Jeff Sessions (R-AL) got a little heated on the Senate floor today in responding to Deputy National Security Adviser John Brennan’s op-ed in USA Today earlier this week. The following is just an excerpt of Sessions’ retort to Brennan, rebutting his argument on procedural issues rather than the more incendiary charges that criticizing the Obama administration’s handling of the EunuchBomber “only serve[s] the goals of al-Qaeda.” On part of his argument captured here, Sessions scores points, and on one part … well, not so much. Sessions reminds us that Miranda only goes back 50 years and isn’t explicitly part of the Constitution — but it was a response to abuses of civil rights by law enforcement that the 1964 decision attempted to prevent.

However, that applies to criminal proceedings against American residents arrested for breaking the law.  The better point here isn’t whether Canada reads rights to suspects arrested by police in the normal course of law enforcement, but the ludicrous idea that we should read them to our enemies of war when captured after attempting to commit a terrorist act that would have killed hundreds of civilians.  A solid majority of Americans believe that approach to be ridiculous: