Remembering D-Day

posted at 11:25 am on June 6, 2010 by Cassy Fiano

June 6, 1944. 66 years ago today, the Allied forces stormed the beaches at Normandy and changed the course of World War II.

It was the largest amphibious assault landing of all time. Over 160,000 men stormed the beaches. Many of them were killed before they even reached the shore. We’ll never know the exact number of brave souls lost that day.

Can you imagine what it must have been like? To see those beaches, to know that there was a good chance the forces could fail, to see the death all around you? These men saw all of this, had to be terrified, were watching their brothers-in-arms falling all around them, and kept going anyways. May God always bless those men, because if they hadn’t possessed such valor, bravery, and courage under fire, Hitler’s murderous cult of death would likely never have been stopped.

Those men, those heroes, and their valiant efforts on D-Day saved the world. Remember them today, and especially remember those who fell.

—–

Follow Cassy on Twitter and read more of her work at CassyFiano.com and Hard Corps Wife.

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Comment pages: 1 2

obama beach?

moonbatkiller on June 6, 2010 at 11:27 AM

Google, in ignoring this important day not only for us but the world, is behaving true to form.

Blake on June 6, 2010 at 11:28 AM

We charged hell and defeated the Devil.

Speakup on June 6, 2010 at 11:30 AM

Well, here’s my favorite tribute to D-Day of them all… me being a metal fan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrJAwCBbnuc

Edunai on June 6, 2010 at 11:32 AM

Those men, those heroes, and their valiant efforts on D-Day saved the world. Remember them today, and especially remember those who fell.

My Uncle Phil, who I never got to meet, was there that day. I thank him for his service.

VegasRick on June 6, 2010 at 11:32 AM

Thank you to those few still left.

Mr. Joe on June 6, 2010 at 11:33 AM

To our eternal shame, this day once held solemn observances and thanks giving for those heroes who saved our way of life, is largely ignored (think Google and their anti-american ways.)

Thank you Cassy.

Webrider on June 6, 2010 at 11:40 AM

A Lesson almost forgotten.

the_nile on June 6, 2010 at 11:42 AM

Even peanuts remembers.

Shy Guy on June 6, 2010 at 11:42 AM

“The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!
I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory!
Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.” Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Order of the Day, 6 June 1944

There’s something about that small set of paragraphs that gets me every time.

Sgt Steve on June 6, 2010 at 11:42 AM

And now for my tribute, the Iron Maiden song, The Longest Day, with a fan video featuring clips from Saving Private Ryan.

ynot4tony2 on June 6, 2010 at 11:43 AM

Thanks for posting this. I found very few “News” sites have given this mention at all today. Sad.

God bless those who fought through this.

Major Nuisance on June 6, 2010 at 11:43 AM

Go to Normandy. You’ll marvel at what those brave men did in crossing that huge beach or climbing the cliffs at Point de Hoc. Truly the Greatest Generation.

Dingbat63 on June 6, 2010 at 11:45 AM

Ronald Reagan.
He was a man of humility, a man of honor.
And HE was a leader.
Six years ago yesterday, he went to meet the heroes of D-Day.

GGMac on June 6, 2010 at 11:45 AM

Thanks to all those brave men and to all the people who fought for us and against evil.

CWforFreedom on June 6, 2010 at 11:45 AM

obama beach?

moonbatkiller on June 6, 2010 at 11:27 AM

..sections of the Normandy beachhead were assigned to the different fighting forces of the participants, the English, Canadians, Americans, etc. These beaches were code-named Omaha, Utah, Juno, Sword, Gold.

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 11:48 AM

God Bless all those who have gone before us, knowingly, into the jaws of hell! Human nature is truly a wonderous thing, I just wish most of it did not take the bad side first for us to truly see the good side.

bluemarlin on June 6, 2010 at 11:49 AM

Here is a link to CBS radio’s complete broadcast day coverage of June 6, 1944. It’s a fascinating and dramatic audio document.
http://www.archive.org/details/Complete_Broadcast_Day_D-Day

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on June 6, 2010 at 11:52 AM

Obama beach?

Seriously?

BallisticBob on June 6, 2010 at 11:54 AM

At least the Military Channel is running a marathon of D-Day/WWII documentaries.

God bless them for their service and sacrifice.

tru2tx on June 6, 2010 at 11:55 AM

Saving Europe’s butt, two times in once century, was paid with the sacrifice of many young American lives.

65 years after the last Great War, Europe has forgotten and half of America could care less. To them war is evil and should be avoided at all costs. To the rest of us it is a necessary evil to rid the world of tyrants and save the lives those tyrants deem meaningless.

My Dad served in the Navy, first in the Mediterranean, later in the South Pacific, on a mine-layer that was a sitting duck. He suffered injuries from a Kamikaze attack, but lived to talk about it. He gone now, but not forgotten.

RIP Dad.

fogw on June 6, 2010 at 11:57 AM

Obama beach?

Seriously?

BallisticBob on June 6, 2010 at 11:54 AM

..see above and here and here and here.

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 11:57 AM

At least the Military Channel is running a marathon of D-Day/WWII documentaries. God bless them for their service and sacrifice.

tru2tx on June 6, 2010 at 11:55 AM

..the Military Channel?

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 11:59 AM

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 11:59 AM

287 on Directv.

BallisticBob on June 6, 2010 at 12:02 PM

We can only hope the bravery of the leaders of that time will be recaptured since we have ZERO leadership in these days.

Always, our military are the bravest of the brave.

SouthernGent on June 6, 2010 at 12:04 PM

No adequate words, just solemn thoughts and deep thanks for those that have, do, and will serve.

Midas on June 6, 2010 at 12:05 PM

Anyone else whose sick of google’s commie, America hating, never remember a useful holiday punk asses can use this pirate link to get google search results without using their search engine:

The searches have no ads and can display up to a 100 results at a time. Get the word out dudes!!!

abobo on June 6, 2010 at 12:06 PM

Thank you to all the young men who laid down their lives that day, never got married and had kids. Forever in their debt.

rbj on June 6, 2010 at 12:09 PM

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 11:59 AM

287 on Directv.

BallisticBob on June 6, 2010 at 12:02 PM

..I was funnin’ ya Bob. It sounded like we should thank the Military Channel for their service and sacrifice.

The War Planner on June 6, 2010 at 12:09 PM

fogw on June 6, 2010 at 11:57 AM

Mine served proudly on the USS Radford. Lost that good man 3 yrs. ago. They still have a reunion every year. This year will be in Branston. Mainly attended by their widows and children.

katy the mean old lady on June 6, 2010 at 12:09 PM

Cassie, thank you. Sending it on around the world via e-mail and Facebook.

katy the mean old lady on June 6, 2010 at 12:12 PM

My father, a US Merchant Marine officer, served on a Liberty ship providing support and supplies off Omaha Beach on D-Day.

rrpjr on June 6, 2010 at 12:12 PM

My Daddy was medically discharged from the Army the year before the invasion because of his heart. Asked, “How in hell did you get into the Army?” He replied, “I sure as hell didn’t ask to get in!” So, he went home to my Mom, and I was conceived and born 3 months before this. His ‘group’ that he would have been with were all killed.

Posey on June 6, 2010 at 12:12 PM

Heroes.

Philly on June 6, 2010 at 12:16 PM

Google, in ignoring this important day not only for us but the world, is behaving true to form.

Blake on June 6, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Hey i know google is anti American, but i’m slow on this. what are they specifically doing? not doing? Thx.

bernzright777 on June 6, 2010 at 12:16 PM

katy the mean old lady on June 6, 2010 at 12:09 PM

Dad served on the USS Keokuk. He attended yearly reunions as well until his Alzheimers and limited mobility prevented him from going.

fogw on June 6, 2010 at 12:23 PM

If you’re into history, I’d suggest reading “D-Day” by Anthony Beevor.

It’s a lengthy history of the invasion by one of the best military historians. Lot’s of detail, and a little dry at times, but a great story of the invasion and the following days before the allies had a good foothold. It’s a miracle the thing succeeded.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 12:30 PM

Hey i know google is anti American, but i’m slow on this. what are they specifically doing? not doing? Thx.

bernzright777 on June 6, 2010 at 12:16 PM

They often change the “Google” banner on the homepage to reflect the history of the day. No recognition of DDay anniversary, just the usual google banner.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 12:32 PM

A tragedy that all for which they fought – the defeat of a fanatical totalitarianism- has turned out to have been for nought, since a far greater fanatical totalitariansm- Islam- has been invited into Europe by those whom we saved from the merely pagan Nazis.

And in America, a mega-mosque is in the works right at the shadow’s edge of the missing World Trade Towers, to secure Islamic imperialism’s triumph among the dhimmis of the Big Apple.

Their battle, in effect, has been lost 66.6 years later.

profitsbeard on June 6, 2010 at 12:32 PM

My father, a US Merchant Marine officer, served on a Liberty ship providing support and supplies off Omaha Beach on D-Day. rrpjr on June 6, 2010 at 12:12 PM

Mom was a welder building Liberty ships. Proud of her too.

Dingbat63 on June 6, 2010 at 12:33 PM

Obama beach?

BallisticBob on June 6, 2010 at 11:54 AM

LEAVE MICHELLE ALONE!

Shy Guy on June 6, 2010 at 12:37 PM

Grandfather was clocked upside the head at the docks loading a liberty ship. Had to be hospitalized just prior to. He went home to have some 9 kids.

moyeti on June 6, 2010 at 12:37 PM

The only two places I have seen any mention of D-Day is by Cassy and guest blogger Doug Powers at MM. I might have missed some.
To those who died, God keep them in Your arms, to those still alive, thank you from the bottom of my heart.
L

letget on June 6, 2010 at 12:37 PM

Helen Thomas thinks they should have gone back to England.

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 12:39 PM

letget on June 6, 2010 at 12:37 PM

A post a Blackfive also.

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 12:40 PM

Re: Google’s non-nod to D-Day

The whole world isn’t exactly interested (right or wrong) in what America and the Allies did that day. Some may even get offended (right or wrong).

They are a WORLDWIDE company and they are practicing good business skills in recognizing things that are common to most of everyone. Expecting them to be patriotic is silly.

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:42 PM

Aviator,
Sorry, I have never been to their site. Thanks for the up date.
L

letget on June 6, 2010 at 12:42 PM

Thank God the MSM isn’t covering the landings today. The headline would read “Disaster on the beaches”.

GarandFan on June 6, 2010 at 12:44 PM

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:42 PM

Um, there are different google homepages for different locations. For example: http://www.google.fr/
Has nothing to do with “good business skills”.

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 12:46 PM

Thank God the MSM isn’t covering the landings today. The headline would read “Disaster on the beaches”.

GarandFan on June 6, 2010 at 12:44 PM

Geraldo would be drawing out the whole plan in the sand for the Germans.

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 12:47 PM

Hey i know google is anti American, but i’m slow on this. what are they specifically doing? not doing? Thx.

bernzright777 on June 6, 2010 at 12:16 PM

They’ve honored the 40th anniversary of Sesame Street for an entire week, surly dedicating one day to the reason why they can call themselves Google and not Schutzstaffel search engine is worthy of honoring too.

Michelle Dubois on June 6, 2010 at 12:50 PM

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 12:46 PM

The Americanized version can still be reached.

I just think this conservative issue with Google is stupid. Why should we care if a business is formally patriotic? It’s a waste of time.

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:51 PM

They are a WORLDWIDE company and they are practicing good business skills in recognizing things that are common to most of everyone. Expecting them to be patriotic is silly.

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:42 PM

Fail.

They are capable of targeting home page for US viewers only, as they did for Thanksgiving in 2009.

Expecting them to be patriotic is silly, because they aren’t.

fogw on June 6, 2010 at 12:58 PM

I just think this conservative issue with Google is stupid. Why should we care if a business is formally patriotic? It’s a waste of time.

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:51 PM

The beauty of freedom is that you don’t have to waste your time here at the moment. You could ummmm ride your bike through Pittsburgh, for example.

MNDavenotPC on June 6, 2010 at 1:01 PM

The Americanized version can still be reached.

I just think this conservative issue with Google is stupid. Why should we care if a business is formally patriotic? It’s a waste of time.

foucaultsvac on June 6, 2010 at 12:51 PM

Well, it is the American version, so American centric tributes should be OK. I think the point is if they never changed the logo for tributes to this or that I would have no comment. Over time they have clearly shown their liberal bias in what they have chosen or not chosen to tribute on their homepage. Do you think it is “smart business” to piss off more conservative customers? It is not and they clearly care more about making a statement than about smart business.
If they are willing to show their liberal bias in this way how does anyone know if they cook their search results, even in a subtle fashion, in a biased way?

Aviator on June 6, 2010 at 1:01 PM

Grab some kleenex then go here.

Akzed on June 6, 2010 at 1:09 PM

The Greatest Generation, in its most pivotal moment in history. We can never repay the price that was paid. The Normandy invasion sequence in Saving Private Ryan was difficult to watch, and that was just a movie. One can only imagine what the real D-Day was like.

On a lark, I finally got around to watching my Yankee Doodle Dandy DVD. Every time I see that movie, the heroism and American spirit that comes through in “Over There” and “She’s A Grand Old Flag,” songs that have been sung by our soldiers and played by military bands for generations since George M. Cohan first wrote them, brings tears to my eyes.

OneVision on June 6, 2010 at 1:37 PM

Here is a link to CBS radio’s complete broadcast day coverage of June 6, 1944. It’s a fascinating and dramatic audio document.

http://www.archive.org/details/Complete_Broadcast_Day_D-Day

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on June 6, 2010 at 11:52 AM

Sigh, this was back when C-BS actually practiced “journalism”.

Del Dolemonte on June 6, 2010 at 1:39 PM

Thanks for remembering these heroes that fought and died for our freedoms.

d1carter on June 6, 2010 at 1:43 PM

The Nazis thought the jagged cliffs were unassailable until the elite U.S. Rangers scaled them in a valiant D-Day assault. Now the rocks are undergoing major surgery to save them from an even greater force — Mother Nature.

The cliffs at Pointe du Hoc, the Normandy promontory where the Rangers stared down death, have eroded by 10 meters (33 feet) since June 6, 1944. Today, the job is to strengthen the cliffs, not conquer them, and keep the bunker used by the Nazis as an observation point from falling into the pounding sea.

Schadenfreude on June 6, 2010 at 1:44 PM

Thank God the MSM isn’t covering the landings today. The headline would read “Disaster on the beaches”.
GarandFan on June 6, 2010 at 12:44 PM

And re Pointe de Hoc, they would say “See, there were no (big) guns there…Roosevelt lied just to get French wine.”

Dingbat63 on June 6, 2010 at 1:54 PM

May we never forget.

In honor of today, I will watch Band of Brothers. My favorite movie/series of all time.

kiakjones on June 6, 2010 at 1:58 PM

Everyone should visit the D-Day Memorial in Bedford, Virginia if you get the chance. It is wonderful.

Saving Private Ryan is one of the few movies that ever made me cry – and it was at the very end, when the old Ryan goes back to the Normandy cemetery. I felt almost worthless as a person in comparison to those heroes who fell that day.

rockmom on June 6, 2010 at 2:01 PM

Another good perspective on D-Day is in Patton. I watched that with my 16-year-old who is studying WWII now in his World History class. The Germans were seriously afraid of Patton, and they were convinced that Normandy was a diversion largely because Patton wasn’t there. And Patton saved the Allied forces from getting hopelessly bogged down in the hedgerow fighting after D-Day. It wasn’t a perfect operation by any means, but thank God we had the commanders who knew how to make it work.

rockmom on June 6, 2010 at 2:05 PM

Can you imagine what it must have been like? To see those beaches, to know that there was a good chance the forces could fail, to see the death all around you? These men saw all of this, had to be terrified, were watching their brothers-in-arms falling all around them, and kept going anyways.

Exactly Cassy. It is my understanding according to those that were there (and are still alive) the movie Saving Private Ryan was the closest depiction of what it was like to storm onto those beaches that day. All I can say is a depiction of that day and what it was like was sobering enough for me, I could not imagine being there for real.

As it was my palms were sweating while I was watching that scene in Saving Private Ryan knowing full well I was safe and sound in a movie theater. It was then that I truly realized just what courage, determination, and bravery it took for those men to keep going in the face of such overwhelming odds and almost certain death.

We owe them a huge debt of gratitude to say the least. I humbly say thank you and God bless you to all those brave men of D-Day and to all those that served in all wars past and present.

*SALUTES*

Liberty or Death on June 6, 2010 at 2:13 PM

Everytime I watch the opening scenes of “Private Ryan” and also the invasion scenes in” Band Of Brothers”, it brings tears to my eyes. The ability to stay focused and keep on going had to be unbelievable, especially when you learn that it was junior ranking officers young enlisted that survived kept the attack alive and well and succeeded. I do not believe that I could have even done it when younger,,it surely was the greatest generation and I am happy that I got to know some of them. Truly great human beings, as a Navy Admiral said,,where uncommon valor was a common occurrence” and even though he had one particular battle in mind,,I think it works for every war we have ever been in.

retiredeagle on June 6, 2010 at 2:16 PM

There were army movie crews in some of the early landing craft that had film of action on the beach. Later in the day the film was being handed up to a boat and the bag was dropped into the sea. Almost no film survives of D-Day.

Ted Torgerson on June 6, 2010 at 2:16 PM

Thank God the MSM isn’t covering the landings today. The headline would read “Disaster on the beaches”.
GarandFan on June 6, 2010 at 12:44 PM

And re Pointe de Hoc, they would say “See, there were no (big) guns there…Roosevelt lied just to get French wine.”

Dingbat63 on June 6, 2010 at 1:54 PM

How unfortunately true…the liberal lefty history revisionists stop at nothing to twist history to ensure America is villified…they are SCUM!

Liberty or Death on June 6, 2010 at 2:24 PM

My Dad and both his brothers were in the Navy. All three were in the Pacific on D-Day. The youngest brother is the only one left. He no longer attends his reunions, too many absent companions these days. On a little different note both my sons were born on D-Day…four years apart.

Oldnuke on June 6, 2010 at 2:28 PM

I thought I would share with you a passage from my grandfather’s letter home in 1944 recounting that day. He was 38 years old at the time and had grown up in small town Arkansas. He was always a good story teller. I put a flag on his grave this weekend.

“I’ll never forget climbing down the ropes to the landing barge. On the way in, about 50 yards away, the USS Arkansas looked as if she were on fire, as every gun was wide open – I mean she was really talking; and just astern of her was the USS Texas sounding off as if she had a coon treed. I had to holler, ‘Give em hell! – I just couldn’t hold it! However on account of the tumult, I was probably the only one who heard it. It did give me a certain amount of comfort to see old Arkansas in there pitching – and I mean pitching!”

DirkaDirka on June 6, 2010 at 2:28 PM

” Hero’s all”

Now “O” is trying to give it all away and or apologize for it.

Texyank on June 6, 2010 at 2:29 PM

Everytime I watch the opening scenes of “Private Ryan” and also the invasion scenes in” Band Of Brothers”, it brings tears to my eyes.

retiredeagle on June 6, 2010 at 2:16 PM

Me too, in fact after seeing Saving Private Ryan I wanted my son to watch it with me because it’s important for younger generations to always remember the sacrifices that were made to ensure the freedoms they enjoy and often take for granted. They need to understand the real history of WWII not just the revisionist history they learned in school.

Alas I was never able to get my son to watch it with me and now he lives in NY and is a flaming liberal…where oh where did I go wrong…

*shakes head in shame*

Liberty or Death on June 6, 2010 at 2:37 PM

After leaving the theatre after seeing Private Ryan I sat in my truck and cried and cried. I resolved then that I would travel to Normandy. Three months later I was standing in the US cemetery and on the beaches, Point du Hoc and Arronmanches. To look out over the water and imagine what our soldiers experienced, I cried again. Sat down and thought what war destructs and achieves. It was worth the sacrifice paid in blood and tears. Our WWII soldiers are almost gone but they will be honored and remembered. I want to go back again to stand where the greatest generation fought and died so bravely. This time I want my daughter and grandkids to be with me.

momoftxmomof3 on June 6, 2010 at 2:48 PM

So, in honor of the occasion, where is Obama playing golf today?

pilamaye on June 6, 2010 at 2:49 PM

*shakes head in shame*

Liberty or Death on June 6, 2010 at 2:37 PM

It’s ok, Liberty. Someone will eventually steal his birkenstocks and he’ll suddenly realize he’s for punishment of crime. Then, he’ll become one of us.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 2:50 PM

Thank you, Uncle Conrad, buried in the U.S. cemetery in Normandy.

exhelodrvr on June 6, 2010 at 2:50 PM

This time I want my daughter and grandkids to be with me.

momoftxmomof3 on June 6, 2010 at 2:48 PM

Going this summer with the wife and 15 year old daughter. I want my daughter to stand in the cemetery in Colleville and see what the cost of freedom really is.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 2:53 PM

Our military leaders would all be jailed if they conducted warfare as the did back in 1944. Which is why we no longer win wars but count ourselves fortunate to see them end in a stalemate. DD

Darvin Dowdy on June 6, 2010 at 2:53 PM

On The Military Channel’s “Day After D-Day” just now a survivor reminds us “The bottom line is – Freedom is not Free.”

It’s an ironic reminder today as we go deep into debt while our freedoms are gradually stolen from us by progressives and their filthy legislation.

ontherocks on June 6, 2010 at 3:30 PM

My grandfather, from whom I draw this online pen name, served in D-Day as a member of the 82nd Airborne, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment.

He counts himself lucky that his plane was shot to bits around him as he jumped out the door instead of being on the beaches.

We planned to attend the reunions & such at the 60th anniversary 6 years ago but he was diagnosed with stomach cancer in December of ’03 and in beating the cancer he lost most of his mobility, and the ability to travel on airplanes.

After I hit submit I’m going to call him and thank him as I have done almost every year.

SgtSVJones on June 6, 2010 at 3:33 PM

After I hit submit I’m going to call him and thank him as I have done almost every year.

SgtSVJones on June 6, 2010 at 3:33 PM

Thank him for all of us.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 3:35 PM

What did they teach you guys that constitutes “revisionist” history of WWII? What happened is clear enough – the Allies fought a defensive war to put down the worst regimes in human history. I hope you don’t mean alleged atrocities such as the strategic bombing campaign or the use of the atomic bomb – or even worse, failing to do more to stop the Holocaust. I’d say we did a lot to try and stop it – like wage the largest war ever. I do agree that the Soviet efforts on the Eastern Front are now receiving their due in the defeat of the Nazis. West and East were equally important there.

Good thing you didn’t learn Canadian “history” – they think that D-Day would have failed with out them.

KillerKane on June 6, 2010 at 3:38 PM

I rarely go to see movies but I saw Saving Private Ryan the first weekend it was out and went back and saw it again the next weekend. First and only time I ever paid twice for the same movie. The D-Day scenes made such an impact on realizing how great our soldiers are. Saving Private Ryan losing the Oscar to Shakespeare in Love demonstrates the idiocy of Hollywood liberals.

PatMac on June 6, 2010 at 3:40 PM

Another note re “Saving Private Ryan”. I had read Stephen Ambrose’s The Boys of Eisenhower” I think it was and the D-Day landing scenes described were riveting. When I read and I suppose like everyone else,,you visualize what is decribed,,,,,,,when viewing Private Ryan,,,Ambrose’s book came to mind, it was uncanny. It was like I had been there already.

retiredeagle on June 6, 2010 at 3:54 PM

My father in-law was one of the many wounded in that invasion. He’s now deceased, and I have the Purple Heart that he was awarded.
Every year on this day, I stand before that Medal, and pray
for all those brave souls who lost their lives and to those wounded in the invasion.
God bless our Military; Past, Present and Future!

centre on June 6, 2010 at 3:55 PM

At the age of 23, my grandfather jumped out of an airplane that was full of holes and landed just south of the Douve River in France, nearly 6 miles south of the drop zone target of Ste Mere Eglise

Over the next 24 hours he assisted in gathering up 2-4 other men in his regiment and with the aid of a 10-12 year old French Resistance member made contact with nearly 150 other members of the regiment.

The young boy’s father & older brother rowed the men across the Douve River 3-5 at a time, taking nearly 3 nights to do so. My grandfather crossed in the first trip and assisted in scouting the German positions and collecting parachute bundles that were miss-dropped.

Afterwords the men of this conglomeration of companies made their way towards the town taking large numbers of German prisoners by laying ambushes along the main road with weapons recovered by my grandfather.

He went on to serve in the Battle of the Bulge in the Ardennes Forest and be one of the first units across the Rhine River in the push to Berlin (Operation Varsity).

For his service to our nation he was awarded 2 Bronze Stars, and the Combat Infantry Badge, in addition to the standard European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and World War II Victory Medal given to all service members.

In the present my best friend also aged 23 returned from his first tour of duty in Iraq about a month ago and was the one who reminded me of today’s significance

Today I am 23 years old and am eternally grateful for the service given by all who are able and have served their nation.

SgtSVJones on June 6, 2010 at 4:16 PM

My father, PFC Patrick Maguire, US Army Ordnance Corps, was not at Normandy that day. He was liberating Rome with Mark Clark’s army after having endured the North African and Sicilian campaigns, as well as the brutal warfare of Monte Cassino. He would never, ever talk about it. He simply wanted to forget. He did what he had to do, an Irish immigrant who felt he had to give back to his adopted country and who did it gladly.

I salute him and all his comrades who fought in Italy and France on that day. We can never forget what those men did.

Thank you, Dad, and rest in peace.

NavyMustang on June 6, 2010 at 4:28 PM

My father, the Rev. Reginald Haw, landed on D-day as chaplain of 47 Royal Marine Commando. Only 3 of their 15 landing craft made it to the beach, his was one of them and he stepped ashore dry. The remainder of the commando swam ashore and linked up. Once ashore, their orders were to not engage the enemy but to work their way west inland behind the German defenses. On the night of June 6th they camped just south of the town of Port-en-Bessin and attacked the town from the rear on June 7th, taking it with heavy casualties. Port-en-Bessin was essential to the allies success as it was where PLUTO (PipeLine Under The Ocean) came ashore and supplied fuel for the allied vehicles.

As I write this I’m looking at a photo of the officers of 47 RM Commando and the map of his beach sector which my father carried ashore.

God bless you Dad, and all the brave men who were there on that day.

Trafalgar on June 6, 2010 at 4:42 PM

Also, my godfather, Lt. John Bennett landed with 47 RM Commando on D-Day. On June 9th he and another officer were sent out on patrol to the west to try and hook up with the American troops from Omaha Beach. The way the story was told, they heard a vehicle approaching and dived into a roadside ditch. Uncle John told the other officer he should jump out and challenge the vehicle. The other officer responded that since he was a captain and Uncle John a lieutenant, it should be he who did any jumping out! He did so and yelling at the approching vehicle in German heard the reply “Say, are you guys British?” He responded “Yes, are you Americans?”. The reply immediately came back “Hell no, we’re not Americans, we’re Texans!” And so the British and American armies linked up!

God bless you too Uncle John

Trafalgar on June 6, 2010 at 4:52 PM

……..”there is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest.”

“One’s country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it’s the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you.” – Ronald Reagan

^^^Reading that is bringing tears to my eyes.
I miss Ronald Reagan.

BTW….How many of today’s youngsters know what today is???
Our “greatest generation” is becoming our “dwindling generation”.

To all our “brave warriors”…past and present.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTs6a0ORdQU

tencole on June 6, 2010 at 4:53 PM

The Masonic Lodge ,San Gabriel #89 in Georgetown,Texas has a framed 48 Star American Flag. It is blood stained with bullet holes in it, a young Soldier from Austin carried it ashore on D Day.The flag and his belongings were sent to his widowed mother. The woman needed help she ask the Masonic Brothers who provided for her needs. She gave the only thing of value she had as a token of gratitude,her sons American Flag.
This flag is framed and reminds all who see it in the main Lodge room that we can never repay the debt to the men who gave all.
We will never forget OUR SOLDIERS.

Col.John Wm. Reed on June 6, 2010 at 5:07 PM

It’s ok, Liberty. Someone will eventually steal his birkenstocks and he’ll suddenly realize he’s for punishment of crime. Then, he’ll become one of us.

BacaDog on June 6, 2010 at 2:50 PM

Heh, funny one baca. I used to be fairly liberal in my younger days too, then I grew a brain and became more conservative.

Liberty or Death on June 6, 2010 at 5:08 PM

We just got back from visiting the MUSEUM Of The SOLDIER in Portland IN. What an amazing place! The artifacts and the stories of the men and women who served are so amazing. It’s about one hour northeast of Indy and well worth the trip. Check their website for info and hours http://www.museumofthesoldier.com/. Thank you fellow Vets for your service. Freedom is not free.

indypat on June 6, 2010 at 5:24 PM

But Pat Buchanan says that we fought for nothing – Hitler posed no threat to anyone and…

HEY! Where are you guys taking me? Don’t throw me into that dumpster!

Screw the revisionists. The Allies saved the world by defeating the Nazis, Fascists and Imperialist Japanese. That’s good enough for me.

KillerKane on June 6, 2010 at 5:33 PM

Remember the paratroopers of the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions!!!!

nazo311 on June 6, 2010 at 5:43 PM

Thank-You for Freedom!

Thank-You for your sacrifices,

the Greatest Generation!

canopfor on June 6, 2010 at 8:57 PM

God bless out troops today as well as yesteryear. Thanks to those who sacrificed to accomplish their missions in supporting freedom for America. Remember them in your prayers and thank them for their service.

dthorny on June 6, 2010 at 9:25 PM

No observation by the Obama White House. I wonder why these rats even bother to lie about their service.

borntoraisehogs on June 7, 2010 at 1:03 AM

The idiots in the White House didn’t mention this day…but went to the theater.

Imbeciles rejoice!

Schadenfreude on June 7, 2010 at 1:09 AM

“In the end, the world didn’t need a Superman… Just a Brave one.”

-Tim Daly portraying Superman in “Apokolips Now Pt. 2″

Reagan’s Address at Point-du-Hoc Commemorating D-Day 6/6/84

Jones Zemkophill on June 7, 2010 at 1:38 AM

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