Aftermath: GOP makes big gains in state legislatures, governors

posted at 10:55 am on November 3, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

While people understandably focused on the Congressional races in the midterm elections, the change in the states may be more profound and have more impact on future Congresses, as well as on the upcoming 2012 presidential race.  Republican incumbents didn’t lose a single gubernatorial race last night and the GOP picked up ten seats overall in those races.  They also dominated the legislative races in the states, winning control in more than a dozen states.

First, the executive races:

The wave swept a diverse batch of GOP winners into office, including a Latina in New Mexico, a Latino in Nevada and the daughter of Sikh immigrants in South Carolina.

The GOP pickups were a major blow to President Barack Obama on an already tough night. In addition to Ohio and Iowa, Republicans seized the executive mansions in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Nevada, Kansas, Tennessee and Oklahoma. More than half of the states will be keys to his reelection.

Democrats only got one pickup, California, although Rick Scott hasn’t officially completed his win in Florida.  If Alex Sink makes up the 50K vote deficit she currently has in the final 10% of precincts left to count, that would be a second pickup.  The race in Oregon is closer than Florida, with only 40K votes separating Republican Chris Dudley and former Democratic governor John Kitzhaber.  Republican Paul LePage narrowly leads in Maine as well.

The broad change complicates matters for Barack Obama.  Losing Wisconsin, Tennessee, Kansas, New Mexico, and especially Michigan and Iowa eats into Obama’s base of support in a general election, and potentially even in a primary, although Obama does better on the coasts anyway.  If a Democrat rises out of the Midwest to challenge Obama from the right (Evan Bayh) or the left (perhaps Russ Feingold?), Obama may have a tough time surviving it.

Meanwhile, Obama’s party is heading for hard times, thanks to a major shift in legislative control just as redistricting begins in earnest:

A bad night for Democrats Tuesday got even worse at the local level: Republicans were on the verge of winning nearly all 17 of the state legislative chambers they had originally set out for on Tuesday, some for the first time in decades, a shift that puts the GOP in the driver’s seat when the congressional redistricting process begins early next year.

The GOP gains were most significant in the Midwest, where the party picked up state House majorities in the Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania, and were within striking distance of capturing legislatures in the highly-prized electoral battlegrounds of Michigan and Wisconsin. But Republicans also gained control of both chambers of the New Hampshire and North Carolina legislature, and took the Alabama legislature for the first time since Reconstruction.

The New Hampshire win was a windfall for Republicans, who picked up more than 120 seats to flip the House while also snatching away the Senate, earning a seat at the redistricting table with Gov. John Lynch, a Democrat who narrowly won a fourth term. And the Buckeye State win gave the GOP a measure of revenge: they lost control of the House to Democrats in 2008 by just a handful of seats.

Coupled with wins at the gubernatorial level, the GOP takeovers of those state legislatures means Democrats will be out in the cold when new congressional districts are drawn with 2010 census data.

Before considering the redistricting issue, this demonstrates that the wave was both wide and deep last night.  The message from voters wasn’t just in response to Nancy Pelosi or Barack Obana, but to the entire Democratic Party and its direction.   This will also mean that Republicans will have a deeper bench in future Congressional races, making it even more difficult for Democrats to reverse their losses in the near- to mid-term.

That’s not what worries Democrats the most, though, about future Democratic prospects in the US House.  These legislatures have to redraw Congressional districts this year, which means that the politics of each district will change.  Some Democratic incumbents may be forced to run against each other in order to survive in 2012, and in these states at least, Republican districts will become easier to defend.   That will be especially important in battleground states like Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and North Carolina.

This may be the biggest victory for Republicans from last night, and perhaps the longest-lasting.


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Ask the commander of Dien Bien Phu.
Bishop on November 3, 2010 at 11:31 AM

Yes, the Sane, productive people of California are almost surrounded by the forces of Ho Chi Moonbeam.

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 11:38 AM

I’m still trying to figure out what is it about 14.5% unemployment that the people of Nevada like. Thanks guys.

Here in PA, we did our part.

fogw on November 3, 2010 at 11:06 AM

I wish I could explain it. The problem in Nevada is that for those not working, things are bad, but for those with jobs things are livable.

Las Vegas is a union city and the Dems and unions are joined at the hip. Reid’s team got out those votes by busing them from the casinos. They gave out fliers with their picks and their little workers dutifully did as their master’s bid.

Jvette on November 3, 2010 at 11:38 AM

Have fun protecting your seats via redistricting!

Maybe once that’s done you’ll drop the pretense of being the “transparent, ethical” party?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Why accuse before anything has been done?

BuckeyeSam on November 3, 2010 at 11:39 AM

Don’t be too happy about California. I live here and can’t leave because my house won’t sell in the current market, and maybe never. I did my part and voted down the line Republican yesterday, got my son and daughter to the polls as well. Husband already voted by mail.

We are going to have to live with all the crud that Brown and Boxer shovel on this state. I was here before when Brown was governor, so I know what to expect. (sigh)

hachiban on November 3, 2010 at 11:40 AM

When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe.
– Thomas Jefferson

Change Europe to CA or IL.

WashJeff on November 3, 2010 at 11:14 AM

In the sea of red, there are small islands of blue and those are the big urban areas of the states. These are the people who are destroying this country. No wonder the Dems hate the suburbs and want us all living like caged rats in their cities.

Jvette on November 3, 2010 at 11:41 AM

Ask the commander of Dien Bien Phu.
Bishop on November 3, 2010 at 11:31 AM

Yes, the Sane, productive people of California are almost surrounded by the forces of Ho Chi Moonbeam.

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 11:38 AM

lol! I needed that!

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:41 AM

Maybe once that’s done you’ll drop the pretense of being the “transparent, ethical” party?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Now now, the democrat party stopped playing fair a long time ago. Sauce for the goose and all that.

Rebar on November 3, 2010 at 11:42 AM

I gotta brag just a tiny bit about the Texas house. We made a Staggering Net Gain of 22 seats in the House. Not one single R incumbent lost.

The majority is so huge that we are within one vote of being able to write and pass constitutional amendments without a single D crossover.

RushBaby on November 3, 2010 at 11:42 AM

IN passed its property tax cap amendment. 1% of assessed home value. Property taxes in IN will be 50% or more lower in IN than IL.

So fricken jealous!!

WashJeff on November 3, 2010 at 11:35 AM

Maybe our overlords will give us a furlough so we can visit Indiana.

annoyinglittletwerp on November 3, 2010 at 11:42 AM

When I’m sworn in next month as the state rep for my district, we will put an end to the rumor that New Hampshire is becoming North Massachusetts.

HUGE win for the GOP in NH last night.

Bruce MacMahon on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

What’s worse is that the deer hunting success rate in Kalifornia is under 15%. I grew up in Mo. It’s time to head back to the Midwest venison farm!

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

New York voted for the man who almost single handedly caused the financial collapse of 2008, Andy Cuomo, and voted for a corruptocrat democrap as Attorney General, Schneiderman. The Republican Party leadership, Mr. Cox, et al., should immediately tender their resignations. A once in a lifetime potential to win all top electoral offices in NYS was squandered by these know nothing and do nothing politicos.

eaglewingz08 on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

Maybe our overlords will give us a furlough so we can visit Indiana.

annoyinglittletwerp on November 3, 2010 at 11:42 AM

I still like the idea of redividing IL and IN. Make IL be Cook County and northern Lake County IN, and make the remaining area IN. I can dream!

WashJeff on November 3, 2010 at 11:49 AM

Why accuse before anything has been done?

BuckeyeSam on November 3, 2010 at 11:39 AM

You don’t wake up wondering if the sun had risen, do you? Politicians of either party redistricting in such a way that protects their seats is as likely as the sunrise. You know it, I know it…why act like something is fundamentally different now?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:49 AM

Good Lt on November 3, 2010 at 11:07 AM

Now that was funny!

txhsmom on November 3, 2010 at 11:50 AM

eaglewingz08 on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

Only Rudy could have beaten Cuomo, and only after the mother of all campaigns.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:50 AM

This California resident is currently looking for jobs out of state. This election was the turning point for me. It’s time to go.

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:16 AM

Me too, Pugwriter. It’s sad – this state had so much potential even 10 years ago. It’s going to lose a good chunk of it’s remaining productive citizens soon (including offspring– my daughter is considering UCLA or Berkeley for next year, but after California’s performance last night, I will, ahem, strongly encourage her to go out of state).

LASue on November 3, 2010 at 11:51 AM

RushBaby on November 3, 2010 at 11:42 AM

I am happy about it too. I just wish it would trickle down locally….I really want all the PC crap out of the Texas Public Schools. No more multicultural bull crap, and get rid of the requirement that you have to be bi lingual in Dallas, to be hired by the Public School System.

The Republicans want to shore up their gains, they need to show us the change in our neighborhoods. No more GREENIE agenda taught to my kid in school. I don’t believe in AGW and I sure the he11 don’t want it taught as a religion to my kid in Public School. I am paying high property taxes to our Public School System…..and no more Fall, Winter and Spring Festivals. Bring back Halloween, Christmas and Easter Parties. I am sick of the school system bending over backwards to fit the Progressive agenda…The Republicans want to show Voters they can change our lives they need to show us, don’t just hold the line “PUSH BACK”

Dr Evil on November 3, 2010 at 11:52 AM

You don’t wake up wondering if the sun had risen, do you? Politicians of either party redistricting in such a way that protects their seats is as likely as the sunrise. You know it, I know it…why act like something is fundamentally different now?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:49 AM

The difference is that you raised no objections that anybody here can see when Democrats did it after 2006 and 2008.

But suddenly, it’s a bad idea, a blight on America and the reason the GOP is, um, the enemy of democracy or something.

If you can point to a GOP candidate anywhere that said they would NOT redistrict after getting into office, please show us.

It’s called politics.

Elections have consequences. So do yea votes on large pieces of socialist legislation at the national level.

Yes?

Good Lt on November 3, 2010 at 11:53 AM

Maybe once that’s done you’ll drop the pretense of being the “transparent, ethical” party?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Relax, Champ. We’ll just be undoing all the previous Dem gerrymandering.

BTW, how does that full diaper feel?

stvnscott on November 3, 2010 at 11:53 AM

This California resident is currently looking for jobs out of state. This election was the turning point for me. It’s time to go.

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:16 AM

Me too, Pugwriter. It’s sad – this state had so much potential even 10 years ago. It’s going to lose a good chunk of it’s remaining productive citizens soon (including offspring– my daughter is considering UCLA or Berkeley for next year, but after California’s performance last night, I will, ahem, strongly encourage her to go out of state).

LASue on November 3, 2010 at 11:51 AM

The natural resources here are second to none. The mishandling of those same resources is, likewise, second to none.

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:54 AM

As much as I like this, I firmly believe there should be no safe districts, for any party.

Every congress critter should have to worry about re-election every time it comes up.

Or else you could end up like me with a corrupt congress gritter for life…Eddie Bernice Johnson, TX-30.

cozmo on November 3, 2010 at 11:54 AM

What’s worse is that the deer hunting success rate in Kalifornia is under 15%. I grew up in Mo. It’s time to head back to the Midwest venison farm!

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

You can come to my yard in SD and bag all the deer you want. I am sick and tired of them eating my roses down to the ground. You can even get a mountain lion permit if you want. Those stupid lazy things are all over the place and I dunno what they are eating but it isn’t deer.

And yeah I live in the Black Hills National Forest, but I am right in the middle of town where wild animals are supposedly afraid to go. Isn’t that why we have to have so many wildlife sanctuary areas?

Lily on November 3, 2010 at 11:57 AM

The difference is that you raised no objections that anybody here can see when Democrats did it after 2006 and 2008.

Good Lt on November 3, 2010 at 11:53 AM

Could you point out any examples of redistricting after 2006 or 2008?

Generally, it’s only done once per decade.

notropis on November 3, 2010 at 11:57 AM

Could you point out any examples of redistricting after 2006 or 2008?

Generally, it’s only done once per decade.

notropis on November 3, 2010 at 11:57 AM

Well slap me then, because I was working under the assumption that there was going to be a 40-year rule of the Democrat party.

Good Lt on November 3, 2010 at 11:58 AM

The high priced army of GOP consultants that Meg Whitman used will turn up again working for GOP presidential candidates. We need to keep an eye on where they go, and run from those candidates as quickly as possible.

Mark1971 on November 3, 2010 at 11:58 AM

Memo to Democrats in Washington: You just got teabagged! Suck on that!

Pcoop on November 3, 2010 at 11:59 AM

Or else you could end up like me with a corrupt congress gritter for life…Eddie Bernice Johnson, TX-30.

cozmo on November 3, 2010 at 11:54 AM

Don’t you just love her?! I think the whole state was hoping she would go down. Well, everyone EXCEPT for TX-30. Too bad Pastor Broden made some mistakes. Awwww… Who am I kidding? It wasn’t even close.

stvnscott on November 3, 2010 at 11:59 AM

Good Lt on November 3, 2010 at 11:53 AM

So long as you admit that the GOP ought to abuse a broken method of apportioning representation, everything’s fine. Non-partisan citizen panels would be preferable, but hey, to the victor go the spoils, right?

It’ll be interesting to see what governing does to the image of the GOP as noble stalwarts of the people. It’s already warn off for you, apparently. Enjoy the fruits of corruption, you earned it.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM

You can come to my yard in SD and bag all the deer you want. I am sick and tired of them eating my roses down to the ground. You can even get a mountain lion permit if you want. Those stupid lazy things are all over the place and I dunno what they are eating but it isn’t deer.

And yeah I live in the Black Hills National Forest, but I am right in the middle of town where wild animals are supposedly afraid to go. Isn’t that why we have to have so many wildlife sanctuary areas?

Lily on November 3, 2010 at 11:57 AM

That settles it. I’m narrowing my job search to SD! Great opportunity to get myself a good bird dog too!

pugwriter on November 3, 2010 at 12:03 PM

It would be even more meaningful if we repealed the 17th Amendment so that state legislatures selected Senators.
DrMagnolias on November 3, 2010 at 11:09 AM

THIS.
I want it.

For those who are worried that cutting & running from places like CA & NY I say this:
Don’t feel bad about leaving.
This can be your way of fighting for something better in your state.
As a productive citizen, you are making your voice heard by LEAVING with your MONEY.
Without you to enable them, these places will go up in liberal flames, allowing you to have finally fought your fight & made your point.

And while I really don’t want any liberals coming here, in North Dakota, we will welcome all of you persecuted conservative souls.
There are many jobs here my friends.
But in W. ND you may have to bring your own house with you.
There’s a big shortage of homes in W ND.

Badger40 on November 3, 2010 at 12:04 PM

Have fun protecting your seats via redistricting!

Maybe once that’s done you’ll drop the pretense of being the “transparent, ethical” party?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:37 AM

This is the bitter taste of defeat, is it not?

No pretense, but unlike you, with the Dems, we mean to hold our elected officials feet to the fire. That is what this election was all about. Dems made it clear they weren’t interested in what we wanted. They refused to listen, rather, they demeaned, chastized, criticized, and even rediculed their constituents. Now…some states, like California, chose to keep that kind of leadership. But many others shunned it, spurned it, turned it away.

Make no mistakes. We’re sick of being brow beaten by both parties, but Republicans so far, have heard the outrage, and we WILL hold them accountable. Can liberals say the same for their leaders?

I don’t think so!

capejasmine on November 3, 2010 at 12:04 PM

There is an opening now for the Tea Parties at the state level to make profound changes via state legislatures.

It is much more profound than the national opportunities.

I hope we take it.

rickyricardo on November 3, 2010 at 12:07 PM

Have fun protecting your seats via redistricting!

Maybe once that’s done you’ll drop the pretense of being the “transparent, ethical” party?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Take a look at Jack Murtha’s former district, then get back with us with your holier than thou attitude. That’s just one egregious example. Raul Grajalva’s district in AZ has little gerrymandered areas with the same purpose.

Maybe by re-districting along reasonable lines, the Republicans will restore some sanity.

AZfederalist on November 3, 2010 at 12:08 PM

It’ll be interesting to see what governing does to the image of the GOP as noble stalwarts of the people. It’s already warn off for you, apparently. Enjoy the fruits of corruption, you earned it.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM

Corruption? Have you been paying attention to your ilk lately? My God man!!! WAKE UP!!!

Corruption comes from both sides, but it’s quite hypocritical of you to be hurling that, when that’s all we’ve had from Dems for the past 3 freakin years.

At the Obama ordained sanity rally last weekend, communists came out asking…what’s wrong with communism? I won’t get into that right now, but it’s an outright admission, of what the Democrat party has become. They hide behind the word “progressive” but in the end, it’s the same d@mn thing. So obviously, this is what you are, and it is not something to be embraced, but to be railed against.

I really feel for you. You may see this as the path to utopia, but it’s only a path to a reality of nightmares.

Just ask all those murdered under communisms in China, Russia, North Korea, etc…

capejasmine on November 3, 2010 at 12:08 PM

capejasmine on November 3, 2010 at 12:04 PM

The proof will be in the pudding. We’ll all be watching; we all have a vested interest in government getting smaller and being held more accountable. The only difference between you and I is that I don’t trust the GOP to do it.

And for the record, I congratulated you guys last night on a job well done. I really respect the process, and conservatives showed that they respect it as well. I’m not bitter. I’ll just be watching like a hawk for examples of tea partiers and conservatives going back on their word. Hopefully you will too.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:09 PM

Maybe by re-districting along reasonable lines, the Republicans will restore some sanity.

AZfederalist on November 3, 2010 at 12:08 PM

Do you really believe they will?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:11 PM

So long as you admit that the GOP ought to abuse a broken method of apportioning representation, everything’s fine. Non-partisan citizen panels would be preferable, but hey, to the victor go the spoils, right?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM

Ernesto, if the districts were drawn as close to square as physically possible, the GOP would still gain. Don’t try to pass off the notion that each side is dirty. Minority majority districts are but one example. If you look at Pennsylvania, (before last night) the dem districts are at their minimum population, and the GOP districts are at their max.

Vashta.Nerada on November 3, 2010 at 12:14 PM

Hooboy, do the Dems have themselves some problems!

Ideological problems–the progressive agenda is now a liability, apart from certain urban and ethnic enclaves. There’s a growing schism in Donkey Land.

Structural problems–The GOP will rewrite congressional districts in the majority of states. Much of the South and Midwest have enough Republican cushion to throw half of their Dem districts up for grabs. Plus, a strongly Republican House will choke off funds to the Dems’ Blue Machine of unions, government workers plus media and academia.

Communications problems–Not one of the Dems’ big narratives concerning the election and their agenda has survived yesterday. They are starting from scratch. With nuthin’.

Procedural problems galore–work with the other side? Obamy don’t play that game, even as he jets off to do Mumbai on $200 million a day. Holder, Rangel, Waters et al will be visibly on the hot seat, and, while the public does not like vendettas, these are poster boys for what’s wrong in Washington.

Also, California will stand out like a weeping open sore, just as Reid’s grumpy Gus face back leading the Senate will be too. And don’t be surprised to see a dozen or more top Dem Reps resign rather than go back to minority status, maybe even the Nancemeister herself.

Obama’s been whining about the bad hand he was dealt. Don’t be surprised to see him ask to change the game to Lowball with the hand he has now.

Chaz on November 3, 2010 at 12:16 PM

Do you really believe they will?

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:11 PM

I hope the republicans draw the districts exactly how the democrats did – to their maximum advantage.

This idea that the republicans have to abide by rules the democrats ignore, is dead.

Rebar on November 3, 2010 at 12:18 PM

OT, I know, but .. can anyone direct me to a list that shows WHICH new statesmen/women will take over immediately, and which in Jan ??
I just haven’t looked that closely.

CONGRATS TO ALL OF US FOR LAST NIGHT ! hehe

pambi on November 3, 2010 at 12:23 PM

Elections have consequences…

d1carter on November 3, 2010 at 12:24 PM

Vashta.Nerada on November 3, 2010 at 12:14 PM

I would gladly accept square districts that resulted in more GOP representation over further gerrymandering. Your compatriots, however, seem to salivate at the thought of playing the dirtiest of political games.

The dems made a living out of this, and that’s why I don’t sit around lamenting their downfall. But I get the feeling that those with an interest in transparent government will not be well served by the incoming republicans either.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:29 PM

The wins in the states are the real story of the night.

These governors and legislators are going to lay down the 2010/12 redistricting and that is going to make it even more difficult for the DOTUS and the Dems in 2012.

Now, let’s just hope the PROGRESSIVES or the CINO’s in the GOP don’t sell us out and we wind up with the same crap as Obama has been giving us only on a slower train over the cliff.

PappyD61 on November 3, 2010 at 12:33 PM

The New Hampshire win was a windfall for Republicans, who picked up more than 120 seats to flip the House while also snatching away the Senate, earning a seat at the redistricting table with Gov. John Lynch, a Democrat who narrowly won a fourth term.

There are actually over 120 seats in the state legislature of a tiny state like New Hampshire, which only has 2 seats in the U.S. House?

Yet the State House in California (53 U.S. House districts) has only 80 members, and the State Senate only 40 members–a candidate needs more votes to be a CA State Senator than a U.S. House member!

California would probably get a better state government if it (at least) doubled the number of State legislators, so that people would be better represented. Of course, good luck with the re-districting!

Steve Z on November 3, 2010 at 12:33 PM

HUGE win for the GOP in NH last night.

Bruce MacMahon on November 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM

Amen-the Rethuglicans now have a veto-proof majority in the NH Legislature, which is the largest in the US and the 4th largest English speaking legislative body in the world.

But of course, that means nothing. After all:

Right, yeah you’ll gain seats. That happens in virtually every midterm after the majority party wins the presidency. Congrats on conforming to historical trends.

crr6 on October 27, 2010 at 11:23 AM

Del Dolemonte on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

At the Obama ordained sanity rally last weekend, communists came out asking…what’s wrong with communism? I won’t get into that right now, but it’s an outright admission, of what the Democrat party has become. They hide behind the word “progressive” but in the end, it’s the same d@mn thing. So obviously, this is what you are, and it is not something to be embraced, but to be railed against.
I really feel for you. You may see this as the path to utopia, but it’s only a path to a reality of nightmares.
Just ask all those murdered under communisms in China, Russia, North Korea, etc…
capejasmine on November 3, 2010 at 12:08 PM

I really would like some of you Leftists to explain the difference between the ideology of the Democratic party today and the ideology of the Communist/Socialists?

How are they different?

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:09 PM

My apologies. I didn’t see any of your posts last night. Things were so fast, and so furious, I just couldn’t keep up, so I went to the tv, then to bed. lol

Rest assured, I plan to keep my local, and national officials feet to the fire. I don’t like gerrymandering much, but I don’t think that’s something that can be stopped? Each party will do what they need to, for survival.

But as for transparency, and policy…I think Americans are engaged, and ready. As I said, that’s what last night was about. Not just a repudiation of Dem policies, but a message to all in D.C. We’re mad as hell, and we’re not taking it anymore. They have been warned. Whether or not they heed that, is up to them. They do know now, there will be repurcussions to t heir actions, or inaction.

capejasmine on November 3, 2010 at 12:36 PM

There are actually over 120 seats in the state legislature of a tiny state like New Hampshire, which only has 2 seats in the U.S. House?

Steve Z on November 3, 2010 at 12:33 PM

See my post below yours. NH’s Legislature has 424 members.

Del Dolemonte on November 3, 2010 at 12:36 PM

And it just so happens that unemployment now runs 99 weeks, roughly two years. Just long enough to last democratics until the next election. Coincidence? You decide.

slickwillie2001 on November 3, 2010 at 12:37 PM

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

One believes in a representative government, and the other is either anarchist or totalitarian, depending on whether they prefer Lenin or Marx. One believes in the private ownership of the means of production, the other does not.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:40 PM

LePage wins the Blaine House in Maine. For the first time since 1964, all 3 branches of Maine government have gone Republican.

maineconservative on November 3, 2010 at 12:47 PM

Chaz on November 3, 2010 at 12:16 PM

They have themselves an Obama problem too. He’s actually a liability in many (most?) parts of the country. Normally, you want someone in higher office who can support down ticket candidates. That’s one thing that really propelled him above Hillary in 2008. What’s he do now? In 2012, someone could very well challenge Obama if they can show more support downticket.

MrX on November 3, 2010 at 12:52 PM

Enjoy the fruits of corruption, you earned it.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM

The fruits of the Dem corruption that gave us a 60+ seat pickup in the house along with a slew of Governors mansions? Oh, I’m already enjoying them. They are delicious, like your tears.

Caiwyn on November 3, 2010 at 12:53 PM

Third to last graph: Barack Obana is a misspell. Nit-picky, but I know you appreciate accuracy for posterity’s sake, Ed.

John the Libertarian on November 3, 2010 at 12:58 PM

I really would like some of you Leftists to explain the difference between the ideology of the Democratic party today and the ideology of the Communist/Socialists?
How are they different?
Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

One believes in a representative government, and the other is either anarchist or totalitarian, depending on whether they prefer Lenin or Marx. One believes in the private ownership of the means of production, the other does not.
ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 12:40 PM

Wouldn’t Believing in representative government mean that they would listen to the people instead of Rahming legislation down their throats?

Wouldn’t Believing in representative government mean that they would Not threaten freedom of the press or speech? (as in the administration’s attacks on Fox News, etc and threats against insurance companies if they blame Obamacare for rate increases.)

Wouldn’t Believing in private ownership mean that they wouldn’t be taking over industries like the car companies, healthcare and regulatory control of energy use?
(I know that more like Fascism, but you get the idea)

I don’t see much of a difference there – except for degree, but then again most Communist/Socialist oppressive regimes didn’t start out that way from day one. (it tales a while to get those Civilian security forces up and running).

They don’t really sound too much different except for the time line of their oppression.

Are you sure there are differences?

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:58 PM

The broad change complicates matters for Barack Obama.

When Democrats are faced with these kinds of problems, don’t they begin whining that the country is “ungovernable?”

ted c on November 3, 2010 at 1:04 PM

Today, the Grim Reaper shall spend the day cleaning the gore from his blade….

ted c on November 3, 2010 at 1:04 PM

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

For what you say to be true, that its only a matter of time…how is it that democrats today propose lower tax rates than those 70 years ago? How is it that a republican enabled price controls, but no democrat proposes it today? If the timeline is linear, your argument is false. If the timeline isnt linear, your argument is still weak.

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 1:18 PM

Hey, at least the ‘rats took California away from that rock-ribbed conservative Ahnold.

I’m thinking Whitman losing was a good thing, there is no way she could have manhandled the state legislature to get anything done. It’s all demorat now and Moonbeam gets to put his theories back into practice.

Bishop on November 3, 2010 at 11:09 AM

As painful as it is seeing anyone vote for Jerry Brown, you’re probably right. Arnold probably wasn’t a bad governor, until he ran headlong into the solid Democrat legislature of California and ultimately just gave up. Could Whitman really have done any better.

Sometimes the losses are actually better for you.

tom on November 3, 2010 at 1:22 PM

California cannot turn around until the government employees unions are destroyed and made illegal. As long as they exist it will be impossible to turn the California legislature conservative, because they have unlimited amounts of money to spend promoting democratics.

slickwillie2001 on November 3, 2010 at 1:52 PM

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 12:35 PM

For what you say to be true, that its only a matter of time…how is it that democrats today propose lower tax rates than those 70 years ago? How is it that a republican enabled price controls, but no democrat proposes it today? If the timeline is linear, your argument is false. If the timeline isnt linear, your argument is still weak.
ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 1:18 PM

Hmm.. I note that you’re avoiding the comparison points that I made, is there a reason for that?

how is it that democrats today propose lower tax rates than those 70 years ago?

Are you talking about the Effective tax rates?

Price controls?

To use you terminology, that kind of sounds a bit weak, are we to believe that a Communist dictatorship like North Korea or Cuba can escape the stigma of being a failed Socialists H@ll hole just by NOT having Price controls?

What about the fact that government either owns or tightly controls several industries and making “progress” at taking over other industries?

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition has the definition of socialism as:

1.Any of various theories or systems of social organization in which the means of producing and distributing goods is owned collectively or by a centralized government that often plans and controls the economy.
2.The stage in Marxist-Leninist theory intermediate between capitalism and communism, in which collective ownership of the economy under the dictatorship of the proletariat has not yet been successfully achieved.

Note that It mentions it being intermediate capitalism and communism – think of it as a Fundamental change between capitalism and communism where the government owns some industries and is “progressively” taking over more – kind of like what is happening now in this country.

Or is that different somehow?

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 2:23 PM

ernesto on November 3, 2010 at 1:18 PM

Any response?

Chip on November 3, 2010 at 3:05 PM

In 2003, when there was an effort to redraw the tiny clustered gerrymandered districts around Houston, some of which are the size of large golf courses and helps to give us people like Sheila Jackson-Lee, the State Democrats FLED THE STATE to make sure a vote COULD NOT TAKE PLACE.

Yes, that actually happened.

Can’t wait to see how much fun we’re going to have as the Democrats put up the fight of their lifetimes to keep the lines from being redrawn.

And you know they will.

manofaiki on November 3, 2010 at 5:12 PM

If you think I’m joking about the size of those small districts around Houston, let me assure you I’m not.

Here’s a pic:

[URL=http://www.imagebam.com/image/88f269105079494][IMG]http://thumbnails32.imagebam.com/10508/88f269105079494.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

manofaiki on November 3, 2010 at 5:14 PM

whoops,trying again:

manofaiki on November 3, 2010 at 5:15 PM

http://www.imagebam.com/image/88f269105079494

manofaiki on November 3, 2010 at 5:16 PM

There, see it now?

EXTREMELY LARGE GOLF COURSES.

:)

manofaiki on November 3, 2010 at 5:25 PM

New Mexico conservative here! While most of our state races went to the Dems, Susana Martinez took the Governorship! A Hispanic, female, conservative governor against illegal immigration and for fiscal sanity? This is awesome.

I’m happy (and maybe a little jealous) for you guys who get to relish in your newly conservative state legislatures!

nmlaw2012 on November 3, 2010 at 6:11 PM

I am reposting this from the last page of the 12 AM thread from last night (I have the perspective of growing up in MI, and living in CA for almost 20 year until 2003):

OK Peeps, this is the deal. MI was a solid, pro union, pro dem state almost forever. They would sometimes vote an R governor, but pretty much the legislature was either split or D in control. The detroit area dominated the state.

Now, after being completely, economically obliterated, beginning back in the 70′s when the Big 3 were way too slow to recognize the coming globalization of business and how their business cost model was way out of whack to be competitive, it took Michigan FOUR DECADES to hit bottom. Detroit used to have 2 million people inside the city limits. It dropped below 1 million about a decade ago. Michigan has lost an entire college educated generation to other states during the past 2 decades.

Michigan voters finally woke up and looked around and said, this isn’t working anymore. With the exception of the 2 Dem dinosaurs (dingall and conyers) in the SE portion of the state, we did well this election cycle. We have to deal with our 2 senators, but one is really old and the other will be in the fight of her life in 2012. The 2 Ds left in the House, they are really old. If they even live to see the 2012 election, this could be the one that finally sends them packing.

California has to hit bottom first. They haven’t figured it out yet. However, it won’t take them 40 years to do so. One thing they have to deal with, that Michigan didn’t have during its 40 year decline, is the absolute INVASION of illegal aliens and the drain on the state budget. With this election in CA, more of the taxpayers will leave the state, and there won’t be enough left to confiscate money from to save this state’s budget problems. They will have to spiral down and collapse before the morons who vote there fully comprehend just how badly run this state is.

Michigan is finally getting it right. There is hope. Now, I have Snyder (our new gov) on double secret probation. I hope he is not a closet arnold. We will have to see. At least he will have an R legislature to work with.

karenhasfreedom on November 3, 2010 at 9:01 PM

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