An update to this morning’s AP story, which confirmed that the Dems were considering it. Everyone but everyone, from The One on down to Captain Tingles, concedes that tomorrow’s vote is a referendum on ObamaCare. But just in case the vote doesn’t go their way, they’re going to ram it down your throat anyway.

The White House and Democratic Congressional leaders, scrambling for a backup plan to rescue their health care legislation if Republicans win the special election in Massachusetts on Tuesday, are preparing to ask House Democrats to approve the Senate version of the bill, which would send the measure directly to President Obama for his signature…

Still, some lawmakers, Congressional aides and lobbyists described numerous obstacles to the House’s approving the Senate-passed bill.

House Democrats have voiced a number of complaints with the Senate measure, and top White House officials and Congressional leaders have struggled to bridge differences between the two bills. And despite promises by Mr. Obama and Congressional leaders to add those hard-fought agreements and other changes later, there would be no guarantees.

In an interview on Monday, Representative Bart Stupak, Democrat of Michigan, who opposes the Senate bill because of provisions related to insurance coverage of abortions, said: “House members will not vote for the Senate bill. There’s no interest in that.”

Among the crap House Democrats would have to swallow whole to pass Reid’s bill unchanged: No public option, no ban on abortion funding, no exemption for unions from the “Cadillac tax” on higher-end plans, and, as the Times reminds us, no eligibility for illegals to buy insurance on the new national exchange. Fearless prediction: They won’t have the votes. Progressives hate the Senate bill as is and Blue Dogs will flip out if Scotty B shocks the world, and there’ll probably also be a few Dems who object on good-government grounds to trying to ram this through after such a clear repudiation from blue-state voters. Pelosi has only a five-vote margin to work with; it’s hard to believe that she can hold that together under the circumstances, especially since a Brown win would be a dagger in the heart of the left’s CW about how it’s more important to pass something than nothing — which is, in a nutshell, the proposition that Coakley’s now running on. Are there 218 Democrats with balls enough to take all that on? Mark Halperin says yep. The big A says nuh uh.

Madam Speaker, at least, appears to have resigned herself to ping pong: Here’s video from the San Francisco Chronicle of her vowing that Change is coming to American health care, whether you like it or not. Exit question: Why tell the Times that it’s full speed ahead with ping pong on … the eve of the election? Doesn’t that just give independents more reason to go to the polls and extend the middle finger to Obama by voting for Brown? Or is the idea here to convince swing voters excited by the thought of him being the 41st no vote that the machine’s going to ignore them anyway, so they might as well be true blue and vote for the Democrat?