Reason TV’s Nanny of the Month

posted at 2:40 pm on February 1, 2010 by Ed Morrissey

Say, didn’t Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow work all of this out in Footloose?  Remember that small Midwestern town where Lithgow’s thundering preacher made all of the kids unhappy by not letting them look like a bad parody of teen dance movies, until Bacon moved into town and finally got Lithgow to see the need to shake their groove things, yeah-yeah?  Well, Reason TV’s Nanny of the Month may be only a degree or two removed from John Lithgow, but it isn’t the morals of the kiddies that the Diamond Bar city council wants to protect with their ban on new live entertainment licenses.  Ask yourself who benefits from locking out new competitors in the nightclub business in the Southern California city, and it ain’t the souls of the lost youth in the foothills:

Basically, this acts as a market barrier that benefits all of the existing license holders.  They won’t have any further competition, which allows them to do things like hike cover charges and drink prices more easily.  If I was a dancing fool in Diamond Bar, I’d check into who pushed this and why.

Addendum: I actually think Footloose was one of the better films in the teen-rebel genre, mainly because of Lithgow’s performance and a surprisingly sympathetic tone towards his character.  It was just too enticing as a hook for this post.


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let’s hear it for the boy!

you go Ed!

cmsinaz on February 1, 2010 at 2:46 PM

Basically, this acts as a market barrier that benefits all of the existing license holders.

Yup. For the same reason, in “dry” counties in the south, it isn’t just the bible-thumpers who want to keep the counties “dry.” The bootleggers also like it that way. They don’t want any competition moving in.

UltimateBob on February 1, 2010 at 2:46 PM

Footloose was filmed not too far from where in grew up. Lehi, Utah and Lehi Roller Mills was the location. Definitely not mid-western, but some have said it works as back then it was something like 95% Mormons living in the area.

The one problem is, Mormons don’t have a problem with dancing . . . they just don’t do it well.

thomashton on February 1, 2010 at 2:48 PM

Just as (Kevin) Bacon makes everything better, so too does John Lithgow.

JohnGalt23 on February 1, 2010 at 2:48 PM

Ask yourself who benefits from locking out new competitors in the nightclub business

Typical thinking that the economy is a zero sum game. If someone else opens a live entertainment venue it means someone else has to forfeit theirs, or the free market might decide which one to patronize.

fourdeucer on February 1, 2010 at 2:51 PM

How’s the conference going, Ed? Has Allah let his Freddy Krueger mask slip yet?

Scott P on February 1, 2010 at 2:51 PM

…Diamond Bar…I’m very very familar with the place.

Oil Can on February 1, 2010 at 2:51 PM

Also I believe Snopp Dog owns a home in the gated community called the Country with in city limits. How ironic.

Oil Can on February 1, 2010 at 2:53 PM

shake their groove things, yeah-yeah?

A little help for my friends…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7UU9_6cMHk

Shake it!

alohapundit on February 1, 2010 at 2:56 PM

We got trouble… right here in River City!

I’m not quite sure I’d call state-sanctioned restriction of trade a nanny issue. After all, it’s pretty clear that they are not really looking to protect the young’uns. This seems less like nannyism and more like the same kind of politics where things are done under the guise of protecting people from themselves.

highhopes on February 1, 2010 at 2:57 PM

Say, didn’t Kevin Bacon and John Lithgow work all of this out in Footloose? Remember that small Midwestern town where Lithgow’s thundering preacher made all of the kids unhappy by not letting them look like a bad parody of teen dance movies, until Bacon moved into town and finally got Lithgow to see the need to shake their groove things, yeah-yeah?

ROFL!!!

Let’s play chicken, with our tractors! :D

Well looks like Diamond Bar has forgotten what America means, and what pursuing the American dream is about. I hope the people of this town boycott the establishments til this is overturned. I would.

capejasmine on February 1, 2010 at 3:02 PM

Nice new live entertainment licenses you got there…

… it would be a shame if anything happened to it.

Seven Percent Solution on February 1, 2010 at 3:07 PM

That same city council probably doesn’t make love standing up for fear someone may think they are dancing.

fourdeucer on February 1, 2010 at 3:12 PM

…Diamond Bar…I’m very very familiar with the place.

Oil Can on February 1, 2010 at 2:51 PM

..so am I. It’s between the place where I live and the places where I go to have fun.

VoyskaPVO on February 1, 2010 at 3:17 PM

While filmed in Utah–something that STILL surprises me, as it apparently looks more Oklahoma-ish than Oklahoma does–the movie actually takes place in a real Oklahoma town not far from here.

And yes, it is based (loosely, I might add) on a true story.

jedijson on February 1, 2010 at 3:28 PM

..so am I. It’s between the place where I live and the places where I go to have fun.

VoyskaPVO on February 1, 2010 at 3:17 PM

Ain’t that the truth.

Oil Can on February 1, 2010 at 3:29 PM

What’s impressive is the camera work in Footloose. The next time you watch it, keep in mind that the roller mill is only about a block west of the freeway, and the high school is just the other side of the roller mill.

TVHall on February 1, 2010 at 3:33 PM

As they said on NPR regarding this, “They’re only calling it a nanny state because it’s a state doing exactly what a nanny does.”

calbear on February 1, 2010 at 3:35 PM

It’s always about the money, always follow the money. These people don’t do anything for “our own good” if they are not going to profit by it.

I like the way you think Ed ;)

Dr Evil on February 1, 2010 at 3:36 PM

Personally, I always thought “I Was a Teenage Werewolf” from the late 50′s (starring Michael ‘Little Joe’ Landon) was the best of the best teen rebel movies. It perfectly captured that ‘awkward stage’ angst and the frustrated testoreone induced rage against not getting the teen angel of your dreams and the ‘oppresive rule’ of the ‘grups’ (grown ups). LOL

JimP on February 1, 2010 at 3:39 PM

Lithgow?

Act-ing!
Brilliant!
Thank you.

But as far as Footloose, “Holding Out for a Hero” and “The Girl Gets Around” are fine.

juanito on February 1, 2010 at 3:40 PM

And as for the future of Footloose,

Anticipointment.

juanito on February 1, 2010 at 3:42 PM

City council of Jackson, WY has done the same thing. They hold two unused liquor licenses, but refuse to make them available to new businesses.

Why?

Officially, they don’t want drunken violence to get out of hand (like they could ever do anything about that anyway.)

Of course, you all know the real reason… ;)

Ace ODale on February 1, 2010 at 4:08 PM

UltimateBob on February 1, 2010 at 2:46 PM

After he came back from WWII, my father ran a liquor store near downtown Dallas. It was the closest liquor store to Oklahoma’s southern border and Oklahoma was dry. He loaded many a trunkful into cars with OK plates and he told me that the two people who oppose a liquor election are Baptists and Bootleggers.

Kafir on February 1, 2010 at 4:49 PM

The one problem is, Mormons don’t have a problem with dancing . . . they just don’t do it well.

thomashton on February 1, 2010 at 2:48 PM

They’d probably be a little better at it if they were to partake of an adult beverage.

Puddleglum on February 1, 2010 at 4:51 PM

I’ve only been to LA once and stayed in Diamond Bar. Came back with a nasty upper respiratory infection. I blamed it on the smog.

Kafir on February 1, 2010 at 4:52 PM

JohnGalt23 on February 1, 2010 at 2:48 PM:
Just as (Kevin) Bacon makes everything better, so too does John Lithgow.

Laugh-a while you can, monkey-boy!

stoutcat on February 1, 2010 at 5:17 PM

Community centers, cultural centers, clubs, lodges and hotels would be allowed to have disc jockeys, dancing, bands or karaoke at receptions and community meetings only once every 90 days, according to the proposal.

Schools, churches and some city-sponsored events would be exempt from the regulation.

Bars and restaurants that already offer live entertainment would be allowed to continue.

A message for City Manager James DeStefano to specify the number of businesses with entertainment permits wasn’t returned.

The Planning Commission approved the proposal 3-0 on Dec. 8.

The ban mostly stems from public outcry the city received about a problem restaurant, officials said.

“In recent years, the city and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s
Department have received an increased number of complaints about the impacts of bars, nightclubs, and indoor entertainment activities,” according to a city report.

In 2006, the city battled Scribbles Grille and Restaurant on Gentle Springs Lane, which neighbors complained was being run more like a nightclub. There were complaints about increased underage drinking, trashing of nearby businesses’ property, thefts, assaults and sexual activity because of Scribbles, officials said.

“It was draining a lot of local law enforcement resources on Friday and Saturday night,” Councilman Jack Tanaka said.

The city changed the restaurant’s permit to ban live entertainment. A complaint was filed against the restaurant, and a judge granted the city an injunction.

Scribbles is no longer in business, officials said.

Chang isn’t in favor of the dancing ban but said the city needs to act before the temporary ban ends.

“I’m against anything that is too restrictive,” she said. “I believe there are other ways of managing disruptive issues.”

Tanaka said the city’s hands were tied with the legal battle and resident uproar over Scribbles. The ordinance will clear up the ambiguity in city permits, he said.

“It kind of gets rid of the gray areas,” he said.

Tanaka also said it isn’t too restrictive on businesses’ ability to offer singing and dancing.

“I think there is still some room for that to be allowed, depending on how it’s presented,” he said. “There will be some clearer expectations by both sides.”

Full Article

GT on February 1, 2010 at 5:35 PM

Ahh…shoot. Hit the wrong button.

My purpose in posting the article was this….

Libertarians tell us that we should have the freedom to do whatever we want as long as it doesn’t interfere with the rights of others.

According to the article, that is what was happening and what triggered the moratorium in the first place. Based on that, does the Diamond Bar council still deserve the “Nanny State” award or is ReasonTV being somewhat hypocritical?

Just ask’n.

.

GT on February 1, 2010 at 5:41 PM

That’s actually common. The town south of me where I often dj and work dance nights they have limited licenses for clubs. They use the idea that “more night clubs means more drunk drivers” to maintain the status quo.

The reality of the situation is that there are only so many people who go out regardless of how many clubs are opened. Clubs that don’t draw CLOSE. I know. I’ve seen many go under in my tenure as a dj and event organizer.

It basically keeps the good ole boy infrastructure going, and keeps business as usual which limits the entertainment options for those who go out. You’ll have the same five clubs doing the same lametastic dance events or live music.

In short, it makes for one rather dull night life unless someone can come into the existing clubs and convince them to try something different at the expense of their guaranteed crowd.

That seldom happens unless a club is on the verge of going under or is watching their regulars dwindle cuz they’re getting bored and going to house parties instead. Attendance going splat is ALSO a sign that the night life licensing garbage is killing your industry.

I’ve been working around this stuff for years, and let me tell ya. Competition? It’s good for the industry. It challenges you to get creative with your entertainment.

One Angry Christian on February 1, 2010 at 7:23 PM

Hey Bunkie.

Why is it you maroons don’t understand they are trying to fight prostitution and drug dealing? Are you really that thick? :: ))

Observation on February 1, 2010 at 7:39 PM