Quotes of the day

posted at 9:30 pm on January 3, 2010 by Allahpundit

“The parallels between the 1990s and today should offer only so much comfort for the Republicans, Barbour says, particularly on the presidential level. The year 2012 won’t be an easy one for the GOP. After all, ‘the predisposition of voters’ is to reelect a president. At the same time, he cautions those who foresee a great, long liberal era to recall recent history. ‘After 1992 the press wrote, ‘The Republicans are dead; there’s going to be a long Democrat era.’ And after 2004 they wrote, ‘They’re going to have a long Republican era.’?’…

“One key element of Barbour’s recipe for revival: expanding the Republican Party by reaching out to moderates. In the ’90s, he backed moderate candidates in the Northeast and Midwest and helped to elect moderate governors like California’s Pete Wilson, New Jersey’s Christie Whitman, and Massachusetts’s Bill Weld. He thinks the party ought to be doing the same thing today: ‘People are crazy if they think we win by getting more pure. We win by getting big.’

***
“The National Republican Congressional Committee, the key cog in helping to finance GOP campaigns, has banked less than a third as much money as its Democratic counterpart and is ending the year with barely enough money to fully finance a single House race — no less the dozens that will be in play come 2010…

“Republicans are already expressing concerns that they may not have enough resources to fully take advantage of the political climate, which is shaping to be the most favorable for the GOP since the last time they took control of the House in 1994…

“The NRCC was also hurt financially during last month’s special election in upstate New York. in which the committee endorsed and spent money on a moderate nominee, Dede Scozzafava, who quickly drew the ire of the conservative grass-roots.

“The committee spent nearly $1 million on the race, but more worrisome, lost support from many of the small-donor conservatives who have traditionally been a significant element of the committee’s fundraising efforts.”

***
“‘A whole new cultural paradigm to the political process.’ That must be what’s gotten armchair activists like ourselves — who’d never done anything much political but gripe and moan on the blog and maybe write a few letters to the editor — to get up out of that armchair last March and April, Tea Party signs in hand, to tell the powers that be that we are “as mad as hell and aren’t going to take this any more.’…

“Could anything be cooler than disintermediating a bunch of old fuddy-duddies via the Internet?”


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

‘People are crazy if they think we win by getting more pure. We win by getting big.’

Who is this “we”? I don’t think Barbour would even answer the question of who his “we” is because it would be too divisive, or something.

Buddahpundit on January 4, 2010 at 1:38 AM

Party doesn’t matter.

Conservative vs. liberal does.

Zell Miller vs. John McCain?

BowHuntingTexas on January 4, 2010 at 1:45 AM

I always thought that Gov. Barbour was one of the best spokespersons for conservatism. I am so disappointed. Just another politician who stands for nothing and falls for everything. Y’all just keep wondering where the money went.

Cindy Munford on January 4, 2010 at 1:50 AM

It’s hard to define party or, in my opinion, liberalism and conservatism. I do not consider myself a liberal or really a conservative, but I do lean right. I am pro-life, but not by any means a pro-life activist, and could not care less about gay marriage. I think what drove me to become a “Republican” at about 17 was the personalities of the left, more than anything. Is it just me, or is the Democratic Party full of petty, whiney a-holes, while the right has less of them?

NathanG on January 4, 2010 at 1:58 AM

One key element of Barbour’s recipe for revival: expanding the Republican Party by reaching out to moderates.

It depends who these “moderates” are. If the Republican party is going to be the party of slightly less big government, there is no point.

On the other hand, if the clueless “conservative base” get their way, Obama will easily get a second term as well. Again, America’s political divisions:

Socialists (progressives, fake “liberals”): 30%
Real (classic) liberals, libertarians, “moderates”: 30%
Conservatives: 40%

As long as the political divide is defined as liberal vs conservative, the “liberals” are still going to win.

The only way the Republican party can take the country back is by providing a clear anti-socialist alternative – liberty! – that can win over libertarians, real (classic) liberals, city folk, the under-40s, etc.

But clueless conservatives will never accept that…

modifiedcontent on January 4, 2010 at 1:59 AM

McCain was the the MODERATE’s ideal loser candidate.

So much for moderates.

profitsbeard on January 3, 2010 at 10:08 PM

McCain wasn’t picked by the moderates. He has always been socially conservative but he didn’t make headlines about it during his career. Giuliani was the only moderate in 2008. I think he could have neutralized all the scare tactics the Left uses like “The Repubican is going to outlaw abortion.” Too bad his primary strategy was so flawed.

Speedwagon82 on January 4, 2010 at 2:19 AM

Of course their donations are dropping off. People like me are bypassing the RNC to donate directly to conservative candidates.

Because we DO want to get more “pure.” I don’t even know who these “moderates” are. Scozzofava was described as a moderate.

disa on January 4, 2010 at 2:56 AM

I wonder if the money NRCC didn\’t raise went to SarahPAC

Phoenician on January 4, 2010 at 3:03 AM

It doesn’t matter who you elect. They’ll just go on spending you into a hole in the ground, regardless, until you’re fvcking ruined, and me right along with you. I’ve lived among you sh1theads for years, and I know your ways.

Kralizec on January 4, 2010 at 5:28 AM

The NRCC, like most political organizations, does not listen to the voters. In the past, this was no problem because the ‘old media’ controlled the message and we weren’t as hyperpartisan as we are now. However, the speed of the internet breeds a common attraction and an immediacy that unifies and solidifies small factions through values and principles. In the past, NY 23 wouldn’t have been of interest to anyone outside of the district or the national organization. Now, though, we all know about it, we all voice an opinion, we won’t be silenced (this means you, Newton), and we are all participating.

TinMan13 on January 4, 2010 at 5:30 AM

Scozzofava was described as a moderate.

disa on January 4, 2010 at 2:56 AM

Classic! That is the problem with the GOP. If the GOP thinks Scozzofava is moderate, they might as well put Obama in the same category. as a libertarian/Conservative I reject that way of thinking. I could care less about the GOP. I am giving more time and money then I ever have in my life to Politics. Helping conservative candidates. Not just within my state. GOP needs to get a clue!

IowaWoman on January 4, 2010 at 6:09 AM

doriangrey on January 3, 2010 at 9:42 PM

amen!

cmsinaz on January 4, 2010 at 6:38 AM

“The NRCC was also hurt financially during last month’s special election in upstate New York. in which the committee endorsed and spent money on a moderate nominee, Dede Scozzafava, who quickly drew the ire of the conservative grass-roots.

The thing was Dede was not a moderate, she was more liberal than that…Lugar is a moderate and if she had been more like him, the Republicans would have held the seat.

I do think that in politics like real estate, location is everything. The candidate needs to appeal to the voters of the region. They can be conservative and do that, as long as they keep certain basics in mind, like fiscal conservatism. They can get big, doing that.

Look at the Tea Parties, some people say they want them to be their own party..fine, but the libertarians are not going to care about same sex marriage or abortion and the social conservatives are not going to be obsessed with the federal reserve and the Paulbots are not going to support a foreign policy that other members of the movement can live with. They are a movement and as such they do not have to agree on anything other than the focus of that movement.

So, yeah, the Republicans need to get big, but they can do that plugging into the people with the energy and allowing the voters to make the decision in the primaries.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 6:49 AM

Classic! That is the problem with the GOP. If the GOP thinks Scozzofava is moderate, they might as well put Obama in the same category. as a libertarian/Conservative I reject that way of thinking. I could care less about the GOP. I am giving more time and money then I ever have in my life to Politics. Helping conservative candidates. Not just within my state. GOP needs to get a clue!

IowaWoman on January 4, 2010 at 6:09 AM

I think it was the media that called her a moderate more than the GOP did. The GOP just let the local party people pick a local politician who was considered popular with her base. I doubt if they even knew what her politics were on a lot of issues. I also think that this was a mistake they will remember.

It is not fair to blame the entire party for something like this. There are still plenty of real conservatives in the party and they deserve support. After all, the Democrats would never let someone like Pence in the door.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 6:52 AM

I always thought that Gov. Barbour was one of the best spokespersons for conservatism. I am so disappointed. Just another politician who stands for nothing and falls for everything. Y’all just keep wondering where the money went.

Cindy Munford on January 4, 2010 at 1:50 AM

Remember where Barbour is from. A moderate in his state would be considered a conservative just about anywhere else.

Here in Indiana, Mitch Daniels has done a pretty good job as a Republican Governor. He is pro business and has stood up to the radical environmentalists who are trying to kill coal. By midwestern standards he is a conservative and he won here the same way Republicans won in New Jersey and Virginia. He ran on local issues and he did not bankrupt the state. He has laid of state people to keep that promise.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 6:57 AM

If we win by getting “big,” the only way to get big is to bet back to principles – get back to CONSERVATISM.

J.J. Sefton on January 4, 2010 at 7:07 AM

Remember where Barbour is from. A moderate in his state would be considered a conservative just about anywhere else.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 6:57 AM

Oh Good! Let’s get down to some good old-fashioned bashing of Southerners to start the new year off!

highhopes on January 4, 2010 at 7:15 AM

Oh Good! Let’s get down to some good old-fashioned bashing of Southerners to start the new year off!

highhopes on January 4, 2010 at 7:15 AM

I am not bashing southerners. I was born and raised in Oklahoma. There are Democrats in that state, like Boren, but in spite of that fact not one single county went for Obama. Not one. It was totally red. The point being that in Oklahoma the moderates are more conservative than they are in states like Ohio. That is just a fact.

So, when Barbour talks about getting big, I am not sure he means he wants us all to turn into liberals or something like that.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 7:24 AM

So, when Barbour talks about getting big, I am not sure he means he wants us all to turn into liberals or something like that.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 7:24 AM

The thing about Barbour is that he won in Mississippi by attracting Dems as well as the GOP. It’s probably a lesson worth considering so long as it means attracting moderates from the Dems and not the McCain brand of liberalism under a faux veneer of fiscal and social conservatism. I’m sure there has to be a bunch of Dems out there equally outraged by what the coward in the White House is doing to this country. We need to find and attract those individuals.

highhopes on January 4, 2010 at 7:29 AM

I’m sure there has to be a bunch of Dems out there equally outraged by what the coward in the White House is doing to this country. We need to find and attract those individuals.

highhopes on January 4, 2010 at 7:29 AM

Those Dems are finding the TEA parties all on their own, if the GOP cant find them, it’s because they aren’t looking for them. The GOP is accepting their strategic advice from the Marxist elites in the Democrat party who have a vested interest in giving the GOP strategic advice that will cripple the GOP.

Would George Patton have accepted strategic advice from Rommel on how to defeat the German army? Why in God’s name are the GOP taking advice from the Democrats?

Could it possible be because the GOP leadership are really Marxist elites from the same cloth as the Democrat Marxist elites?

doriangrey on January 4, 2010 at 7:39 AM

The GOP will get BIG when the party nominates candidates who are able to express and adhere to well-defined principles. What’s so tough about that???

alwyr on January 4, 2010 at 7:56 AM

I don’t have a problem with — am not (at all) offended by — the advice, strategy, that the GOP “needs to reach out to moderates” BUT *I DO* have a problem with the strategy that the GOP SHOULD ITSELF BECOME MORE LEFT in that effort.

I don’t know what the happy-moderate is at this point but every single effort I’ve ever seen by the GOP “to reach out to the moderates” results in a Leftwing quasi-Democrat candidate on a GOP ticket and further ruins the GOP’s opportunities to lead.

“Reaching out to the moderates” got us McCain…and there was a real effort there by many of us among GOP voters (and Independents) to even recognize much about McCain that was different from a Moderate Democrat. Though I relented and voted for him but only after Palin was named V.P. and the idea of an Obama-win was looming and horrible (and has proven to be even worse than horrible, though I have no guilt in that regard having spoken out loud and clear in denigration of that eventual win).

“Reaching out to moderates” takes the GOP ever-Left and the GOP going ever-Left has resulted in the GOP losing ever-more Conservative, Moderate and Independent voters.

The GOP has to declare itself with clear statements and forego this mushy-touchy-feely-be-everything-to-anyone effort.

Lourdes on January 4, 2010 at 8:08 AM

…though, again, I respect Haley Barbour and his advice; the GOP seems to have already well “reached out to moderates” and more in the GOP should stop taking that to mean that the GOP SHOULD BECOME MORE MODERATE, because, it’s lack of declaration of clear stance on many an issue that has allowed the GOP to be mushy overall: too many voters remain muddled as to what the GOP represents in that regard.

With McCain’s lead last election, I lined-up issues of his with those held by HIllary Clinton before Obama gained momentum and there was not a great deal of difference between the two.

So, “reaching out to moderates” SHOULD NOT MEAN that the GOP should somehow become more Leftwing. It’s been too Leftwing for a while now on many issues and that’s what’s cost us elections.

Lourdes on January 4, 2010 at 8:12 AM

‘People are crazy if they think we win by getting more pure. We win by getting big.’

That’s the same kind of reasoning that says we should bring the crime rate down by legalizing armed robbery and murder.

It’s not “winning” if you are surrendering your principles in order to get elected.

JohnTant on January 4, 2010 at 8:45 AM

A key problem here is a bizarre definition of what constitutes a “Moderate Republican”.

Principled moderates are OK: ones that have a real agenda and stick by it faithfully are fine with me. We may not always agree, but I can respect the person.

Up until now, though, the GOP has been reaching out to unprincipled snakes, slapping a GOP label on anything they think can win the target seat (see Dede “I’m totally a Republican: I promise” Scuzzlebubba). A moderate with principles I can take. A “moderate” who just blows with the political winds, or will “make a deal, any deal” just to be called a statesman by the Times, or will hike up their skirt for any piece of legislation that sails into port if it gets them on TV is welcome to go to hell.

Lehosh on January 4, 2010 at 8:53 AM

As a Representative Republic we are represented by a person we vote our confidence in to sally forth our words and desires that will keep U.S. safe and secure in our person, property, and papers.

We need to insure we hold our elected persons responsible to U.S. and not their or others special interests that they wish to posit upon U.S.

Just as in life there is right and wrong we should continue the two party system rather then divide U.S. further than we are already. Let’s just think of or it a Dem vs. U.S. Thus, the Demoncrates think we are the majority in politics so you get to live by our rules, and the Republicans represent the Republic of U.S. and vote the public conscience.

MSGTAS on January 4, 2010 at 9:00 AM

in which the committee endorsed and spent money on a moderate nominee

Moderate???? Compared to whom? Mao?

MarkTheGreat on January 4, 2010 at 9:33 AM

I sent my RNC fund raiser letter back with: No rubles for RINOs.

Mojave Mark on January 4, 2010 at 9:35 AM

If we win by getting “big,” the only way to get big is to bet back to principles – get back to CONSERVATISM.

J.J. Sefton on January 4, 2010 at 7:07 AM

This is the key point – we actually win by getting “focused.”

Our strategy should be based on what I call the “big boat.”

1. It’s not a tent. – tents don’t go anywhere.

2. Admission to the big boat is available to all who subscribe to the core principals of conservatism:
A. Smaller government.
B. Lower taxes
C. Individual freedoms
D. A healthy respect for the framers/founders view of the republic, expressed in reverence for the constitution.
E. A stated belief in American Exceptionalism and Greatness.

3. On the boat, let all who come aboard, grab an oar, and start rowing!

4. When we get where we are going (conservatives in leadership positions,) then we can effect the changes we need to make our country as great as it can be.

massrighty on January 4, 2010 at 10:36 AM

Hmmmm.

Give money to the national GOP organizations that are predisposed to liberals?

No f-ing thank you.

memomachine on January 4, 2010 at 10:49 AM

Cindy Munford on January 4, 2010 at 1:50 AM

Please give me your full definition of what being a conservative actually is. I’m really curious, as it seems like too many HA commenters treat being a conservative as equivalent to being a religious convert.

BradSchwartze on January 4, 2010 at 11:01 AM

Lehosh on January 4, 2010 at 8:53 AM

Actually, being a RINO is getting simpler and simpler: Anybody who even expresses the slightest skepticism at the following individuals:

Rush Limbaugh
Glenn Beck
Sarah Palin.

BradSchwartze on January 4, 2010 at 11:04 AM

Please give me your full definition of what being a conservative actually is. I’m really curious, as it seems like too many HA commenters treat being a conservative as equivalent to being a religious convert.

BradSchwartze on January 4, 2010 at 11:01 AM

I know this comment was addressed to Cindy; I don’t intend to “answer for her.”

But, as in my post above, there are some core conservative values that can be (to some degree) agreed upon by all.

Core principals of conservatism:
A. Smaller government.
B. Lower taxes
C. Individual freedoms
D. A healthy respect for the framers/founders view of the republic, expressed in reverence for the constitution.
E. A stated belief in American Exceptionalism and Greatness.

There are more than these, if you add in the tenets of what is commonly called “social conservatism;” but, that’s where this gets a little sticky.

I may be pro, or con, same sex marriage – should my belief exclude me from considering myself a conservative?

If we stick with something like the basic outline I’ve given here, we’ll have a common area of agreement, and room to respectfully disagree on other issues.

The core principals I’ve identified are often lacking in the speeches and positions of those who are more liberal/progressive.

And they shouldn’t be.

massrighty on January 4, 2010 at 11:27 AM

‘the predisposition of voters’ is to reelect a president

Tell that to Bush ’41 and Jimmah Carter.

GarandFan on January 4, 2010 at 11:28 AM

tigerlily on January 4, 2010 at 1:24 AM

Hyperbole thy name is tigerlily. You want to overturn Roe V. Wade? Want to end Abortion? I do.

But you will not stop the practice merely by outlawing it. All you do is send it underground were it is more dangerous and far harder to stop. Abortion, whether you like it or not, will not dissappear merely by passing a law you twit. Stop acting like it. Learn, get smarter and be prepared for a multi-generational fight.

There is only one way to end Abortion and that is from the bottom up.

Destroy the welfare Culture and the Welfare State and you cut down on the abhorrent practice by 50 percent. Hell, you also cut down on crime and drug abuse by a major percentage.

From the Bottom up will solve it. From the top down will only make it worse.

Holger on January 4, 2010 at 1:46 PM

Holger on January 4, 2010 at 1:46 PM

I’ve said all I’m going to say to someone who on the one hand says they are fine with supporting a pro-abort republican and then tries to say that abortion is is “abhorrent”. Your jellyfish act is so intellectually lacking and to be honest, predictably hypocritical, not to mention dreary and dull, that I don’t know why you bother. In case you didn’t notice, you already outed yourself as a pro-abort further up the thread. As for me, I really don’t want to discuss things any further with a little boy who will never be a man as long as he not only won’t defend helpless unborn innocents, as a real man would, but is part of keeping the butchery going. Apparantly, 40 million dead so far is nothing for you to trade in for your 30 pieces of silver that you hope to keep in your bloody hands when you elect a pro-abort republican who will promise to keep your money safe from the tax man. I, and millions of others who are sick of this seeing this country turned into a killing field for the convenience of promiscuous (whether in thought or deed) “men” like you, (as I have noticed you come across as such in some of your comments IMO), will be busy fighting you and your spineless fellow travelers every inch of the way. Yes, we want out country back – from people like you and the most pro-abort precedent ever. Get it through you head – it’s a first principle – when life itself is unjustly taken, then all other injustices – (think of your wallet and your money unjustly taken through taxes; I know that’s more important to you than defending innocent lives) against all other subordinate rights may also be taken. So endeth the lesson. And my part in trying to help you grow a spine.

tigerlily on January 4, 2010 at 3:55 PM

We don’t need a “screaming Howard Dean”, but we do need a candidate who can lock in the grassroots voters with common sense and at least a hint of personal INTEGRITY.

GoldenEagle4444 on January 3, 2010 at 10:15 PM

Can you say Sarah?

IowaWoman on January 4, 2010 at 6:03 PM

I think it was the media that called her a moderate more than the GOP did. The GOP just let the local party people pick a local politician who was considered popular with her base. I doubt if they even knew what her politics were on a lot of issues. I also think that this was a mistake they will remember.

It is not fair to blame the entire party for something like this. There are still plenty of real conservatives in the party and they deserve support. After all, the Democrats would never let someone like Pence in the door.

Terrye on January 4, 2010 at 6:52 AM

The entire GOP went along with the choice and do not forget they put up a cool million to help her. The locals did not put up the money. I will not give them a dime to waste it on trash!

IowaWoman on January 4, 2010 at 6:47 PM

Comment pages: 1 2