The price of freedom

posted at 9:06 am on May 31, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

Ronald Reagan, 1986:

Memorial Day is an occasion of special importance to all Americans, because it is a day sacred to the memory of all those Americans who made the supreme sacrifice for the liberties we enjoy. We will never forget or fail to honor these heroes to whom we owe so much. We honor them best when we resolve to cherish and defend the liberties for which they gave their lives. Let us resolve to do all in our power to assure the survival and the success of liberty so that our children and their children for generations to come can live in an America in which freedom’s light continues to shine.

The Congress, in establishing Memorial Day, called for it to be a day of tribute to America’s fallen, and also a day of national prayer for lasting peace. This Nation has always sought true peace. We seek it still. Our goal is peace in which the highest aspirations of our people, and people everywhere, are secure: peace with freedom, with justice, and with opportunity for human development. This is the permanent peace for which we pray, not only for ourselves but for all generations.

The defense of peace, like the defense of liberty, requires more than lip service. It requires vigilance, military strength, and the willingness to take risks and to make sacrifices. The surest guarantor of both peace and liberty is our unflinching resolve to defend that which has been purchased for us by our fallen heroes.

On Memorial Day, let us pray for peace — not only for ourselves, but for all those who seek freedom and justice.

Normally on this day, I’d try to write something that captures the meaning and purpose of Memorial Day.  My friend Bruce McQuain at QandO managed to do it with a single picture, which he has dedicated to his friend Stuart Lee Barnett, lost in Vietnam on August 26, 1970.   It reminds us that not everyone “celebrates” Memorial Day:

Our Green Room authors Cassy Fiano and Slublog have written excellent pieces for today.  Here are a few other:

I’ll be spending the day with family, and wish all of you a good and thoughtful Memorial Day.

Update: Midas in the comments finds the information on the soldier whose grave is depicted in the picture:

After graduating from Duke, Regan turned down a job offer from UBS, a financial services company, and a scholarship to Southern Methodist University’s law school to enlist in the Army, where he passed on Officer Candidate School to focus on becoming a Ranger.

“He said, ‘If I don’t do it, then who will do it?’” said Regan’s fiancee, Mary McHugh, a medical student at Emory University who, like scores of others at the Park Avenue house yesterday, wore Regan’s high school graduation photo clipped to her shirt. “He recognized it as an option and he couldn’t not do it.”

Army Sergeant James John Regan was born June 27, 1980, in Rockville Centre, New York. He graduated from Chaminade High School in Mineola, New York, where his lacrosse skills earned him a scholarship to Duke. There, while earning a bachelor’s degree in economics, he played midfield on two teams that won conference championships and one that reached the NCAA semifinals.

Regan enlisted in February 2004 and spent three years in the Army, earning a Bronze Star, Purple Heart and several medals marking his service in Iraq and Afghanistan. He went to the Army’s language training school and read about the countries he patrolled, but remained humble enough to make his three sisters laugh with a Borat film-character impression or explain the region’s centuries-old conflict to his mother, Mary Regan, when he was home for Christmas.

He was “a best friend to everyone he knew,” said his youngest sister, Michaela, 16.

Regan’s stint in the Army was to end in February 2008, and he and McHugh planned to marry the next month. They were to move to the Chicago area, where her family lives, and he was going to become a social studies teacher and coach lacrosse.

Please keep the Regans and Ms. McHugh in your prayers today.  James John Regan, Sergeant, Army Ranger, gave his last full measure of devotion on February 12, 2007.


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Ed posts Reagan in 1986. How about Obama in 2010?

“I’m busy, America. When’s tee time, Rahm?!”

Good Solid B-Plus on May 31, 2010 at 9:09 AM

My friend Bruce McQuain at QandO managed to do it with a single picture, which he has dedicated to his friend Stuart Lee Barnett, lost in Vietnam on August 26, 1970.

More tears…

Zorro on May 31, 2010 at 9:13 AM

Great photo Ed…
America’s true treasure, the American warrior.
May God Bless each and every one of these warriors & their families.

Keemo on May 31, 2010 at 9:14 AM

That which is most precious calls for the highest price. They have defended freedom with their very lives, it falls to the rest of us to preserve it. We cannot fail them when they didn’t fail the rest of us.

God bless those willing to put themselves in harms’s way. God bless their families. God bless the United States of America.

Hog Wild on May 31, 2010 at 9:16 AM

EVERY day is Memorial Day.

Tony737 on May 31, 2010 at 9:18 AM

Thank you to all for whom we have this day. You are never forgotten.

TugboatPhil on May 31, 2010 at 9:20 AM

Oh that picture. I’m tearing up. Any woman who’s loved a man knows what it is to stretch out next to him, to feel his strength and warmth….

May God bless the families of the fallen today. May God bless and keep America forever.

Grace_is_sufficient on May 31, 2010 at 9:21 AM

I wish we’d change back to May 30 as Memorial Day. The “Monday holiday” move was a mistake.

All the news reports today in Philly will start with the Jersey Shore: “And it’s the unofficial start of summer, as families enjoyed the first long weekend at the beach and business owners are hoping for a profitable summer.”

After Shore film clips and interviews: “And we mustn’t forget why we celebrate Memorial Day. [brief clips of parades, cemetary ceremonies].

Wethal on May 31, 2010 at 9:21 AM

Ed posts Reagan in 1986. How about Obama in 2010?

“I’m busy, America. When’s tee time, Rahm?!”

Good Solid B-Plus on May 31, 2010

What a contrast. Our greatest 20th century president and our worst of all time, Wilson included.

My dad and two of my brothers, like myself, were veterans. They all came home but have since passed on. I am the last surviving veteran in my family and I will remember them and especially all those who fell in battle and earned that special place at heaven’s table. God bless them all.

Extrafishy on May 31, 2010 at 9:26 AM

Great post Ed.

I was visiting the sites of two friends in Arlington about two years ago and I saw a similar sight of a young widow, seated at the gravesite of her fallen husband. She was having a conversation with him, had a blanket and flowers there with her.

Solemn.

ted c on May 31, 2010 at 9:26 AM

The picture is perfect. Thanks Ed and Bruce for sharing it.

conservative pilgrim on May 31, 2010 at 9:26 AM

Thank you to our brave heroes. We can come to this blog today and express our opinions freely because of your heroic sacrifices.

Philly on May 31, 2010 at 9:27 AM

It reminds us that not everyone “celebrates” Memorial Day

The price that families and loved ones pay.

antisocial on May 31, 2010 at 9:34 AM

Freedom is not free. Thank you to all those who serve in our Armed Forces.

Yossarian on May 31, 2010 at 9:42 AM

Oh that picture. I’m tearing up. Any woman who’s loved a man knows what it is to stretch out next to him, to feel his strength and warmth….

May God bless the families of the fallen today. May God bless and keep America forever.

Grace_is_sufficient on May 31, 2010 at 9:21 AM

Thanks for saying what I wanted to but can’t with tears streaming down my face.

CarolynM on May 31, 2010 at 9:42 AM

Just read the page about the soldier in question from the photo – still sniffling over here…

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/jjregan.htm

God bless him, his family and loved ones – and the same for all who have served. My deepest respect and thanks for your service.

Midas on May 31, 2010 at 9:43 AM

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.
Ronald Reagan

And I thank everyone that has served and fought for us.

GnuBreed on May 31, 2010 at 9:50 AM

Damnit, I hate crying before 8AM…

karl9000 on May 31, 2010 at 9:52 AM

rmy Sergeant James John Regan was born June 27, 1980, in Rockville Centre, New York. He graduated from Chaminade High School in Mineola, New York,

A great high school, where they instill good values in young men.

RIP

blatantblue on May 31, 2010 at 9:57 AM

Love.

royzer on May 31, 2010 at 9:59 AM

Today is a day for honor and remembrance. Not disrepect and lip service.

kingsjester on May 31, 2010 at 10:02 AM

For years we have taken part in decorating the markers of those who did not return in Punchbowl National Cemetery with a flag, fresh flower lei, and a slow salute to those who did not return from their duty of bringing a sense of freedom to others.

From my naturalized Korean wife borne during the Korean conflict, a retired G.I. servant who spent 25 years actively protecting our rights, one son en-route to serve U.S. in Afghanistan, and the other writing code to protect our secret formula for freedom and all it brings.

We only wish that those who do not agree with our beliefs to at least take this moment to remember U.S. and what it stands for.

MSGTAS on May 31, 2010 at 10:07 AM

My father served in the navy, two years ago he died and we put a navy flag on his grave but a storm blew it away. When my mother came up to Maryland a few weeks ago she bought a new one at the naval academy and put it on his grave yesterday while my Aunt Rose put American flags on the graves of all of the veterans in our family.

A simple act of putting a flag on their graves never fails to move me every year. These men fought for and many died for that flag, it is fitting that we let them rest with it as well.

And some people would like to destroy that flag…that is what sickens me

Cookies Mom on May 31, 2010 at 10:13 AM

To absent friends!

“May the road rise up to meet you, may the wind be ever at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face and the rain fall softly on your fields. And until we meet again, May God hold you in the hollow of his hand.”

GarandFan on May 31, 2010 at 10:13 AM

That picture is truly heart-wrenching.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:16 AM

That picture is truly heart-wrenching.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:16 AM

it really is :/

blatantblue on May 31, 2010 at 10:18 AM

I don’t know what to say for that woman, or the thousands and thousands like her. The sadness of the day usually has the commander in chief laying a hand on the shoulder of all of the families, but not this year. We are on our own. I’ll take my kids to lay flags at my Brother & Uncle’s.

moyeti on May 31, 2010 at 10:19 AM

We, along with two others in our block, have the flag flying 24/7 in honor of the men and women who died so our Republic could be free. A thank you somehow doesn’t seem to be enough, but I will say it.
L

letget on May 31, 2010 at 10:19 AM

No greater love has man than to lay down his life for his fellow men.

docdave on May 31, 2010 at 10:22 AM

Oh that picture. I’m tearing up.

Grace_is_sufficient on May 31, 2010 at 9:21 AM

Me too, and I’m a guy.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:22 AM

What an honorable day…what a day to exhibit class and thankfullness…..what a day to say thanks to those who paid the ultimate sacrifice to ensure our enduring freedome!

WHAT A DAY FOR THE COMMUNISTS AT GOOGLE TO AGAIN IGNORE!
Boycott anything Google!!!!!!!!!!

SDarchitect on May 31, 2010 at 10:26 AM

WHAT A DAY FOR THE COMMUNISTS AT GOOGLE TO AGAIN IGNORE!
Boycott anything Google!!!!!!!!!!

SDarchitect on May 31, 2010 at 10:26 AM

Using a US-based VPN to access, I’m seeing an American flag with yellow ribbon and the message “In honor of the soldiers who have given their lives for our country.” on the Google main page.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:31 AM

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:31 AM

No doubt that GOOGLE is owned and infested by Progressives; however they do have a tribute up honoring our fallen warriors and credit to them for that.

Keemo on May 31, 2010 at 10:36 AM

Oh that picture. I’m tearing up.

Grace_is_sufficient on May 31, 2010 at 9:21 AM
Me too, and I’m a guy.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:22 AM

Me also. /Salute to all who have made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom.

Mini-14 on May 31, 2010 at 10:39 AM

Thanks for that, Ed. For a reminder that gratitude for those who fall is a feeling that can transcend time and national boundaries this is a story that brought tears to these British eyes…..
http://www.theagedp.com/?p=607

callingallcomets on May 31, 2010 at 10:41 AM

Thanks to all those that have served and I have not the words for those that gave their lives.

——

Note Yahoo remembered

http://www.yahoo.com/

As did:

http://dogpile.com/
http://www.msn.com/

CWforFreedom on May 31, 2010 at 10:44 AM

That picture is truly heart-wrenching.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:16 AM

Yeah…

ladyingray on May 31, 2010 at 10:49 AM

Some pictures are worth much more than a thousand words.

Just the other day, while driving through the NE countryside, I noticed some incredible displays commemorating the fallen by towns no bigger than some city neighborhoods.

Too often the names of their lost were horrendously high in proportion to the general population…to imagine such a thing happening to oneself is a grim thought indeed.

May the United States they defended last yet a little longer.

Dark-Star on May 31, 2010 at 10:58 AM

Arlington

BallisticBob on May 31, 2010 at 10:58 AM

Thanks for saying what I wanted to but can’t with tears streaming down my face.

CarolynM on May 31, 2010 at 9:42 AM

Oh, me too. Freedom is not free, so sad how many have forgotten that or chisled it down to “rhetoric”.

This is for my own brave “warriors” and their “brothers in arms”, for those future “warriors” and for those who have given the ultimate.
My respect, love and prayers go to all the families/loved ones of America’s best.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTs6a0ORdQU

tencole on May 31, 2010 at 10:59 AM

What a heartwrenching picture.
For those of you living near old cemeteries thaT have not been visited by the legion, DAR,SAR, etc., please take it upon yourselves to decorate the graves of soldiers’ stones from wars long past.
Sometimes it is easy to forget them.
I would like to honor my parents for their Vietnam service in the Navy, my paternal grandfather’s service during WWII,my paternal stepgrandfather’s service in WWII & Korea & Vietnam for the Air Force, my maternal grandfather’s service in the Army during WWII, and my paternal Great grandmother’s service in the WACS during WWII.
God Bless you all.

Badger40 on May 31, 2010 at 11:07 AM

Never forget to say thank you. For my fellow Marines: Semper Fi. And for my son, who is about to answer the call: Semper Fi, Devil Pup.

BKeyser on May 31, 2010 at 11:08 AM

Oh my gosh – that picture is heartbreaking. It made me tear up.

To all of you who have served and are serving – THANK YOU!

gophergirl on May 31, 2010 at 11:09 AM

God bless the fallen and those who have and still serve as well as their families. There would be no freedom in the world except for their sacrifices. Now that we have those among us who do not understand what this great nation has accomplished, we must stand tall so freedom shall never die. Freedom is not free. The blood, sweat and tears it will take to preserve our nation will never end. If it does, we cease to exist. God Bless America.

volsense on May 31, 2010 at 11:15 AM

I just did a Google search on:

“F**k the Communist A**holes at Google”

Feel free to join in… I am sure you can supply the redacted letters.

drunyan8315 on May 31, 2010 at 11:16 AM

That picture is heart-wrenching. Brought tears to my eyes.

neobadger on May 31, 2010 at 11:18 AM

At the end of this day, when we’ve all had time to think long and hard about the ghastly price paid to get us all here, we owe it to these men and women to do everything we can to preserve and build upon the legacy they conveyed to us. To let it slip between our fingers while we’re sitting in front of the TV or cruising the Mall, would constitute one of the most blatant betrayals of every sacrifice they made.
What a colossal irony it would be to save liberty on the field of battle and let it slip away in the halls of Congress.
We owe it to them to be involved in this decision. To do the inconvenient and the embarrassing and the annoying, to honor the courageous and the faithful and the true. At the end of the day, it is the very least we can do!

Lew on May 31, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Fly your flags proudly, and enjoy your cookouts, but keep foremost in your mind the sacrifices that our fallen warriors and their families have made to ensure the safety and continuation of the greatest country on the face of the earth; and be resolved that by our actions at the ballot box and in the intercourses of daily life, their sacrifices will have not been in vain.

God bless our fallen heroes, God bless our active troops and retired Veterans, and God bless America.

hillbillyjim on May 31, 2010 at 11:45 AM

Sobering and eloquent. Such sadness. Freedom certainly is not free. May God grant comfort and grace.

paul1149 on May 31, 2010 at 11:47 AM

The Marianist Brothrs at Chaminade must be doing something special with their young men. For Chaminade has developed far more than its share of those who stand on the wall. No other high school on Long Island and NYC has sent as large a proportion of its graduates to defend their nation and its ideals, more even than my own beloved Xavier HS with its 163 yr tradition of military instruction. God Bless James Ryan and Mary McHugh and all who stand on the wall, and those who stand by and await their return.

xkaydet65 on May 31, 2010 at 11:55 AM

That picture is truly heart-wrenching.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:16 AM

But does it capture Obama’s imagination?

Extrafishy on May 31, 2010 at 11:55 AM

I cannot look at that picture anymore.

God Bless our Troops! God Bless our Fallen!

John the Libertarian on May 31, 2010 at 12:04 PM

We the beneficiaries of this ultimate gift from our proud and valorous veterans owe it to them to work hard to preserve the freedom they gave us. We should be living our lives as honorably as they did. Anyone who doesn’t vote (such as all the conservatives who were ticked off at John McCain) should remember this the next time the polls open and get over their pique. Don’t like the candidate? Then get INVOLVED in your local grass roots efforts to get someone you do like. This is what these brave men and women have preserved for us, and failure to accept the duty to vote and voice your opinion is to ignore, even deny, the gifts they gave us.

Webrider on May 31, 2010 at 12:07 PM

Speechless. Mournful. Grateful.

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on May 31, 2010 at 12:35 PM

What Webrider said. Damn us forever, if we let them down.

dhimwit on May 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

There is a special place in heaven for these folks….
God bless them….and comfort them.

dec5 on May 31, 2010 at 12:38 PM

This picture made me tear up as well

A U.S. Marine leans on the headstone of a comrade recently buried in Section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, May 27, 2010

William Amos on May 31, 2010 at 12:39 PM

Arlington

BallisticBob on May 31, 2010 at 10:58 AM

..thank you for posting this link…sobbing…grateful…

LEBA on May 31, 2010 at 12:42 PM

Memorial Day is always bittersweet for me. Wife’s birthday and all. But it’s oh so important to step back and remember those who have given it all to preserve our freedom. Little reminders, like that photo, bring it home in such a compact way. Thank you Ed, and may God bless the families, friends, and loved ones of the fallen.

bestwins on May 31, 2010 at 12:52 PM

“Their last full measure of devotion.”

29Victor on May 31, 2010 at 1:00 PM

letget on May 31, 2010 at 10:19 AM

I’d put mine up on holidays but 9/11 changed that. Now it is up for good (except in extreme weather cases. I lost one when I didn’t take it down.)

I’ll add this photo to my memory because it illustrates the sacrifice of so many, and not just of the soldier.

Many thanks and blessing go out to the families of the fallen on this day.

JohnnyD on May 31, 2010 at 1:03 PM

That picture does say it all. I can not stop crying. We can NEVER be grateful enough. Let our troops know Americans are grateful even if their Commander and Chief is not. They serve us not him.

IowaWoman on May 31, 2010 at 1:50 PM

Many thanks to those who serve and sacrifice in the military. God bless you and your families and loved ones. Happy memorial day.

tartan on May 31, 2010 at 1:58 PM

Nice post Ed. Many thanks and blessings to any families of the fallen reading this.

abobo on May 31, 2010 at 2:17 PM

Army Command Sgt. Maj. James D. Blankenbecler

40, of Alexandria, Virginia.
Blankenbecler was in a convoy that was hit by an improvised explosive device and rocket propelled grenades in Samarra, Iraq. Blankenbecler died of his injuries. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 44th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas. Died on October 1, 2003. He was a classmate and friend.

To SPC Bee Jay , HQ and HQ Company, 2nd Battalion, 504th
Parachute Infantry Regiment. He was killed with 23 other 82 Airborne troopers on 23 March 1994 as they prepared for a training jump. I recruited Bee Jay when I served as a US Army Recruiter in Texas City, TX. He was working in the food del…i of the supermarket next door. He was a husband and father who wanted nothing but a better life for his family.

usarmyretired on May 31, 2010 at 2:28 PM

Army Command Sgt. Maj. James D. Blankenbecler

40, of Alexandria, Virginia.
Blankenbecler was in a convoy that was hit by an improvised explosive device and rocket propelled grenades in Samarra, Iraq. Blankenbecler died of his injuries. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 44th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas. Died on October 1, 2003. He was a classmate and friend.

To SPC Bee Jay Cearley, HQ and HQ Company, 2nd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He was killed with 23 other 82 Airborne troopers on 23 March 1994 as they prepared for a training jump. I recruited Bee Jay when I served as a US Army Recruiter in Texas City, TX. He was working in the food del…i of the supermarket next door. He was a husband and father who wanted nothing but a better life for his family.

usarmyretired on May 31, 2010 at 2:29 PM

We are so blessed.

Gave thanks this morning at Texas State Cemetery where some of our nation’s best are at rest — from the early days of the Republic to the wars of present — and where all other such heroes are honored.

May their souls forever rest. May their memory forever last.

publiuspen on May 31, 2010 at 2:30 PM

The picture says all that needs to be said. Only thing left to say is thanks Dad and all those who are with you now.

mikkins on May 31, 2010 at 2:34 PM

Anything I even think about saying seems so inadequate. When I think of how I would like the world to perceive the United States, I picture our military. They are truly our finest representatives. I am full of pride when I think of what they have done in the past and what they will be called to do in the future. Geesh, that’s a lot “I’s” in that comment, it was not attempt to horn in on Mr. Obama’s territory.

Cindy Munford on May 31, 2010 at 2:37 PM

“I’m busy, America. When’s tee time, Rahm?!”

Good Solid B-Plus on May 31, 2010 at 9:09 AM

He’s too busy pretending to be the 2nd Lincoln. Not even the weather agrees.

Schadenfreude on May 31, 2010 at 2:47 PM

A Canadian perspective – thank you Canada!

Anyway, I’ve always thought it’s a wonderful thing, Americans have this SECOND occasion for paying tribute to war veterans. So . . . I was doubly pleased to watch Fox News Sunday’s Chris Wallace honoring (for the second-year-running) as his “Power Player of the Week,” a man who may not have political clout, but is a power player ‘in spirit.’

Schadenfreude on May 31, 2010 at 2:51 PM

From yesterday’s “Powerplayer of the Week“, a real moving piece.

Schadenfreude on May 31, 2010 at 2:55 PM

While I was stationed in DC,,I worked as a volunteer with the Park Service at the newly opened “Wall”. I spend my Memorial Days since then recalling the stories that bring tears to my eyes. I also have spent many hours in the Pacific Islands drinking beer,Irish Whiskey, with WWII Marine Vets from Iwo, Guam, Saipan, crying with them over their lost comrades. I consider myself humbly honored to have them share their stories and memories with me. That is my memorial day,,a glass raised to those gentlemen and ladies that gave all their tomorrows so we could have our todays.

retiredeagle on May 31, 2010 at 3:20 PM

I also posted this morning, if you’ll forgive me. As the mom of a serviceman, I found this so tragic, but so American. Yet, as a Marine Corps Staff Sergeant myself, I understand completely.

The Corporal of Marines who was our thousandth loss in Afghanistan? He was born on the Fourth of July.

Semper Fidelis, little brother. God bless them ALL.

tree hugging sister on May 31, 2010 at 4:13 PM

Yes, that picture about says it all, thanks to all who have made the ultimate sacrifice and to those who must carry on.

tim c on May 31, 2010 at 4:30 PM

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

– Written in Ypres, 1915 by a doctor in the Canadian Army, Lt. Colonel John McCrae

Rosmerta on May 31, 2010 at 4:59 PM

As a citizen of the United States, I hereby charge Barack H Obama with murder in the deaths of the soldiers of the above mentioned United States. I here by request that THe US Marshals office place said Barack H Obama under arrest until he can be formerly arraigned.
Signed:
Bruce Boswell
Citizen of the United States.

BruceB on May 31, 2010 at 4:59 PM

I was at a tea party meeting a couple of weeks ago and most of the people there, like myself, were children of WWII vets. My dad and his three brothers fought and all came home. Dad was the last surviving brother and passed away three years ago. Anyway, we talked about how it’s now up to us, the offspring of the Greatest Generation, to fight to get our freedom back. I may not be parachuting into Normandy on D-day as my uncle did, but we’re fighting just as hard of a battle against Obama and his band of thuggish socialists. I’m sure my father and every other veteran, would have never imagined that our greatest threat to the freedom they fought and died for would come from within. For me, every day is Memorial Day.

TxAnn56 on May 31, 2010 at 5:26 PM

Powerful: Final Salute

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on May 31, 2010 at 7:41 PM

A big lump in my throat, that picture so heart wrenching to see. It truly speaks more than a thousand words and brings everything into perspective.

Conservalicious on May 31, 2010 at 9:28 PM

I’ve just been going through some of the links you all have posted. Thank you. I’m sitting here a soggy mess and my daughter just asked, “Why are you sitting there torturing yourself looking at that?” I said I’m not, but I want to remember what this day is about. I want to be grateful.” I made her look at that picture and a moment of a video. She’s twelve. She doesn’t want to be sad, and I don’t want to make her, but she needs to know. I really wish Memorial Day hadn’t become synonymous with ‘start of summer vacation party’. It doesn’t feel right to party when so many are suffering such sadness.

Here’s a petition to have it returned to May 30th, in case it hasn’t been posted already.

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/6/restore-the-traditional-day-of-observance-for-memorial-day

pannw on May 31, 2010 at 10:03 PM

That picture is truly heart-wrenching.

DarkCurrent on May 31, 2010 at 10:16 AM

Memorial day is not just for those that served and died but also for those that suffered the loss when their loved ones never returned.

docdave on June 1, 2010 at 12:39 AM