She’s really working the everyman angle here. Perhaps … too much? Jim Geraghty:

O’Donnell begins, “I didn’t go to Yale.” Er, no, but she’s been accused of serially misrepresenting her education record. She continues, “I didn’t inherit millions, like my opponent.” Besides the slight dollop of envy it suggests, it’s a poor defense to the accusations of stiffing former employees. Again, if the aim is to make the race about what’s happening in Washington or what Chris Coons would do in office, turn to those issues a bit quicker – Election Day is in less than four weeks!

Finally, the slogan “I’m you” recurs again, twice, and I’m not sure how far that will carry her. It’s clear what they were going for, but perhaps, “I’m not the establishment” or “I’m not Washington,” or “I’m the only candidate that’s as angry as you are about what’s going on in Washington.” I find it too easy to imagine a voter saying, “you’re not me.”

Yeah, the “I’m you” catchphrase is wearing thin but I’m not sure what JG wants in terms of turning to the issues. The takeaway from yesterday’s Fairleigh Dickinson poll is that Delaware voters, especially women, aren’t keen on the tea-party agenda. O’Donnell will be okay if she sticks to broad generalities that all voters like to hear, e.g. less spending and lower taxes — which she does mention in this ad — but she’d be crazy to get into specifics given the electorate she’s facing. (No doubt that’s what Coons will press her on at the debate.) My main knock on this spot is that, stylistically, it’s identical to the “I’m not a witch” clip, replete with maudlin piano music. She’s already done the direct heartfelt personal appeal; the way to go now should be upbeat, aggressive, and even humorous at Coons’s expense to get voters on her side. Fred Davis, her ad guru, did the Obama “Celebrity” spot for McCain. More like that, please.