theory that people are too stupid to know what they should pay!!!

NEXT TO GO: the Chevy VOLT!!!

….for the same reason!!!

landlines on November 12, 2010 at 5:20 PM

Is this a business or a charity case?

Count to 10 on November 12, 2010 at 4:45 PM

Neither. It’s an equal rights case. Since other stores succeed then the government needs to ensure that all businesses succeed. Otherwise it’s not fair.

These two clowns are probably products of the MA school system where failure is not an option – everyone succeeds – there are no winners, no losers, no pass, no fail … until they get into the real world … and fall flat on their faces.

Failure can be a very valuable and positive experience if you learn and grow from it. Obviously they never have or they wouldn’t be blaming everyone else.

These two have learned nothing from it and will continue to fail … or go to work for the government where you don’t have to worry about it.

Rod on November 12, 2010 at 5:24 PM

Chinese build a 15 story hotel in six days with less than 48 hours for erection. You couldn’t get an appointment with the building inspector in this country in six days. The environmental impact study would take three years.

Viator on November 12, 2010 at 5:00 PM

I build my last home in the foothills of Southern CA. It took me 18 months – 18 @#^& MONTHS – to get a permit.

Rod on November 12, 2010 at 5:29 PM

If you came in only for baguettes, the occasional piece of cheese, the occasional dinner, or something specific you were very disappointed we did not have, you can not tell yourself you were a supporter of our market. We hope that people that say they support small local businesses actually do support small local businesses. You may not always get what you want but you will get what you need.

Ay caramba! If that’s not a typical liberal attitude, then nothing is. Screw what you idiot customers want! We’ll give you what you need, and by god, you’ll like it!

No wonder your “business” went under. Even in uber-blue Taxachusetts, people will eventually get fed up with attitudes like this. They might as well have named the place “Don Otto’s Soviet”. It would have been a more fitting name……

djm1992 on November 12, 2010 at 5:34 PM

BrideOfRove on November 12, 2010 at 4:57 PM

Yeah I got both of the critters in my yard.
I have to occasionally shoot at em with a bb gun at night just to keep them from diggin shyte up.

But, most of the time they’re too drunk to even care, in which case we just go out and gather up the free range ‘dilla eggs.

OkieDoc on November 12, 2010 at 5:34 PM

These two clowns are probably products of the MA school system where failure is not an option – everyone succeeds – there are no winners, no losers, no pass, no fail … until they get into the real world … and fall flat on their faces.

—————
no, just complete morons that fell through the cracks of the natural order of selection. They don’t have the common sense god gave a dumb goose. What about the father? He was a partner too and just as big and idiot. Different generation that didnt get a trophy for everyone. The complete moron gene passed down in that family!

Niteowl45 on November 12, 2010 at 5:50 PM

Ley’s just hope she restricts her efforts to local food and doesn’t try to pursue her “Interests”

Erin McLaughlin’s Interests:
International development and conflict resolution in the Middle East and Africa,

Alden Pyle on November 12, 2010 at 2:01 PM

No…let’s encourage her to follow in the footsteps (or treadmarks) of Rachel Corrie and similar oxygen thieves.

RedMindBlueState on November 12, 2010 at 5:51 PM

It would be interesting, to me, if a group of highly touted food channel gurus could pass a true blind test on free-range vs cage chicken, partcularly if prepared the way they like it with one-pound of spice for each pound of chicken.

What a con job!

Old Country Boy on November 12, 2010 at 1:27 PM

Here you go OCB, I think this will make you very happy:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/what-are-the-best-eggs-cage-free-organic-omega-3s-grocery-store-brand-the-food-lab.html

Ann NY on November 12, 2010 at 6:51 PM

Eggs, from free-range chickens, are $8.50 a dozen. When asked whether people will balk at the cost, Otto shrugs and explains these chickens’ laying routine. “Their lay cycles rely on the sun, not on artificial lamps that distort production,’’ he says.

Until just a few years ago I raised chickens and sold the eggs. My chicken house didn’t have any lights in it; the chickens’ “lay cycles rel[y](ied) on the sun”. They weren’t “free range” in that they didn’t wander at will but they didn’t sit in cages either. The endeavor was quite profitable. I sold the eggs for $2/dozen. I only stopped because I got a very good paying job that didn’t leave time to care for a few dozen laying hens.
You’d have to be pretty stupid to pay $8.50/dozen for eggs.

single stack on November 12, 2010 at 7:23 PM

If any one was wondering why egg-production has gone to “industrial” models, now you know. $8.50 a dozen, yowch!

LarryD on November 12, 2010 at 12:24 PM

That was my thought exactly!

There is a reason for egg farms where maybe the chickens aren’t as happy… if a chicken can be happy… but they are dependable.

Any place that depends on people to regularly pay $400 a month just for the meat on their shopping list is asking a bit much in a recession aren’t they? I wonder what the owners pay for there meat now that they don’t have an income. I bet they aren’t buying $8.50 eggs either.

How many people with that kind of money to burn do their own cooking and shopping anyway?

Maybe I just don’t know but how things work.

petunia on November 12, 2010 at 7:46 PM

You know….OT and all that… It’s times like this I wish I went with something like “Rick Deckard” instead of “Rightwingguy”. Except there’s the whole subtext of “is he or isn’t he”…….a replicant.

Rightwingguy on November 12, 2010 at 4:37 PM


…..one of them got fried running through an electrical field…..

and so the math stops working.

roy_batty on November 12, 2010 at 8:00 PM

Ann NY on November 12, 2010 at 6:51 PM

Thankyou Ann. You made this old man’s day. I was an engineer scientist by trade, before retirement. I have raised chickens on my farm as a hobby – with the old country girl operating a 10K hatchery on the side for a few years. At that time the arucana (colored or easter egg) was the in-item for its supposed low cholesterol. I happened to have a chemist friend, working at a local lab, who in a previous life had run into he same thing. His job was to see if there were any cholesterol differences between arucana eggs and commercial eggs. His findings were that there were no differences and the state he was in prohibited the advertising of such differences based on his findings.

For all you dear hearts that think you like free range eggs, remember that free range chickens often are acquainted with roosters. Caged hens (you only get eggs from hens for the incogncenti) never see a rooster. The result of the roosterial acquaintance will often be blood or an embryo in the egg yolk. That is why your grandma NEVER broke an egg directly in the cake, but into another dish. Happy eating!

Old Country Boy on November 12, 2010 at 8:15 PM

“Yes, they came from free range chickens, you can tell by the small size, mottled look and the strong smell. We’ll give you a deal and sell them to you for only $4 a dozen…”

taznar on November 12, 2010 at 3:06 PM

..sounds like a hippie chick I used to date at UCLA.

The War Planner on November 12, 2010 at 3:21 PM

I seem to remember the hippie chicks being more like $6 a dozen, but then that’s inflation for you…

bofh on November 12, 2010 at 8:56 PM

If this was in California and it was 2001 she would have made a killing, now not so much.

Such a great allegory for the whole neo-Eco-envio-left save the planet with one chicken at a time that is free ranged yet the cost is 100 times what can be when well being is not the highest priority, making money is.

tjexcite on November 12, 2010 at 11:08 PM

Oh yessss what this economy needs is an 800% markup on common domestic goods.

Can we just shoot stupid people yet?

ace tomato on November 13, 2010 at 12:05 AM

Rod on November 12, 2010 at 5:24 PM

Exacty right!

B. Hussein Obama is another example of this same kind of person.

Mahdi on November 13, 2010 at 8:45 AM

Don and Erin: “We need a government program to edumacate the masses as to why our over-priced, unwanted products are in the best interest of Bostonian elitists.”

“. . . and a bail out, while yer at it . . .”.

BigAlSouth on November 13, 2010 at 8:49 AM

I wonder: when they weren’t selling enough to keep the business, did they drop their prices to get more customers, or did they raise their prices on the theory that the number of sales was fixed?

Count to 10 on November 13, 2010 at 11:58 AM

From the article moochy linked –

“In my dad’s day food was actually better for you because a lot more of it was local, conglomerates striving for profit didn’t make everything then. And in some ways the food from that time resembles the food we’re offering now.”

There’s their problem right there, at the beginning; if you don’t “strive for profit”, as is obvious by their attitude towards it, you will not last. What did they think they were doing? Running a customer-supported non-profit?

JeffWeimer on November 13, 2010 at 2:51 PM

I finally realized why she was so angry and why she said, what she said, in the way she said it.

She actually just discovered Libs are total frauds. The don’t really support the things they claim to support. It’s all just an act and she learned the lesson the hard way when they refused to pay for what they claimed they wanted.

That’s why she’s mad. That’s what she’s calling out. Since most of us aren’t Lib eco-frauds, the real message gets missed.

TheBigOldDog on November 13, 2010 at 5:12 PM

There are five Big Lots stores within 25 miles from Boston. No free-range eggs but lots of canned goods from communist China. Perhaps the female proprietor should check out a BL business plan and get a clue.

Mae on November 13, 2010 at 9:27 PM

I’ll bet they wouldn’t have needed $8.50 for eggs if these LINO (Liberal In Name Only) shop owners hadn’t insisted on making such a large PROFIT!!!

Where was their concern for the working man?

And I didn’t see any indication that they gave their employees way-over-minimum-wage pay, health care, child care, 2-week vacations, family leave, personal time off, and health club memberships!!!!

/SARC>

landlines on November 14, 2010 at 10:46 AM

Should’ve included Mike Otto’s LinkedIn when I found it:

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/mike-otto/18/326/233

Guy’s got as little experience as his bride-to-be…

On a lark, I looked up his other job experience mentioned, Dunrite Construction…this is owned by his father!

http://dunriteboston.com/

Dad ain’t too bright, if he allows his son this amount of impingement on his reputation as a businessman.

Miss_Anthrope on November 15, 2010 at 9:58 AM

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