New jobless claims rise …

posted at 9:30 am on April 8, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

Will the Associated Press and Reuters get to use their favorite adverb for economic news today?  The news from the Department of Labor will almost certainly come “unexpectedly” to the media, as initial jobless claims rose significantly despite the rosy spin put on the Census Bureau-driven employment numbers from March (via DogSoldier):

In the week ending April 3, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 460,000, an increase of 18,000 from the previous week’s revised figure of 442,000. The 4-week moving average was 450,250, an increase of 2,250 from the previous week’s revised average of 448,000. …

The highest insured unemployment rates in the week ending March 20 were in Alaska (7.1 percent), Puerto Rico (6.1), Oregon (6.0), Wisconsin (5.7), Montana (5.6), Idaho (5.5), Michigan (5.4), Pennsylvania (5.4), Nevada (5.3), and Rhode Island (5.2).

The largest increases in initial claims for the week ending March 27 were in Texas (+3,640), Oregon (+2,412), New Jersey (+1,715), California (+1,275), and Kentucky (+926), while the largest decreases were in Michigan (-2,240), Illinois (-1,872), Oklahoma (-1,270), Missouri (-1,079), and North Carolina (-673).

On the other hand, the news improved for one sector:

Initial claims for UI benefits by former Federal civilian employees totaled 1,187 in the week ending March 27, a decrease of 76 from the prior week. There were 2,311 initial claims by newly discharged veterans, an increase of 106 from the preceding week.

There were 21,025 former Federal civilian employees claiming UI benefits for the week ending March 20, a decrease of 1,776 from the previous week. Newly discharged veterans claiming benefits totaled 36,877, an increase of 706 from the prior week.

The federal government grows while the private sector shrinks.  There are a lot of adverbs and adjectives that can be used to describe that trend, but “unexpectedly” isn’t among them in this adminstration and with this Congress.

Update: Like clockwork, AP uses its favorite adverb:

Initial jobless claims increase unexpectedly

New claims for jobless benefits increase unexpectedly, while total benefit rolls drop

Christopher S. Rugaber, AP Economics Writer, On Thursday April 8, 2010, 9:09 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits rose last week, a sign that jobs remain scarce even as the economy recovers.

The Labor Department said Thursday that first-time claims increased by 18,000 in the week ending April 3, to a seasonally adjusted 460,000. That’s worse than economists’ estimates of a drop to 435,000, according to a survey by Thomson Reuters.


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Comment pages: 1 2

We are in a crisis: The ONLY way to save jobs is to make sure the Democrats lose theirs in November.

TN Mom on April 8, 2010 at 3:26 PM

Next week’s headline… AP unexpectedly buys a thesaurus.

Job headlings will now be happening without warning, without prior notice, unpredictably, suddenly, all of a sudden, out of the blue, suprisingly, and all at one.

E L Frederick (Sniper One) on April 8, 2010 at 3:45 PM

“The federal government grows while the private sector shrinks. There are a lot of adverbs and adjectives that can be used to describe that trend, but “unexpectedly” isn’t among them in this adminstration and with this Congress.”

Your use of understatement is commendable, Ed.

Stepan on April 8, 2010 at 3:45 PM

Wow! Didn’t see that one coming.

ronsfi on April 8, 2010 at 3:55 PM

The USA and probably the rest of the world is in a deflationary death spiral. The cause is too much debt and adding more debt will make it even worst.

The fastest way to get out of this mess is to let everybody default and clear the balance sheet but doing this will be very painful. The good part it will only last couple of years or so instead of decades like we are seeing in Japan (on their third decade of deflationary death spiral).

jdun on April 8, 2010 at 4:15 PM


FYI, I would expect the Q1 GDP increase to be in the range of 4-5% based on some of the things I’ve read.

Jimbo3 on April 8, 2010 at 12:02 PM
You go to the bank with that and you won’t have a pot to urinate in come Q2.

This economy is contracting fast, no one is hiring with the insane clown posse in charge of an overreaching, corrupt and incompetent White House and Congress.

NoDonkey on April 8, 2010 at 2:56 PM

–We’ll see. It may be closer to 3%, but it will be up.

Jimbo3 on April 8, 2010 at 5:51 PM

So every dead cat bounce is now a recovery.

MarkT on April 8, 2010 at 6:10 PM

Where is the speech from Obowma…?

Seven Percent Solution on April 8, 2010 at 6:32 PM

–We’ll see. It may be closer to 3%, but it will be up.

Jimbo3 on April 8, 2010 at 5:51 PM

Obama’s recession has turned into Obama’s depression.

Johan Klaus on April 8, 2010 at 6:35 PM

–We’ll see. It may be closer to 3%, but it will be up.

Jimbo3 on April 8, 2010 at 5:51 PM

Went for the low flying fruit I see, surprising.

jarodea on April 8, 2010 at 7:48 PM

This should be no surprise, since all of those Easter Bunny people are out of work for another year…

Sheeeeesh, people…

Khun Joe on April 8, 2010 at 7:52 PM

This entire administration is like a goose that wakes up in a new world every morning . . . and everything is “unexpected”.

rplat on April 8, 2010 at 9:03 PM

They’ll just hire 800,000 people to work the Fourth of July celebration in the Mall to offset this. Either that or getting a bunk and three squares a day in the Civilian Defense Force will be every bit appealing as the Civilian Conservation Corps was to the Greatest Generation.

They’ve got to hold off economic disaster until after the November elections and do everything they can to foster the false recovery…orrrrr…make sure they have all the power they can get so these elections won’t even matter (which is the way I’m leaning…I don’t trust these SOBs).

Dr. ZhivBlago on April 8, 2010 at 11:23 PM

Look for the media to spin the economy from now until November.

It won’t matter at all if unemployment remains sky high, if the dollar is worth zilch, if interest rates are off the charts or if we’re all queing up in bread lines- the media will portray the economy as the best in decades.

And the sheeple, even those who are unemployed or underwater financially, will bleat in agreement, and vote for Dems.

justltl on April 8, 2010 at 11:31 PM

Next week’s headline… AP unexpectedly buys a thesaurus.

E L Frederick (Sniper One) on April 8, 2010 at 3:45 PM

Too good to not repeat

The USA and probably the rest of the world is in a deflationary death spiral. The cause is too much debt and adding more debt will make it even worst.
jdun on April 8, 2010 at 4:15 PM

I agree. The Wikipedia article on the Great Depression is possibly tailored to lead us to draw comparisons, but the data is real. THe market dropped in 29, went up in 1930. Spending dropped and deflation started in 1931. They had the Dust Bowl. We have the Oil Price Gouging. They had a trade war, but I do not see a recovery even without that trade war.

Credit dried up then, as now, and there were overproducing nations (back then it was the USA, today it is China).

Interest becomes a competitive commodity, but there is no money to borrow because the flow stops.

I expect a lot more unemployment in the long term, especially with 20+ million mexicans hanging around to share the jobs

Obama selling T notes to himself to print money doesn’t help, and raising interest to sell t-notes abroad doesn’t help either. The obama welfare state is the ultimate nation killer, and shutting down and selling off NASA is not going to fund even California’s debt load

Who knows, maybe the AP will go under

entagor on April 9, 2010 at 11:40 AM

Comment pages: 1 2