Great moments in Christmas: School says Jesus on cross “violent image”

posted at 10:55 am on December 15, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

One eight-year-old in Taunton just learned a valuable lesson in political correctness, and a school district may wind up learning a little something about free speech, religious expression, and not asking questions to which one does not want to hear the answers.  An elementary school student was asked to draw something that reminded him of Christmas.  When he drew a picture of Jesus on a crucifix, the teacher and the administration recoiled in horror at the “violent image.”  No, really:

An eight year old elementary school student in Taunton was sent home from school and required to undergo a psychological evaluation after drawing a stick figure picture of Jesus on the cross.

The  second grader at Maxham Elementary school was told by this teacher that the drawing was violent.  This was after the class was asked to sketch something that reminded them of Christmas. …

The father tells the “Taunton Gazette” because his son put Xs  on the eyes of Jesus, the teacher thought it was violent.

But he drew Jesus with a smile!  Doesn’t that count for anything?

It’s hard to imagine a more clueless, knee-jerk response than the one given by this school.  First, Jesus on a crucifix has been a symbol of Christianity for two millenia.  Since Christmas is in fact a Christian holiday, at least nominally, the crucifix in this drawing clearly came from Christian symbolism and not some latent threat of a reenactment of the last scenes of Spartacus from a second grader. How dense or deliberately obtuse must a teacher and administrators be not to understand the symbolism involved in this drawing?

The story does end on a happy note.  The father of the student has been given permission for his child to attend another school in the district.  They should have transferred the teacher and the administrators instead, preferably to quiet rooms with as little contact with children as possible.  The real threat here is that the gross stupidity will infect the students.

Update: We headlined this, but I should update the post with the school’s response (hat tip from Twitter DTipson):

But after a few days on the cross themselves — and staying silent because of confidentiality issues — Taunton school officials began telling a much different story. In a statement posted on the system’s Web site, school officials said that in fact the boy had never been suspended, the teacher never requested that the children make a drawing that reminded them of Christmas or any religious holiday, and that the drawing that the boy’s father distributed to the media is in fact not the one the boy’s teacher discovered and was concerned about.

The school said it could not provide further information for reasons of confidentiality, but it noted that until Chester Johnson spoke to the newspaper the family and school officials had been “working together in a cooperative and positive manner.” It said all proper protocols had been followed and that school officials would do the same thing again if presented with similar circumstances …

Johnson acknowledged that his son was not suspended but insisted the drawing was the one that upset the teacher. He added that his son wrote his name above the Christ figure and said it was a self-portrait. It was also reported that in June 2008 a fifth-grade student was suspended from a local middle school for a day after he drew a stick figure that appeared to show him shooting his teacher and a classmate — an event that led some to believe the incident with the second-grader may have been related to that episode and heightened concern over possible school violence since the Columbine massacre.

Still, Johnson wasn’t backing down. The Boston Globe said he “held court” for the media at his girlfriend’s apartment Tuesday, insisting that the school apologize and that his son’s rights were violated. “It hurts me that they did this to my kid,” Johnson said. “They can’t mess with our religion; they owe us a small lump sum for this.”

So the school disputes what the father said, and the father is still sticking to his story.  The “self-portrait” claim seems a little beyond a second-grader, but not impossible.  Even so, demanding a psychological evaluation over a drawing of a crucifix seems very, very strange — and if the school would do it again, I’d still wonder whether parents wouldn’t do better to follow Johnson’s lead and send their children somewhere else.


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This is ridiculous on its face.
FACT: Little boys between the ages of 7-12 draw endless pictures of tanks, stick men being shot with arrows, guns, Star Wars and Lord of the Rings epic battle plans-you name it. Little boys have a natural rambunctious savage streak, which is why they are given to mothers. This picture is actually quite tame, compared to the stuff my three boys draw ALL THE TIME. And believe me, they are thoroughly indoctrinated Christians. If they drew something as tame as the Crucifixion I would wonder, as would anyone who knows anything about boys. This child was discriminated against because of his religion, and nothing else.

Kristamatic on December 15, 2009 at 1:09 PM

You know who’s anti-Catholic?

Father Ted.

funny stuff, but I’ve always wondered if it may have been why Dermot Morgan left us so soon.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:10 PM

As others have pointed out on this thread, the teacher could easily have used the drawing as a way to engage students about the diversity of Christmas interpretation and religious expression.

The crucifixion of Jesus Christ, while brutal, illustrates historical religious intolerance– Exactly the sort of intolerance demonstrated when the teacher reproached the child.

A trip to the psychologist and a heap of sensitivity training should be required for the teacher.

anXdem on December 15, 2009 at 1:11 PM

When I was in CCD years ago, the priest told us that no one really knows when Christ was born. The ancient church settled on Dec. 25th for two reasons.

1. It coincided with the pagan celebrations of winter solstice so it would be easier for them to convert.

2. On the pre-Gregorian calendar, Dec. 25th was the day of the winter solstice, which is the darkest day of the year. Since the days get lighter after the 25th, it was a metaphor for Jesus bringing the light of God to the world.

ExcessivelyDiverted on December 15, 2009 at 1:19 PM

This picture is actually quite tame, compared to the stuff my three boys draw ALL THE TIME.

That’s a good point, considering my boys have drawn pics of people getting eaten by giant spiders, crushed under the feet of monsters, or getting thrown from a cliff. If one of them drew what this kid did, I would secretly wonder why there were no pools of blood.

Bishop on December 15, 2009 at 1:22 PM

That’s a good point, considering my boys have drawn pics of people getting eaten by giant spiders, crushed under the feet of monsters, or getting thrown from a cliff. If one of them drew what this kid did, I would secretly wonder why there were no pools of blood.

Bishop on December 15, 2009 at 1:22 PM

O/T – Are boys more violent that girls?

[Don't answer that. I'm just being ornery lol.]

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:25 PM

Just a little double-standard test for all involved:

For MLK-day, what if the teacher asked the students to draw something that reminded them of Martin Luther King Jr., and the child drew (with no blood or gore, not celebrating it as a good thing) a picture of his assassination? Troubled child, or social-justice aware?

For President’s day, what if she had asked students to draw something that reminded them of George Washington, and they drew a battle scene(with no blood or gore, merely depicting soldiers and cannons)? Troubled child, or historically literate?

Teachers need to stop acting like ninnies. Depicting violence and glorifying it are different things.

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 1:27 PM

This is why my kids go to a private school.

How are they suppose to learn when the teachers are morons?

Scary.

Fyi, my husband is a public school teacher and he is the one who suggested private catholic school.

momof2 on December 15, 2009 at 1:27 PM

dave742 on December 15, 2009 at 12:12 PM

At least you don’t deny your support for child-rape, Chavez, or that you hate teh Jooooooos. That is a start.

PimFortuynsGhost on December 15, 2009 at 1:30 PM

An 8-year-old who draws a picture of a man being tortured to death should be sent for a psychiatric evaluation, and his parents should be investigated for psychologically and emotionally abusing him. That they belong to a psychotic death cult is no excuse.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:33 PM

mankai on December 15, 2009 at 1:05 PM

This is why

mizflame98 on December 15, 2009 at 1:09 PM

Well, I can’t argue with that.

mankai on December 15, 2009 at 1:35 PM

An 8-year-old who draws a picture of a man being tortured to death should be sent for a psychiatric evaluation, and his parents should be investigated for psychologically and emotionally abusing him. That they belong to a psychotic death cult is no excuse.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:33 PM

Lol.

That “psychotic death cult” helped bring you the civilization you now enjoy.

Project much?

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:38 PM

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:33 PM

Oh hiccup get real the kid did not draw the scouring of Jesus or Jesus being nailed to a cross. He drew a crucifix.
And Christians do not worship the death of Jesus but the sacrifice he made. I realize this is an adult concept but I am sure in time you will understand the difference.

LincolntheHun on December 15, 2009 at 1:39 PM

That “psychotic death cult” helped bring you the civilization you now enjoy.

Project much?

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:38 PM

I assume you’re talking about the Romans. They didn’t worship crucifixion, though.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:40 PM

An 8-year-old who draws a picture of a man being tortured to death should be sent for a psychiatric evaluation, and his parents should be investigated for psychologically and emotionally abusing him. That they belong to a psychotic death cult is no excuse.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:33 PM

Ah, the familiar ‘religion bad – fascism good’ argument. Keep it up.

I only hope we can count on our other atheists to denounce you so we don’t get the weird idea that atheists hate religion to the point of supporting fascism to oppose it.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 1:40 PM

That “psychotic death cult” helped bring you the civilization you now enjoy.

Project much?

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:38 PM

hicsuget appears to reject the current Western ideals of freedom based on Christian values and institutions in favor of totalitarian regimes.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 1:41 PM

bridgetown on December 15, 2009 at 1:03 PM

Yes, the Greek word stauros literally means “pole.”

But literal translations are not always the correct translation. All historical evience points to the fact that Jesus was crucified on a cross.

But you are correct: “It’s about the testimony, not the ghoulish crucifix the child drew.”

davidk on December 15, 2009 at 1:41 PM

I have thought about auditioning for the green room on this topic: That the statists are quickly gaining power by politicizing discomfort in all its forms — economic, social, psychological, and relational. This story of the crucifix is just one more instance of the liberal-educational complex stepping into a perceived discomfort and asserting its authority in order to “save” us from that which will cause undue psychological harm. Unfortunately, the tactic seems to work. When you look at the so-called “moderates” and “independents” you can pretty much bet which way they will swing on an issue depending on how much discomfort it causes. There is a certain large portion of the population that will avoid confrontation at any cost, and they will vote for the faction that seems to be the least abrasive at any given time. As long as someone promises that they need not be disturbed, they will listen.

The liberal-educational complex has been conditioning our children toward this mindset for at least two generations. That’s how we get the watered-down curriculae and the warm, fuzzy nonsense that passes off for “self-esteem”. That’s why competition and excellence are frowned upon. It has nothing to do with promoting egalitarianism and everything to do with psychological degradation and erosion of the independent spirit.

This crucifix episode is a perfect storm for the establishment: It promotes religious division; it is sexist; it is allegedly violent; it is a means of separating one from another by encouragement of faith and sacrifice; it places hope in something other than the state and its masters.

You see, if you hold fast to certain values and beliefs, you are the cause of discomfort for others. In the minds of the liberal-educational complex, that is the ultimate sin, and no price can be paid for it — not even the death of Jesus on the cross.

ObjectionSustained on December 15, 2009 at 1:43 PM

Dave Rywall on December 15, 2009 at 12:38 PM

Your parents obviously gave you a choice.

momof2 on December 15, 2009 at 1:43 PM

I assume you’re talking about the Romans. They didn’t worship crucifixion, though.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:40 PM

I see you give yourself a B+ in American History, too.

Nice work.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:46 PM

hicsuget appears to reject the current Western ideals of freedom based on Christian values and institutions in favor of totalitarian regimes.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 1:41 PM

He/She also fails to understand the symbiotic relationship of primitive Christianity and ancient Roman Civilization.

Constantine.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:50 PM

Constantine.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:50 PM

And the Romans certainly worshiped death. Christians don’t worship death; they worship Christ.

But facts are irrelevant to hicsuget.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:52 PM

hicsuget appears to reject the current Western ideals of freedom based on Christian values and institutions in favor of totalitarian regimes.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 1:41 PM

The Western ideas of freedom, which, incidentally, I embrace, are not at all based on christian values (when christianity ruled Europe unopposed in the middle ages, what freedom was there?)–they are based on Enlightenment values which christians denounce to this very day.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:46 PM

Non sequitur.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:52 PM

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 1:41 PM

Jumping Jesus Christ. Point out where Christ discussed The Natural Rights of Man, the Natural State of Man, Government of the People, By the People and For the People. Did Rome create the idea of a Republic or did Christ. Maybe Athens plagarized Democracy from a treatise written by Christ.

We owe more to Remus and Romulus than we do Christ.

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:53 PM

Someone show me where Jesus signed the Declaration of Independence?

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:55 PM

As aggressive as my boys have been lately, I’m positive violent pictures are in our future. Thankfully, I’m probably going to homeschool them – where I can avoid such nonsense as this.

Also, I doubt my boys will sit still for 7 hours. We’re working on 7 minutes right now! Man, boys are active critters!

Anna on December 15, 2009 at 1:56 PM

He/She also fails to understand the symbiotic relationship of primitive Christianity and ancient Roman Civilization.

Constantine.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:50 PM

Constantine became emperor in 317 CE. Rome was founded (according to Roman mythology) 753 BCE. Whatever symbiosis you might be talking about leaves nearly 1100 years of Roman history unaccounted for.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:57 PM

So, if a child had drawn a scene of someone’s heart being cut out for a ritual sacrifice because it was part of his religion, you would have no problem with it?

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 11:43 AM

No. Not if he did so because I told him to draw something that reminded him of his religion. I kinda be asking for it, now wouldn’t I?

Bobbertsan on December 15, 2009 at 1:57 PM

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:46 PM

Non sequitur.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:52 PM

Very droll. Do stay on topic, though.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:58 PM

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 1:58 PM

Your Latin, it would seem, is as bad as your Roman history. Non sequitur means it does not follow, as in, the thing you said made no sense as a reply to the thing I said.

(Your response, no doubt, will include a statement to the effect that you knew what non sequitur meant before I pointed it out. I will thus give you the opportunity to prove it: feel free to translate hic suget) from Latin into the language of your choosing.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:03 PM

This story is beyond outrageous.

There are those who mock that Christianity is under assault–well, this is just one more piece of evidence to the contrary.

The article states that recently the boy had attended the Our Lady of LaSalette Shrine in Attleboro, MA. I have been to this shrine numerous times and it is exceedingly well-known for its Christmas lights display. It’s truly breathtaking. And anyone who visits the shrine is absolutely going to see crucifixes all throughout the grounds.

I apologize if someone else has posted this already, but here is a link the the Shrine and to it’s “Christmas at the Shrine” page. Please note the picture in the center at the top of the page.

http://www.lasalette-shrine.org/Christmas.html

Niere on December 15, 2009 at 2:03 PM

The issue is, is this child violent and sick in the brain pan, or is he a normal little boy who is merely drawing a religious picture? I say the latter. And we have laws in this country, in the constitution, that defend his right to his religious beliefs. The teacher behaved contrary to the Constitution, violated this boys rights, and should be jailed for it, but fired at the very least. All of you atheists should be right there with us Christians defending this boys right to his religion, just as you would not want someone telling you that you must believe in God, or we are taking you for a psychological evaluation. This is about his basic Constitutional rights.

Kristamatic on December 15, 2009 at 2:03 PM

Constantine became emperor in 317 CE. Rome was founded (according to Roman mythology) 753 BCE. Whatever symbiosis you might be talking about leaves nearly 1100 years of Roman history unaccounted for.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:57 PM

Try to keep up.

Roman civ. helped spread Christianity.

But it’s your non sequiter to begin with, not mine.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:04 PM

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:03 PM

thank you, horace, for the spell check.

But nonsequitur does fit what you’re doing right now.

Nice job.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:05 PM

I will thus give you the opportunity to prove it: feel free to translate hic suget) from Latin into the language of your choosing.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:03 PM

/non sequitur

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:06 PM

The Western ideas of freedom, which, incidentally, I embrace, are not at all based on christian values (when christianity ruled Europe unopposed in the middle ages, what freedom was there?)–they are based on Enlightenment values which christians denounce to this very day.
hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:52 PM

Which Enlightenment values lead you to say this?:

An 8-year-old who draws a picture of a man being tortured to death should be sent for a psychiatric evaluation, and his parents should be investigated for psychologically and emotionally abusing him. That they belong to a psychotic death cult is no excuse.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:33 PM

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:55 PM

So you take issue with my statement that Christianity played a large part in the values of freedom in Western culture but don’t bat an eye when hicsuget suggests that the religious should be re-educated by the state?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:07 PM

Which Enlightenment values lead you to say this?:

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:07 PM

What Enlightenment values lead me to say that graphic depictions of torture are inappropriate for parents to be sharing with their 8-year-olds? How about the Enlightenment values that children should be taught tolerance, that torture is not acceptable either as public policy or as private sadism (see Rights, Individual), and that people should embrace life rather than worshiping death.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:11 PM

What Enlightenment values lead me to say that graphic depictions of torture are inappropriate for parents to be sharing with their 8-year-olds? How about the Enlightenment values that children should be taught tolerance, that torture is not acceptable either as public policy or as private sadism (see Rights, Individual), and that people should embrace life rather than worshiping death.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:11 PM

The sort of tolerance that calls for the ‘intolerant’ to be forcibly re-educated by the state?

Spin it any way you like you basically crying “He’s a witch! Burn him!”.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:13 PM

What Enlightenment values lead me to say that graphic depictions of torture are inappropriate for parents to be sharing with their 8-year-olds? How about the Enlightenment values that children should be taught tolerance, that torture is not acceptable either as public policy or as private sadism (see Rights, Individual), and that people should embrace life rather than worshiping death.

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 2:11 PM

You also seem to be ignoring the several posts above by me and others detailing the sorts of things 8 year olds typically draw. I guess most children and their parents should be rounded up and re-educated?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:15 PM

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:07 PM

Because I don’t condmen hicsuget means I condone him?

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 2:15 PM

Because I don’t condmen hicsuget means I condone him?

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 2:15 PM

You took the time to respond to my post but not to his. Is it unreasonable to conclude that you found my statement more offensive or disagreeable?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:18 PM

What Enlightenment values lead me to say that graphic depictions of torture are inappropriate for parents to be sharing with their 8-year-olds? How about the Enlightenment values that children should be taught tolerance, that torture is not acceptable either as public policy or as private sadism (see Rights, Individual), and that people should embrace life rather than worshiping death.

Not quite sure what you are saying here. Are you suggesting that the crucifix is worshipping death? Anyone who even knows the basics of Christianity would understand that the Crucifix represents life not just for Jesus but for the world past, present and future. The lack of the crucifix, the denial of the curcifix, the condemnation of the crucifix is death. There is no manger without the crucifix because there is no mission.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:22 PM

Jumping Jesus Christ. Point out where Christ discussed The Natural Rights of Man, the Natural State of Man, Government of the People, By the People and For the People. Did Rome create the idea of a Republic or did Christ. Maybe Athens plagarized Democracy from a treatise written by Christ.

We owe more to Remus and Romulus than we do Christ.

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:53 PM

The Greeks and the Romans made large contributions to Western thought but Christians made larger ones in my estimation. The Greeks and Romans regularly did things that in modern times would be decried as inhumane and unconscionable. But then again so did some Christian denominations. The way the ideas of the Greeks and Romans were re-interpreted in Western culture has a lot – if not mostly – to do with Christianity. I admit that non-Christians made important contributions to the Western ideals of freedom and liberty. Is it so hard to give Christians credit for their contributions (like fighting slavery)?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:24 PM

Not quite sure what you are saying here. Are you suggesting that the crucifix is worshipping death? Anyone who even knows the basics of Christianity would understand that the Crucifix represents life not just for Jesus but for the world past, present and future. The lack of the crucifix, the denial of the curcifix, the condemnation of the crucifix is death. There is no manger without the crucifix because there is no mission.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:22 PM

Your unqualified opinion of your own religious views are irrelevant. Hicsuget has declared you intolerant and for that you are to be re-educated until you agree with him. His Enlightenment values of tolerance and humanity demand it of him.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:26 PM

Well now, name me a couple of Christians who gave their kids the freedom to choose and I’ll take it alllll bakc and baby Jesus won’t cry,

Dave Rywall on December 15, 2009 at 12:38 PM

My parents. Mom is Catholic, Dad is atheist. I’m a Baptist.

vapig on December 15, 2009 at 2:31 PM

The Romans exposed babies to die, the Romans killed thousands in their circuses and amphitheathers for amusement, the Romans killed thousands all over the world to advance their empire–not just to protect themselves or even to colonize and produce wealth, just because they could. Western Christians slowly began to attribute civil rights to all people see the English Bill of Rights and the English petition of rights. These two documents had more to do with the protection of the individual and later Lockeian social contract philosophy, than the “democracies” of the romans and greeks. The Virginia constitution was partly written by John Locke, also a Christian. The idea that God gives man his dignity and all men are equal to God resulted in philosophical basis of Lockeian life, liberty and property than anything or anyone else.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:32 PM

As he does far too frequently, Ed Morrissey posts a link and comments on it without actually reading the link:

Johnson said the teacher became upset when his son said he drew himself on the cross.

(emphasis added)

Does this story still seem a bit odd? Yes it does. But I think it’s appropriate for a teacher to take steps when a student draws a picture of himself being murdered.

For Morrissey to post this without even acknowledging that the child said he drew a picture of his own corpse reflects either lazy reading or intellectual dishonesty.

orange on December 15, 2009 at 2:32 PM

Great moments in Christmas: School says Jesus on cross “violent image”

“Violent” is an accurate description. Without being certain of what would happen in 3 days, the followers of Jesus in attendance must have found the crucifixion very violent.The teacher should have been aware of the broader context, but not all other students would necessarily view the depiction with the perspective of death conquered.

dedalus on December 15, 2009 at 2:32 PM

Jumping Jesus Christ. Point out where Christ discussed The Natural Rights of Man, the Natural State of Man,

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:53 PM

It’s called the New Testament.

Also, it’s a pretty symbiotic relationship. Western Civ 101 at Any College USA will have taught you that (we hope…sheesh)

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:32 PM

Well now, name me a couple of Christians who gave their kids the freedom to choose and I’ll take it alllll bakc and baby Jesus won’t cry,

Dave Rywall on December 15, 2009 at 12:38 PM

You got me there. My parents are atheists. They disowned me when I came home from college a Christian.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:33 PM

Well now, name me a couple of Christians who gave their kids the freedom to choose and I’ll take it alllll bakc and baby Jesus won’t cry,

Dave Rywall on December 15, 2009 at 12:38 PM

Mine too. Dad was a non-denominational, anti-organized religion Christian, Mom was reared a Methodist. I am a Catholic, my sister is an atheist, and my brother was baptized a luthern before his death.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:35 PM

The father tells the “Taunton Gazette” because his son put Xs on the eyes of Jesus, the teacher thought it was violent.

I bet this teacher doesn’t watch “A Christmas Story” since Black Bart and his gang end up with Xs on their eyes…

ladyingray on December 15, 2009 at 2:35 PM

ladyingray on December 15, 2009 at 2:35 PM

That teacher has opted to watch “Avatar” this holiday season.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:36 PM

As an agnostic-bordering-on-atheist I’m embarrassed to see the limited cultural sensitivity and perspective of those such as Count to 10 and hicsuget on display here.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Jumping Jesus Christ. Point out where Christ discussed The Natural Rights of Man, the Natural State of Man,

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 1:53 PM

Holy shit. That’s His whole point. No wonder you are anti-Christian, you don’t know what it is.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Your unqualified opinion of your own religious views are irrelevant. Hicsuget has declared you intolerant and for that you are to be re-educated until you agree with him. His Enlightenment values of tolerance and humanity demand it of him.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:26 PM

He’s very concerned by kids drawing stick figures, you understand. Violence bad! “Because shut up theocratic fascist,” he replied!

TheUnrepentantGeek on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

You took the time to respond to my post but not to his. Is it unreasonable to conclude that you found my statement more offensive or disagreeable?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:18 PM

That doesn’t equal to supporting hicsugets stupidity. Yes, I find your statement the more absurd, as absurdas a Muslim claiming Algebra is a Muslim invention when it is not, it is an Indian invention.

Hic is absurd. Claiming that telling tales of heros fighting evil is telling stories of mindless slaughter is absurd.

But that is Hic’s opinion based nothing more on emotional response. Your statement masquerades as fact. Islam did not invent Algebra and Western Civilization is founded in Rome and Athens.

Holger on December 15, 2009 at 2:38 PM

Holy shit. That’s His whole point. No wonder you are anti-Christian, you don’t know what it is.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Holger…read the Bible before you pretend to “shock” us with what is/isn’t in it. lol

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:38 PM

As an agnostic-bordering-on-atheist I’m embarrassed to see the limited cultural sensitivity and perspective of those such as Count to 10 and hicsuget on display here.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

You may be an agnostic/athiest, but they are simply stupid.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:39 PM

So, again, why do Christians send their children to Caesar’s schools?

Send_Me on December 15, 2009 at 2:40 PM

Western Civilization is founded in Rome and Athens.

Classical thought brought back to Europe by the Crusaders.

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:41 PM

So, again, why do Christians send their children to Caesar’s schools?

I don’t

Haunches on December 15, 2009 at 2:41 PM

You may be an agnostic/athiest, but they are simply stupid.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:39 PM

ZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ladyingray on December 15, 2009 at 2:42 PM

You sure got that right, Morrissey. But I do wonder what allahpundit`s view is on this piece . . . .

Sherman1864 on December 15, 2009 at 2:43 PM

Is it so hard to give Christians credit for their contributions (like fighting slavery)?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 2:24 PM

Christian churches were a force in the abolition movement, and were a source for many courageous leaders. However Christianity prevalently co-existed with slavery for centuries after the resurrection of Christ. There was more at work in the minds of those fighting slavery than just the enlightenment of the Holy Spirit.

dedalus on December 15, 2009 at 2:44 PM

I swear, the atheists in this thread pretending to be very, very concerned by stick figure depictions of very well known religious icons is as hilarious as it is mendacious.

You’re angry at god. For the nine-millionth time, we get it. Go take your anger issues elsewhere. Maybe see a therapist.

But nodding your heads at someone traumatizing a kid so that you can pretend to be concerned with his potential “violence” problems? Slimy. Keep speaking for your movement and we’ll fill every church pew from here to Tibet.

TheUnrepentantGeek on December 15, 2009 at 2:44 PM

As an agnostic-bordering-on-atheist I’m embarrassed to see the limited cultural sensitivity and perspective of those such as Count to 10 and hicsuget on display here.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Wait, wait, I get called culturally insensitive for pointing out a bit of cultural chauvinism?

Maybe. But, then, I treasure my insensitivity in certain cases.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:46 PM

(I apologize in advance for the use of asterisks — I’m behind a firewall.)

For those who are curious, hic suget, translated literally, is “here s*cks”, or more idiomatically, “it s*cks here” or “this place s*cks”.

However, the Latin verb sugere means “s*ck” in the G-rated sense, as in “to drink through a straw”. For the NC-17-rated sense usually implied by the use of “s*ck”, the correct Latin verb is “irrumare”, which is better translated as the action taken by the “s*ckee” than the “s*cker”. In other words, “irrumare” is used of a man and means to stick his, er, stick down the throat of the person servicing him.

So, though hicsuget’s nic gets creativity points, it seems to me that it would come nearer to its intended meaning to use the phrase “hic me irrumat”, which is to say, “this place gags me.”

But then I’m not terribly smart, so what do I know?

Mary in LA on December 15, 2009 at 2:46 PM

You may be an agnostic/athiest, but they are simply stupid.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:39 PM

I know they are not stupid. Subconsciously limiting their perspective perhaps.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:48 PM

TheUnrepentantGeek on December 15, 2009 at 2:44 PM

Incorrect. I’m not at all concerned with the stick figure in question. In school, I knew guys who drew bloody sci-fi battles during class (and, in hindsight, probably should have been evaluated). I’m concerned with the rush to defend said stick figure just because it happens to resemble a religious symbol.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:49 PM

But then I’m not terribly smart, so what do I know?

Mary in LA on December 15, 2009 at 2:46 PM

Well you know that hics uget sucks. That pretty much sums it up.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:49 PM

I guess that teacher wouldn’t have approved of reading what the prophet Isaiah told his Jewish people: “…we hid as it were our faces from Him; He was despised, and we esteemed Him not…We did esteem Him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon Him, and with His stripes we are healed. All we, like sheep, have gone astray, we have turned every one to his own way, and the Lord has laid on Him the iniquity of us all.” (Isaiah 53:3-6)

KyMouse on December 15, 2009 at 2:51 PM

by the way the AP article reproduced on Breitbart says: “Johnson said the teacher became upset when his son said he drew himself on the cross. Johnson, who is black, told WBZ he suspects racism is involved. He said he thinks the school overreacted and wants an apology.”

So we also have the angle that maybe the boy was specifically targeted by the teacher due to his race (or would the same thing happen had the boy not been black?)

raccoonradio on December 15, 2009 at 2:51 PM

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:48 PM

I don’t think atheists/agnostics are stupid, so I meant you no offense.

“Limiting”, though, doesn’t even begin to sum up those two, in terms of their perspectives.

“Bigoted” would be more appropriate.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:52 PM

I’m concerned with the rush to defend said stick figure just because it happens to resemble a religious symbol.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:49 PM

Of course you are.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:53 PM

Mary in LA on December 15, 2009 at 2:46 PM

Nice job–illustrating how the self-inflated troll hicsuget is both ignorant and a Giver of Oral S*x to all Mankind

Janos Hunyadi on December 15, 2009 at 2:54 PM

“Limiting”, though, doesn’t even begin to sum up those two, in terms of their perspectives.

“Bigoted” would be more appropriate.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:52 PM

My perspective are not the ones that are limited, here.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:55 PM

hicsuget on December 15, 2009 at 1:40 PM

Thats one of the bad things about this site: the trolls are just very dull and unimaginative.

I’m not Christian, and I thought this was stupid.

Shambhala on December 15, 2009 at 2:56 PM

Of course you are.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:53 PM

I wouldn’t even have commented on this thread if it wasn’t for all of the “Oh wow is us Christians, to be so horribly persecuted” comments.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:57 PM

Oh yeah, I’m thrilled my tax dollars are going to public schools.

Iblis on December 15, 2009 at 2:57 PM

Thanks, Janos! I must admit I hadn’t thought of the possibility that hicsuget chose that nic for its, um, advertising potential. That puts rather a different spin on it. :-D

Mary in LA on December 15, 2009 at 2:58 PM

You may be an agnostic/athiest, but they are simply stupid.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:39 PM

I know they are not stupid. Subconsciously limiting their perspective perhaps.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 2:48 PM

Some Christian, or someone calling themselves a Christian, whizzed in these peoples’ cornflakes at some point or another. Maybe it was someone without a clue what Jesus was about; maybe it was a genuine Christian who (as we all do) failed to live up to the standard of our namesake. Maybe it was just someone who said “no” to their plans to do something immoral, or at least refused to applaud it. But somewhere along the way, people like this decided they had to get even with God and His people. They use clever little phrases like “sky-god” or “make baby Jesus cry”, that are supposed to cause us to fly into white-hot rage (they do anger me, in the same way someone maligning anyone I love would; but they mostly make me sad, because I know they’re desperately unhappy people, and as a Christian I have compassion for them, and forgive them).

The irony is that their taunts and insults don’t make me half as angry as my compassion and forgiveness make them.

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 2:59 PM

My perspective are not the ones that are limited, here.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:55 PM

Of course it’s not.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I don’t think atheists/agnostics are stupid, so I meant you no offense.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 2:52 PM

I didn’t think you meant me (how could you?)

I also know Count to 10 and hicsuget both to be highly intelligent, since I usually agree with them. I just think they’ve lost perspective somehow in this case.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 3:00 PM

Johnson said the teacher became upset when his son said he drew himself on the cross.

Probably a miscommunication, but under the circumstances what was the school supposed to do? Every time some kid shoots up a school the whole country agonizes over all the signs that were missed. If it appears that Christmas makes this poor kid think of being brutally murdered, then of course the teacher has a responsibility, not only to the community but to the child, to make sure he’s ok.

Much ado about much ado about nothing.

RightOFLeft on December 15, 2009 at 3:01 PM

The irony is that their taunts and insults don’t make me half as angry as my compassion and forgiveness make them.

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 2:59 PM

You’re right.

But I’ll never let them “wizz” in my cornflakes.

Defending the faith is a very comprehensive task.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 3:01 PM

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 2:59 PM

I don’t know that I have ever met someone like that — though there might be some who frequent hot air. On the other hand, with a switch of atheist and Christian, that describes right2brite to a ‘t’.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 3:02 PM

My perspective are not the ones that are limited, here.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:55 PM

Your perspective has left the bounds of common sense.

You claim we’re cutting the kid some slack because it was a religious symbol – we’re cutting the kid slack because:
(a) Kids this age draw all sorts of violent things and it doesn’t amount to anything troubling.
(b) He was asked a question that elicited him to think about religion – and he ‘shockingly’ drew a religions image.
(c) This image is common and well understood to be a Christian symbol and so worries that he’s thinking about crucifying his class mates can logically be dismissed.

You seem to be giving him a hard time because it was a religious symbol.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 3:02 PM

I didn’t think you meant me (how could you?)

I also know Count to 10 and hicsuget both to be highly intelligent, since I usually agree with them. I just think they’ve lost perspective somehow in this case.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I see. I’ll leave it at that, then.

bluelightbrigade on December 15, 2009 at 3:03 PM

Claiming that “Christians worship crucifixion” hicsuget belies his own utter ignorance, along with his lack of historical awareness of Christianity birthing its own Renaissance and subsequent Age of Reason during the Baroque and Classical Eras, aka the Age of Enlightenment. His concept of responsible and loving parents as psychotic death cultists while himself belonging to the ardent fisting little kids pervert klan provides evidence of hicsuget’s deeply disturbed psyche. His fraudulent “authenticity” is a cancerous plague of revisionism spreading Newspeak, “the only language in the world whose vocabulary gets smaller every year” in proportion with shredded records and limited brain activity stuck on stupid.

maverick muse on December 15, 2009 at 3:05 PM

I also know Count to 10 and hicsuget both to be highly intelligent, since I usually agree with them. I just think they’ve lost perspective somehow in this case.

DarkCurrent on December 15, 2009 at 3:00 PM

So hicsuget doesn’t usually display irrational hatred towards the religious?

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 3:06 PM

Chester Johnson told WBZ-TV that his son made the drawing on Dec. 2 after his second-grade teacher asked children to sketch something that reminded them of the holiday.

Johnson said the teacher became upset when his son said he drew himself on the cross. Johnson, who is black, told WBZ he suspects racism is involved. He said he thinks the school overreacted and wants an apology.

Ed, why did you leave out this part?

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 3:06 PM

I wouldn’t even have commented on this thread if it wasn’t for all of the “Oh wow is us Christians, to be so horribly persecuted” comments.

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 2:57 PM

No informed American Christian would compare persecution here to that endured by Christians in the Middle East or in many Communist countries. Anything we have to deal with, at least for now, is child’s play by comparison.

But neither should you pretend that there isn’t discrimination. I’ve been chosen as the employee to be laid off because I didn’t “fit in with the other guys” (based upon my politely declining daily invitations to topless bars). My wife has had the same experience when she wouldn’t go out boozing with the office manager and the other women in the office. My child was scolded for bringing a Christian audiotape on a day when she was told to bring her favorite music (each child had such a day, the objective being to celebrate that each child’s beliefs, preferences, etc. were to be celebrated).

All of these experiences have made me keenly aware of what it is to be ill-treated for one’s beliefs, so I’m a fierce opponent of PRO-Christian discrimination, as well. But if we Christians don’t exert our right to free exercise of our faith, tyrants like this teacher, Drywall and Count to 10 would be all too happy to revoke those rights.

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 3:08 PM

Ed, why did you leave out this part?

Count to 10 on December 15, 2009 at 3:06 PM

8 year olds have very active imaginations – if you sent them to a psychiatrist for everything they did or said because if an adult said it you’d be concerned then every child in school is going to be seeing a psychiatrist.

gwelf on December 15, 2009 at 3:11 PM

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