To think, I once feared that this guy might cause long-term problems for conservatism.

“You remember our slogan during the campaign — yes, we can. Their slogan is ‘no, we can’t,’” he said to laughter from the Democratic fundraiser crowd. “No, we can’t. It’s really inspiring.”

Obama said that all Republicans have done is obstruct the agenda he and his fellow Democrats are pushing in Washington.

“No on help for small businesses, no on middle-class tax cuts, no on clean-energy jobs, no on making college more affordable, no on Wall Street reform,” he said.

What’s funnier, the fact that the whole reason the left is disgruntled these days is because they think “yes we can” was a bit of a fraud (on a big Krugmanesque stimulus, on the public option, on civil liberties, etc) or the fact that it’s precisely because, yes, we can — and did — pass an ineffective stimulus and health-care bill that’s left his party in ruins? I don’t know how Democrats manage the cognitive dissonance of insisting that Obama’s achieved so! much! already! while simultaneously blaming his ills on GOP obstructionism that’s caused him to achieve relatively little. Yes, we can talk out of both sides of our mouth.

This is what he was busy doing on a day when (a) lefty stats guru Nate Silver was warning progressives that they don’t fully grasp how terrifying the generic ballot polling is for Democrats, and (b) the Cook Report was declaring that fully 68 Democratic seats are now rated merely lean Democratic or toss-up. No, we can’t … afford any further Democratic control of Congress, because no, we can’t … pay for any more Hopenchange. How’s that for a slogan?