Did the EPA create the bedbug revival?

posted at 10:55 am on August 30, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

If it seems as though bedbugs come from another era, it’s because they generally do.  In the US, the parasitic creatures had all but disappeared, thanks to pesticide applications after World War II.  However, the EPA has banned the most effective pesticides that deal with bedbugs, and according to the Daily Caller, the approved list mainly stuns them into two-week stupors rather than eradicating them:

Around when bed bugs started their resurgence, Congress passed a major pesticides law in 1996 and the Clinton EPA banned several classes of chemicals that had been effective bed bug killers.

The debate isn’t over long-banned DDT, since modern bed bugs have developed a tolerance for that chemical. But in the pre-1996 regime, experts say, bed bugs were “collateral damage” from broader and more aggressive use of now-banned pesticides like Malathion and Propoxur.

Now some health officials are clamoring to bring those chemicals back to help solve the bed bug “emergency.” Meanwhile, EPA bureaucrats have downplayed the idea and environmentalists are pushing hard against the effort, citing safety concerns.

The issue has led to a standoff between Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland, a Democrat, and EPA chief Lisa Jackson, who shot down Strickland’s appeals over the issue in a tersely worded letter in June.

The Jackson response rises to the level of bureaucratic art.  Strickland’s state has become one of the main battlegrounds against bedbugs, and children are particularly vulnerable.  Rather than issue a limited waiver for the use of Propoxur to eradicate the parasites, Jackson denies it on the basis of its impact on children — as though the application couldn’t be mitigated with proper access control and training.  Instead of allowing Ohio to use an effective eradication agent, Jackson offers $550,000 in “community outreach” funds, saying — I kid you not — “education and outreach are key components to bed bug control on a community-wide basis.”

Who knew education and outreach could be so toxic?  Those bedbugs should be shaking in, er, our beds.

Instead, the EPA only allows a few weak-tea pesticides to be used in battling the bedbugs.  For Star Trek fans, think of it as attempting to fight with phasers set to stun:

According to research at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, academic headquarters for studying the six-legged beast, some strands of bed bugs can survive, zombie-like, for up to 16 days after being directly sprayed with currently used pesticides.

If you consider that in most instances insects are intended to die shortly after coming into brief contact with pesticide residue, that’s pretty dramatic.

It’s not just dramatic, it creates a repeating problem.  Using approved pesticides will likely bring immediate relief from the problem, but that relief is a mere deception.  Once the effects wear off, the same bugs will become active again within two weeks, recreating the problem all over again, and forcing victims to pay over and over again for applications of useless pesticides rather than solving the problem the first time with a pesticide that works.

It’s yet another demonstration of clueless government bureaucracy, unwilling to understand the needs of its citizens.  We don’t need to let the bedbugs bite when we have the means necessary to eradicate them.


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Comment pages: 1 2

When the bedbugs hit the Lincoln Bedroom and Obama isn’t able to rent it out to cronies in exchange for campaign contributions, I’m sure that these two pesticides will come back at least on a limited basis.

teke184 on August 30, 2010 at 10:58 AM

In the US, the parasitic creatures had all but disappeared,

The Democratic Party relies on parasites just to exist.

UltimateBob on August 30, 2010 at 10:59 AM

I think it would be a really good idea to set up a “Bedbug Credit” via the EPA.

That will fix the enviro problem…

Odie1941 on August 30, 2010 at 11:00 AM

For Star Trek fans, think of it as attempting to fight with phasers set to stun:

EXTERMINATE!

always hoped for a Star Trek/Doctor Who cross over

Doctor Zhivago on August 30, 2010 at 11:01 AM

They’re gonna have to do something because the little SOB’s are everywhere and they ain’t going away.

BigWyo on August 30, 2010 at 11:01 AM

So when can we expect Obama to announce who he is appointing as the new BedBug Czar?

pilamaye on August 30, 2010 at 11:01 AM

Same thing with ants. You stun them for a few days with the approved “pesticide” and then they are back again.

The eco-wackos hate only one organism: humans. It’s as simple as that.

PattyJ on August 30, 2010 at 11:03 AM

Win, win for them. Get the pesticide off the market and get more funding (read: increased control) over the problem it creates.

Never let a completely preventable crisis go to waste, as they say.

Bee on August 30, 2010 at 11:03 AM

It’s not just dramatic, it creates a repeating problem. Using approved pesticides tax credit will likely bring immediate relief from the problem, but that relief is a mere deception.

Is this a cut and paste quote from the “3rd Homebuyers Tax Credit” post.

WashJeff on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

Utterly revolting front page pic, by the way. *shudder*

Bee on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

So when can we expect Obama to announce who he is appointing as the new BedBug Czar?

pilamaye on August 30, 2010 at 11:01 AM

Shirley Sherrod is available, and the way I hear it she’s got all kinds of sucking experience.

GrannyDee on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

GOP, here’s a suggestion: Bring back Diazinon, Malathion, and Propoxur in the same bill that abolishes the EPA.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

Send the bed bug ridden sheets to where the EPA officials live!

Lady Heather on August 30, 2010 at 11:05 AM

My question: what happens when the bugs inevitably become immune to DDT?

Not gonna be pretty.

Dark-Star on August 30, 2010 at 11:05 AM

Anyone think the GOP would advance the idea that the restrictions on DDT should be rescinded? If they were to float a trial balloon, would any of them resist the leftist pushback that results?

Skandia Recluse on August 30, 2010 at 11:06 AM

EPA – Humans are threat to Environment.

Oil Can on August 30, 2010 at 11:06 AM

Bedbugs live, and millions of people have died of malaria…it is much more important for animals and bugs to live then humans.
Humans, according to liberals, are just a bother…

right2bright on August 30, 2010 at 11:07 AM

Another vote of confidence for the lifestyle the eco-freaks would have us all living under; squatting in a peat shack, wearing a g-string woven from poison ivy, our teeth falling out from decay, dying of strep throat, and all while constantly scratching the myriad cooties from our scabby hides. Yay for Mother Gaia!

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:07 AM

Was the recent fumigation of the West Wing of the White House due to a pest infestation? Was the recent redecorating of the Oval Office for the same reason?

Skandia Recluse on August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

Anyone up for letting the lil bed buggers loose in the offices of the EPA? Muwhahahahahah. lol

Kidding, kidding, kidding. But it sure would be tempting, to give them a taste of their own medicine.

capejasmine on August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

According to research at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, academic headquarters for studying the six-legged beast, some strands of bed bugs can survive, zombie-like, for up to 16 days after being directly sprayed with currently used pesticides.

This implies that they die at the end of those 16 days — not that they are stunned into dormancy for the duration and then revive.

Count to 10 on August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

… in the same bill that abolishes the EPA.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

And replace the EPA’s building with either trees or a windmill farm. We will go green by shrinking government!!!

WashJeff on August 30, 2010 at 11:09 AM

Utterly revolting front page pic, by the way. *shudder*

Bee on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

Agreed. May avoid HotAir a bit until it moves a little further down the page, and I won’t have to look at it.

Abby Adams on August 30, 2010 at 11:10 AM

Actually, you can still get Malathion, but it is dramatically reduced in strength, so you have to formulate your own mixing regime, doubling or tripling the poison/water ratio via trial and error to get an effective mix.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:10 AM

Another vote of confidence for the lifestyle the eco-freaks would have us all living under; squatting in a peat shack, wearing a g-string woven from poison ivy, our teeth falling out from decay, dying of strep throat, and all while constantly scratching the myriad cooties from our scabby hides. Yay for Mother Gaia!

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:07 AM

UGH! That’s an utterly depressing, and gruesome picture. Fear not though. We are to live like that….not the eco-freaks. ;) Can’t have our betters, and the more intellectuals ….squatting, and scratching now…can we? *sigh*

capejasmine on August 30, 2010 at 11:10 AM

Jackson offers $550,000 in “community outreach” funds, saying — I kid you not — “education and outreach are key components to bed bug control on a community-wide basis.”

These costs are so high because bed bugs have a high illiteracy rate being from the inner city. /s

barnone on August 30, 2010 at 11:10 AM

If DDT were allowed to be used in Africa, millions of lives would be saved. Mosquito nets are a joke in comparison.

Rachel Carson has blood on her hands.

Lothar on August 30, 2010 at 11:11 AM

Just think of the bureaucratic nightmares under ObamaCare.

darwin on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

My question: what happens when the bugs inevitably become immune to DDT?

Not gonna be pretty.

Dark-Star on August 30, 2010 at 11:05 AM

Apparently, they already are.

Count to 10 on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

Thanks to the EPA it is almost impossible to kill poison ivy too with what they sell on the market which is advertised for killing poison ivy. Going to try again today but after the last time, it looks like it came back healthier so I would assume the same thing is true for bedbugs.

If I had my way, I would fire the EPA because their doing away with pesticides and chemicals that could actually work is creating havoc.

PhiKapMom on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

Will the United States bring back quarantine regulations to stop the spread of insect pests that attach themselves to humans and their pets? Will travelers to places like NYC have to go through decontamination before they are allowed entry to mass transit hubs like air terminals and train stations?

Skandia Recluse on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

It’s for the children!
Most organophosphates are pretty safe if used as directed.
Next up on Lisa’s list:

tick and flea collars for dogs
dips
flea bombs and extermination methods for flea infested homes
lawn sprays
insecticide treatment for food crops
dewormers for dogs and cats
Pour-on for cattle
treatments for swine mange

a capella on August 30, 2010 at 11:13 AM

Maybe Sherrod can get social justice settlements for the poor that have bed bugs.

seven on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

The debate isn’t over long-banned DDT, since modern bed bugs have developed a tolerance for that chemical. But in the pre-1996 regime, experts say, bed bugs were “collateral damage” from broader and more aggressive use of now-banned pesticides like Malathion and Propoxur.

I call BS on this. The “tolerance” rumor needs to be put to rest. They did not develop any tolerance to DDT, that is a myth. DDT was and still could be effective if used properly. The EPA and Rachel Carson with her stpuid book full of lies are arguably the biggest mass murders in the history of the world. Banning DDT has directly caused the deaths of nearly 50 million people, mostly children in Africa dying from malaria.

Johnnyreb on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

Thanks to the EPA it is almost impossible to kill poison ivy too with what they sell on the market which is advertised for killing poison ivy. Going to try again today but after the last time, it looks like it came back healthier so I would assume the same thing is true for bedbugs.

PhiKapMom on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

If you really want to get rid of the poison ivy, put gasoline in your pump sprayer. It will also kill all of the grass, and everything else smaller than a sapling, but the poison ivy will be gone, and grass will grow back.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

Never let an imagined crisis go to waste.

pambi on August 30, 2010 at 11:18 AM

When the bedbugs hit the Lincoln Bedroom and Obama isn’t able to rent it out to cronies in exchange for campaign contributions, I’m sure that these two pesticides will come back at least on a limited basis.

teke184 on August 30, 2010 at 10:58 AM

There’s two big freakin bedbugs in the WH Master Bedroom.

bloviator on August 30, 2010 at 11:18 AM

I suppose mailing Lisa Jackson an envelope full of live bed bugs would be considered an act of terrorism? Maybe we could dump some on her property and see what happens?

redshirt on August 30, 2010 at 11:19 AM

some strands of bed bugs can survive, zombie-like, for up to 16 days after being directly sprayed with currently used pesticides.

And to think there are people out there who scoff at my bunker, who laugh at the shag carpet and the blacklight posters, the 8-track tape collection and the harvest gold refrigerator.

I’ll be laughing last as those same people scratch at my door, hoping desperately (and unsuccessfully) for shelter from the zombie tide.

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:19 AM

Skandia Recluse on August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

Critters hopped a ride with the Obama’s luggage? Or NY friends bringing them in? Very well could be.

And guess what O? They live in the walls. They will be back to bite you in the night if that is why you just redid the WH. And I shudder to think of what the carpet looks like after watching a year of Michelle’s wardrobe choices.

journeyintothewhirlwind on August 30, 2010 at 11:19 AM

An alternative I saw on TV was putting heaters in a space to jack the room temperature up to 135 to 140 degrees for several hours, which causes the bedbugs to overheat and dessicate. Of course this takes hours, so it’s not an easy fix. And I imagine that they have to do one room at a time, also, you’d have to remove anything that couldn’t handles those temps.

Ward Cleaver on August 30, 2010 at 11:19 AM

She could give away a full body size condom to sleep in.

This is the greenie weenie movement getting out of hand. It brings on unintended consequences.

seven on August 30, 2010 at 11:20 AM

In many cases, victims discard most or all of their furniture and other belongings in a desperate push to rid themselves of the problem.

Stimulus!

rockhead on August 30, 2010 at 11:21 AM

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

Alternatively, if you are the patient sort, and want to preserve the grass, you can put on a latex glove, and a cotton glove over it, put some gasoline into a jar, and wet your gloved fingers in gasoline. Then, wipe gasoline on the poison ivy leaves. Four or five leaves per vine should be enough to kill it.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:22 AM

call BS on this. The “tolerance” rumor needs to be put to rest. They did not develop any tolerance to DDT, that is a myth. DDT was and still could be effective if used properly. The EPA and Rachel Carson with her stpuid book full of lies are arguably the biggest mass murders in the history of the world. Banning DDT has directly caused the deaths of nearly 50 million people, mostly children in Africa dying from malaria.

Johnnyreb on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

Yep. But, you see, it is the good intentions that really count.:)

a capella on August 30, 2010 at 11:25 AM

“education and outreach are key components to bed bug control on a community-wide basis.”

Simple solution then, get the worlds greatest community organizer to educate and unionize the little buggers and then get them to go on strike.

fourdeucer on August 30, 2010 at 11:25 AM

Maybe this is another example of crony capitalism too. If we got rid of the bugs with one pesticide application, the companies wouldn’t be able to sell us more. This way, we buy..and buy…and buy.

PattyJ on August 30, 2010 at 11:26 AM

as though the application couldn’t be mitigated with proper access control and training.

Done some exterminating in your day, Ed?

ernesto on August 30, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Hey ! maybe THIS is the reason behind the re-decoration of the Oval Office ! Hmmm…

http://www.drudgereport.com/

pambi on August 30, 2010 at 11:29 AM

Imam Rauf, slumlord extraordinaire is doing what he can to encourage the bedbug rise: http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=38763

Like Valerie Jarrett, Rauf is constructing slums of vermin in our metropolitan areas.

onlineanalyst on August 30, 2010 at 11:30 AM

That’s what these oppressive are, pesky little critters that bite you when you are asleep living your everyday life raising your children and not paying attention to politics.

Serve em right. Manhattan is infested with them. They are even in the penthouses of the limousine liberals and the posh lawyers offices.

Ivy League educated idiots. I’ll bet they aren’t in Wasilla.

God works in strange ways.

Jayrae on August 30, 2010 at 11:30 AM

Thanks to the EPA it is almost impossible to kill poison ivy too with what they sell on the market which is advertised for killing poison ivy. Going to try again today but after the last time, it looks like it came back healthier so I would assume the same thing is true for bedbugs.
If I had my way, I would fire the EPA because their doing away with pesticides and chemicals that could actually work is creating havoc.
PhiKapMom on August 30, 2010 at 11:12 AM

Use Quick knock down Roundup (it has a second type of herbicide in it that will kill quicker). Follow the label directions carefully. Spray all leaf surfaces until spray begins to run off. Be careful not to expose the spray to any plants you don’t want to kill. That includes spray that gets on your shoes that might get skuffed off your shoes on the lawn. :(.

Repeat applications are the key to success.

Just remember that all parts of the Poison Ivy plant are poisonous at all times of year, living or dead.

Oh, by the way, this is justthe tip of the iceberg as far as how detrmental the EPA is to proper pest management. Far outlived it’s usefulness.

turfmann on August 30, 2010 at 11:31 AM

Another culprit might be an immigration policy that encourages illegal semi-slave labor to house themselves 8 to a bedroom in cramped apartments….

Kasper Hauser on August 30, 2010 at 11:31 AM

DDT is the best for malaria causing mosquito. WHO worked for 35 years to try and prove the lies of the book silent spring but failed miserably. But 1.5 million Africans secumb to malaria paying the price for the lie each year, most are children under the age of 5. A travesty of gigantic proportion, and should be remedied immediately.

And Obama says he cares … Hah what a laugh.

And why don’t people know, ask the media.

What about health checks for immigrants?

tarpon on August 30, 2010 at 11:32 AM

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:19 AM

Stock up on aerosol insecticides. they’ll be worth their weight in gold, er ammo, for bartering. Don’t store them next to the Spam.

a capella on August 30, 2010 at 11:33 AM

Simple solution then, get the worlds greatest community organizer to educate and unionize the little buggers and then get them to go on strike.
fourdeucer on August 30, 2010 at 11:25 AM

Put the bedbugs under the control of the teachers union and their biting effectiveness will drop by half within a month.

The downside is that the bedbugs will get tenure within a year and then by law we can never get rid of them no matter how dismal the infestation.

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:33 AM

Instead of allowing Ohio to use an effective eradication agent, Jackson offers $550,000 in “community outreach” funds, saying — I kid you not — “education and outreach are key components to bed bug control on a community-wide basis.”

Lisa Jackson to Ohio kids: Sleep tight, let the bedbugs bite, do not be in a fright, just turn on the light!

Steve Z on August 30, 2010 at 11:33 AM

The bloodsuckers in DC are finally getting some competition.

I have suffered through a couple of flea infestations, and they are damn tough to get rid of. Finally, I learned about treatments that interrupt their life cycle; these really do work. They are now readily available in pet stores though you do have to learn a bit and read the labels.

I’m just wondering if a similar approach to bedbugs would be best. Though the length of a bedbug’s life may make this impractical compared to the short lived flea.

GnuBreed on August 30, 2010 at 11:35 AM

That includes spray that gets on your shoes that might get skuffed off your shoes on the lawn. :(.

turfmann on August 30, 2010 at 11:31 AM

You mean those brown footprints across my backyard weren’t alien, but a poor application of Roundup?

right2bright on August 30, 2010 at 11:35 AM

This is why we can’t have Democrats in the White House. They make poor SCOTUS appointments, and they allow crackpots run wild in the EPA. Strickland is the governor of my state, and he may be on the right side of this issue. But he’s in bed with these eco-zealots. He either has to switch parties or work with Doug Schoen-types to quarantine these tinfoil brigades in small liberal precincts where they belong–or go down with them.

I hope Kasich can use this against Strickland.

BuckeyeSam on August 30, 2010 at 11:36 AM

From an article about bedbugs in New York City:

“Only 2% of Republicans had bedbugs, while
12% of Democrats did.”

So changing your political leanings can decrease your
chances of bedbug problems by 600%. Food for thought. Article at:
http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/08/16/2010-08-16_untitled__bedbugs16m.html

iurockhead on August 30, 2010 at 11:36 AM

GOP, here’s a suggestion: Bring back Diazinon, Malathion, and Propoxur in the same bill that abolishes the EPA.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:04 AM

Yeah!

itsacookbook on August 30, 2010 at 11:36 AM

Was the recent fumigation of the West Wing of the White House due to a pest infestation? Was the recent redecorating of the Oval Office for the same reason?

Skandia Recluse on August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

Too bad those pests were out on vacation…

I keed.

tickleddragon on August 30, 2010 at 11:37 AM

The EPA has become evil.

Everything is more important than humans.

Even after Nov. we have to keep up the fight against the oppressive leftists!

petunia on August 30, 2010 at 11:37 AM

It’s for the children!!

So, we’ll protect them from chance exposure to a mildly toxic substance, and in the meanwhile, let parasites feed on them.

Oh, well, the death toll from the foolish ban on DDT is only several tens of millions, what are a few million parasite-infested children in comparison? It’s all in the name of protecting Mother Gaia, you know.

mr.blacksheep on August 30, 2010 at 11:37 AM

Eradicate them hell! The EPA is offering amnesty to the little critters while Acorn signs them up to vote!

stoutj734 on August 30, 2010 at 11:38 AM

Yep. But, you see, it is the good intentions that really count.:)

a capella on August 30, 2010 at 11:25 AM

But, but, but, they saved a few osprey chicks from dying from thin egg shells! Now if somebody can train ospreys to eat mosquitoes in Africa…

I wouldn’t trust birds…yesterday at the beach a seagull stole part of a sandwich right out of my hand!

Steve Z on August 30, 2010 at 11:39 AM

Done some exterminating in your day, Ed?

ernesto on August 30, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Time for some more.

a capella on August 30, 2010 at 11:40 AM

I have suffered through a couple of flea infestations, and they are damn tough to get rid of. Finally, I learned about treatments that interrupt their life cycle; these really do work. They are now readily available in pet stores though you do have to learn a bit and read the labels.

Can you buy them at flea markets? :)

Steve Z on August 30, 2010 at 11:41 AM

Lisa Jackson is a moonbat who needs to go now..

Dire Straits on August 30, 2010 at 11:41 AM

I have suffered through a couple of flea infestations, and they are damn tough to get rid of.

GnuBreed on August 30, 2010 at 11:35 AM

When we were stationed in Cuba we lived in cinder block houses and you want to talk about tough to get rid of. We had flea and tick invasions multiple times and those little suckers could live in the cracks and crevases in those cinder blocks and you practically had to nuke them to kill them. We usually resorted to using bug bombs in the entire house at the same time with all the windows closed and the AC off. Made for some nasty smells a few weeks after the application, but they worked.

Johnnyreb on August 30, 2010 at 11:41 AM

The EPA is making a lot of health issues more difficult to deal with. Two drugs I used to buy off the counter that knocked out my nasal allergy attacks are no longer available.

WannabeAnglican on August 30, 2010 at 11:43 AM

ernesto on August 30, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Seen any where you are?

My wife stayed at the Roosevelt recently on a business trip and although she didn’t find any bugs, one of her associates found a few in another room.

Bishop on August 30, 2010 at 11:46 AM

Revival of the bed bug can be attributed to our open border policies.Good luck staying in motels.Along with all the other surprises in a motel the bugs have a major foothold.

docflash on August 30, 2010 at 11:49 AM

NEW EPA 100% GUARANTEED NON-CHEMICAL BEDBUG KILLER REVEALED!

Two blocks of wood

A. Place bedbug on first block of wood
B. Crush it with second block of wood

MaiDee on August 30, 2010 at 11:49 AM

Once you are infected, you have to throw away mattresses and box springs–so it is more complicated and expensive than just extermination.

Margee on August 30, 2010 at 11:49 AM

This is just another media crisis of the week to distract us from what really matters, like the non-stop review of the NO Katrina disaster instead of covering Becks Restoring Honor rally. Where’s all the coverage of the flood damaged Grand Ol’ Oprey in Nashville or the flood damage in OKC?

Kissmygrits on August 30, 2010 at 11:51 AM

In the olden days, aristocrats travel with huge entourage and trains of baggage. Yes, you guessed it, with their own bedsheets and such.

/just saying

Sir Napsalot on August 30, 2010 at 11:52 AM

That includes spray that gets on your shoes that might get skuffed off your shoes on the lawn. :(.
turfmann on August 30, 2010 at 11:31 AM
You mean those brown footprints across my backyard weren’t alien, but a poor application of Roundup?
right2bright on August 30, 2010 at 11:35 AM

No, that was me…

As I tell customers with balances overdue in excess of 90 days: I have Roundup and I know how to use it. ;)

If you really want to get rid of the poison ivy, put gasoline in your pump sprayer. It will also kill all of the grass, and everything else smaller than a sapling, but the poison ivy will be gone, and grass will grow back.
Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:17 AM

I assume (praying actually) that you’re being sarcastic. Putting a high explosive through a pressurized sprayer, then atomizing it when it
comes through the nozzle is only a good thing if you want to cause a big explosion.

Not only that, gasoline is far, far more toxic that most any pesticide you can buy as well as being a proven carcinogen.

turfmann on August 30, 2010 at 11:59 AM

Just defy them.
Tell the EPA to pound sand.
Ignore their authority.
Ignore the letters.
Ignore the fines.
They only have as much sway as you grant them.

Sefton on August 30, 2010 at 12:02 PM

Wait! forget about non-toxic bedbug killers. BEDBUGS HAVE BECOME AN ENDANGERED SPECIES. All hotels reporting bedbug infestation are to become government protected endangered species habitat areas.

MaiDee on August 30, 2010 at 12:03 PM

Do I sense the need for a Bed Bug Summit on the South lawn?

Fallon on August 30, 2010 at 12:08 PM

Did the EPA create the bedbug revival?

But of course. Speaking of bedbugs.

Buy Danish on August 30, 2010 at 12:09 PM

There could easily be more to it than Ed’s critique addresses.

The EPA clout could be prejudicial, being used to punish some chemical companies, favoring conglomerations that benefit whichever company donated the most or already “owns” the EPA bureaucracy.

It wouldn’t be the first time. And that would conform to Obama administration tactics.

maverick muse on August 30, 2010 at 12:12 PM

Bedbugs are a nasty pest. Permethrin insecticides claim to be efficient on bedbugs. Who has used it according to directions without success against bedbugs?

Whereas, we should be more concerned about allowing the control of the life threatening insects such are the 3rd world malaria carrying mosquitoes.

If Americans can get Congress to permit the extermination of bedbugs via most effective chemical, we should be able to conquer the DDT taboo for 3rd world tropic regions suffering massive death counts from malaria.

maverick muse on August 30, 2010 at 12:23 PM

Once you are infected, you have to throw away mattresses and box springs–so it is more complicated and expensive than just extermination.

Not necessarily true. We had an infestation in one bed room. I took the mattress and checked it carefully. There were no holes in the fabric, so cleaned it thoroughly and put it in “full cover, zippered mattress pad, where it will remain for at least one year.

I also washed all the clothes in the room, cleaned the carpet and treated every nook and cranny (including all electrical sockets after removing the plates) with two kinds of pesticides. I repeated the pesticide treatment 10 days later.

I also took apart the wooden platform be board by board until I found where the bugs were hiding. Killed them all and treated every crevice, crack or screw-hole with the pesticides.

I similarly treated all the other furniture in the room.

The process of cleaning one small bedroom took about 20 hours, but it seems to have done the job. (six weeks free of bugs or bites!)

Kasper Hauser on August 30, 2010 at 12:24 PM

And yes, had we had a good DDT bug-bomb, that would have been much, much easier…

Kasper Hauser on August 30, 2010 at 12:26 PM

In the US, the parasitic creatures had all but disappeared,

And then the people voted in G.H.W. Bush, who was so weak-kneed that Clinton and other Democrats were elected.

Oh wait. You were talking about bedbugs.

Never mind.

Squiggy on August 30, 2010 at 12:26 PM

This is just another media crisis of the week to distract us from what really matters, like the non-stop review of the NO Katrina disaster instead of covering Becks Restoring Honor rally. Where’s all the coverage of the flood damaged Grand Ol’ Oprey in Nashville or the flood damage in OKC?

Kissmygrits on August 30, 2010 at 11:51 AM

Get real! Those other places did not have 10,000 people dying, cannabalism in the Dome, and blown up levies. /s
Are the people of NO fed up with the deep-well drilling moratoriam and destruction of the wetlands because of delayed booms and skimmers while the feds sent lawyers to the Gulf instead?

There are lots of diseases and vermin rising because of shabby immigration control. Ellis Island served a purpose once upon a time.

onlineanalyst on August 30, 2010 at 12:31 PM

Alternatively, if you are the patient sort, and want to preserve the grass, you can put on a latex glove, and a cotton glove over it, put some gasoline into a jar, and wet your gloved fingers in gasoline. Then, wipe gasoline on the poison ivy leaves. Four or five leaves per vine should be enough to kill it.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 11:22 AM

gasoline will dissolve the latex pretty much on contact. you’ll want to use a glove designed for contact with strong thinners, etc.

jimkaray on August 30, 2010 at 12:35 PM

Uh, levees…
FIFM

onlineanalyst on August 30, 2010 at 12:38 PM

Cincinnati is #1 in bedbugs, a true epidemic. As with most community-wide problems, the poor suffer the most. It also kills the second-hand store business, as all used mattresses, sofas and chairs are suspect. So let’s have some compassion and bring back pesticides that work on this problem.

As to the letter from the EPA, it’s a case of “we know best”. They write, EPA continues to take a leadership role. Yeah. That’s the problem. They’re concerned about the pesticide’s effect on kids. Why not leave that to local govt and parents?

Paul-Cincy on August 30, 2010 at 12:39 PM

It wasn’t only DDT. Termites have also made a comeback since the EPA banned Chlordane. Chlordane used to last for over a decade with very few reported incidents. And how many less bugs would we have if we still had methoxychlor, chlorpyriphos (Dursban/Lorsban), diazinon (home use), and many others. Of course, the chemical companies always come up with less effective solutions and can sell them at higher price because they are on patent. These that are banned saved the consumer a bundle of money.

Christian Conservative on August 30, 2010 at 12:39 PM

They are using the same strategy to fight bed bugs as they are to fight terrorists, who knew?

Alden Pyle on August 30, 2010 at 12:40 PM

Better call in Homeland Security to check the WH for bugs,
flies, bees, rats and now bedbugs??

Is no one safe from these threats, I think Washington should be fumigated to rid ourselves of all these parasites.:):)

concernedsenior on August 30, 2010 at 12:49 PM

Not only that, gasoline is far, far more toxic that most any pesticide you can buy as well as being a proven carcinogen.

turfmann on August 30, 2010 at 11:59 AM

That is the whole point of using it – it works, unlike the over the counter pesticides. The only way a person can get any effective poisons anymore is to sit for the professional licensing schools – or use gasoline.

gasoline will dissolve the latex pretty much on contact. you’ll want to use a glove designed for contact with strong thinners, etc.

jimkaray on August 30, 2010 at 12:35 PM

I think what I was thinking of was neoprene. Normally, I just do it barehanded, but some folks might not want to.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 1:01 PM

It wasn’t only DDT. Termites have also made a comeback since the EPA banned Chlordane.

Christian Conservative on August 30, 2010 at 12:39 PM

I miss that stuff. Had a stockpile, but it is gone now.

Vashta.Nerada on August 30, 2010 at 1:02 PM

Drudge reports that the Oval Office is being completely redecorated while Bammie is in Marxist Vineyard. Could this be why, or is it just one of M’chell’s whims?

slickwillie2001 on August 30, 2010 at 1:06 PM

I think the general intolerance toward bedbugs demonstrated in these comments is illustrative of the bigotry and closed-minededness of you right-wingers…

On behalf of the bedbug “silent majority: out there, “can’t we all just get along?”

Kasper Hauser on August 30, 2010 at 1:08 PM

Will the EPA declare bedbugs an endangered species that needs protection? Don’t they have rights too? Aren’t there lawyers willing to represent them? Weren’t they ‘here before we were’? What makes us think that our species is better than they are?

slickwillie2001 on August 30, 2010 at 1:17 PM

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