It’s been over a week since Congress decided to put government in charge of health care.  Democrats say Americans will get used to the idea.  So far, though, the likely voters polled by Rasmussen don’t appear to be much moved at all.  The same 54% that want ObamaCare repealed last week want it repealed today, while only 42% oppose a repeal:

One week after the House of Representatives passed the health care plan proposed by President Obama and congressional Democrats, 54% of the nation’s likely voters still favor repealing the new law. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 42% oppose repeal.

Those figures are virtually unchanged from last week. They include 44% who Strongly Favor repeal and 34% who Strongly Oppose it.

Repeal is favored by 84% of Republicans and 59% of unaffiliated voters. Among white Democrats, 25% favor repeal, but only one percent (1%) of black Democrats share that view. …

Scott Rasmussen, president of Rasmussen Reports, notes that “the overriding tone of the data is that passage of the legislation has not changed anything. Those who opposed the bill before it passed now want to repeal it. Those who supported the legislation oppose repealing it.”

Frankly, I expected those numbers to drop after a few days.  Americans have a pragmatic sort of optimism in adversity, and after ObamaCare’s passage, I figured that would take the form of a “wait and see” attitude.  Democrats made a lot of promises about this legislation, and there would be some impulse to wait to see how this bill fulfills or fails them.

Certainly, Democrats in office had hoped for that kind of response, but thus far, they’re not getting it.  That may be due to some of the unpleasant details that the media have finally reported.  Businesses are having to take big charges on lost tax credits, and promises over pre-existing condition treatment raised expectations to unrealistic heights.  Instead of making lives easier, the bill has already made lives more complicated.

The real test will come in Rasmussen and other polling around September.  If 54% of people still want it repealed — and that opposition has remained relatively unchanged for the last several months — then Democrats won’t have anywhere to hide.