Great moments in Christmas: School says Jesus on cross “violent image”

posted at 10:55 am on December 15, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

One eight-year-old in Taunton just learned a valuable lesson in political correctness, and a school district may wind up learning a little something about free speech, religious expression, and not asking questions to which one does not want to hear the answers.  An elementary school student was asked to draw something that reminded him of Christmas.  When he drew a picture of Jesus on a crucifix, the teacher and the administration recoiled in horror at the “violent image.”  No, really:

An eight year old elementary school student in Taunton was sent home from school and required to undergo a psychological evaluation after drawing a stick figure picture of Jesus on the cross.

The  second grader at Maxham Elementary school was told by this teacher that the drawing was violent.  This was after the class was asked to sketch something that reminded them of Christmas. …

The father tells the “Taunton Gazette” because his son put Xs  on the eyes of Jesus, the teacher thought it was violent.

But he drew Jesus with a smile!  Doesn’t that count for anything?

It’s hard to imagine a more clueless, knee-jerk response than the one given by this school.  First, Jesus on a crucifix has been a symbol of Christianity for two millenia.  Since Christmas is in fact a Christian holiday, at least nominally, the crucifix in this drawing clearly came from Christian symbolism and not some latent threat of a reenactment of the last scenes of Spartacus from a second grader. How dense or deliberately obtuse must a teacher and administrators be not to understand the symbolism involved in this drawing?

The story does end on a happy note.  The father of the student has been given permission for his child to attend another school in the district.  They should have transferred the teacher and the administrators instead, preferably to quiet rooms with as little contact with children as possible.  The real threat here is that the gross stupidity will infect the students.

Update: We headlined this, but I should update the post with the school’s response (hat tip from Twitter DTipson):

But after a few days on the cross themselves — and staying silent because of confidentiality issues — Taunton school officials began telling a much different story. In a statement posted on the system’s Web site, school officials said that in fact the boy had never been suspended, the teacher never requested that the children make a drawing that reminded them of Christmas or any religious holiday, and that the drawing that the boy’s father distributed to the media is in fact not the one the boy’s teacher discovered and was concerned about.

The school said it could not provide further information for reasons of confidentiality, but it noted that until Chester Johnson spoke to the newspaper the family and school officials had been “working together in a cooperative and positive manner.” It said all proper protocols had been followed and that school officials would do the same thing again if presented with similar circumstances …

Johnson acknowledged that his son was not suspended but insisted the drawing was the one that upset the teacher. He added that his son wrote his name above the Christ figure and said it was a self-portrait. It was also reported that in June 2008 a fifth-grade student was suspended from a local middle school for a day after he drew a stick figure that appeared to show him shooting his teacher and a classmate — an event that led some to believe the incident with the second-grader may have been related to that episode and heightened concern over possible school violence since the Columbine massacre.

Still, Johnson wasn’t backing down. The Boston Globe said he “held court” for the media at his girlfriend’s apartment Tuesday, insisting that the school apologize and that his son’s rights were violated. “It hurts me that they did this to my kid,” Johnson said. “They can’t mess with our religion; they owe us a small lump sum for this.”

So the school disputes what the father said, and the father is still sticking to his story.  The “self-portrait” claim seems a little beyond a second-grader, but not impossible.  Even so, demanding a psychological evaluation over a drawing of a crucifix seems very, very strange — and if the school would do it again, I’d still wonder whether parents wouldn’t do better to follow Johnson’s lead and send their children somewhere else.


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Had he drawn an Islamic terrorist with an uzi, all would be fine.

jediwebdude on December 15, 2009 at 10:57 PM

8-year-olds don’t typically draw themselves being murdered.

RightOFLeft on December 15, 2009 at 3:21 PM

They also draw pictures of themselves in battle with laser wielding dinosaurs.

And yes, they do draw pictures of themselves dead, with their guts hanging out. In a volcano. With robots. And then they laugh, and chase the dog around wielding a fork. And then they pee unceremoniously off the side of the treehouse, and then they flush a pair of socks and a rubber duck down the toilet. The trolls aside, all of you people hand wringing about this kid obviously do not know anything about boys. Boys will be boys? Anyone remember that old phrase? It is exactly about this sort of thing. Boys like to fart and blame it on people. Boys like to pretend they are Indiana Jones, and they definitely like to beat the crap out of each other one minute, and the next minute they are playing stuffed animals together. This kid is normal- it’s the adults that are all jacked up.

Kristamatic on December 15, 2009 at 11:26 PM

Kristamatic on December 15, 2009 at 11:26 PM

Made me smile. I love that boys are like that.

keebs on December 15, 2009 at 11:33 PM

Interesting they changed the story since I read this earlier. The first version didn’t say the boy said it was himself on the cross and said nothing about race.

darcee on December 15, 2009 at 11:50 PM

I feel badly for this 2nd grade boy’s experience.

To whatever extent the child’s father altered the story when eliciting media coverage, he did his family no favor.

So the school superintendent claims now that the cross picture was not the one “discovered” by the teacher, and that the boy was never suspended. She disclaims the teacher’s “draw a picture” assignment as well, as if there was no class time set aside for drawing anything, certainly no topic suggested–denial. While the superintendent claims it was the child’s father that publicized the affront, she fails to note that it was the teacher who took this “problem” through the rounds of protocol within the school system that claims it cares first for the child and family, not for its own staff. She stated that the protocol process is notifying school staff and administration, interviewing the child with counselor, and putting it in his record. Did she forget interviewing the child AND parents before enforcing the advertisement throughout the school system in her proper protocol? The typical 2nd grader’s concept of his world outside of home is school life which the teacher chose to radically alter, singling him out for judgment and scrutiny from all the authority figures at school, having failed the litmus test of FIRST talking privately with the parents and leaving whatever “discovery” matter to rest instead of immediately labeling him with a permanent “problem child” school record. The school’s protocol reaction triggered an obviously undesirable response from the family, and from the public. So if jumping the gun is the “proper protocol” at school triggered in the name of “concern for the child and family”, that system needs correction to appreciate the school’s pronounced obligation to the children first. Or so it would appear.

maverick muse on December 16, 2009 at 6:13 AM

We live in a school district that is in constant worry over being sued, otherwise, I would pull out all my kids and home school. I already pulled out my special needs kid, when they did this exact thing- screw up and then deny deny deny. You can’t trust these people to do what is right or fair. The only reason I leave my kids in is that a lot of the time it is instructive for them to learn how people in the world are- If you are anxiously engaged with them, you can teach them by contrast when their teacher is telling them things that are off, and meanwhile, your children serve as a light to those who sit in darkness- it is a fine line to walk though.

Kristamatic on December 16, 2009 at 6:20 AM

Hmmm…is this what it really appeared to be or is it a case of a parent over-reaction or attention seeking or is the superintendent a liar?

Tonight the superintendent of Taunton Public Schools, Julie Hackett issued a statement in response to the father’s allegations:

It has been reported in the media that a student was suspended over drawing a rendering of Jesus Christ on the cross. This report is totally inaccurate, and the student was never suspended. This incident occurred nearly two weeks ago, it was handled appropriately, and the school staff and family had been working together in a cooperative and positive manner.

The drawing published in various media outlets is not the same drawing that was discovered by the teacher. It has not been established whether the drawing was actually completed in school. Contrary to what has been reported, there was no request or assignment by the teacher for students to sketch something that reminded them of Christmas or any religious holiday. The inaccuracies in the original media story have resulted in a great deal of criticism and scrutiny of the system that is unwarranted.

http://www.necn.com/Boston/New-England/2009/12/15/Taunton-Superintendent-denies/1260931655.html

Deanna on December 16, 2009 at 8:16 AM

The only reason I leave my kids in [public school] is that a lot of the time it is instructive for them to learn how people in the world are- If you are anxiously engaged with them, you can teach them by contrast when their teacher is telling them things that are off, and meanwhile, your children serve as a light to those who sit in darkness- it is a fine line to walk though.

Kristamatic on December 16, 2009 at 6:20 AM

After homeschooling our four children for 19 years, I think the better approach is to homeschool the kids first, then introduce them to the public school system. Our kids would took a handful of classes in the junior and senior years of high school-—foreign language, advanced science and math-—and they surpassed many of their peers because they were more engaged in their studies. They had disciplines of self control, respect for the adults, and actually did their homework.

I appreciate that you are engaged with your children and that they are a light among their peers.

I find that homeschooled kids receive less peer pressure and therefore are more self confident and better equipped to endure the nonsense they encounter when going to high school or college.

Peer pressure has a tendency to destroy individualism and homogenize thinking to fit the group.

Pazman on December 16, 2009 at 8:23 AM

8-year-olds don’t typically draw themselves being murdered.

RightOFLeft on December 15, 2009 at 3:21 PM

They also draw pictures of themselves in battle with laser wielding dinosaurs.

And yes, they do draw pictures of themselves dead, with their guts hanging out. In a volcano. With robots. And then they laugh, and chase the dog around wielding a fork. And then they pee unceremoniously off the side of the treehouse, and then they flush a pair of socks and a rubber duck down the toilet. The trolls aside, all of you people hand wringing about this kid obviously do not know anything about boys. Boys will be boys? Anyone remember that old phrase? It is exactly about this sort of thing. Boys like to fart and blame it on people. Boys like to pretend they are Indiana Jones, and they definitely like to beat the crap out of each other one minute, and the next minute they are playing stuffed animals together. This kid is normal- it’s the adults that are all jacked up.

Kristamatic on December 15, 2009 at 11:26 PM

Exactly Kristamatic. Part of the government takeover is the feminization of boys to break down the family. There is no one less civilized than an 8 year old boy and they are awesome and funny and real. My 6 year old boy made a peace dove in kindergarten this week. When asked it’s name he replied “Destructo”. Apparently the (catholic) teacher laughed so hard she couldn’t breath. I’m always glad when my sons’ teachers are mothers or fathers of boys, real boys.

Haunches on December 16, 2009 at 8:35 AM

Yes, Haunches, exactly. And while I appreciate every one who home schools as being brave and principled, I think if you let your boys be real boys, with the right amount of discipline, you can let them go to public school, because it is good to teach them to be themselves. Being an individual (and a conservative) is all about not being a sheep, and I’m not sure my boys could do that if they were home all day with me being the thought police. I like that they have different kinds of friends and sometimes have teachers who are mean- it teaches them how to manage. I don’t want them to be hothouse flowers- they have to learn to be tough men, and to do that they need to have challenges.
So maybe what it boils down to, is the parents of this kid should have skipped the media circus and told the kid- way to be, kiddo, be yourself, as hard as you can.

Kristamatic on December 16, 2009 at 8:48 AM

TULSA, OK — Founder of ORU, Oral Roberts, has died at the age of 91 due to complications from pneumonia. Below is the full text from the Press Release sent out.

Speaking of religious charlatans…

Apparently he didn’t have enough faith to be healed from pneumonia.

mankai on December 15, 2009 at 4:13 PM

I worship the risen Christ, not any of his followers. His followers, including me, are all flawed people, unworthy of redemption. It is only by God’s grace that we are redeemed, not of works lest any man should boast.

And I don’t know that much about Roberts, but if his faith was genuine — and whatever my disagreements with him, I don’t assume otherwise — if his faith was genuine, there’s no reason to assume he wanted to be cured. Paul said (Phil. 1:21) “for to me, to live is Christ, to die is gain”. Maybe Roberts just finally got the ultimate gain.

RegularJoe on December 15, 2009 at 4:42 PM

Not wanting to get too far off topic… but Roberts duped millions with false doctrines and false hopes.

He told us a 90-foot Jesus told him he was going to kill Roberts if he didn’t raise whatever millions of dollars he said… to build a hospital that “Jesus” (read “another Jesus”; cp 2 Cor 11:4, 13-15) promised him would yield miracles… it yielded empty beds and bankruptcy.

He was a charlatan of gargantuan proportions… and a false prophet. That is far beyond the simple “flaws” of which you write (and to which I agree). Satan’s ministers are “ministers of righteousness.”

For the record, whatever his eternal fate, he’s dead and in the grave like everyone else who has ever died (save one). As for wanting to be cured… since his theology teaches that sickness is the result of lack of faith in the first place (or a “negative profession”), he’s guilty under his own condemnation… and since ALL Pentecostals die of something, they’re all fools for buying into that theology (the ones that do)… which they do because they view God less as a Savior and more as a Santa Claus or bellhop.

mankai on December 16, 2009 at 8:56 AM

As opposed to some of the hot-house flowers I see first time 40 year old mothers raising, I try to remember that I am rearing men not boys. The characteristics that make you a successful adult are not always the ones that make you a wonderful child. I love to see them standing up for themselves, challenging authority when its unreasonable in a respectful way, not tattling, brushing off the little hurts, thinking instead of feeling, not giving up, facing their fears, being independent, determining when its best to put up with crap or when its best to throw it back, having dignity and pride, and being honest in the face of punishment.

Haunches on December 16, 2009 at 8:57 AM

haunches, you and I need to start our own school. ;)

Kristamatic on December 16, 2009 at 9:04 AM

Kudos to the school for recognizing
a problem child before he becomes a thug/menace to society… The father’s attempt to obfuscate the issue
speaks volumes as to origins of the problem.

As for home-schooling, it’s Great, for rare students and familes. Most parents though, especially those who were/are drop-outs, druggies and thugees can’t educate themselves, let alone their neglected and abused children.

Also, find it curious how quick some conservatives are(ED) to validate the goverment media propaganda, when they wave a cross, and claim a poor black child has been abused by the system. Wake UP sleepwalkers!

“Let’s Roll”

On Watch on December 16, 2009 at 9:10 AM

Kristamatic and Haunches,

Great descriptions of child rearing in your posts. Why would want to miss out on that experience by handing your kids over to the public school system for six hours a day, especially in the early years of their childhood?

Consider homeschooling for what it is: a one-on-one tutor for your child, not thought police; a place to learn in 3 or 4 hours, then play like a kid for the rest of the day with other kids (…yes, we let them off the “compound”).

I agree: you need to start your own school!

Pazman on December 16, 2009 at 9:27 AM

I too am appalled. This incident shows how out of touch with reality and the Bible the left and PC crowd is.

Task – Draw something that reminds you of Christmas, and the young student draws a cross with Jesus on it. This is an emblem for Easter, a Nativity scene would have been more appropriate.

But the teachers obviously do not understand the difference or, they are not of this world. When they saw the cross they went into a catatonic fit, similar to what happens when a vampire sees the cross.

MSGTAS on December 16, 2009 at 9:37 AM

My boys, now 18, 15 and 6 have been in the Catholic school system. 2 out of 3 need the school structure. I have, however, read every book, cover to cover, that they have had and I have reviewed every homework, every project, every event. Sometime I have to explain why the school is wrong but it hasn’t been often until senior year. The elementary school has rewarded feminity but I’ve countered that with inner city football then wrestling and lacrosse starting at age 5. I was shocked to find that the football, not the basketball, in the black community is run by religious black men with almost my identical goals. They are the fathers who have stayed involved. Basketball tends to attract the children of single mothers and thugs. I love boys and think that all those women who don’t like men need to be exposed to a boy—what wonderful amazing creatures.
The schools I’ve picked are small and they know me personally, and prefer not to piss me off.

I’ve always thought that the ideal boys’ school would involve a serious work-out in the morning, another at noon, and maybe a few laps in between. If you feed them, exercise them, love them, and don’t sweat the mess life is good.

Also, find it curious how quick some conservatives are(ED) to validate the goverment media propaganda, when they wave a cross, and claim a poor black child has been abused by the system. Wake UP sleepwalkers!

Huh?

Haunches on December 16, 2009 at 9:43 AM

Task – Draw something that reminds you of Christmas, and the young student draws a cross with Jesus on it. This is an emblem for Easter, a Nativity scene would have been more appropriate.

There is no nativity without the cross. The wooden manger presages the cross. The mission of Christ was the cross. Christmas was barely a celebration until the pagans had to be brought around from their winter solstice celebrations. Christ is inexhonerably linked at all times to the cross because his death was the reparation that brought about salvation. The shadow of the cross was there at his birth.

Haunches on December 16, 2009 at 9:50 AM

it should just be a routine conversation to make sure the kid isn’t in harm’s way.

dedalus on December 15, 2009 at 6:52 PM

A routine parent-teacher conference would have sufficed in the first place, even inviting the school counselor into the initial conference with the parents’ consent.

According to the parent, the school administration tagged his 2nd grade son “violent” over a drawing and at least threatened to suspend the boy.

It appears that the father was NOT the first to be consulted by the teacher in this incident, according to school protocol as referenced by the school’s superintendent to the media, relaying this incident as two weeks old and under appropriate control.

Tampering with evidence discredits the source, no matter the “qualifications”.

The school superintendent denies that the boy was suspended without denying that the threat was made to suspend. The school superintendent also denies that the Christ-themed drawing was the so-called “violent” “drawing discovered by the teacher”. Finally, the school superintendent denies that any Christmas theme was assigned as a class art subject, failing to specify WHAT the teacher assigned as the theme for student drawings.

Aside from the self-promoting bureaucracy of the school district that employs the teacher in question, she also has her union to back her as advocate.

PC does not have the child’s best interests at heart, but the bureaucracy’s best interest that relegates the students into the cattle corral for conformist dogmatic indoctrination including branding.

The child’s only loyal advocates are his parents whose only effective tool will be the truth made known.

maverick muse on December 16, 2009 at 10:06 AM

Kristamatic and Haunches,

Great descriptions of child rearing in your posts. Why would want to miss out on that experience by handing your kids over to the public school system for six hours a day, especially in the early years of their childhood?

Consider homeschooling for what it is: a one-on-one tutor for your child, not thought police; a place to learn in 3 or 4 hours, then play like a kid for the rest of the day with other kids (…yes, we let them off the “compound”).

I agree: you need to start your own school!

Pazman on December 16, 2009 at 9:27 AM

I agree wholeheartedly- I already Homeschool my special needs child. If our school district were different, I would pull them out- but it is one of the best schools in the state, and I am sure because my husband works there. I’ve got a spy. Also, I think there are things kids learn by riding the bus, and dealing with playground politics. Right now My 11 year old is dealing with kids teasing him about his allergy free lunch- he is learning all sorts of things about standing up for himself. Last year, he stopped a bully from hazing his little brother on the bus, all on his own. I think in this day and age kids need to be battle hardened. Other folks think kids need to be sheltered- it is a difference of opinion is all. I get why you feel the way you do.

Kristamatic on December 16, 2009 at 10:07 AM

Not wanting to get too far off topic… but Roberts duped millions with false doctrines and false hopes.

mankai on December 16, 2009 at 8:56 AM

My point is not that he was honest (I have grave doubts, but it is not for me to judge, other than whether I would follow his teachings — which I do not), and definitely not that he was doctrinally correct.

I was merely pointing out that even a person who DOES believe God will cure them if they have enough faith MIGHT reach an age where their friends have gone on, their best days aren’t that good, and they’re ready to go on to their reward, and therefore might NOT ask for healing. I claim no knowledge of whether Roberts believed what he taught, nor whether he wanted to be cured.

RegularJoe on December 16, 2009 at 10:14 AM

The real threat here is that the gross stupidity will infect the students.

Everywhere in this country…

Wisconsin schools will be required to teach the history of organized labor under a bill signed by Gov. Jim Doyle. The bill Doyle signed Thursday also requires Wisconsin schools to teach the history or collective bargaining.

I’m certain they’ll also be taught about the mob tactics of labor unions, how they took down GM and Chrysler, coersion, and their role in taking over government. /sarc off

Nalea on December 16, 2009 at 10:20 AM

careful on this one folks. Local talk is that’s not the image the kid drew and the father’s motives are questionable at best…

TheBigOldDog on December 16, 2009 at 10:50 AM

careful on this one folks. Local talk is that’s not the image the kid drew and the father’s motives are questionable at best…

TheBigOldDog on December 16, 2009 at 10:50 AM

I hope, for the sake of other students in the school, that “local talk” is correct. Obviously, commentary is all on the story as reported.

RegularJoe on December 16, 2009 at 11:22 AM

She disclaims the teacher’s “draw a picture” assignment as well, as if there was no class time set aside for drawing anything, certainly no topic suggested–denial.

maverick muse on December 16, 2009 at 6:13 AM

Which actually makes perfect sense.

Think about it: we’re supposed to believe that this teacher — allegedly someone who hates Jesus so much s/he wants to suspend a child for drawing a picture of Him — actually told the kid to “draw something that reminded him of Christmas”?

If the teacher actually hated Jesus or Christians so much, s/he probably wouldn’t base lesson plans around Christmas.

(note: the kid actually wasnt suspended, and there’s no evidence that the teacher hates Jesus. I’m just pointing out the flaws in the logic here)

HotAir got played on this one.

orange on December 16, 2009 at 11:48 AM

orange on December 16, 2009 at 11:48 AM

None of us were there; we hear a tale and have to judge whether it’s credible. Sadly, the story, generally speaking, is consistent with other stories that have been reported in recent years, so it has some credibility. It still could be a bunch of bull, of course.

I will agree with you that, even if the rest of the story is true, it’s unlikely that the teacher assigned a “Christmas” picture. But it’s completely credible that she assigned a “holiday” picture, and (in the telling of the most scrupulous Christian) could mistakenly be recounted as a “Christmas” picture assignment.

But my doubt that a “Christmas” picture was assigned is based more on school policies than the teacher’s prejudices.

Why? Because “Christmas” has two related, but very different, meanings: It is a religious observance of profound significance for observant Christians; and it is a secular event of family, friends, gifts, feasting and good cheer for just about everybody in the U.S. and most of the western world.

I’ve known plenty of totally secular people (and a fair number of people of non-Christian faiths) who had lights on the house, a tree in the den, and the family gathered around a turkey on Christmas morning. To them, “Christmas” isn’t a religious event at all; it’s just a traditional feast time in the society they live in. These same people are liable to hide eggs at Easter, give Valentines to their sweethearts on St. Valentine’s day, or attend Mardi Gras on Fat Tuesday. They’ll celebrate Thanksgiving, while believing there’s no one to thank. These Christian events have come to be a part of our society to the point that they are celebrated in secular ways by non-Christians.

So, absent school policies forbidding use of the “C” word this time of year, even a non-believer might suggest drawing a “Christmas” picture, assuming it would be a snowman, elf, tree, reindeer, or other non-religious image.

The story may yet prove to be untrue. Again, I hope it is. But I don’t find this particular point convincing.

RegularJoe on December 16, 2009 at 1:20 PM

Barak Hussain Obama mmmmm, mmmm, mmmm. No room for any other messiah in the school or in the brain. MMMM mmmmmmm MMMM

Haunches on December 16, 2009 at 2:04 PM

My youngest is a junior in high school so I only have a year and a half left of public school – yeah! My kids have had some great teachers over the years, but a lot of really bad ones too. I am definitely tired of battling it out with them.

The nanny rules drive me and my kids crazy. Outside of school, they’re considered adults with adult responsibilities, at school they’re treated like 5-year-olds. They had a drug sweep last week. I was furiously texting my daughter to be careful not to get caught with her inhaler and contraband ibuprofen. She’s 18. My son has a pocketknife for his Wood Tech class. If he had been caught with it in the school, he would have been arrested and expelled.

If I could do it over again (God forbid!), I would homeschool, even though it would have been tough with a more-than-full-time job. My kids would have had a better education, more sleep, and more time for learning other things (ballet, music, science, etc.). It would have been cheaper too, I paid $700 for the two of them at registration this semester including my son’s books for his AP classes. They still could have participated in classes and activities at school too (choir, sports, etc.)

As for this story, the fact that it’s changed several times is suspicious. I already thought that the parents too easily caved to the psych exam, I would have fought it tooth and nail.

Common Sense on December 16, 2009 at 5:22 PM

I once worked at a church answering phones. A broadcast was on TV from the church. Some guy from San Francie called in having a fit. He was irrate, excited and losing his mind. He had just seen the broadcast and it included the crucifixion. He was angry and responding violently over the phone because the TV broadcast was “violent” and disturbing.

I took everything in knowing that what I was about to say next would really send him over the edge.

I told him; sir what you are seeing on TV is a historical fact.

He lost it, for sure. I mean I could hear him losing it over the phone.

Imagine that he probably grew up growing hemp, anti-war protests, or maybe he was the bathhouse type, What? Hey! it’s in the realm of possibility.

Anyhow, it’s said that people can grow up so sheltered.

father on December 16, 2009 at 6:09 PM

I will agree with you that, even if the rest of the story is true, it’s unlikely that the teacher assigned a “Christmas” picture. But it’s completely credible that she assigned a “holiday” picture, and (in the telling of the most scrupulous Christian) could mistakenly be recounted as a “Christmas” picture assignment.

But if the teacher is militantly atheist and thinks the sight of Jesus on the cross is shocking, they wouldnt even bring up “holidays”. Thus, (A) either the teacher never made this assignment, (B) the teacher is not a militant atheist, as has been the depiction or (C) both.

So, absent school policies forbidding use of the “C” word this time of year, even a non-believer might suggest drawing a “Christmas” picture, assuming it would be a snowman, elf, tree, reindeer, or other non-religious image.

RegularJoe on December 16, 2009 at 1:20 PM

Sure, a “non-believer” might do that. But not a non-believer who thought it was awful to draw Jesus.

You’re only making reference to half of my point. I’m saying that there are two things that must be true for Morrissey’s interpretation to be correct:

1) The teacher assigned a holiday art project

2) The teacher is a militant atheist who “recoils in horror” at a picture of Jesus

I’m pointing out how unlikely it is that both of those things are true. In fact, it appears far more likely that neither of those things are true.

Ed Morrissey got played by somebody who wanted to get a “small lump sum” in their stocking for Christmas. He unwittingly did everything he could to help this guy with a frivolous lawsuit.

orange on December 16, 2009 at 6:25 PM

You’re all a bunch of friggin wacko’s.

fastestslug on December 16, 2009 at 7:01 PM

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