It really is an achievement. Think how hard you’d have to work to produce a bill that’s equally hated by left and right.

Mike Crapo reminds us this evening that to undo this, the GOP would need the mirror image of what the Dems have now, i.e. 60 in the Senate and a Republican in the White House, which ain’t happening anytime soon. Even if tea partiers ride a red wave through to 2012, flipping 20 seats between now and then is a tall, tall order. (The last time the GOP had 60 Senate seats was 1911.) The longer it takes to get to the magic number, the more entrenched the bill becomes in the public imagination, the more people begin to rely on and plan around it, and the more difficult it becomes to drive a stake through it. As depressing as it is, Bill Kristol’s probably right that the Massachusetts special election next month is the last chance to nuke the bill. The future of American health care in the hands of Ted Kennedy’s constituents? What could go wrong?

Actually, there is one other hugely risky way to improve the chances of repealing ObamaCare: The GOP, as a minority party, could take up the cause this year of ending the filibuster starting in 2012. The Dems would be tempted to agree since the odds are fair that they’ll still control the Senate by then and could ram through more of their agenda via simple majority vote. The risk, of course, is that if the GOP takes back Congress and defeats The One, they can kill this travesty of a bill lickety split in 2013. How lucky do you feel?