Reason TV: Obama flunks education reform

posted at 3:35 pm on October 7, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

When Barack Obama took office, he declared that education was his highest priority and launched the Race to the Top initiative that Obama said would transform our schools. According to Reason TV, however, it has only taken education in the same failed direction of the past decades and expanded the union sinecure in education. Almost all of the stimulus spending that Obama claims has “saved or created jobs” has gone into the education sector, which isn’t surprising at all when noting the political donation patterns of the two big teacher unions and their influence on policy, says Nick Gillespie:

Obama’s education vision deserves an F for at least three reasons:

1. Money Talks. Obama says that the educational system needs new ideas and more money. Despite a doubling in inflation-adjusted per-pupil spending since the early 1970s, student achievement is flat at best. But Obama is placing most of his bets on the money part. While he brags constantly about his Race to the Top initiative, in which states competed for $4 billion to fund innovative programs, he’s spent more than $80 billion in no-strings-attached stimulus funds to maintain the educational status quo.

2. Choice Cuts. Candidate Obama said that he’d try any reform idea regardless of ideology. Yet one of his first education-related moves after taking office was to aid his Senate mentor, Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), in killing a successful and popular D.C. voucher program that let low-income residents exercise the same choice Obama did in sending his daughters to private school.

3. The Unions Forever. The two largest teachers unions, The American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association, overwhelmingly supported Obama with their votes and their contributions. Some 95 percent of the groups’ campaign contributions go to Democratic candidates and the NEA, spends more money on elections that Microsoft, ExxonMobil, Walmart, and the AFL-CIO combined. No wonder Obama’s big talking point is that he wants to add 10,000 more teachers to public payrolls despite the fact that there are already more teachers per student than ever.

We spend more than ever on education, and we get less and less. Obviously, money is not the issue. In the same period, we have expanded federal control and reduced choice, and that hasn’t improved the situation, either. We need to find ways to introduce competition into the system and get more local control over schools. We’ve written often about the former, but the latter is perhaps even more important. As responsibility for education has moved out of the communities and then out of the state, the pressure on schools to produce results has become diffused and the responsibility blurred. By returning control back to the communities and getting the federal government out of the picture, it will clarify lines of accountability and return power back to the parents, where it belongs.

Obama hasn’t failed at this to any greater extent than his predecessors, but we shouldn’t grade on the curve, either.


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he declared that education was his highest priority and launched the Race to the Top initiative that Obama said would transform our schools.

but, did he mean priority priority….or, was it just a high priority?

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 3:38 PM

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 3:38 PM

I’m confused also. He has sooooo many top and highest priorities.

dogsoldier on October 7, 2010 at 3:40 PM

We spend more than ever on education, and we get less and less.

Johnny went to sleep last night to the sound of his mother getting smacked around and his dad drinking a fifth and passing out on the couch. Johnny ate frozen pizza for dinner and wakes up to poptarts or school breakfast—then he goes to class.

Sally went to sleep last night after she had dinner with her two parents and brother. She was encouraged to work hard, do her homework and told that she was important in her family. She ate a good breakfast and then went to sit in class next to Johnny.

Is it any wonder why an increase in spending does not achieve any further results in performance? There are some factors that simply do not explain educational performance adequately and spending per student is obviously one of them.

If we were committed to performance, we wouldn’t be so focused on spending—we’d be discussing healthy, stable marriages, parental involvement, fatherhood, religion and personal discipline. But, we don’t–we are focused on spending for the sake of spending because we can always use more money….

targets. missed.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 3:43 PM

IMO, and this is with children from early elem to college, education is by far the worst it has been in the 16 years I’ve had a child in the system.
It is so frustrating because as a parent the decline is obvious at the local level. It is even obvious over the last 2 school years the messiah has been in office.
Clearly throwing money at the situation is not the answer.

ORconservative on October 7, 2010 at 3:46 PM

The chart showing education employment vs student enrollment is just incredible.

modnar on October 7, 2010 at 3:51 PM

But he hasn’t pontificated about how Michelle Rhee should be fired…

MeatHeadinCA on October 7, 2010 at 3:51 PM

Education?

Show us your transcripts, big boy. I dare ya’.

Cody1991 on October 7, 2010 at 3:51 PM

Homeschooling…

PatriotRider on October 7, 2010 at 3:53 PM

When Barack Obama took office, he declared that education the economy green jobs playing golf was his highest priority

FIFY

VibrioCocci on October 7, 2010 at 3:56 PM

This shouldn’t surprise anyone. It’s the Annenberg Challenge all over again, except this time Barry has a lot more of other peoples’ money to waste.

AZCoyote on October 7, 2010 at 4:01 PM

Here’s the problem with money for education: It goes to things unrelated to educating students. Money is spent on lawyers, bureaucrats, pensions and expensive designer school buildings. It’s the same thing that happens with government–the more money it gets, the bigger and more inefficient it becomes.

Schools should be a place to learn. Teachers should be held accountable for and paid based on students performance. They should also be exempt from silly, frivolous lawsuits. Unions need to go away. Teachers and schools should pay for retirement just like the majority of businesses in this country. Administration staff should be reduced. Retirement age needs to be raised. Most of all, parents should be more active in the kids education.

ReaganWasRight on October 7, 2010 at 4:02 PM

Obama’s only failed if you are judging his efforts by what he CLAIMED his goals to be – educating children.

His actual goal, as I am sure you are aware, is increased government dependency among adults, and increased centralization of power.

He has succeeded.

Less on October 7, 2010 at 4:03 PM

sadly no one in politics really cares

you can not subject kids to a unionized workforce which has been highly politicized (i know an urban teacher)

you can not have x percent of the population embrace a culture that considers education to be for chumps

you can not siphon off the best teachers into other professions for 30 years

no doubt there are good teachers, but the system is corrupt. as long as Lady Gaga, JayZ, and basket ball players are the role models, we are screwed.

r keller on October 7, 2010 at 4:04 PM

Obama says that the educational system needs new ideas and more money. Despite a doubling in inflation-adjusted per-pupil spending since the early 1970s, student achievement is flat at best. But Obama is placing most of his bets on the money part.

The education system does not need knew ideas. If education has been failing for decades but succeeded for millenia before, doesn’t that suggest that we should use instead old ideas?

Classical education is time tested.

Unions ruin everything they touch.

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:05 PM

Classical education is time tested.

Unions ruin everything they touch.

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:05 PM

that’s what we do with our girls. It’s a great program–

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:08 PM

Vouchers will help.

We have a huge drop out rate. I suspect Obama has no clue that a 12 month school year will increase dropouts.

seven on October 7, 2010 at 4:10 PM

targets. missed.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 3:43 PM

Nice.

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:12 PM

that’s what we do with our girls. It’s a great program–

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:08 PM

My 4 kids are way smarter now then I ever will be.

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:13 PM

Homeschooling…

PatriotRider on October 7, 2010 at 3:53 PM

But doesn’t that requires lots of federal/state money? /sarcasm

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:15 PM

But doesn’t that requires lots of federal/state money? /sarcasm

shick on October 7, 2010 at 4:15 PM

that’s the thing–homeschoolers pay for BOTH their local public schools AND fund their own school at home AND produce better results.

spending meme destroyed.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:20 PM

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 3:43 PM

While I agree parents can be paramount in this process, the teacher isn’t completely absolved, either, especially considering how extensive the educational reach into our homes has become….

Let me try to explain.

Kids in school in the ’50s could have a crappy home life. But their teachers’ instructions in reading, writing, and ciphering (the bulk of their lessons), would allow those students an opportunity to escape to a better life (or at least one not fraught with stupidity).

Anyone screwing up was at least disciplined in school (the paddle, anyone?), potentially kicked out to fend for themselves.

Now, 2 parents at home (themselves reared in our current public schools) can’t step in often enough and force their rights as a parent (and many times don’t know when the line has been crossed). This is due to them being brought up in a more pervasive public school system.

Now, all forms of discipline, not just the paddle, have been removed from the schools. Do kids even do homework anymore? That started in the inner cities in the ’90s, BTW…

This has all been intentional. As our schools, half-wits who decided as a measure against fully-witted persons asking pesky questions, have progressively taken on more parental responsibilities, leaving each generation less self-sufficient than the one before.

As a former teacher, I had the values discussion with a high school friend, also a teacher whom I thought of as a fellow conservative. She thought teaching values in the school was fine, to which I replied “But whose values?”

I recommend reading anything by Richard Mitchell. As an English Professor (and former Underground Grammarian) from Rutgers, he noticed this trend in the ’80′s. I’ve reach all of his works: The Leaning Tower of Babel, The Gift of Fire, etc. All of them focus on the intentional ‘failure’ of the system, thereby ensuring more money and power to the teacher-trainers and school administrators at the expense of the populace.

Our ‘failed schools’ problems, those I only saw in the inner cities in the ’90s, have now reached all levels of secondary and higher ‘education.’

It is a cancer. Best to cut it out altogether at this point, let we passively kill the patient (the republic).

Miss_Anthrope on October 7, 2010 at 4:23 PM

The problem, imo, is you can homeschool and I can supplement the mess at the neighborhood school with on line learning but the only way the idiots that run the show are going to notice is when their gravy train ends. Because that’s all it is, a gravy train.
There are countless kids who’s parents have no clue that will send kids forever guaranteeing an neverending gravy train. It is a bigger mess than the economy.
At our neighborhood school, kids get breakfast and lunch. There’s 5 days of free lunch in the summer with no restriction on who can eat. It is a daily source of freebies for families. Typical lib gravy train “for the children”.

ORconservative on October 7, 2010 at 4:28 PM

Too many parents, Pastors, and Priests have abrogated too much of our childrens education to the likes of Charles Darwin, Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud. Kick them out of the public schools and parents, Pastors and Priests start taking responsibility for the mental health and the cultural and spiritual health of your kids.

fourdeucer on October 7, 2010 at 4:29 PM

that’s the thing–homeschoolers pay for BOTH their local public schools AND fund their own school at home AND produce better results.

spending meme destroyed.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:20 PM

I wholeheartedly agree.

As a non-religious person, I’ve thought of doing this since I left teaching!

More and more non-religious (but obviously conservative or otherwise incredibly logical) people are choosing to do this.

“You can burn down all the schools and hang all the professors, but that’s only a cosmetic solution.”

-Richard Mitchell

Miss_Anthrope on October 7, 2010 at 4:30 PM

The decline in public school education can be directly traced back to the removal of biblical education from it. Prayer in school, as well as the posting of the 10 commandments were removed starting back in the 50′s and 60′s. Since then, a steady and alarming increase in dropout rates, suicides, drug usage, teen pregnancy, abortion, crime and voila’—here we are.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:31 PM

“When Barack Obama took office, he declared that the economy immigration reform DADT jobs health care Afghanistan climate change card check education was his highest priority….”

mrt721 on October 7, 2010 at 4:31 PM

This shouldn’t surprise anyone. It’s the Annenberg Challenge all over again, except this time Barry has a lot more of other peoples’ money to waste.

AZCoyote on October 7, 2010 at 4:01 PM

In addition to having more money, this time the cash is not coming from a private foundation. It’s coming out of our pockets. Which makes it all the sweeter for 0.

iurockhead on October 7, 2010 at 4:33 PM

I wholeheartedly agree.

As a non-religious person, I’ve thought of doing this since I left teaching!

More and more non-religious (but obviously conservative or otherwise incredibly logical) people are choosing to do this.

“You can burn down all the schools and hang all the professors, but that’s only a cosmetic solution.”

-Richard Mitchell

Miss_Anthrope on October 7, 2010 at 4:30 PM

the future of this nation belongs to those who avoid the public school system. Look at the leadership of this nation—did Obama go to public school? Hillary? GWB? Billy Jeff? Gore? no…none of them did, not one. It is not a pathway to success, it’s a pathway to failure. If the results were so damn important, we’d be focusing on real reform–instead, we discuss superficial needs such as spending and it has a singular trajectory–upwards of course. The problems are systemic, the system is a failure and it was designed to fail our children no matter what.

I will say it again. The future of this nation starts and ends at the dinner tables of America. Homeschooling is producing leaders, thinkers, fighters, winners and is not promoting losers like public education does.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:36 PM

If the trajectory of spending has eclipsed all reason, then it begs the questions: Where does the money go and for what is it used? One could assume that those dollars actually go toward funding the infrastructure that would educate a child and that more money ought to translate into better education—that’s common sense. However, this model fails common sense.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:39 PM

Obama had a chance to actually put action behind his words by supporting Washington Mayor Adrian Fenty on school vouchers. But the president never gets out and leads on any issue unless he knows he’s got the key parts of the Democratic coalition covering his back — when the teacher’s unions went after Fenty, Obama didn’t lift a finger to save him and he was voted out of office last month.

jon1979 on October 7, 2010 at 4:42 PM

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:36 PM

Great posts Mr. ted c.

fourdeucer on October 7, 2010 at 4:42 PM

My government spent TRILLIONS and all I got was this LOUSY PRESIDENT!

csdeven on October 7, 2010 at 4:43 PM

My government spent TRILLIONS and all I got was this LOUSY PRESIDENT!

csdeven on October 7, 2010 at 4:43 PM

Free KoolAid along with the Govmint Cheese!

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:44 PM

Does anyone remember that obama took away the vouchers in DC for the underprivileged (which mostly included the African American children) and they still support him over 90%. He really took away their children’s future. He really cares, right?

Bambi on October 7, 2010 at 4:48 PM

He really cares, right?

Bambi on October 7, 2010 at 4:48 PM

sure. He cares about forcing kids into failing schools that will train them successfully to do one thing…..to sing his hosannas….

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:50 PM

At our faculty meeting on Monday the union rep handed out cards from CTA asking us to show our support for Jerry Brown, Barbara Boxer, and Tom Torlaksen (education chief). I not only checked NO NO NO, I wrote “you’ve got to be kidding, right?” under Brown’s name. Do not call, do not send me e-mail, do not send me glossy political propaganda paid for by my own union dues.

I got one in the mail today, and yep…as usual, if CTA endorses someone, I vote for the other guy.

Bob's Kid on October 7, 2010 at 4:52 PM

I will say it again. The future of this nation starts and ends at the dinner tables of America. Homeschooling is producing leaders, thinkers, fighters, winners and is not promoting losers like public education does.

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:36 PM

C’mon ted. I agree with you on many posts, almost all, but is this purposely hyperbolic? All homeschooled students are winners? Really? Let me tell you, I’ve seen many kids come out of homeschooling and into the public schools. Not all of them did well in homeschooling, and some are behind their grade level.

Your homeschooling soapbox is a bit rickety with this post, my friend. I say this with great respect for you and your views.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 4:59 PM

This shouldn’t surprise anyone. It’s the Annenberg Challenge all over again, except this time Barry has a lot more of other peoples’ money to waste.

AZCoyote on October 7, 2010 at 4:01 PM

+10

And for the same socialistic reasons as the Annenberg Challenge, too. Never let a good non-catastrophe go to waste.

unclesmrgol on October 7, 2010 at 5:00 PM

My daughter learned from a friend this weekend (who is public-schooled) that her friend’s spanish teacher both gives the answers to the test in class beforehand, and then walks about during the actual test giving correct answers and pointing out incorrect ones on student’s tests.

I’m all about the importance of a supportive family environment, but some proportion of the teachers are a serious part of the problem as well.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 5:04 PM

Let me tell you, I’ve seen many kids come out of homeschooling and into the public schools. Not all of them did well in homeschooling, and some are behind their grade level.

Your homeschooling soapbox is a bit rickety with this post, my friend. I say this with great respect for you and your views.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 4:59 PM

We homeschool our six, and I would be the first to say that homeschool is not for everyone. However, your sample is obviously skewed in that you’re getting those who, for whatever reason, chose to stop homeschooling. I think it would be safe to assume that you’re going to see more of the underperforming side of homeschoolers, by default. And it’s probably good on the whole for those students that they’re now in the public schools.

But I also agree with Ted. The future core of our nation is being preserved and nurtured in tens of thousands of homeschooling households around this nation. The public schools will hopefully produce some future leaders as well, but the homeschool track is vital, imho.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 5:09 PM

The problem is nobody who went to a public school can understand the chart.

tetriskid on October 7, 2010 at 5:47 PM

The future core of our nation is being preserved and nurtured in tens of thousands of homeschooling households around this nation.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 5:09 PM

Again, a vast overstatement. Yes, some public schools fail and fail badly. Some are excellent, however, and I feel confident that those schools will also produce students who will “preserve and nurture” our nation.

Also, my students come out of homeschooling for variety of reasons, most of them economic and not academic.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 5:49 PM

highest priority…after suing Arizona…golf…passing health care…parties…vacation…golf…whining about not be respected…golf…whining about being treated like a dog…vacation…solar panels…golf…speeches…parties…music …beer summits…golf…more whining…vacation…golf….okay, now let’s discuss educat….golf…ion

right2bright on October 7, 2010 at 5:57 PM

Your homeschooling soapbox is a bit rickety with this post, my friend. I say this with great respect for you and your views.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 4:59 PM

That is not what the stats say my friend…you may have known some that did not succeed, nothing is perfect…but it is pretty well established, home schooling excels.

right2bright on October 7, 2010 at 5:59 PM

That is not what the stats say my friend…you may have known some that did not succeed, nothing is perfect…but it is pretty well established, home schooling excels.

right2bright on October 7, 2010 at 5:59 PM

Read my response to TexasDan above. I acknowledge that the stats on homeschooling are excellent. Therefore, homeschooling families don’t need to make sweeping statements like the ones above…the numbers speak for themeselves. Why boast with gross overstatement?

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 6:10 PM

Also, my students come out of homeschooling for variety of reasons, most of them economic and not academic.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 5:49 PM

I doubt it. Homeschooling can be done very inexpensively. If you were not doing well as a family at educating your child and had to talk about why you chose not to continue, it might be nice to not have to discuss the real reasons in public.

Again, a vast overstatement

No, a strong conviction. I went to public school, and on to the Ivy League. I’m not completely down on the ability of a public school to provide a solid education. But the content and shaping of character, as well as the personal attention to the student that a homeschool affords, have, on average, a markedly different result than the typical public school experience.

Let me say it this way; parents of public school (or private for that matter) students can indeed put as much attention into their children’s education as an attentive homeschooler does and have similar results. But without that attention, the non-homeschooled student is almost certainly going to have a curriculum less focused on things like, say, civics. For instance, my kids are studying critical thinking this year–that wasn’t part of my public school education.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 6:17 PM

Obama hasn’t failed at this to any greater extent than his predecessors, but we shouldn’t grade on the curve, either.

1) The Department of Education doesn’t teach a single student.

2) Obama signed the legislation to end school vouchers in the ONLY federal school system, Washington D.C.

3) Was it Clinton or Bush that signed the legislation for school vouchers in D.C.? Bush. So yes, Bush did more than Clinton and Obama.

barnone on October 7, 2010 at 6:18 PM

As a teacher, there is a night I look forward to every year. It is the meet the teacher night we have at the beginning of each year. I love it because I get to meet the parents of my best students. Only the parents who care about their children’s education show up, and it is these kids who are my brightest and the best.

Throwing more money at the schools won’t help. The 500lb. gorilla in the room is the fact that when a kid’s parents aren’t engaged in their education, neither is the kid. Maybe an incentive to the parents in the form of lower taxes if their kids are performing at or above the median level might finally get them interested in their children. Paying the unions, administrators or local government will never help the kids, especially in poor districts where live at home Dads are few and far between. If the home environment isn’t pro-school (and in this increasingly promiscuous and liberal society is it a surprise?) the kids will not take school seriously. They’ll still wear $150 sneakers and have the latest cell phones and droids and blackberries, but they won’t put a priority on their education. They’ll join the legions of unemployables who will wind up voting democrat. Just what we need. Doubt me? Look at who the high school dropouts voted for in 2008. Over 90% for Obama.

Dr.Gills on October 7, 2010 at 6:24 PM

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 6:17 PM

These are typical talking points from non-educators. A single educational experience, extrapolated out, does not warrant vast overstatements like “the tens of thousands of homeschoolers will lead this nation…” Not even statistics warrant these kind of overstatements. How can you know that ONLY homeschoolers will lead our nation out of its funk?

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 6:42 PM

These are typical talking points from non-educators. A single educational experience, extrapolated out, does not warrant vast overstatements like “the tens of thousands of homeschoolers will lead this nation…” Not even statistics warrant these kind of overstatements. How can you know that ONLY homeschoolers will lead our nation out of its funk?

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 6:42 PM

I taught high school English for a time, Grace. If what you read into my statements was “only homeschoolers will lead in the future”, then it’s pointless to continue.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 7:05 PM

The money just rolls from the Dems, to teachers unions to dems, and so on.

Until the Feds relinquish their hold on education, abolishes teacher unions, and gives the states, and local districts total control over the educational sector….it will always be like this.

Look on the bright side though. At least they’re being indoctrinated. That’s something. Right???? *UGH*

capejasmine on October 7, 2010 at 7:23 PM

Thanks for linking AP, this is a great piece from Reason.

Anyone else going to make the Reason cruise?

TallDave on October 7, 2010 at 7:23 PM

My government spent TRILLIONS and all I got was this LOUSY PRESIDENT!

csdeven on October 7, 2010 at 4:43 PM
Free KoolAid along with the Govmint Cheese!

ted c on October 7, 2010 at 4:44 PM

And 43 million on “FREE” FOODSTAMPS!!!

dthorny on October 7, 2010 at 7:34 PM

I taught high school English for a time, Grace. If what you read into my statements was “only homeschoolers will lead in the future”, then it’s pointless to continue.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 7:05 PM

Between you and Ted, that was the implication, yes. And you only retreated from it when questioned.

Dan, you and I are more on the same page than not. Homeschooling is a wonderful option for many famiiles. It does not, however, work for every family, and it IS quite possible to be well-educated in a public school. For goodness’ sake. The militancy of homeschooling families is disheartening to say the least, especially in Christian circles. It’s becoming as bad among homeschoolers as it is among the “union or bust” public school advocates.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 7, 2010 at 8:04 PM

Grace_is_sufficient, the only one being militant is you. We may be more on the same page than not, but you seem to have difficulty reading my statements for what they say and not what you think they say. Your categorization of homeschool families as “becoming militant”, as well remarks like “sounds like talking points from non-educators” are insulting and shallow.

I stated clearly that I believe homeschooling is vital for our nations’ future. That does not mean that I think home schoolers will play the only role; simply that they will play a vital one.

I referenced my own personal experience in public school in explaining to you that I’m not down on public education per se, or saying that it can never provide any benefit. I listed what I see as the important distinctives that are generally provided in a homeschool education as evidence for my convictions. The only one who retreated from anything was you: in your refusal to respond to any of the content of my posts, and in your resorting to name calling and smears.

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 10:11 PM

TexasDan on October 7, 2010 at 10:11 PM

You’re right, in large part, and I apologize.

I read much into what you said…mostly because I’ve seen public school teachers beaten up on this board by fellow conservatives who are convinced that we’re out to indoctrinate their children into liberal thought rather than simply teach, enjoy, appreciate, and care for them. Some of these comments toward me have been personal.

Additionally, as a born-again Christian public school teacher, I’ve caught my share of Pharaisaical sniffing from homeschooling parents and their children who routinely question my public-schooled daughter about our school choice. When I carefully read through your posts, I realized you weren’t going there, and it’s my fault that I assumed you were, or planned to.

Please accept my apology.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 8, 2010 at 5:53 AM

The problem with public school versus say a private school or college is that we won’t kick kids out of public school. In Tx public schools there is simply no real discipline that can be enforced and the students know this. In college, even a public college, if you become unruly and want to disrupt the class you get kicked out. They are allowed to simply remove the distraction. Ditto for private school, thats why both these (private school/universities) institutions can function. If a highschool student in a public school tells the teacher to go fuck themselves they get a detention or in school suspension for a day or two. If they really go nuts they get suspended and spend 2 days a home playing xbox and smoking weed. Expulsion is now 45 days in alternative education then right back to class. The problem teachers face is that about 30% of the parents are MIA and if 1/3 of your class faces no consequences for their actions then order will be difficult to maintain. The solution will be here when we realize that in districts like Dallas and Houston about 25% of your students belong in Juvenile hall or reform schools.

snoopicus on October 8, 2010 at 8:28 AM

Over time, the underlying problem with the US education system has become clear.

All anyone needs to do is to look at the drop in quality as it relates to the increase in teacher union and Federal government control. By definition, communism is the joining of the labor union with the government.

What we are looking at is the failure that always accompanies the communist approaches.

SOCIALISM DOES NOT WORK!

Freddy on October 8, 2010 at 12:51 PM

Please accept my apology.

Grace_is_sufficient on October 8, 2010 at 5:53 AM

Absolutely. And I’m sad to hear that you have been the recipient of judgement from those in the home school community over your decision to use the private school system–and that they would question your daughter over it is even more inappropriate.

TexasDan on October 8, 2010 at 1:44 PM