Bombshell: Walter Reed shrinks thought Hasan might be nuts since last year

posted at 5:53 pm on November 11, 2009 by Allahpundit

In case the victims’ families weren’t planning to sue the military, this ought to solve that problem. Unbelievable.

When a group of key officials gathered in the spring of 2008 for their monthly meeting in a Bethesda, Md., office, one of the leading — and most perplexing — items on their agenda was: What should we do about Hasan?…

Both fellow students and faculty were deeply troubled by Hasan’s behavior — which they variously called disconnected, aloof, paranoid, belligerent, and schizoid. The officials say he antagonized some students and faculty by espousing what they perceived to be extremist Islamic views. His supervisors at Walter Reed had even reprimanded him for telling at least one patient that “Islam can save your soul.”…

One official involved in the conversations had reportedly told colleagues that he worried that if Hasan deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, he might leak secret military information to Islamic extremists. Another official reportedly wondered aloud to colleagues whether Hasan might be capable of committing fratricide, like the Muslim U.S. Army sergeant who, in 2003, killed two fellow soldiers and injured 14 others by setting off grenades at a base in Kuwait.

Their chitchat about this guy continued into this year, with one official summing it up this way for NPR: “Everybody felt that if you were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, you would not want Nidal Hasan in your foxhole.” And yet — they were planning to deploy him anyway. In fact, here’s the amazing thing about the NPR piece, which you absolutely must read in its entirety: For all the speculation kicked around about Hasan possibly being schizoid or paranoid or having some other diagnosable condition, no hard evidence — aside from his jihadist sympathies — is offered. In fact, NPR flatly states that “they didn’t have clear evidence that he was unstable.” Which makes me wonder if this is less a case of a guy in the grip of mental illness than a case of psychiatrists trying, and failing, to relate to radical ideology in the idiom of their profession.

The million-dollar question: Why didn’t they do something about it? Four reasons, per NPR: (1) Thanks to military bureaucracy, it’s hard to get a doctor fired; (2) he was being transferred to Fort Hood, so he’d be their problem soon; (3) they didn’t know about his e-mails to jihadbot preacher Anwar al-Aulaqi, thanks to the joint terrorism task force’s moronic rules barring information-sharing with other government agencies by its members without task force approval; and (4) ye olde reliable “we didn’t want to be seen as discriminating” fear of political incorrectness. Which, of course, is also what led the feds to look the other way at his e-mail correspondence. As one investigator put it, “(Hasan) appeared to be at a moral impasse, a moral dilemma who was reaching out for advice. Had we launched an investigation of Hasan we’d have been crucified.”

Pete Hoekstra told Fox last night that there’s more going on here than the White House has let on thus far, but whether that was a reference to this breakdown at Walter Reed or ABC’s scoop about further jihadist contacts or something else entirely is as yet unclear. Republicans aren’t waiting around for any more evidence, though: McCain called it terrorism earlier today and doubtless many more GOPers are soon to follow. Exit quotation from historian Walter Russell Mead: “The danger for the Obama administration, and it is a major danger, is that it will look cool, cerebral and politically correct in the face of what many Americans will see as a grave and growing threat.”

Update: Via Weasel Zippers, here’s Obama’s crony Chicago pal Mayor Daley naming the real culprit in the real murders.

 


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But he wouldn’t have had access to the weapons or ammo he used. He also was in a military uniform that conforms with other suicide attacks by muslims on U.S. trops.

Cybergeezer on November 11, 2009 at 6:49 PM

Actually, there was nothing he used that any civilian cannot purchase from the reports I’ve seen.

Aviator on November 11, 2009 at 7:51 PM

If was a family member of one of the victims, I would be filing complaints against each and every person who knew anything about Major Muslim Jihadi – and did nothing. First, I would swear out a criminal complaint for criminal negligent homicide. Then I would go after them in civil court. This PC crap has got to stop and these people that said they knew what he was doing and did nothing – are indirectly responsible for his murder spree.

Sporty1946 on November 11, 2009 at 7:52 PM

Exit quotation from historian Walter Russell Mead: “The danger for the Obama administration, and it is a major danger, is that it will look cool, cerebral and politically correct in the face of what many Americans will see as a grave and growing threat.”

Because of his dithering on the troops to Afghanistan and the donks reputation of being soft on national defense, this can be a serious blow to his approvals. For a guy who is supposed to be so politically astute, he sure has a tin ear on this one.

a capella on November 11, 2009 at 7:56 PM

Nuts?

Or just a crazy jihadist?

Seems irrelevant except in nations with the most to lose. Why is it that the very nations which have the biggest targets on their backs would be the ones most enamored with the dangerous sham of political correctness?

Diane on November 11, 2009 at 7:56 PM

It seems that before one can understand Hasan better than he understands himself, one must first attempt to understand himself as he understands himself. Thus, I offer that he killed because he thinks, among other things, that doing so makes him good, that his being good pleases his god, and that pleasing his god brings him great rewards.

Kralizec on November 11, 2009 at 7:59 PM

Charles Krauthammer (a psychiatrist, by the way) said Hasan should have been booted from the progrma for proselytizing his patients. It was clearly unethical and the supervising doctors knew that.

Wethal on November 11, 2009 at 8:00 PM

Hasan is not nuts.
Hasan is a Jihadist.

Wrap him in bacon and leave him out in the desert.

Kenny Solomon
Senior Expediter
The 72 Virgins Club Travel Agency

E T Cartman on November 11, 2009 at 8:08 PM

Aviator on November 11, 2009 at 7:51 PM

Have you tried shopping for one of these guns and/or ammo? Ammo is civilian restricted when you can find it. Reloading supplies virtually non-existent.

Cybergeezer on November 11, 2009 at 8:17 PM

A little PC from another line of service.
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2009/11/024933.php

a capella on November 11, 2009 at 8:18 PM

Please check out the link to Dr. Pat Santy (a NASA psychiatrist), it’s a bit heady (not for you of course) but that’s where you will find the key.

The only thing that Islam does well is damage the human psyche.
Here is the KEY, Shame vs. Guilt: The Islamic culture does not recognize self-imposed guilt (can you say suicide bomber?) because YOU are a slave (to the will of Allah) and can’t be trusted with ANY choice – not even guilt. Guilt comes from within; it’s up to you. But we’re talking “totalitarian to the nth degree” here. With Islam, nothing comes from within; SHAME, on the other hand, must be cast upon you (it ain’t up to you). The metaphor is Stoning. People in the psychiatric community a lot smarter than me, will tell you that this aspect (the total absence of guilt) is what produces a severely damaged person, incapable of empathy. But hey, you’re a slave. You don’t need empathy. (Again, can you say suicide bomber?)

My definition of virtue is ‘doing the right thing even when no one is there to see you’. With Islam, if no one is there (excluding infidels of course) to cast shame, then no harm – no foul. They do not fear guilt, they fear (the shame of) getting caught. WE keep agreements out of a SELF IMPOSED sense of honor. With Islam you only keep agreements (again, excluding with infidels of course, for whom agreements don’t count in the first place) to avoid shame. Islam is literally a religion/culture without honor or virtue. But hey, “we don’t need honor or virtue, we have Allah!”

Pole-Cat on November 11, 2009 at 8:44 PM

Please, let us all take a moment to pray that this is the beginning of the end for political correctness.

anniekc on November 11, 2009 at 8:50 PM

Cybergeezer on November 11, 2009 at 8:17 PM

It may be hard to find, but it is available on the civilian market and Hasan did not have to be in the military to purchase either weapon or ammo.

Aviator on November 11, 2009 at 9:01 PM

I would hope that the military, our intel services, and others involved with sensitive material or national security are undergoing closer scrutiny right now.

The newly appointed Iran desk fellow at the State Department, in particular, needs to be vetted.

onlineanalyst on November 11, 2009 at 9:03 PM

Have you tried shopping for one of these guns and/or ammo? Ammo is civilian restricted when you can find it. Reloading supplies virtually non-existent.

Cybergeezer on November 11, 2009 at 8:17 PM

Guns are not hard to find/purchase at all; as for ammo, it’s not civilian restricted, it is scarce but civilians can purchase it if they can find it.

uncivilized on November 11, 2009 at 9:04 PM

Real life demands more than Monday-morning quarterbacking.

I’ll believe this sudden faith in profiling by libertarians, when you admit cashiering 10 harmless officers for speech patterns, is worth stopping one Hasan.

Chris_Balsz on November 11, 2009 at 9:08 PM

Another angle on all this that’s been bugging the hell out of me is: what kind of care was he giving our soldiers?. I listened to a program today from KFI in LA that provided some insight into that question. Bryan Suits relayed some information he received from a soldier that returned from Iraq in 2005. Hasan counseled with the soldier, asking him what role he had played in Iraq. The soldier said he was infantry. Hasan replied that his wife should be a widow and his children should be orphans for what he had done. The soldier went to the Inspector General and filed a written report. Evidently, he’s not the only one to have made such complaints. Where are those reports????

dont taze me bro on November 11, 2009 at 9:23 PM

“Islam can save your soul.”

RFLOL!

Yeah, what good has Islam done for Hasan? Oh, that’s right, programmed him to kill his fellow soldiers in the relative safety of their own base.

Islam, it’s what’s for hate.

HotAirJosef on November 11, 2009 at 9:58 PM

Both fellow students and faculty were deeply troubled by Hasan’s behavior — which they variously called disconnected, aloof, paranoid, belligerent, and schizoid.

Setting aside for a moment here the wretched, despicable terrorist acts by Hasan — no disrespect to the victims but just for a moment here in order to make a point — isn’t OR WAS NOT the issue for the observable time in which Hasan was “noticed” to be ‘irregular’ more than enough cause to remove him from access IN ALL AREAS OF COUNSELLING OTHERS?

If for only one reason only — respect for the persons of every single individual in military service — Hasan SHOULD HAVE BEEN LONG AGO REMOVED FROM HAVING ANY AND ALL ACCESS TO ANY AND ALL AREAS OF “COUNSELLING” in the military.

I am having a difficult time finding as sane or, rather, reliable and logical, each and every “fellow student and faculty” who today admit to having these observations of Hasan and yet made no direct actions to remove Hasan from access to others.

Somehow, the idea of Hasan even handling medical records sends me into worry. The point I’m making is that this is one person (Hasan) who should never have been allowed to continue in any aspect of clinical practice, once observed as today we’re hearing he was (as being “called disconnected, aloof, paranoid, belligerent, and schizoid”).

Back to the essence of Hasan’s extensive disturbance, however, I agree that he is a Muslim terrorist and that his actions at Fort Hood are those of terrorism.

It helps no one nor solves nothing to continue to try to avoid the use of the proper words to define what his actions were and who he is.

Lourdes on November 11, 2009 at 10:23 PM

“Islam can save your soul.”

RFLOL!

Yeah, what good has Islam done for Hasan? Oh, that’s right, programmed him to kill his fellow soldiers in the relative safety of their own base.

Islam, it’s what’s for hate.

HotAirJosef on November 11, 2009 at 9:58 PM

And, the obvious ridiculousness aside (I share your “RFLOL” reaction to that statement by Hasan which he declared under ruse of a MEDICAL counseling situation)…

It’s one thing for one individual to offer theological or ideological counseling to another, BUT, in Hasan’s case, specifically, he was FUNCTIONING (so it was as venue) as a medical doctor within the society of our U.S. military, counseling others on their psychology.

He was NOT there as a Chaplain, nor was he out in the world as a lone Muslim offering his lone Muslim theology to someone asking about theological options.

Hasan clearly could not distinguish these significant, important aspects to his work, and in that alone, suggests he’s mentally unstable and/or ethically corrupt.

But again, it’s difficult for me to believe that those who noticed these irregularities by Hasan are credible themselves, if but for the simple fact that they didn’t take immediate steps to get Hasan out of contact with military personnel in any capacity medically.

Lourdes on November 11, 2009 at 10:29 PM

Another angle on all this that’s been bugging the hell out of me is: what kind of care was he giving our soldiers?. I listened to a program today from KFI in LA that provided some insight into that question. Bryan Suits relayed some information he received from a soldier that returned from Iraq in 2005. Hasan counseled with the soldier, asking him what role he had played in Iraq. The soldier said he was infantry. Hasan replied that his wife should be a widow and his children should be orphans for what he had done. The soldier went to the Inspector General and filed a written report. Evidently, he’s not the only one to have made such complaints. Where are those reports????

dont taze me bro on November 11, 2009 at 9:23 PM

And there’s one soldier who acted appropriately — responsibly, sanely, correctly in all aspects of his job and as a member of a responsible society.

Where are the attempts by the “students and faculty” who observed Hasan in years past while Hasan acted “schizoid” and such?

What Hasan said to that soldier is utterly disgusting and nuts. I mean, truly, crazy.

Lourdes on November 11, 2009 at 10:32 PM

“One of the questions they pondered: Was Hasan psychotic?”

No. He was a Muslim and wanted to kill “The Enemy.”

davidk on November 11, 2009 at 6:04 PM

I think it’s both.

BUT the Left and the appeasing, enabling Obama Administration is certainly working feverishly to try to suppress the fact that aspects of Islam theology INSTRUCT, REQUIRE AND INSPIRE psychotic behaviors, such as shooting other soldiers if one is in the military, such as destroying “the infidels”.

THAT’s the essence of the problem. I’m sure there are SOME people who “believe” in Islam who are not psychotic, psychologically, but some aspects of Islam as a belief system do run to the conclusion that to act pscychotically is admirable. Thus, it attracts, nurtures and encourages those who are predisposed to pscyhosis.

Worse, Islam is NOT a race or ethnicity. The Left at this very hour is foaming about racial and ethnic complaints as to those identifying Muslim terrorism, while, that is in itself (that response by the Left) is psychotic.

Lourdes on November 11, 2009 at 10:37 PM

It’s one thing for one individual to offer theological or ideological counseling to another, BUT, in Hasan’s case, specifically, he was FUNCTIONING (so it was as venue) as a medical doctor within the society of our U.S. military, counseling others on their psychology.

Hasan clearly could not distinguish these significant, important aspects to his work, and in that alone, suggests he’s mentally unstable and/or ethically corrupt.

But again, it’s difficult for me to believe that those who noticed these irregularities by Hasan are credible themselves, if but for the simple fact that they didn’t take immediate steps to get Hasan out of contact with military personnel in any capacity medically.

Lourdes on November 11, 2009 at 10:29 PM

I agree. The problem is, we have too many loony tunes calling themselves “liberals” when they’re not.

Obviously if a Christian or a conservative Jew had done this, I can assure you that SanFranNan would call hearings into this and tell the brass to call her Senator. I hope the families sue and make sure the chain of command is held culpable – as well as break down another firewall surrounding our intelligence agencies.

HotAirJosef on November 11, 2009 at 11:00 PM

Hasan is not suffering from any mental disorder, other than being a true believer in a religion. The tenets of Islam are so foreign and repulsive to our minds that we immediately think that any fervent Muslim is lunatic. Please, y’all stop helping his defense by calling him insane or crazy.

Pelayo on November 11, 2009 at 11:03 PM

what kind of care was he giving our soldiers?

There was a story in the NY Daily News about a mother who stuck by her son when he was hospitalized at Walter Reed with a traumatic brain injury.

She said Hasan struck her as “evil,” but she succeeded in getting the other doctors to shield her son from him.

It seems that the soldiers who fought back, or had someone to advocate for them, were able to avoid him, but you have to wonder what psychological damage he inflicted on the injured and defenseless. Damn those “supervisors” at Walter Reed, with their lame excuses for doing nothing.

Nichevo on November 11, 2009 at 11:10 PM

HotAirJosef on November 11, 2009 at 11:00 PM

Sorry, Speaker SanFranNan.

Right now, she’s on the deep you-know-what list with me.

HotAirJosef on November 11, 2009 at 11:12 PM

I think any Walter Reed personnel who got to see Hasan’s slideshow presentation in 2007 had pretty much had the question of the guy’s mental fitness answered for all time:

How could anybody NOT view that slideshow given at a MEDICAL CONFERENCE and realize this guy had SERIOUS FREAKING PROBLEMS?

manofaiki on November 11, 2009 at 11:32 PM

Links did not show up to Hasan’s slideshow presentation in the last post; here it is again:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/gallery/2009/11/10/GA2009111000920.html

manofaiki on November 11, 2009 at 11:33 PM

So maybe we should rethink allowing imams in our prisons. After all, the people there already have mental problems. Right?

Connie on November 11, 2009 at 11:39 PM

In the sense that any Jihadhist is nuts, he was nuts. Otherwise the Feds are building a case to get Islam off the hook and also their General-In-Chief Casey, who made idiotic PC remarks.

You could say that traitorous US Islamic imams teachings are bearing fruit–or rather bearing fruits (and nuts).

MaiDee on November 12, 2009 at 12:04 AM

Hasan is not suffering from any mental disorder, other than being a true believer in a religion. The tenets of Islam are so foreign and repulsive to our minds that we immediately think that any fervent Muslim is lunatic. Please, y’all stop helping his defense by calling him insane or crazy.

Pelayo on November 11, 2009 at 11:03 PM

Allow me to put it this way: to a sane mind, ANYone who would behave as per Muslim terrorists, or Jihadists, is, indeed, “mentally ill” in A WESTERN PERSPECTIVE.

I never suggested, however, that someone who is mentally ill is mentally incompetent. In Hasan’s case, and in the cases of the 9/11 Jihadists, for other examples of Muslims acting out on insane perspectives, they’re NOT LEGALLY EXCUSED or outside legal culpability for their obvious crimes.

The clinical and legal definitions of the term, “psychotic” (as “mentally ill”) are different.

Because, if not, then we could easily say that any and all who murder, rape, pillage, abuse, etc. are, indeed, “mentally ill” if not oftentimes actually pscyhotic specifically. But that does not mean that they are not aware of what they’re doing so are not beyond any criminal punishment for their crimes (behaviors).

Certain kinds of psychosis involve detailed planning, intense premeditation, of their crimes. As in Hasan’s case, able to plan, including intensely specific, regimented, highly organized events, but clearly “not well in the head”.

So labelling Hasan as psychotic in no way dismisses his judgement or process of judgement in any criminal, legal process.

Lourdes on November 12, 2009 at 5:39 AM

I think, generally, for someone who is mentally ill to be deemed by the courts as “insane,” they have to be proven to not have been capable of knowing that their wrong actions were, indeed, wrong, during those actions being carried out.

In other words, shooter had no idea how the guns got into his hands, had no memory of ever buying the guns found in his hands later after a shooting spree and was not aware of who he was or how he got to where he engaged in shooting others. But that’s very difficult to prove, that degree of being “out of it” or not in one’s right mind, that someone doing such would be utterly unaware of how they’d planned, organized and carried out their criminal acts.

They could be faking the lack of awareness (most likely) or could also be suffering some sort of temporary amnesia (shock, that old PTSD thing as after-affect, etc.), or, actually have some mental impairment that rendered them unable to know what they were doing when and how or why (utterly irrational, or, criminally insane, in other words).

Lourdes on November 12, 2009 at 5:43 AM

In which case, someone who is actually, truly criminally insane ALMOST ALWAYS lacks the ability to plan complicated tasks and then carry them out systematically…

…which rules out terrorists, what with all that planning and premeditated evil.

Lourdes on November 12, 2009 at 5:44 AM

I don’t see any Red Flags in the power point Presentation as I read it, but the truth would be in how it was delivered, and perceived by his audience. The Power Point is quite good really, and should be used to train others how to spot others like him.

Ed Laskie on November 12, 2009 at 9:21 AM

I still have not seen this brought up anywhere but what about PURPLE HEARTS for the victims? Or will it fly in the face of political correctness.

PURPLE HEARTS!!!!

Bruce Hendrix on November 12, 2009 at 9:31 AM

And some bronze stars????

Bruce Hendrix on November 12, 2009 at 9:31 AM

Being a psychiatrist does not declare that you are a sane person or have been cleared as sane in any respect.
As this tragedy illustrates, the United States education system is in horrible shape. People are being indoctrinated, not educated. And the educators, themselves, are extreme fanatics of some sort, that are teaching their own agenda to an ever increasing number of subjects that will swallow anything to get a passing grade.
There’s going to have to be some very tragic circumstances to reverse this trend.
History dictates.

Cybergeezer on November 12, 2009 at 9:39 AM

Doesn’t the fact that people called his sanity into question undermine the idea that this is terrorism?

I’m not entirely convinced either way, but can’t we at least entertain the notion that this is a psychopath and not a terrorist?

I mean, is this guy a terrorist? Or these people?

orange on November 12, 2009 at 12:59 PM

They knew about him and got him away from washington that is what really happened I believe.

workingforpigs on November 12, 2009 at 2:22 PM

Being a psychiatrist does not declare that you are a sane person or have been cleared as sane in any respect.

Indeed, most psychiatrist went there hoping to heal thy self.

Pole-Cat on November 12, 2009 at 7:09 PM

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