Atheists outraged over a stamp honoring Mother Teresa

posted at 1:13 pm on January 31, 2010 by Cassy Fiano

Mother Teresa was a woman universally beloved across the globe for her humanitarian efforts in India and around the world. Her work with the poor and the dying, the disabled and disadvantaged, with refugees, and so on earned her the Nobel Peace Prize (an honor that was actually earned, imagine that) in 1979. So when the United States Postal Service decided to honor her life with a commemorative stamp, most people were happy. But of course, since a Christian is being honored, a group of atheists are outrageously outraged and want the Post Office to cancel the stamp.

An atheist organization is blasting the U.S. Postal Service for its plan to honor Mother Teresa with a commemorative stamp, saying it violates postal regulations against honoring “individuals whose principal achievements are associated with religious undertakings.”

The Freedom from Religion Foundation is urging its supporters to boycott the stamp — and also to engage in a letter-writing campaign to spread the word about what it calls the “darker side” of Mother Teresa.

The stamp — set to be released on Aug. 26, which would have been Mother Teresa’s 100th birthday — will recognize the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize winner for her humanitarian work, the Postal Service announced last month.

“Noted for her compassion toward the poor and suffering, Mother Teresa, a diminutive Roman Catholic nun and honorary U.S. citizen, served the sick and destitute of India and the world for nearly 50 years,” the Postal Service said in a press release. “Her humility and compassion, as well as her respect for the innate worth and dignity of humankind, inspired people of all ages and backgrounds to work on behalf of the world’s poorest populations.”

But Freedom from Religion Foundation spokeswoman Annie Laurie Gaylor says issuing the stamp runs against Postal Service regulations.

“Mother Teresa is principally known as a religious figure who ran a religious institution. You can’t really separate her being a nun and being a Roman Catholic from everything she did,” Gaylor told FoxNews.com.

Postal Service spokesman Roy Betts expressed surprise at the protest, given the long list of previous honorees with strong religious backgrounds, including Malcolm X, the former chief spokesman for the Nation of Islam, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister and co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

“In fact we honored Father Flanagan in 1986 for his humanitarian work. This has nothing to do with religion or faith,” Betts told FoxNews.com.

Gaylor said the atheist group opposed Father Flanagan’s stamp but not those for King and Malcolm X, because she said they were known for their civil rights activities, not for their religion.

Martin Luther King “just happened to be a minister,” and “Malcolm X was not principally known for being a religious figure,” she said.

“And he’s not called Father Malcolm X like Mother Teresa. I mean, even her name is a Roman Catholic honorific.”

The “darker side of Mother Teresa”? Really?

And it seems to me that they’re kind of picking and choosing who they’re outraged over, aren’t they? Martin Luther King Jr. was just as well-known a Christian as Mother Teresa was a Catholic. I doubt Martin Luther King thought he “just happened to be a minister”.

What difference does it make if someone who is being honored for their good works was a Catholic nun or not anyways? Being a Catholic nun or a Christian leader is not something you can separate those two people from. Is the argument then that you cannot honor a good person who did amazing things for their entire lifetime simply because they were Christian? Gaylor also attacked Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity, saying it was a “wealthy” charity, and that she — shockingly! — was against abortion and wanted to baptize people before they died. She says this is part of the Roman Catholic Church’s “PR machine” to make Mother Teresa a saint. Because, you know, canonization as a saint always involves shadowy conspiracies with the USPS.

I know it’s tough to understand for some people, but Christians tend to be… anti-abortion, and they want people to be baptized and accept Christ as their savior. They have this whole thing about not wanting people to go to hell, as crazy a concept as that might be.

And her charity did indeed massively expand over the course of her lifetime. At the time of her death, 610 missions were operating in 123 countries. The work being done at these missions included: hospices, homes for people suffering from diseases such as leprosy and HIV/AIDS, caring for the disabled, alcoholics, refugees, victims of natural disasters, the poor and the blind, soup kitchens, orphanages, and so on. But I guess because she was, after all, first and foremost a Catholic nun who didn’t struggle with her mission of humanitarian relief in a little hut on the side of some road in Calcutta, we should completely ignore all the good she was able to do. She was successful in helping thousands upon thousands of people around the world, but because she was Catholic, all of that should just be ignored? To the Freedom from Religion Foundation, a better person to look up to (and whose stamp we should all buy) is Katharine Hepburn… an actress and an atheist.

The USPS spokesman Roy Betts has said that the reaction to the Mother Teresa stamp has so far been overwhelmingly positive. Most people love and respect her because of all she did for so many others. So, to sum up, the FFRF wants to keep her from being honored — despite her good works and humanitarian efforts — simply because she was a Catholic nun, even though the majority of people seem to be unoffended. It seems pretty obvious to me that this is a gross overreaction, and an immature one at that. But let’s not underestimate their efforts or anything. They’re starting a letter-writing campaign… and that will surely teach the Post Office a lesson.

Cross-posted from Cassy’s blog. Stop by for more original commentary, or follow her on Twitter!


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darclon on January 31, 2010 at 8:03 PM

Saying that her accomplishments are noted elsewhere is hardly a ringing endorsement or strong defense.

She still has no reason to be on an American stamp.

And despite receiving countless millions in donations (imagine how much one of the world’s most well-known charities would receive on regular basis), her facilities were dismal and she withheld painkillers from patients so they could suffer for their sins (etc.).

Of course, when she had heart trouble it was off to Switzerland and San Francisco to see the finest specialists on the planet.

As for her religion, I suggest that if she wasn’t Catholic, she’d never have conservatives wanting to honor an anti-American, pro-Socialist hypocrite who withheld pain medication as a matter of religious practice with a US stamp.

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 10:37 PM

Who accuses her of these things? Christopher Hitchens? You suggest she spend the money she received on upgrading her buildings instead of expanding to help more people? She was documented as having pain meds on hand and refused to administer them? Where is that? I would like to see a link other than Hitchens. It’s also interesting that a self-exposed radical socialist like Hitchens is calling her a socialist, which she probably was, but why the derogatory tone as he should admire it as he does in himself.

Haunches on January 31, 2010 at 10:50 PM

Haunches on January 31, 2010 at 10:50 PM

Former nuns in her order.

This shouldn’t surprise you. She once refused to send her nuns to a place that had no priest writing that such a thing would be useless. Withholding pain medications so people could suffer for their sins or keeping her facilities stark to be consistent with the “virtue” of poverty she believed in is wholly consistent with her faith system.

Now, you can choose to ignore those facts, but they are documented by nuns from her order… and as noted… wholly consistent with her theology. When I stepped on a nail as a kid the nuns told me to offer to offer up my pain for my sins (and that was in Philadelphia). Nothing new here.

Just one of many stories from ex-nuns:

Then there occurred an incident in Manila, when Colette was first year novice mistress, that shook her resolve. At the time, no new admissions were allowed in the children’s home on the nuns’ day of recollection. Nevertheless, on this very day, a very sick child was brought in. The novice who admitted the desperate parents came to Colette for guidance.

“I wasn’t supposed to admit that child, but I knew that if we didn’t do something straightaway the child would probably die. He was obviously very sick, dehydrated, in a lot of trouble.”

Colette said she had a very big argument in order to admit the child. He eventually recovered, but the fallout from this incident was that Colette was relieved from her position of novice mistress.

When Colette wrote to Mother Teresa about this incident, she received a reply from another nun reminding her how Mary had watched Jesus die on the cross, accepting the inevitable. She was reminded that obedience came first.

Where were the kajillions she received in donations every year? isn’t that worth investigating. What did she ever do for the US except encourage more “social justice” crap and write letters to defend Keating?

Lincoln Savings and Loan collapsed in 1989, at a cost of over $3 billion to the federal government. Some 23,000 Lincoln bondholders were defrauded and many elderly investors lost their life savings.

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 11:25 PM

As for her religion, I suggest that if she wasn’t Catholic, she’d never have conservatives wanting to honor an anti-American, pro-Socialist hypocrite who withheld pain medication as a matter of religious practice with a US stamp.

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 10:37 PM

You are obviously familiar with her career, I didn’t see the need to rehash pro-Mother Theresa arguments.

I do find it telling that her harshest critics are socialists (and Hindu nationalists).

The USPS stamp for October is from an Italian painting housed in the Vatican Pinacoteca. Does it have any business on an American stamp? Maybe atheist attention whores can protest its religious theme of an “Angel with Lute”.

My point is that there have been far worse themes for USPS stamps and few better.

darclon on January 31, 2010 at 11:32 PM

There are more effective organizations than UNICEF, but their objectives of reducing childhood death, malnutrition, disease, and exploitation are ones that are laudable and transcend religious views

I repeatedly said that they do some good work. I do not however believe that they should include abortion in the services they fund, especially with the money they receive from the United States taxpayer.

Haunches on January 31, 2010 at 10:11 PM

UNICEF is a criminal organization. They closed down the private adoption system in Guatemala because they were not getting their cut. They support a president there who will not allow international adoption unless he gets paid, and handsomely. Meanwhile, children starve to death in one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere.

Not one more dime for these murderers.

tcn on February 1, 2010 at 12:23 AM

You attempt to write as though you are not a common hating troll, but you are one of the commonest, and, YOU LIE!

tigerlily on January 31, 2010 at 3:33 PM

Oh noes! I iz teh commonest!

Instead of actually making an argument you simple say it isnt true and call me names. How very christian of you. Wonder what god would think…

SnakeintheGrass on February 1, 2010 at 12:37 AM

Instead of actually making an argument you simple say it isnt true and call me names. How very christian of you. Wonder what god would think…

SnakeintheGrass on February 1, 2010 at 12:37 AM

How about, “Satan, get thee behind me?”

Actually, you don’t really wonder at all. In fact, you haven’t a clue.

tcn on February 1, 2010 at 12:39 AM

The USPS stamp for October is from an Italian painting housed in the Vatican Pinacoteca. Does it have any business on an American stamp?

darclon on January 31, 2010 at 11:32 PM

The portrait was painted by someone in Colorado, Thomas Blackshear II, an award winning painter.
Bill Clinton and the U.S. Congress also made Mother Teresa an honorary U.S. citizen in 1996 which puts her in there with Winston Churchill.

Just so you know . . .

Ingenue on February 1, 2010 at 12:40 AM

YiZhangZhe on January 31, 2010 at 8:48 PM

Beautifully done. You would have made St. Thomas Aquinas proud.

atheling on February 1, 2010 at 12:51 AM

I would like to point out, to the people who like to say she checked herself into expensive hospitals while her charges lay dying and in pain . . . it was not a hospital in NY, it was California, and ten to one the members of her order begged her to do it. She attempted to retire after her health was failing but was reelected as the head of her order by an almost unanimous vote, hers was the only vote that was against herself.

Missionaries of Charity is not a hospital, they are not doctors, they are merely people who care for the sick. A caregiver is not the same as a doctor. Without the Missionaries of Charity these are people that would die on the street and alone. They wouldn’t even have a chance at medical care. I do believe that if Mother Teresa had the option she would have sent every single one of them to the most expensive hospitals in the world. However, if she did that with the money she had there would have been so many without.

^^
Basically a summarization of this:

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1434

Ingenue on February 1, 2010 at 12:57 AM

Yes, apparently, there was a Dark Side to MT: her Mission of Charity was HER MISSION OF CHARITY and she operated as the dominatrix of HER MISSION OF CHARITY.

MT, in the wasteland of India where human life, in general, had little value, directed her minions to select those in need that could actually be saved. Given her lack of funding to care for one and all, she did select those with the greater opportunity, in her view, to survive and become productive. Her actions are what we now call “triage”, the treatment protocol we now use in overwhelming emergencies.

MT saved many lives; MT lost many lives. She did what she did without any financial support from the world at large for decades.

As Ingenue state previously, Missionaries of Charity is not a hospital, they are not doctors, they are merely people who care for the sick. A caregiver is not the same as a doctor. Without the Missionaries of Charity these are people that would die on the street and alone. They wouldn’t even have a chance at medical care. I do believe that if Mother Teresa had the option she would have sent every single one of them to the most expensive hospitals in the world. However, if she did that with the money she had there would have been so many without.

Quaoar on February 1, 2010 at 1:24 AM

“Mother Teresa is principally known as a religious figure who ran a religious institution. You can’t really separate her being a nun and being a Roman Catholic from everything she did,” Gaylor told FoxNews.com.

Hmm. So Gaylor thinks atheists do not work with the poor, the sick, the elderly. In his mind, that’s left to us Catholics, amongst others.

What do the atheists do, to help them escape when they’re blue?
They sit around and wonder, what religious folk would do…
And that’s what atheists don’t do… all day long.

I think Jesus should have a stamp! Has He had one already and I didn’t know?

jeanie on January 31, 2010 at 1:31 PM

Every Christmas since 1966.

unclesmrgol on February 1, 2010 at 2:07 AM

Haha i love how theres the “Darker Side” of Mother Theresa, but nothing about the Darker Side of Malcolm X, yeah he was all puppy dogs and rainbows.

Rbastid on February 1, 2010 at 4:04 AM

Wow, we’re on the 5th page of comments and no one has mentioned how the FFRF just glossed over Dr. King and Malcolm X having been commemorated. Could it be that they didn’t attack when they were chosen because those guys were black men? First rule of the Minority Victimhood Club: Don’t attack other minorities. Christians, white people and men are the real victims today.

rmel80 on February 1, 2010 at 4:12 AM

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 11:25 PM

indeed

whiskeytango on February 1, 2010 at 4:46 AM

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 11:25 PM

I like the way you gloss over all the stories that were above that. Like the curing of the couple with TB and about saving the lives of children.
She had a problem with the order of the Sisters, she had an issue with authority. There is a reason why such rules are in place and while what she may have done occasionally had no consequences then, if she’d done them at another time they might have. As she said, it’s like soldier training, some people are cut out for it, some people aren’t.

In the Keating scandal Mother Teresa did not ask for him to not be punished, just asked for leniency because of Keating’s charitable work. Don’t act like she demanded he be exonerated.

Ingenue on February 1, 2010 at 6:00 AM

I’m pretty much an atheist, but not in the FfRF form. Annie Laurie Gaylor turned a rather level-headed organization into one that viewed every religious issue through the prism of woe-is-me feminism.

At any rate, my answer to the Mother Teresa stamps is like my answer to any Christmas stamps, Eid stamps, or any others I find not to my liking: I buy something else.

Simple!

friendlygrizzly on February 1, 2010 at 6:31 AM

Atheists Outrage is Mission Success. Get em’ pi$$ed and keep em’ pi$$ed. Stick a coded bible verse on there somewhere and we might get some of these @$$holes to start jumping out of windows.

ronnyraygun on February 1, 2010 at 6:37 AM

These people are not typical atheists, they are an activist group. FFRF no more represents most atheists Al Sharpton represents most black Americans.

I know diddly about Mother Theresea, and I don’t care. If people want her on a stamp and the PO wants to print them, I couldn’t care less.

MJBrutus on February 1, 2010 at 6:49 AM

What did she ever do for the US except encourage more “social justice” crap and write letters to defend Keating?

Lincoln Savings and Loan collapsed in 1989, at a cost of over $3 billion to the federal government. Some 23,000 Lincoln bondholders were defrauded and many elderly investors lost their life savings.

mankai on January 31, 2010 at 11:25 PM

Sounds more like a description of your typical Democrat Senator.

ronnyraygun on February 1, 2010 at 7:09 AM

Christians, white people and men are the real victims today.

rmel80 on February 1, 2010 at 4:12 AM

Was this supposed to be an attempt at comedy? If not, you’re delusional. As delusional as Al Sharpton and the rest. You can’t make an argument about minority victim hood, then say something as dumb as that.

And to whoever said something about nobody talking about the darker side of Malcom X: he was gay prostitute who had a tendency of sleeping with transexuals and loved to force men (rape) to perform sex acts on him. That’s pretty dark.

Narutoboy on February 1, 2010 at 8:11 AM

rmel80 on February 1, 2010 at 4:12 AM

It only confirms to me that if someone wants to find something negative about a person, all they have to do is dig a bit deeper. Apparently even Mother Theresa has some enemies out there who would detract from all the great work she did. It’s unbelievable that anyone would protest her over anyone else.

4shoes on February 1, 2010 at 8:25 AM

Wow, 5 pages of comments…

Me thinks they doth protest to much…

Keith_Indy on February 1, 2010 at 8:38 AM

this is a gross overreaction, and an immature one at that

Yes. Interestingly, that’s the sort of reaction you get from someone who’s not secure in their faith.

I R A Darth Aggie on February 1, 2010 at 8:53 AM

I haven’t had the time to read over the comments, but just to be clear, there are some Atheists, like myself, who find this outrage outrageous. When a person who does as much for the good of this world as Mother Teresa did is criticized in such a way by non-believers, it’s truly disgusting. The thing that Atheists hate the most, myself included, is someone trying to press their views and beliefs on them. Yet, here is a perfect example of what’s good for the goose, NOT being good for the gander. This is why I don’t usually get along with a lot of fellow Atheists!

I would buy the stamp and I think it has taken far too long for Mother Teresa to be commemorated for her tireless efforts and good will.

JRWARHAWK on February 1, 2010 at 10:22 AM

JRWARHAWK on February 1, 2010 at 10:22 AM

I mean no disrespect by this. It come from gratitude and respect and from my heart.

God bless you.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 11:33 AM

None of you could do this (while living also as one of the poor yourselves), for even one day, let alone vow to do so for the rest of your time on earth.

tigerlily on January 31, 2010 at 3:48 PM
Cool you mentioned that detail I recall Martin Sheen sleeping on a subway grate one time, to show ’solidarity’ with the homeless.

Yeah, it’s okay I guess to sleep on a subway grate one night when you can return to a mansion in the morning.

Libs are so much of phonies, aren’t they? Streisand buys a $4.5 million island, then goes out to say we need to tax tax tax to ‘care’ for the ‘homeless’

Liam on January 31, 2010 at 3:54 PM

Yes, Liam, I think that the power of one person, when they say yes to God can accomplish incredible feats for the good of others. Mother Teresa showed us this. I don’t usually write about personal things, but I think maybe I should write this out:

When my sister Maggie was dying of cancer, I accompanied her to Tijuana Mexico to try an alternative treatment.
It was reveled that the cancer had spread everywhere, by a doctor who gave her the news while she was alone, early one morning. She was devastated, but a priest who we had come to know when we were down there told us that Mother Teresa was in town to visit her order of sisters in Tijuana. I asked Father to please bring my sister to see Mother.
He did, and my own father was there as well. When Mother Teresa approached us, she would put her hand on our cheek and bless us and give us a Miraculous Medal. When she came to my father, she gave him two light “slaps” on the cheek.
My father felt kind of bad, and thought that it was because she knew somehow that he had been such a handful for my mother during their marriage, but as it turns out, I learned some years later as I told that story to two of Mother Teresa’s nuns back in the U.S., that in India, that “patting” or light “slap” to the cheeks is considered a sign of affection. Anyway, my dad said that the power he felt from her as she stood before him (she is about 4′10″) “could have lit up New York City”.

As for my sister Maggie, Mother Teresa took her into the nuns chapel, where Maggie knelt down and Mother Teresa placed her hands on her head (the cancer had spread to her brain) and prayed for her. Mother also gave her a miraculous medal and told her to place it on her forehead and pray for God’s will to heal her.

My sister suffered very much and died four weeks later, and she had an acceptance and peace about her that was beyond inspirational. Maggie told me once that she was offering her death up for our family, and she never complained or asked why. Mother Teresa helped get my sister from this life to the next, as she has done for countless others. So anyone who says that nothing has been changed because she lived had better not say it in front of me.

tigerlily on January 31, 2010 at 4:20 PM

Thank you for sharing this. I know it was private.

God bless you and your family. I will say a prayer for them.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 11:37 AM

. . . . . Her actions are what we now call “triage”, the treatment protocol we now use in overwhelming emergencies.

MT saved many lives; MT lost many lives. She did what she did without any financial support from the world at large for decades.

As Ingenue state previously, Missionaries of Charity is not a hospital, they are not doctors, they are merely people who care for the sick. A caregiver is not the same as a doctor. Without the Missionaries of Charity these are people that would die on the street and alone. They wouldn’t even have a chance at medical care. I do believe that if Mother Teresa had the option she would have sent every single one of them to the most expensive hospitals in the world. However, if she did that with the money she had there would have been so many without.

Quaoar on February 1, 2010 at 1:24 AM

Exactly! Thank you and the others here who have defended the truth.

She was not a “social worker” by her own words. She was not a doctor or an administrator.

She answered the call God gave to her specifically. A very difficult call that most of us could not do. And she answered with a “yes” full of sacrificial love and faith even in darkness.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 11:43 AM

Blessed Mother Theresa, please, pray for us.

And may Our Lord Jesus Christ bless those in this world who spread calumny and lies and half-truths about Mother Theresa and any other person who does the work of the Lord and voices His true Gospel.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 11:45 AM

HOW COME THERE IS NO OUTRAGE OVER THE MUSLIM STAMP JUST RELEASED??

Make sure you don’t let them pawn it off on you when you buy stamps, looks pretty, flowers but is commemorating some Muslim holiday.

concernedsenior on February 1, 2010 at 12:04 PM

Blessed Mother Theresa, please, pray for us.

“The dead know nothing… the dead do not praise.”

And may Our Lord Jesus Christ bless those in this world who spread calumny and lies and half-truths about Mother Theresa and any other person who does the work of the Lord and voices His true Gospel.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 11:45 AM

I quote the nuns from her order and from her own writings.

Cast aspersions on the messengers if you will, the truth is the truth.

mankai on February 1, 2010 at 1:04 PM

HOW COME THERE IS NO OUTRAGE OVER THE MUSLIM STAMP JUST RELEASED??

Make sure you don’t let them pawn it off on you when you buy stamps, looks pretty, flowers but is commemorating some Muslim holiday.

concernedsenior on February 1, 2010 at 12:04 PM

OK… that is stupid and insulting as well.

mankai on February 1, 2010 at 1:05 PM

mankai on February 1, 2010 at 1:04 PM

Yeah I read your article, it had more positives then negatives. You skipped over the part where she talked about saving lives.
As I said before, it basically just complained about the rules of the order. She didn’t like the way the system worked, so she left. Not really that much to say about it.
And actually, I can SEE why what she did would be an issue and give her superior good reason to reprimand her. There is a reason why those rules are in place, the superiors are going to know that much better then the newcomers.

Ingenue on February 1, 2010 at 1:35 PM

Ingenue on February 1, 2010 at 1:35 PM

Thank you.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 2:38 PM

Blessed Mother Theresa, please, pray for us.

“The dead know nothing… the dead do not praise.”

mankai on February 1, 2010 at 1:04 PM

The Saints are alive in Christ. What you quoted does not pertain to Christian Saints/saints. “the dead” in that psalm are those who do not believe in the Lord God.

Luke 20:38: “and he is not God of the dead, but of the living, for to him all are alive.”

John 11:25-26: “Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?”

And what of the Transfiguration? Were Moses and Elijah dead or alive in Christ?

Angels are “alive” and speak with humans, by the will of God and grace of God. Same with the Saints/saints.

Psalm 103: “Bless the Lord, O you his angels, you mighty ones who do his word, hearkening to the voice of his word! Bless the Lord, all his hosts, his ministers that do his will!”

Revelation 5:8: “When he took it, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb. Each of the elders held a harp and gold bowls filled with incense, which are the prayers of the holy ones.”

Revelation 8:3-4: “Another angel came and stood at the altar, holding a gold censer. He was given a great quantity of incense to offer, along with the prayers of all the holy ones, on the gold altar that was before the throne.
The smoke of the incense along with the prayers of the holy ones went up before God from the hand of the angel.”

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 2:57 PM

I quote the nuns from her order and from her own writings.

Cast aspersions on the messengers if you will, the truth is the truth.

mankai on February 1, 2010 at 1:04 PM

You may have noticed I said “calumny, lies and “half truths.

Some of what they said were outright lies and some distortions or half truths. Or they were wrong in their perspective. And when someone spreads untruth knowingly or out of malice without investigating the entire picture or because of a grievance or prejudice that is part of calumny.

And those who believe these half-truths and calumny, like you, and then repeat them are also in my prayers.

Elisa on February 1, 2010 at 3:02 PM

How many athiests were ever honored with a stamp for their good work? Why would athiests want to help anybody? They have have no basis to do so, not even moral. Their religion of evolution provides nothing but survival of the fittest. Leprosy? too bad. You just aren’t fit to survive.

ricelchew on February 1, 2010 at 8:14 PM

How many atheists were ever honored with a stamp for their good work?

So a stamp is the standard for lifetime acheivement?

Why would atheists want to help anybody? They have no basis to do so, not even moral.

So, since atheist don’t believe in a deity that commands genocide, condones rape, infanticide, and glorifies OCD rituals then we don’t have a basis for morality?

Their religion of evolution provides nothing but survival of the fittest.

as much as you would like to assert a Tu Quoque on atheist essentialy being part of a cult, let me remind you that most just simply reject the religious’ unfounded claims of supernatural powers/knowledge.

Leprosy? too bad. You just aren’t fit to survive.

Lepers are fit to survive? So be it, although I was thinking that lepers were unclean and that we should make them live outside of the city, say, in their own colony.

ricelchew on February 1, 2010 at 8:14 PM

whiskeytango on February 1, 2010 at 8:55 PM

Can anybody send that woman to my house? I wanna tie her on a chair and put her in front of my altar. Her eyes should melt when they meet the candles of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary.

Then around that chair I will place all my Catholic statues, angels, Archangels; hey I will even put front and center, several pictures of Mother Theresa that were taken by a photographer that pilgrimaged with her that VERY FEW people have.

Next, I will place on her forehead a Maria Rosa Mystica medal before starting these prayers:

*Baptism of the unborn and the unbaptised of the whole world until the end of the world;
*I will pray for her the Rosary of the Tears of Blood, to put the devil to flight when it is said (I KID YOU NOT!);
*I will get a hold of my blessed cross, holy water and one of my scapulars, and perform an “Exorcism of Satan and the apostate angels;
*Prayer to Archangel Michael (my fav!) then a formal Exorcism;
*And to claim “This house is clear! I will read to her Psalm 67.

*I do have all these prayers and tools at hand.

Then we’ll settle score the atheist way if she still wants to. Perhaps I will have to mop some squished sweet peas/sarc

ProudPalinFan on February 1, 2010 at 9:13 PM

Forgot to add a 21-page prayer called “Oracion de Intercesion Y Guerra Espiritual”. I have prayed that twice, I guess. Call it out loud, and say it like it is.

Have no fear of evil, therefore have no fear of liberals.

;)

ProudPalinFan on February 1, 2010 at 9:18 PM

Look, I have all love and respect for atheists (I love Allah and he knows it, just won’t love me back :[ ) and I feel it is too bad nowadays that people that have done so much good for this world, for its people to squash fears of illness and death is despicable. It is a shame that all of us, of all faith or not, have to be as low as desecrating a person that is deceased and cannot defend herself. Not that she cared, either.

I ask good, caring atheists simply to be aware of these people that are organized to pin down on others. Same goes for the good Muslims that have to come out and denounce their radical fellows. To sacrifice and make reparations for others will be commended by others, and it will fulfill your place on Earth.

Sorry if I pis$ed off some of you on my previous post, but I can’t stand the pure evil that this woman represents, and the organization as well.

ProudPalinFan on February 1, 2010 at 9:36 PM

“Mother Teresa is principally known as a religious figure who ran a religious institution. You can’t really separate her being a nun and being a Roman Catholic from everything she did,” Gaylor told FoxNews.com.

They are saying we a free to practice religion only if we practice it in secret. No one with religious identity may be honored. That would also leave out the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, who used prayer in his protests

Only the faithless need apply

entagor on February 2, 2010 at 3:29 AM

HOW COME THERE IS NO OUTRAGE OVER THE MUSLIM STAMP JUST RELEASED??

Make sure you don’t let them pawn it off on you when you buy stamps, looks pretty, flowers but is commemorating some Muslim holiday.

concernedsenior on February 1, 2010 at 12:04 PM

why would there be outrage?

CarpalTunnel on February 2, 2010 at 7:27 AM

Not a fan of Momma T’s. She had her good and bad points, which direction the balance tips depends on your perspective. To me, she was just another meddling do-gooder. Don’t give a rats ass about the stamp. The gibbering Athiest haters can go hang for all I care.

In fact, extremists and all the other fringies need to shut up to minimize the attention the’re attracting to themselves. There are a LOT of pissed folks in this country that are tired of this nonsense, when the *ahem* coming realignment happens, a lot of these squeaky wheels are going to get greased. And I am not talking about lubricants either.

mrpeabody on February 2, 2010 at 8:05 AM

I don’t care about the fact that MT was a Catholic, but I disagree that she did “good works.”

Her hospices and hospitals didn’t even offer pain relief medication to patients, not because they couldn’t afford it, but as a matter of principle. In MT’s view, pain was “a gift from God.”

Then there was her endorsement of the Duvalier dictatorship in Haiti.

Gaijin51 on March 8, 2010 at 9:19 PM

I just looked up the official criteria for stamp designs, and Mother Teresa arguably doesn’t meet 4 of them:

Stamp Subject Selection Criteria
The U.S. Postal Service and the members of the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) have set certain basic criteria used in determining the eligibility of subjects for commemoration on all U.S. stamps and stationery. These criteria first were formulated about the time of Postal Reorganization in the early 1970s, and have been refined and expanded gradually since then.

Following are the 12 major criteria now guiding subject selection:

1. It is a general policy that U.S. postage stamps and stationery primarily will feature American or American-related subjects.

2. No living person shall be honored by portrayal on U.S. postage.

3. Commemorative stamps or postal stationery items honoring individuals usually will be issued on, or in conjunction with significant anniversaries of their birth, but no postal item will be issued sooner than five years after the individual’s death. The Committee will not accept or consider proposals for a subject until at least two years after his/her death. The only exception to the five-year rule is the issuance of stamps honoring deceased U.S. presidents. They may be honored with a memorial stamp on the first birth anniversary following death.

4. Events of historical significance shall be considered for commemoration only on anniversaries in multiples of 50 years.

5. Only events, persons, and themes of widespread national appeal and significance will be considered for commemoration. Events, persons or themes of local or regional significance may be recognized by a philatelic or special postal cancellation, which may be arranged through the local postmaster.

6. Stamps or stationery items shall not be issued to honor fraternal, political, sectarian, or service/charitable organizations. Stamps or stationery shall not be issued to promote or advertise commercial enterprises or products. Commercial products or enterprises might be used to illustrate more general concepts related to American culture.

7. Stamps or stationery items shall not be issued to honor individual federal agencies, cities, towns, municipalities, counties, primary or secondary schools, hospitals, libraries, or similar institutions. Due to the limitations placed on annual postal programs and the vast number of such locales, organizations and institutions in existence, it would be difficult to single out any one for commemoration.

8. Requests for observance of statehood anniversaries will be considered for commemorative postage stamps only at intervals of 50 years from the date of the state’s first entry into the Union. Requests for observance of other state-related or regional anniversaries will be considered only as subjects for postal stationery, and again only at intervals of 50 years from the date of the event.

9. Stamps or stationery items shall not be issued to honor religious institutions or individuals whose principal achievements are associated with religious undertakings or beliefs.

10. Semipostal stamps are designed to raise funds for causes determined to be in the national public interest and appropriate. Semipostal stamps are sold for a price above their postage value. The differential between the sales price and the postage value of semipostal stamps consists of an amount (less a deduction for the Postal Service’s reasonable costs) to be given to other executive agencies in furtherance of specified causes. The Postal Service issues semipostals in accordance with the Stamp Out Breast Cancer Act and the Semipostal Authorization Act.

11. Requests for commemoration of universities and other institutions of higher education shall be considered only for stamped cards and only in connection with the 200th anniversaries of their founding.

12. No stamp shall be considered for issuance if one treating the same subject has been issued in the past 50 years. The only exceptions to this rule are traditional themes such as national symbols and holidays.

Gaijin51 on March 9, 2010 at 12:15 AM

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