Telegraph: The most conservative movie of the decade is…

posted at 8:22 pm on December 30, 2009 by Allahpundit

I’ve seen two of these, I think. Drumroll:

1. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Peter Weir, 2003)

Peter Weir’s unashamedly old-fashioned and visually stunning adaptation of Patrick O’Brian’s novel is one of the greatest odes to leadership ever committed to celluloid. Australian director Weir has made many terrific films, including Gallipoli, Dead Poets Society, The Year of Living Dangerously, and Witness, but Master and Commander was the pinnacle of his career so far. Nominated for 10 Oscars, including Best Picture, it should be essential viewing for any commander-in-chief. Russell Crowe delivers a powerhouse performance as Jack Aubrey, Captain of HMS Surprise, a British warship that hunts and ultimately captures a far larger French adversary during the Napoleonic Wars. Set in 1805, it is an epic tale of heroism and love for country in the face of incredible odds, and a glowing tribute to the grit and determination that forged the British Empire.

Every movie in Nile Gardiner’s top ten deals with war in one way or another except for one, and that one — The Dark Knight — is often read as allegorical about the war on terror and enhanced interrogation. Gardiner’s reasoning: “A central theme that runs through several of my top ten picks is the eternal conflict between good and evil, and why the forces of tyranny and despotism must be confronted and defeated. They include films that Barack Obama should watch as he contemplates appeasing the likes of Iran and North Korea, or turning a blind eye to mass murder in Burma, Sudan and Zimbabwe.”

Didn’t see number five on his list but he’s on very solid ground based on what I’ve heard from others. As for number ten, it was the subject of one of the all-time great hysterical leftist movie reviews, so he’s safe on that one too. The obligatory exit question: Have at it. Which ones did he forget?

Update: Ah, here’s a good one courtesy of a friend: “Hot Fuzz.”


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What about “Passion of the Christ”, AKA “BDSM for Christians”?

LevStrauss on December 30, 2009 at 8:54 PM

Since when was Christ “conservative”? This is about conservative movies not religious ones.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:00 PM

LevStrauss on December 30, 2009 at 8:54 PM

Yes indeed, you are quite the short bus rider, aren’t you?

Intrepid on December 30, 2009 at 9:01 PM

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 8:58 PM

Field of Dreams too………..come on admit it.

Knucklehead on December 30, 2009 at 9:01 PM

[macncheez on December 30, 2009 at 8:46 PM]

It appears more people subscribe to the cardinal system (0-9) than the ordinal system (1-10) for decades.

Dusty on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

I thought WALL*E was very conservative.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 8:56 PM

Wait. The movie where we’ve destroyed the planet out of materialistic greed and have become so lazy that we can’t do anything for ourselves?

I get your argument, but, come on.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

Update: Ah, here’s a good one courtesy of a friend: “Hot Fuzz.”

Dude.

Movie about the British police…CANNOT be conservative.

Isn’t there a point where they seize this old guy’s entire arsenal in his shed? Okay, the sea mine…maybe a bit dangerous.

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 8:58 PM

Most recent movie line that made me choke up? “My friends, you bow to no one” from Return of the King. That, and the first 15 minutes of Up.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

Seven Percent Solution on December 30, 2009 at 8:41 PM

I’m still waiting for “Brothers at War”.

I assume it is conservative also. And probably a tear jerker.

csdeven on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

Field of Dreams too………..come on admit it.

Knucklehead on December 30, 2009 at 9:01 PM

Never…EVER been able to make it all the way through that movie. Painfully boring.

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

I loved Rocky Balboa. The talk he gives his son is one of the highlights.

“It`s not about how hard you hit, it`s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward!”

ThePrez on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

I know I’m going against the current, but I thought V for Vendetta was a conservative film, with an individual fighting a corrupt government. Of course the cut with the director’s commentary was completely looney. The religion was phoney, which is precisely the point of the antichrist.

pedestrian on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

I could also make an argument that more than a couple of those were actually liberal movies, especially Gay porn flick The 300…

Bleeds Blue on December 30, 2009 at 8:56 PM

Hey, I really liked that flick…

Oh, wait…

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:04 PM

Wait. The movie where we’ve destroyed the planet out of materialistic greed and have become so lazy that we can’t do anything for ourselves?

I get your argument, but, come on.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

Materialistic greed is anti-conservative, in my estimation. It’s when we become a tool of the market, which is radically unconservative.

But I note again, there is no free market in WALL*E. It’s a corporatist state. To see it as a liberal movie is to not look deep enough.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:04 PM

Never…EVER been able to make it all the way through that movie. Painfully boring.

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

Thank you.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:05 PM

Bleeds Blue on December 30, 2009 at 8:56 PM

As I was scrolling down my wife stopped the page so she could guess who was typing your comment. She guessed you. If a semi-regular reader can pick out your comment on a non-political thread it’s time for you to change things up.

I could also make an argument that more than a couple of those were actually liberal movies, especially Gay porn flick The 300

Haha.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 8:59 PM

Must have been the hyperbole. Kind of a default mode. I’ll dial back. But, at least I’m consistent.

Bleeds Blue on December 30, 2009 at 9:05 PM

It appears more people subscribe to the cardinal system (0-9) than the ordinal system (1-10) for decades.

Dusty on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

Faster time to market.

pedestrian on December 30, 2009 at 9:05 PM

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:04 PM

Heh. I heard Crist is going to have a cameo in the sequel.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:06 PM

And speaking of movies that make men cry, I will admit to this. In Armageddon when Bruce Willis tells Ben Affleck “I always thought of you as a son.”

I get a tad choked up. Call me crazy.

ThePrez on December 30, 2009 at 9:06 PM

For those of you who have not seen it yet, I would recommed “The Blind Side”. It is an amazing story that is funny, sad, inspirational, and totally true. We saw it last weekend and I am taking my boys to see it this weekend. Just an awesome movie.

milwife88 on December 30, 2009 at 9:07 PM

Good one…I cried like a baby the first time I saw that.
JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 8:54 PM

It’s ok…I always tear up while watching “Apocalypse Now”, especially the scene at the Do-Long bridge when the crazy black dude with the tricked out M79 whacks the VC screaming from the jungle.

*scuse me, I have something in my eye*

Bishop on December 30, 2009 at 9:08 PM

One film I thought thyat had a fairly conservative flavour to it was Gamer.

Hellrider on December 30, 2009 at 9:08 PM

Not saying any of these should displace the ones on the list, but I liked these for (among other things) what I think of as the conservative can-do spirit of the characters – how they took charge of events & their own lives, and didn’t look to others to “fix” them; how they wanted something better and worked for it:

Ratatouille
The Incredibles
Up
Finding Nemo
National Treasure
Napoleon Dynamite (too often overlooked! a great film!)

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:09 PM

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:04 PM

Yeah, but it’s a kids movie. The driving message is that we’re fat, wasteful, greedy creatures who created so much trash that we destroyed our planet. A robot is more redeeming than any human in the movie. All the people in the movie are a leftists stereotype of conservatives.

Kids movies don’t generally have deep, complex themes. If they do it tends to be unintentional.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:09 PM

No.1 and 2 should be The Incredibles and Ratatouille.
promachus on December 30, 2009 at 8:38 PM

I’m surprised “The Incredibles” wasn’t on the list.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 8:40 PM

What is it with a lot of ya’s with The Incredibles? IMHO that movie was horrible.

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 8:41 PM

Have thought for years that The Incredibles was one of the best movies promoting conservative values I’ve ever seen. The value of the nuclear family, individual merit, fidelity, good vs. evil, etc etc. (One of my favorite lines: “Mom and Dad’s lives could be in jeopardy, or worse, their marriage.” )

Bonus: how often do you see a strong dad who is definitely in charge of his family? Oscars for Best Original Screenplay (shocka – the Oscars?) and for Best Animated Feature.

Bonus 2:
Edna
Mode (voiced by Brad Bird himself)

LOL What a fun, terrific ride that movie was. Pixar sure knows how to make a movie.

inviolet on December 30, 2009 at 9:10 PM

Great lists (I’m trusting y’all for the most part). I see that I have some catching up to do as I’ve only seen 3-4 of all mentioned and they were very entertaining. This working-for-a-living stuff is chewing up too much time. Gotta cut back.

Robert17 on December 30, 2009 at 9:10 PM

Never…EVER been able to make it all the way through that movie. Painfully boring.
MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

Thank you.
BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:05 PM

Heal Allahpundit’s pain.

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:12 PM

Hot Fuzz.. conservative? Maybe, but it sure as heck was funny. I bought it and watch it often.

GoodBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:12 PM

[macncheez on December 30, 2009 at 8:46 PM]

It appears more people subscribe to the cardinal system (0-9) than the ordinal system (1-10) for decades.

Dusty on December 30, 2009 at 9:02 PM

It took me a long moment to realize that,
it was 5 o’clock an hour ago ;-)

macncheez on December 30, 2009 at 9:12 PM

300 was number 10?!?!? ARE YOU KIDDING.

OMG.. love them men. YUM!

upinak on December 30, 2009 at 9:13 PM

It’s ok…I always tear up while watching “Apocalypse Now”, especially the scene at the Do-Long bridge when the crazy black dude with the tricked out M79 whacks the VC screaming from the jungle.

*scuse me, I have something in my eye*

Bishop on December 30, 2009 at 9:08 PM

Sometimes I wonder about you, Bishop… ;)

Another one I teared up at was the ending of the movie “Reds”, with Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton, where Keaton goes for water in the hospital, senses something is wrong, and goes back to the room where Beatty is, but he died while she was gone…

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:14 PM

To: Seven Percent Solution

I second your nomination of Taking Chance.

It is a beautiful movie! Well worth seeing! Bring a liberal friend, who can learn a lot about America from this movie.

wren on December 30, 2009 at 9:15 PM

…the first 15 minutes of Up.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:03 PM

I so agree. The most beautiful 15 minutes of film I’ve ever seen.

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:15 PM

Yeah, but it’s a kids movie. The driving message is that we’re fat, wasteful, greedy creatures who created so much trash that we destroyed our planet. A robot is more redeeming than any human in the movie. All the people in the movie are a leftists stereotype of conservatives.

Kids movies don’t generally have deep, complex themes. If they do it tends to be unintentional.

BadgerHawk on December 30, 2009 at 9:09 PM

Then why do they make a point of saying this guy is the CEO of the world?

The real point of the movie, according to the director, is how irrational love defeats the world’s programming. That love, and relationships with others, is the only true way to freedom. (And the only way to avoid destruction) After all, would you say the humans in the film were truly free until the end? They were overgrown babies!

All of this, I think, is totally conservative.

Conservatives should be against being wasteful creatures who trash the planet. What exactly are we “conserving” anyway?

You’re right that kids won’t see all of this, in fact, they won’t see what you think they will see. What they’ll see is a funny robot and action.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:15 PM

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:14 PM

I forgot the worst one. Even worse than Forrest Gump.

Schindler’s List. A number of moments, but the sheer punch in the gut is the end, where they give him the ring, and after everything he’s done, all he feels is guilt for not having done more. Every single time…just brutal.

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

The Incredibles should have been on that list, maybe even at the top of that list.

Now as for:

What is it with a lot of ya’s with The Incredibles? IMHO that movie was horrible.

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 8:41 PM

Your opinion is wrong. It’s not that it’s misinformed. It’s not a matter of taste. You’re just wrong. It would be like having an opinion that the Earth is flat or that Michael Jackson could’ve played Sam Spade in a remake of The Maltese Falcon. Your opinion is so stupid so incredibly incorrect that I’m surprised that it has not been used a showpiece to shut down the Internet lest stupidity be allowed to spread across the globe at the speed of light.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

inviolet on December 30, 2009 at 9:10 PM

The Incredibles was another incredibly conservative movie from Pixar. It’s bizarre, really, that they keep doing that.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:17 PM

Your opinion is wrong. It’s not that it’s misinformed. It’s not a matter of taste. You’re just wrong. It would be like having an opinion that the Earth is flat or that Michael Jackson could’ve played Sam Spade in a remake of The Maltese Falcon. Your opinion is so stupid so incredibly incorrect that I’m surprised that it has not been used a showpiece to shut down the Internet lest stupidity be allowed to spread across the globe at the speed of light.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

+1

You’re my newest hero.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:18 PM

I so agree. The most beautiful 15 minutes of film I’ve ever seen.

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:15 PM

Damn straight. The rest of the movie was kinda blah but those 15 minutes were simple perfection.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:18 PM

kangjie on December 30, 2009 at 8:40 PM

I sure hope you were joking. Those movies were both absolute abortions, for different reasons.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:19 PM

Your opinion is wrong. It’s not that it’s misinformed. It’s not a matter of taste. You’re just wrong. It would be like having an opinion that the Earth is flat or that Michael Jackson could’ve played Sam Spade in a remake of The Maltese Falcon. Your opinion is so stupid so incredibly incorrect that I’m surprised that it has not been used a showpiece to shut down the Internet lest stupidity be allowed to spread across the globe at the speed of light.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

I like JetBoy but…that was hilarious.

Anyone who hasn’t seen The Incredibles – add to your Netflix queue. You won’t be sorry. Just a load of (conservative) fun.

inviolet on December 30, 2009 at 9:19 PM

Damn straight. The rest of the movie was kinda blah but those 15 minutes were simple perfection.
PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:18 PM

The rest of the movie wasn’t as emotionally gut-wrenching and beautiful, but the scene where Carl opens “My Adventure Book” near the end? Pixar owned me.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

The Lives of Others is indeed an outstanding movie, and I recommend anybody who hasn’t seen it yet to make a note and watch it.

Andy in Colorado on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

Have thought for years that The Incredibles was one of the best movies promoting conservative values I’ve ever seen. The value of the nuclear family, individual merit, fidelity, good vs. evil, etc etc. (One of my favorite lines: “Mom and Dad’s lives could be in jeopardy, or worse, their marriage.” )

Bonus: how often do you see a strong dad who is definitely in charge of his family? Oscars for Best Original Screenplay (shocka – the Oscars?) and for Best Animated Feature.

Bonus 2:
Edna
Mode (voiced by Brad Bird himself)

LOL What a fun, terrific ride that movie was. Pixar sure knows how to make a movie.

inviolet on December 30, 2009 at 9:10 PM

How about syndromes theme….”Once everyone is super, no one will be.”

Fighton03 on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

The 2004 Man on Fire remake should be on this list. Not just because it is my favorite movie. But because it is about atoning for one’s sins and is one of the few movies that portrays The Bible and Christianity in a positive light.

Kataklysmic on December 30, 2009 at 9:21 PM

The rest of the movie wasn’t as emotionally gut-wrenching and beautiful, but the scene where Carl opens “My Adventure Book” near the end? Pixar owned me.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

Yeah I hate dissolving into tears but that scene gets me every time.

inviolet on December 30, 2009 at 9:21 PM

So Avatar was not on the list? Hm.

Greek Fire on December 30, 2009 at 9:21 PM

Damn straight. The rest of the movie was kinda blah but those 15 minutes were simple perfection.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:18 PM

The rest of it was pretty good, I thought. My biggest beef is that they made the villain to sympathetic to kill off. They should have gone the Miyazaki route.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:22 PM

The rest of the movie wasn’t as emotionally gut-wrenching and beautiful, but the scene where Carl opens “My Adventure Book” near the end? Pixar owned me.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

Oh good. I was PWND by Pixar too. I loved UP.

upinak on December 30, 2009 at 9:22 PM

“The Patriot” with Mel Gibson

4Freedom on December 30, 2009 at 9:23 PM

So Avatar was not on the list? Hm.

Greek Fire on December 30, 2009 at 9:21 PM

Well, hearing about it`s content makes me want to conserve my money and not see it.

ThePrez on December 30, 2009 at 9:24 PM

Hey, we’re forgetting Snakes on a Plane.

/=\=/=\=/=\=/=\=/=\=/=(:>~

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:24 PM

I also want to point out that no one has mentioned American Carol.

Which is a good thing. That movie should be forever forgotten.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:26 PM

The Incredibles should have been on that list, maybe even at the top of that list.

Now as for:

What is it with a lot of ya’s with The Incredibles? IMHO that movie was horrible.

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 8:41 PM

Your opinion is wrong. It’s not that it’s misinformed. It’s not a matter of taste. You’re just wrong. It would be like having an opinion that the Earth is flat or that Michael Jackson could’ve played Sam Spade in a remake of The Maltese Falcon. Your opinion is so stupid so incredibly incorrect that I’m surprised that it has not been used a showpiece to shut down the Internet lest stupidity be allowed to spread across the globe at the speed of light.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

Well!

OK, I did lol at that…but seriously, I thought that movie was a total piece of crud. I made myself watch it, even tho halfway through I was ready to go out and shove bamboo shoots up my fingernails just for some fun.

“The Incredibles” was the worst piece of trash Pixar ever produced. Probably the only one.

Didn’t like it. And frankly, I’m absolutely amazed so many here do. But alas.

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:28 PM

The rest of the movie wasn’t as emotionally gut-wrenching and beautiful, but the scene where Carl opens “My Adventure Book” near the end? Pixar owned me.

Slublog on December 30, 2009 at 9:20 PM

Yes that part was deeply moving too. I think when they focused on the Carl/Ellie relationship it was stunningly good. I’m afraid though that a lot of the later parts of the movie were written with little kids and Happy Meals toys in mind and Pixar succumbed to write to a demographic that likes cartoons silly and stupid.

I’m a huge fan of Ratatouille as well but once again it’s Ego’s review at the end that puts it above all of the animated fluff put out by competing studios who think that flattulence jokes can pass for wit.

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:28 PM

IDK about conservative, but Traitor (2008) is an AMAZING movie that most conservatives would love. Apocalypto (2006), again, dont know its its conservative, but one of the best of the decade. I hold a special place in my heart for Idiocracy and Team America.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:28 PM

I’d have to put the 2002 South Korean movie The Way Home on the list, just to round out Gardiner’s conservative messages of free market, love of country, freedom (support for the military as he phrases it) with the basic issues of family and development of individual character. There’s probably others that would compete on that score, but I liked this movie, so I’m putting a plug in for it.

Here’s the plot from IMDB: Seven-year-old Sang-woo is left with his grandmother in a remote village while his mother looks for work. Born and raised in the city, Sang-woo quickly comes into conflict with his old-fashioned grandmother and his new rural surroundings. Disrespectful and selfish, Sang-woo lashes out in anger, perceiving that he has been abandoned. He trades his grandmother’s only treasure for a video game; he throws his food and he throws tantrums. When Sang-woo’s mother finds work and finally returns for him, Sang-woo has become a different boy. Through his grandmother’s boundless patience and devotion, he learns to embrace empathy, humility and the importance of family.

Dusty on December 30, 2009 at 9:29 PM

Oh, and holy crap, Downfall (2004) should be on that list. If anyone hasn’t seen that movie, it is absolutely amazing. Best Hitler portrayal ever.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:29 PM

Hey, we’re forgetting Snakes on a Plane.

/=\=/=\=/=\=/=\=/=\=/=(:>~

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:24 PM

… and Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus …

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:29 PM

V for Vendetta should be on that list, but only for small limited government conservatives and not big government statist social conservatives.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

Concur on Traitor.

daesleeper on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

Oh, and holy crap, Downfall (2004) should be on that list. If anyone hasn’t seen that movie, it is absolutely amazing. Best Hitler portrayal ever.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:29 PM

… I especially like the part when Hitler complains about Favre signing with the Vikings …

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

conservative movie? “the Road” just released

mathewsjw on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

With dailogue like this, of COURSE “Master and Commander is the best conservative movie of the decade.

Capt. Jack Aubrey: Do you want to see a guillotine in Piccadilly?
Crew: No!
Capt. Jack Aubrey: Want to call that raggedy-ass Napoleon your king?
Crew: No!
Capt. Jack Aubrey: You want your children to sing the “La Marseillaise?”
Crew: No!

Any movie that mocks the French is ok in my book.

ExUrbanKevin on December 30, 2009 at 9:32 PM

Speaking of Miyazaki…

Spirited Away is an amazingly good conservative film. Which is surprising since Miyazaki himself is a former marxist. I don’t know how conservative Miyazaki has since become (his next film would have a very strong Anti-War theme, so I don’t know) but the film is a paean to a lost Japan.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:32 PM

PackerBronco on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

I had to see the movie after Hitler lost his Xbox live account.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:33 PM

V for Vendetta should be on that list, but only for small limited government conservatives and not big government statist social conservatives.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

V For Vendetta is anarchist, not small government. Of course, that message gets muddled when the scriptwriters are only interested in taking shots at Bush.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:34 PM

“The Incredibles” was the worst piece of trash Pixar ever produced. Probably the only one.

Didn’t like it. And frankly, I’m absolutely amazed so many here do. But alas.

Just how much money did you get when you pawned your immortal soul? :)

ExUrbanKevin on December 30, 2009 at 9:34 PM

The Dark Knight, the last scene is one of the best displays of Substitutionary Atonement ever on screen.

On that note: where is “Passion of the Christ”?

jp on December 30, 2009 at 9:35 PM

Just how much money did you get when you pawned your immortal soul? :)

ExUrbanKevin on December 30, 2009 at 9:34 PM

Remember ALF? He’s back. In Pog form!

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:35 PM

What about “Passion of the Christ”, AKA “BDSM for Christians”?

LevStrauss on December 30, 2009 at 8:54 PM
Why are atheists so hateful and intolerant?

malclave on December 30, 2009 at 8:58 PM

It’s all they’ve got…

TBinSTL on December 30, 2009 at 9:35 PM

I loved Spirited Away, Keljeck. What made it a conservative film for you?

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:36 PM

Have thought for years that The Incredibles was one of the best movies promoting conservative values I’ve ever seen.

Oh, yeah. The Incredibles. And if you have the 2-disc version, you can see the alternate opening scene for that movie — very, very conservative.

CJ on December 30, 2009 at 9:36 PM

V for Vendetta should be on that list, but only for small limited government conservatives and not big government statist social conservatives.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:30 PM

Conservatism is not, never has been, Anarchist and Nihilistic

jp on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:34 PM

Not anarchist. The government had swelled and had become oppressive of the people. It therefore needed to be destroyed so a better one could be built. If you watch the movie and don’t just rely on kneejerk reviews like the one Hotair did claiming the movie justified terrorism, then you would completely understand the movie, and I think like it. Its very founding fathersy, in freeing yourself from the shackles of an oppressive government that no longer represents you.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner was a great film about the importance of family ties and hard work. And it’s hard to believe all the actors were amateurs.

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

Pixar made two very conversative movies — The Incredibles and Ratatouille. And I still say that one of the most conservative movies of the decade is “Miracle,” about the 1980 U.S. Hockey team. Kurt Russell does a great job of showing how Herb Brooks (a) cut through the wishes of an entrenched bureaucracy, (b) used great ingenuity and teamwork to solve a problem and (c) beat those Commie bastards. And there’s a lot of none-too-subtle Carter bashing, too.

Mr. D on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

jp on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

Some “conservatives”, you ESPECIALLY included, would like nothing more than an absolute police state.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:38 PM

… regardless of the fact that they are apparently fascist red state propaganda flicks aimed at building a New Reich mindset here in the U.S

Bleeds Blue on December 30, 2009 at 8:56 PM

Wow… missed the whole propaganda aspect… thanks for enlightening me… should I seek a refund?

ya2daup on December 30, 2009 at 9:38 PM

“The Great Debaters” with Denzel Washington based on the true story of a debating coach at a small Texas college who made the team competetive against Harvard. Very inspirational.

4Freedom on December 30, 2009 at 9:39 PM

Well, I myself will mention American Carol, which gets better and better with each viewing. It’s actually quite good! The only aspect that wasn’t prophetically right on the mark, was their use of the movie name FASCIST AMERICA as a hilarious fictional title for a movie score. How could they know we’d have a fascist President within just a few years after American Carol’s release.

Master and Commander is a conservative movie? Huh? Sorry, I am a huge fan of that movie and the book series it was born from, but if there is some conservative theme in there, I sure missed it.

I once took a survey created by leftists to determine how far to the right or left I was. I can tell you, the left understands what conservatism is about as well as they know the names of the first three Presidents.

Danzo on December 30, 2009 at 9:39 PM

How is Serenity not on this list?

TBinSTL on December 30, 2009 at 9:39 PM

I loved Spirited Away, Keljeck. What made it a conservative film for you?

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:36 PM

Like I said, it’s a paean to a lost Japan. The bath house in the spirit world takes place in an old abandoned amusement park, which the script points out briefly was shut down in the early 90′s during the recession. The parents are turned into pigs because they’re selfish, just like Chihiro is.

It is when she spends a long time among the native spirits of Japan, in an old style bath house when she learns to grow up. And through it all she doesn’t lose sight of saving her family.

A fun point, Miyazaki told his animators to animate Dragon Haku’s face like a dog’s. None of the animators had seen a live dog before. Since the Japanese generally don’t keep them in apartments. So Miyazaki had a dog brought in from the animal shelter for them to look at and pattern.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:40 PM

MadisonConservative on December 30, 2009 at 9:16 PM

I have to agree with that one. It’s a great movie but a very hard one to watch.

mizflame98 on December 30, 2009 at 9:41 PM

What? No love for “Enemy at the Gates”?

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on December 30, 2009 at 9:42 PM

Mel Gibson had a great one-two punch in 2002 with We Were Soldiers and Signs. Both solid conservative films.

And the article had it listed among its honorable mentions, but I think Rocky Balboa should be ranked in the Top 10. If for no other reason than that scene in front of the restaurant where Rocky tells his son “how winning’s done”. What a great monologue and something that should be required viewing for every lib out there.

Doughboy on December 30, 2009 at 9:42 PM

Not anarchist. The government had swelled and had become oppressive of the people. It therefore needed to be destroyed so a better one could be built. If you watch the movie and don’t just rely on kneejerk reviews like the one Hotair did claiming the movie justified terrorism, then you would completely understand the movie, and I think like it. Its very founding fathersy, in freeing yourself from the shackles of an oppressive government that no longer represents you.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:37 PM

The film is based on a graphic novel. The graphic novel explored the pluses and minuses of anarchy and fascism. They never say that a new government will be built on the ruins of the fascistic one. V never wanted that. V wanted to end government. He was a bomb throwing anarchist.

But this was all muddled, like I said, since the film was only interested in taking potshots against Bush. Because as we all know Bush was the real fascist <.<

And I second what jp said. Conservatism is not about nihilism. Never was.

Keljeck on December 30, 2009 at 9:43 PM

As for Master and Commander, I recommend reading the 20 novels of Patrick O’Brian that include Jack Aubry and Steven Marturin. The movie is based mostly on The Far Side of the World (tenth novel) but takes many elements from Master and Commander(first novel). It includes sections of many of the other books but does leave out a key fact about Maturin that makes the novels that much better.

cobrakai99 on December 30, 2009 at 9:43 PM

Live Free or Die Hard.

Rosmerta on December 30, 2009 at 9:44 PM

Left-Right, who cares, how about an American movie, these were our Fathers, Uncles, cousins and brothers. It was who we were, it is who we are. It is who we want to be, or should.
The best flick of the decade, hands down, Band Of Brothers!

Major Dick Winters, you Sir, Easy, and all who answered the call,are HEROS!

The series made me laugh, it made me cry, it made me proud of who I am. Most of all, it made me thank God that I live where I do, and after all of the squabbling we do, we can come together for a just cause, that may again happen soon enough.

After that, We Were Soldiers, Hal Moore, Thank you Sir. Hal Moore, talk about honor, we should all learn from such men.

M-14 2go on December 30, 2009 at 9:44 PM

Oh, and holy crap, Downfall (2004) should be on that list. If anyone hasn’t seen that movie, it is absolutely amazing. Best Hitler portrayal ever.

thphilli on December 30, 2009 at 9:29 PM

Excellent movie. My 16 year old daughter loves that one.

mizflame98 on December 30, 2009 at 9:45 PM

[4Freedom on December 30, 2009 at 9:39 PM]

Hey, now that you mention Washington, how about Remember the Titans?

[TBinSTL on December 30, 2009 at 9:39 PM]

Good point. I’d be inclined to dump Gladiator. Good movie, wrong list.

Dusty on December 30, 2009 at 9:46 PM

I can not BELIEVE all of you educated people missed this…!

My hope for humanity is lost.

Seven Percent Solution on December 30, 2009 at 9:46 PM

Definitions of “most conservative” will vary, but for my money #1 had to be The Lives of Others. The Pursuit of Happyness would be my second. My third would be “Gone, Baby Gone.”

I didn’t really understand “Master and Commander” as a conservative movie. It’s a naval movie that affirms Royal Navy heritage, but I don’t see anything particularly “conservative.” I guess, if that’s “conservative,” then why isn’t “Gods and Generals” on the list?

Robert_Paulson on December 30, 2009 at 9:46 PM

Also The Great Raid – a movie about the war in the Pacific.

The Japanese are about to execute a group of allied POWs, so a group or Americans and Filipinos are sent in to try and save them.

The movie displays the horrors of the Japanese occupation and the heroism of allied troops.

So, of course Hollywood did their best to scuttle the movie.

18-1 on December 30, 2009 at 9:46 PM

But, at least I’m consistent.

Bleeds Blue on December 30, 2009 at 9:05 PM

yeah, a consistent leftoid dumba**. What was that Emerson quote about the hobgoblin of little minds?

BleedsHobGoblinBlue

it’s because You People substitute talking points for intelligence

Janos Hunyadi on December 30, 2009 at 9:46 PM

Just how much money did you get when you pawned your immortal soul? :)

ExUrbanKevin on December 30, 2009 at 9:34 PM

lol

Anyway, The Iron Giant was much, much better. And missed this list by one year.

JetBoy on December 30, 2009 at 9:47 PM

And the article had it listed among its honorable mentions, but I think Rocky Balboa should be ranked in the Top 10. If for no other reason than that scene in front of the restaurant where Rocky tells his son “how winning’s done”. What a great monologue and something that should be required viewing for every lib out there.

Doughboy on December 30, 2009 at 9:42 PM

I commented on that earlier. But I`m sure many liberals would hear that speech and wouldn`t understand.

ThePrez on December 30, 2009 at 9:47 PM

Twelve O’Clock High………..

Janos Hunyadi on December 30, 2009 at 9:49 PM

Well shoot, I forgot I had the Master and Commander DVD. I’ll have to watch it again :)

aikidoka on December 30, 2009 at 9:49 PM

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