Video: The light bulb goes … off

posted at 12:15 pm on October 6, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

I blame all of our woes on Thomas Edison.  If he hadn’t insisted on creating the first practical incandescent light bulb, why, we all would still be living in a Luddite paradise, albeit a dark one.  We could still burn oil lamps — er, no, that throws off carbon, too.  How about candles?  Better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness, after all.  And that’s true, as long as it’s a single candle, and not a bunch of them, or your carbon footprint might equal that of Godzilla, or Al Gore, whichever is bigger.

Nick Gillespie at Reason takes a critical look at the abolitionist movement aiming at Edison’s world-changing invention, and the poor replacement that bureaucrats will leave us:

In September, the European Union banned the sale of 100-watt incandescent light bulbs, with lawbreakers facing up to $70,000 in fines. Over the next few years, bans on lower-wattage bulbs kick in. In the United States, similar legislation comes into play in 2012. The idea is to kickstart the market for compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), which use less energy than conventional incandescents. Although CFLs present any number of problems (even beyond a much higher initial cost), governments all over the globe are determined to make them the new standard.

Invented in its modern form by Thomas Edison in 1879, the light bulb became synonymous with a brilliant idea. Now, it seems, it’s just one more symbol of a nanny state that increasingly dictates more choices in our public and private lives.

Two years ago, I began replacing my incandescents with CFLs, mostly to help save energy and replacement costs. Reason correctly states that CFLs give off an inferior level and quality of light and do not work with dimmers, which actually helps reduce the energy costs of incandescents. But the biggest problem with CFLs is not the noticeably poorer quality of the light, but the clean-up they require when they break, as I wrote a year and a half ago:

What happens when an incandescent bulb hits the floor? Simple: sweep it up, and try not to step on a shard of glass with bare feet. Here’s how people need to handle a broken CFL:

1. Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or more.
2. Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system, if you have one.
3. Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.
4. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.
5. Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes and place them in the glass jar or plastic bag.
6. Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken bulb on hard surfaces.
7. Immediately place all cleanup materials outside the building in a trash container or outdoor protected area for the next normal trash.
8. Wash your hands after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing cleanup materials.
9. Check with your local or state government about disposal requirements in your specific area. Some states prohibit such trash disposal and require that broken and unbroken lamps be taken to a recycling center.
10. For at least the next few times you vacuum, shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system and open a window prior to vacuuming.
11. Keep the central heating/air conditioning system shut off and the window open for at least 15 minutes after vacuuming is completed.

In other words, we’re saving a few pennies at best on energy costs with CFLs over incandescents — and in return, making our homes potential toxic-waste areas and polluting landfills with mercury. It’s an insane policy that can only be justified by radical environmentalist lunatics.

Update: While on the subject of environmental lunacy, watch what happens when a journalist tries to ask a few tough questions of activists:

The Age Of Stupid preaches the doomsday scenario of human extinction by 2055 and says humans will be to blame for their own demise because they fly too much. But Franny Armstong, director of The Age of Stupid, and many of the people at the movie’s premiere flew to New York for the party. Phelim [McAleer] put them on the spot for flying while trying to deny that travel right to others.

His pointed questions didn’t sit well with the organizers of the event or the environmentalists who attended. The film makers and their security team ejected Phelim despite the fact that he had journalistic credentials to cover the event and had done exactly what journalists are supposed to do — ask probing questions.

As Phelim tried to continue his reporting from the sidelines, the security team repeatedly blocked his camera and his view of the environmentalists headed into the premiere.

The Age of Stupid, indeed.


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I will never, ever use a CFL. Period.

I have begun switching over to Philips 70 watt T60 Halogena bulbs whenever the incandescents burn out. I put up new ceiling fans with four lights, and use 70 watt Halogenas that are actually brighter than the old fans that used three 100 watt bulbs. My two bedrooms are much brighter, and I’m using less electricity. WIN.

Dominion on October 6, 2009 at 5:41 PM

Sad thing is that Bush was the one who signed the legislation banning incandescents. We can’t blame this one on Obamarx.

UltimateBob on October 6, 2009 at 12:21 PM

Our worse enemies are sometimes our friends.
I only heard about this after the fact. I think it was kept pretty well under wraps until after they voted. Never heard one thing before they did this.
What will be next?? Nothing is off the table. 10 years ago would you have ever dreamed the light bulb would be banned in America?? Selling toys at yard sales would get you a million dollar fine? More is coming. The aim is power, control and to send us all back into a 3rd world living standard.

JellyToast on October 6, 2009 at 5:46 PM

My 5th grade teacher brought in an aquarium filled with mercury.

faraway on October 6, 2009 at 5:15 PM

Must’ve been an awfully small aquarium unless you could get a fork lift into your classroom.

Oldnuke on October 6, 2009 at 5:47 PM

I am a practical, conservative Green, and I think CFL bulbs are a nightmare.

Incandescent, or perhaps the coming LED bulbs, are a better choice. Incandescent bulbs are a waste of material, given that they don’t last long, but their materials are cheaper and safer. Car headlights last a very long time, why don’t light bulbs – planned obsolescence?

greenLibertarian on October 6, 2009 at 6:02 PM

I’m lost,light bulbs and the CFL, the Canadian Football League?

Jeff from WI on October 6, 2009 at 6:10 PM

A lesser known fun fact about CFL’s.

CFL’s are especially sensitive to ‘dirty voltage’ which is the chief reason their ‘real world’ life spans don’t match up ‘as advertised’ number on the package.

As with other products, quality buffers the effects of ‘reality’, the one factor that makes a mockery a product’s ‘ideal virtues’.

Ya gets ya pay for. Something your grandpa may have said to you.

CPT. Charles on October 6, 2009 at 6:32 PM

Lucky, lucky us, here in Ohio. In today’s Plain Dealer, all First Energy residential and small business customers were informed that we will be receiving two CFL light bulbs delivered to our doorsteps, along with a booklet on using them.

The two 23-watt light bulbs will cost $21.60, which will be charged to our electric bills at the rate of 60 cents per month over three years! Whether we want the light bulbs or will use the light bulbs matters not. They’re being distributed and customers are being forced to pay for them.

Each bulb will cost First Energy $3.50 (x2/customer), with a total cost of $21.60 to the consumer. A five-pack of similar bulbs costs $13.99 on the Ace Hardware website.

All this has come about because of the Ohio legislature (full of dumbocrats, with a dumbocrat governor leading the pack) along with their appointed buddies at Ohio PUCO. So once again, the public gets screwed. But what’s a little price gouging among First Energy, the Ohio politicians, PUCO and all their lawyers?

Here’s the link to the Plain Dealer story:
http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/10/firstenergy_light_bulbs.html

Be sure to read the comments on the Plain Dealer website. I especially like this one: “What’s next? The farm bureau dumping veggies on my stoop to encourage a healthy diet?”

Needless to say, I’m phoning First Energy and the legislators/governor tomorrow.

GrannyDee on October 6, 2009 at 6:34 PM

Must’ve been an awfully small aquarium unless you could get a fork lift into your classroom.

Oldnuke on October 6, 2009 at 5:47 PM

A friend of mine in Auckland had (God only knows why) a container of mercury about the size of a pint of milk.

The container weighed almost 15 pounds.

I recall that he tried in vain to give the stuff away to schools, industry, etc. but no one wanted it. So it remained in his utility room, sealed, because the cost of official disposal was beyond his ability to pay, and he wasn’t the kind of person to just pour the stuff out on the ground somewhere.

Wanderlust on October 6, 2009 at 6:45 PM

….“What’s next? The farm bureau dumping veggies on my stoop to encourage a healthy diet?”

GrannyDee on October 6, 2009 at 6:34 PM

Well don’t suggest it to them.

I don’t think I like y’alls idea of “giveaway”. In Texas we would call it something else…and there would probably be an EPA cleanup site in the making in front of the door of whoever came up with that program.

cozmo on October 6, 2009 at 6:46 PM

Last year I debated some knuckleheads, i.e., libs on the prospects of opening ones windows during a Minnesota winter day when the temp is oh, say, -10 with a wind chill factor of -25 to cleanse your home of the poison gas from a broken CFL. 15-minutes of heating the great whte outdoors should make you feel warm and comfy, especially when you shut down the forced air furnace at the same time. When your thermostat drops to 50-degrees and you finally close the windows and turn the furnace back on, let’s see how much energy is wasted getting your rooms back up to a somewhat bearable 68. My advice to one and all is to stock up on incandescents well before the law takes effect in 2012 and maybe get by for a few years while da gubmint sees the error of its ways and repeals the manufacture and ban on Edison’s brainchild. Now there’s an idea, huh?

Goldy1 on October 6, 2009 at 6:50 PM

Where are these new mercury laden bulbs made? China? The factories for these bulbs must have large vats of toxic mercury, but I guess it’s okay if it’s Chinese workers getting poisoned. I’m sure AlGore would agree.

Dhuka on October 6, 2009 at 6:58 PM

In other words, we’re saving a few pennies at best on energy costs with CFLs over incandescents —

But when you consider that the new bulbs cost more…how much are we really saving? You can buy a 4 pack of bulbs for a buck…the new ones cost several dollars. Plus, hazmat teams for clean up are real expensive.

Reminds me of the cash for clunkers program…since when is it environmentally friendly to trash a bunch of cars?

njpat on October 6, 2009 at 7:07 PM

Hey asiangirlintights and beachgirlinusa, how’s bout we get together and make a little electricity of our own.

Betcha we’d all be glowin, then.
Hubba hubba.

OkieDoc on October 6, 2009 at 7:08 PM

At the end of the day, the issue is not whether these mercury bulbs last as long as a regular light bulb and whether they are as bright.

The issue is the Federal Government MANDATING what kind of light bulbs we use. One small step for totalitarianism, one giant step for Fascism.

Dhuka on October 6, 2009 at 7:10 PM

But when you consider that the new bulbs cost more…how much are we really saving? You can buy a 4 pack of bulbs for a buck…the new ones cost several dollars.

njpat on October 6, 2009 at 7:07 PM

Shhhh

They hear you and they will put a large tax on them before we can buy them all up.

/

CFLs suck.

CWforFreedom on October 6, 2009 at 7:36 PM

CFLsuck, well said.

Hard to believe that people are being forced to use these bulbs and the cost is added to their e-bills, totalitarianism on the march!

greenLibertarian on October 6, 2009 at 7:41 PM

LEDs.

hillbillyjim on October 6, 2009 at 7:41 PM

It is important to properly disposed of CFLs or at least those CFLs that burn out rather than just exploding. I am sure that every federal building is already geared up to handle this problem. Do your duty: make their disposal a federal problem.

Laurence on October 6, 2009 at 7:46 PM

Ever have long lasting headaches in the workplace due to tube flourescents? I have known co-workers that had that problem and got along great when transferred to a room with very little lighting at all, outside of computer screens… we did call it ‘the meatlocker’ for a reason as it was also one of the coldest places to work, what with all the computers going all the time.

At home I have had a grand total of two CFLs that have lasted their stated time: they are exterior grade, totally enclosed CFLs. Inside the home, their newer cousins last anywhere from 2 weeks to 10 months in multiple different light sockets throughout the house. The exterior ones can’t go into most fixtures due to their protective enclosure… so internal CFLs aren’t living up to their hardened brethren who soldier on for years. And the filament bulbs actually last longer than the CFLs in all of the sockets around the house.

The culprit? My APC Back-UPS tells the story: bad line voltage spikes. The all-season bulbs have an internal ballast to smooth out the voltage, and thus last a long time. Filament bulbs can take spikes in voltage and dimming very well. CFLs? Heh.

And as all important equipment has a UPS on it or a device to clean up the voltage, things like computers and the TV are safe from those spikes. Now if I wanted to chunk over a few thousand dollars for a house-wide UPS system to use CFLs…. why those CFLs just might pay off the cost of the UPS sometime in 20 years or so.

I have a feeling I’m going to need my 12 gauge ammo long before that…

ajacksonian on October 6, 2009 at 7:53 PM

When my cfl’s go out I throw them in the school parking lot to watch them break.Phuk mother gia and the state of ca./sark….or not. I guess i’ll know when kids coming to school have flippers instead of digits.

huckelberry on October 6, 2009 at 8:04 PM

Dominion, are Halogena bulbs as hot as regular halogen bulbs? Halogen bulbs, if they fall against anything flammable (paper, curtains, etc.) will start a fire.

Pelayo on October 6, 2009 at 8:06 PM

The aim is power, control and to send us all back into a 3rd world living standard.

JellyToast on October 6, 2009 at 5:46 PM

Agree with you on the first two, partially disagree on the third.

If you were to return yourself to a 3rd world living standard, you would be violating countless housing, health and safety codes. You could expect to be visited by inspectors, neighborhood reps. and code enforcers of all types, many of whom have just as good intentions as your federal government “does”. They will be able to gain the information about your lifestyle change without ever violating your right to privacy and could force you to give up your property if enough people were affected by your lowering of the entire neighborhood’s [already sliding] property values.
So instead of allowing you the freedom to return to a simple lifestyle, they plan on forcing you to maintain one you can’t afford, taxing you out the ying-yang for the right to do it, and then subsidizing your shortfall with the taxes they collected from you so they appear to be the compassionate, all-controlling good guys.
This allows them to a) control you, both in personal life and level of taxes they can expect to glean off of you b) raise the standard of living by any measurable standard that doesn’t include the word freedom so they can feel both morally and intellectually superior about stealing your rights c) give jobs to people who otherwise have no skills other than enforcing the codes the controllers have thought up d) turn other freedom-minded people away from assisting you by bribing them with code-enforcement jobs or outright subsidies, or at the very least hushing them because of their job requirement of not politicking while employed by the machine.
Like under Bush, reforming the system will not stop its growth–it may only retard it somewhat, or simply allow it to grow unfettered in a totally different direction.
Short of revolution, the only way to stop the encroachment of government–with its bad morals, incompetence and inefficiencies–into every facet of our lives is to return to the primacy of the private sector. Only a vibrant private sector can stall the growth of government.
Once a parasitic vine has started to choke off the tree, how does the tree reassert itself? We have to find a way, if we value the tree of freedom.

rwenger43 on October 6, 2009 at 8:08 PM

I’m not getting the “energy savings” portion of this argument.
The energy savings of going to CFL bulbs are very small; a minor variation in the use of the big energy users (heating, cooling, cooking) can mask any savings. Why are we looking at ligh bulbs instead of saving on the big energy users where savings can be significant? Oh yeah, Liberals- what you feel trumps logic every time.

mad scientist on October 6, 2009 at 8:19 PM

How much energy will be used in the proper disposal or recycling of these magic bulbs? I daresay when it’s all said and done, there will be a net gain in energy use because of these Big Brother mandates.

Why does Big Government hate Gaia?

(Mercury poisoning is serious sh!t, by the way.)

hillbillyjim on October 6, 2009 at 8:26 PM

Come on. Embrace the mercury.
faraway on October 6, 2009 at 5:08 PM

Growing up in the 50′s we played with mercury. All houses had lead paint. We had BB gun battles. No bike helmets. Never had a bike stolen. Exposed bolts on school yard swings mounted on hard asphalt. Lots of skinned knees. Had my own army surplus .45 Auto Pistol at 14 and never shot anyone. No car seat belts.
Most stores closed on Sunday. With such “horrid” conditions, how the hell did I live to be 63 years old? Common sense, personal responsibility and a unified culture. . . that’s how! All gone now. . . thanks, Socialist Democrats.

scullymj on October 6, 2009 at 8:36 PM

I use CFL’s where appropriate, but have noticed that their potential energy savings are more than canceled out by their highly variable (and sometimes brief) lifespan. In hard-to-reach fixtures, incandescent bulbs are still the preferred choice. I plan to stock up on enough incandescents to get me through until the cost curve on LED bulbs comes down out of the stratosphere. (It used to be that they weren’t bright enough, but that problem has already been solved). Then I will happily switch to an all-LED household, without a single government mandate to compel me.

HTL on October 6, 2009 at 8:39 PM

I worked for 17 years with one of the leading private-sector data collection companies on the planet, the last 7 as a manager. We had 3 priorities in every job we did:
1) Accuracy of data
2) Integrity of data collected
3) Cost-effectiveness of the process

The balance of the priorities was dependent on the priorities of the paying customer. While 100% accuracy is both unattainable and unverifiable, the degree of tolerable error is determined in advance by the customer because of the Primacy of #3. In the private sector, the person commissioning the process must be satisfied that the process, not necessarily the results, met expectations.

In contrast, recently I’ve been working again for the Census Bureau. The USCB pretend that both priorities #1 and #2 are not just attainable but expected, yet all employees are repeatedly amazed by the poor work we are constantly asked to verify. Who could have done that shoddy work? Why, the same co-workers who are out there verifying your work, Einstein. Priority #3 not only isn’t primary, it is merely an afterthought used to determine which employees receive extra work (as though all work performed by all employees was of the same standard “perfect” performance.) In short, priorities #1 and #3 will be unattainable in the 2010 Census.

And since so many Americans of all political/ethnic/racial stripes do not trust the Census Bureau enough to give us accurate data, regardless of how well we practice #2, the data will be flawed in the first place.

The bottom line is that, to a layman working on the inside, the mission of the 2010 Census is to gather data in a systematic enough fashion, and to assure that every Census office follows the rigid guidelines set down by Washington so that the data itself and the collection process used will be unimpeachable.

In other words, we’re protecting ourselves from being sued (if that’s possible) or our data being treated as irrelevant.

So if the data-collection is flawed, we must make it uniformly flawed, so no particular subgroup can claim that they were discriminated against. That’s business in the public sector.

To private sector professionals, such intellectual dishonesty and abrogation of our mission statement is beyond offensive.

By the way, I do not work for ACORN, so stop asking that stupid question!

rwenger43 on October 6, 2009 at 8:43 PM

Sorry for the diatribe, but I had to get that off my chest but into a forum that wouldn’t seriously risk my future employment….

rwenger43 on October 6, 2009 at 8:46 PM

Dominion, are Halogena bulbs as hot as regular halogen bulbs? Halogen bulbs, if they fall against anything flammable (paper, curtains, etc.) will start a fire.

Pelayo on October 6, 2009 at 8:06 PM

I would say the 70 watt bulbs put off about the same amount of heat as 100 watt incandescents. The T60 Halogena is white on the inside, and is the same size and almost the same shape as an incandescent. Right now, I have them in my ceiling fans and one table lamp and have not had any problems with heat from the bulbs. Check them out: http://www.amazon.com/Philips-70-Watt-Halogena-Energy-2-Pack/dp/B001FA07UW

Dominion on October 6, 2009 at 8:49 PM

I’ve been hoarding incandescent lightbulbs like Elaine with the Sponges on Seinfeld. Got a closet full.

ErinF on October 6, 2009 at 8:50 PM

I’m lost,light bulbs and the CFL, the Canadian Football League?

Jeff from WI on October 6, 2009 at 6:10 PM

Night games, EH ?

Red State State of Mind on October 6, 2009 at 8:52 PM

scullymj on October 6, 2009 at 8:36 PM

Hey, Oldguy megadittoes there scully. All I gotta say is You lucky dawg, you had a .45, I had to get by on an old Walther p38 that I borrowed from a family friend. Of course I also had the obligatory shotgun and my trusty .22 rifle. Seriously we played all those old agressive games like red rover, and kick the can and remember hedge apple fights, sometimes we used horse apples but you had to make sure they had been aged long enough :-) Hell it’s a wonder we didn’t grow up to be serial killers or something.

Oldnuke on October 6, 2009 at 8:52 PM

GrannyDee on October 6, 2009 at 6:34 PM

I read your article regarding your “gift” of cfl bulbs. Interestingly enough, this was reason for the $21.60 cost to the consumer – That covers the cost of the bulbs ($3.50 each), their delivery and the delivery of the power consumers would have used if they didn’t have them.

So in other words, you’re going to be overcharged for the bulbs, pay for the electricity to run them AND pay for the electricity you would have used if you didn’t have cfl’s. Wow, you all are gettin’ scr&wed. I can hardly wait for crap and trade to be implemented.

ladyhawke53 on October 6, 2009 at 8:59 PM

Hey, if we aren’t scared of a little mercury anymore can we bring back mercury-based biocides and fungicides? They worked Great! /sarc

mad scientist on October 6, 2009 at 9:07 PM

ladyhawke53 on October 6, 2009 at 8:59 PM

As one blogger wrote on the Plain Dealer website:

So not only am I overpaying for bulbs I don’t want, I am paying for the electricity that I would have used if I didn’t have the bulbs? First Energy is charging me for the bulbs AND charging me for the electricity that I WOULD have used if I don’t use the bulbs? But if I use the bulbs, I STILL pay for the electricity that I would have used if I DON’T use them? Does this make sense to anyone?

Screwed, blued and tatooed, that’s us in N.E. Ohio.

GrannyDee on October 6, 2009 at 9:25 PM

Had the same thing happen last year, in a table lamp. Was right there to watch it. The base got hot, began to sputter, glowed red and smoked, and then welded itself into the socket before I could turn it off,.

So now there is a box full of CFL’s in the basement and a hoard of incan’s in the closet.

These things ARE fire hazards, in my humble opinion.

Yoop on October 6, 2009 at 3:48 PM

I had forgotten about that aspect. I had one go in my home office. Luckily I was in the office at the time.

Again, the cfls are a false economy. I mentioned previously that the total cost pollution wise of the cfls is probably higher when you look at the complexity of manufacture and throw in the problems with mercury and cleanup.

However, when you add in the ‘carbon footprint’ of a house burnt to the ground, then the cfls might very well have the effect of actually increasing carbon emissions.

BTW – the whole global warming thing is bulldroppings. Just look at the great lakes 6000 years ago.. actually you can’t. they weren’t there. That area was under an ice sheet 2 freaking miles thick. Edison was still 5900 years from inventing his illumination device. So, what the hell caused all that ice to melt??

bullseye on October 6, 2009 at 9:32 PM


The Cuda deals with the Dollar and the green energy enemy…..OIL….in one posting on Facebook.

Further Proof of the Need for Energy IndependenceShare
Today at 7:39pm

The British newspaper The Independent reported today that Gulf oil producers were negotiating with Russia, China, Japan and France to replace the dollar in pricing oil with a basket of currencies.[1] According to the Wall Street Journal, Arab oil officials have denied the story, but even the possibility of such a talk weakens the dollar and renews fears about its continued viability as an international reserve currency.[2] In fact, today a United Nations official called for a new global reserve currency to replace the dollar and end our “privilege” to run up huge deficits.[3] We can see the effect of this in the price of gold, which hit a record high today in response to fears about the weakened dollar.[4]

All of this is a result of our out-of-control debt. This is why we need to rein in spending, and this is also why we need energy independence. A weakened dollar means higher commodity prices. This will make it more difficult to pay our bills – including the bill to import oil.

In his book Architects of Ruin, Peter Schweizer points out that the Obama administration is focusing primarily on “green energy”, while ignoring our need to develop our domestic conventional energy resources.[5] We’re ignoring the looming crisis caused by our dependence on foreign oil. Because we’re dependent on foreign nations for our oil, we’re also at their mercy if they decide to dump the dollar as their trade currency. We can’t allow ourselves to be so vulnerable to the whims of foreign nations. That’s why we must develop our own domestic supplies of oil and gas.

Though the chant of “Drill, baby, drill” was much derided, it expressed the need to confront this issue head-on before it reaches a crisis point.

Bottom line: let’s stop digging ourselves into debt and start drilling for energy independence.

- Sarah Palin

She’s the only politician that I know of that is willing to tell it like it is. No wonder the D.C. rinos hate her so much.

PappyD61 on October 6, 2009 at 9:33 PM

Last year I debated some knuckleheads, i.e., libs on the prospects of opening ones windows during a Minnesota winter day when the temp is oh, say, -10 with a wind chill factor of -25 to cleanse your home of the poison gas from a broken CFL. 15-minutes of heating the great whte outdoors should make you feel warm and comfy, especially when you shut down the forced air furnace at the same time. When your thermostat drops to 50-degrees and you finally close the windows and turn the furnace back on, let’s see how much energy is wasted getting your rooms back up to a somewhat bearable 68. My advice to one and all is to stock up on incandescents well before the law takes effect in 2012 and maybe get by for a few years while da gubmint sees the error of its ways and repeals the manufacture and ban on Edison’s brainchild. Now there’s an idea, huh?

Goldy1 on October 6, 2009 at 6:50 PM

Of course, while many people will close the doors and open the windows, they will probably NOT block the cool air returns. Most returns do not have a damper built in. SO, a certain amount of mercury will be pulled back into the ductwork to be redistributed throughout your house. I’m not a chemist but I would assume that the mercury vapor passing through the heat exchanger will make it a bit more problematic.

bullseye on October 6, 2009 at 9:37 PM

rwenger43 on October 6, 2009 at 8:08 PM

Well,, the elites would be the ones changing the laws to force us all back to the stone ages. They would want us eating from our community gardens while mandating what vegies we would be allowed to plant. They would force many of us to work local, buy local, live local to save the planet. They would restrict our diet of meat,, and the kind of meat. They would restrict our housing and our energy use.
Bill Clinton said about a year or more ago that Americans should use grass for roofs instead of shingles. I have heard other libs talk about restricting our freedom of movement. Where and how much we can shop. What we can eat. The kind of entertainment we should be allowed to have.
Look at the total of all the things that are being said.
We eat too much food.
We eat the wrong kinds of food.
We buy our food at the wrong places.
We don’t carry our food that we bought in the right kinds of bags.
We don’t wash our food the right way.
We don’t cook our food the right way.
We eat out too much.
We travel too much.
We travel too freely.
We drive the wrong cars.
We drive too fast.
We live in the wrong places.
We buy houses that are too big.
We heat our homes the wrong way.
We keep our homes too hot.
We keep our homes too cool.
We use the wrong fuels.
We use the wrong light bulbs.
We buy the wrong TVs.
We watch too much TV.
Everything about our lives is wrong and bad. Our lifestyles are dangerous to ourselves and to the very planet.
They want to liberate us from our freedoms, from our food, from our homes, from our families, from all of our conveniences and luxuries,,, for all of these things, according to the liberal lie, are dangerous. A threat to our existence. The truth is, our liberties, our freedoms, yes,, are a threat to their plans.
It is not about the light bulb that we choose to use in our homes. The light bulb is not the danger. It is about our freedom to go out buy the light bulb of our choice that is the threat!
That is the thing that must be destroyed. The freedom of choice! The freedom of choice to go where we want, do what we want, buy what we want, say what we want.
And is always about that and never about anything more than that!

JellyToast on October 6, 2009 at 9:59 PM

Global Warming Climate Change “solutions”, like Global Warming Climate Change “science”, to paraphrase, are so bad, they are not even wrong…

elgeneralisimo on October 6, 2009 at 10:03 PM

How long until they start putting an “environmental disposal fee” (tax) built in to the cost of each CFL sold to “defray the cost of cleaning up the environment.” They already do this with many other products.

How do you like that $20 light bulb now?

mojojojo on October 6, 2009 at 10:18 PM

Green is the new Red. It’s all about taking your freedoms and controlling everything you do.

Christian Conservative on October 6, 2009 at 10:48 PM

Doesn’t everyone like the way the dim, blue illumination makes their home look like a morgue?

on fire on October 6, 2009 at 10:53 PM

Proud Rino on October 6, 2009 at 1:45 PM

…..And you voted for obama..Quit licking the lightbulbs, dummy. They’re not an ice cream cone!

HornetSting on October 6, 2009 at 1:58 PM

Too funny- amost yuked, I was laughing so hard!

NightmareOnKStreet on October 6, 2009 at 11:01 PM

Mine are bright. And I don’t drop them like you clumsy oafs so no problem there.

tlynch001 on October 6, 2009 at 11:11 PM

Not all CFL’s are bad. I’m a lighting designer and the CFL’s we use are actually very good (we have trip tubes all over our office building). However, the CFL’s(the curly q ones) being foisted on the American people are not of the quality of the professional types that we design with. The Govt basically forced manufacturers to produce a lamp that is in a more reasonable price range, thus reducing the quality of the lamps significantly. This whole thing is a perfect example of the Govt trying to defy the laws of research and development by forcing a product on the public that has not(and may never be) optimized for widespread public use. So let’s try to remember this is a Government thing first and a CFL thing second.

SG1_Conservative on October 6, 2009 at 11:22 PM

She’s the only politician that I know of that is willing to tell it like it is. No wonder the D.C. rinos hate her so much.

PappyD61 on October 6, 2009 at 9:33 PM

And why I love and pray for her so Much.

IowaWoman on October 6, 2009 at 11:34 PM

Switched about 90% of my house to cheap CFLs about four years ago. Not one failure. Good light. WAAAY less energy used on lighting. I must be a Commie.

INFDL on October 6, 2009 at 11:42 PM

There is a lot of misinformation going on here and in the video many of their points were wrong. A few years back my electricity bill skyrocketed, teenagers and many computers contributed to that, I work in my shop all the time and had 8 4 foot twin fluorescent fixtures at 40W each bulb, did some research and found CFLs with the same kelvin rating as the old style bulbs, 5000K, replaced them all with one 100W 5000K CFL and lowered my bill 80 dollars a month, the bulbs where 8 bucks online and I have had one fail prematurely, the rest are still going strong after 4 years. People need to know if you don’t like the shade of the light you can get different ratings, the common ones are 2700K and that light is too yellow for me, so in reference to the video, they are hanging upside down, come instantly on, require no warm up, have lasted in excess of 4 years and cause no interference, SG1_conservative is correct, do some research online and you can find them that meet your needs, some of this bad press is not correct according to my experience

fixer44 on October 6, 2009 at 11:43 PM

“No comment” is quite a common name. How do you distinguish one from the other? Wonder what the middle name is?

ricelchew on October 7, 2009 at 12:14 AM

Aren’t we all missing the point here?

The federal govt is telling us what kind of lightbulbs we are ALLOWED to use. Similar to the debate (and subsequent banning) of CFC-based freon, they did this based on unsound (to say the least) science. They didn’t care. They did it anyway. And we let them. Again.

runawayyyy on October 6, 2009 at 5:06 PM

Absolutely right!!! And <em>there are some interesting parallels between the CFC Freon ban and the light bulb ban:

1. The “science” behind the change was flawed and largely based on conjecture and anecdotal evidence.

2. The original item was absolutely effective and harmless to humans as proved by 60-100 years of use.

3. The replacement item is inferior and highly poisonous.

4. The replacement item costs at least 15-20 times the cost of the original item.

5. No discernable societal benefit has accrued, and the original scientific argument has been discredited.

Tyrants, of course, are totally unconcerned about any of this.

landlines on October 7, 2009 at 12:32 AM

Does that mean that everyone who bought a fuel efficient car instead of an SUV, is responsible for the CAFE standard?

MarkTheGreat on October 6, 2009 at 4:46 PM

The CAFE standard is responsible for the SUV by causing the death of the compared to SUVs fuel efficient station wagons.

darktood on October 7, 2009 at 2:28 AM

Label me SUCKER. Last year I purchased a bunch of these CFLs thinking that they would save me money. They stink. It takes a while for them to warm up to full brightness. Three of them burned out in the first minute.

shick on October 7, 2009 at 4:52 AM

“Trust me the universe will not notice what kind of lightbulb we use nor will it care. There is more energy available than we could ever imagine using all we have to do is tap it in whatever form we can find it. It’s there for the taking. Save energy, only a feeling non thinking progressive could even imagine such a concept.

Oldnuke on October 6, 2009 at 5:34 PM”

I wonder if they will still make edison bulbs for use on subs. Otherwise a near miss from an RBU would crack all the mother gia bulbs and fill the sub with mercury vapors..

bullseye on October 7, 2009 at 6:25 AM

Switched about 90% of my house to cheap CFLs about four years ago. Not one failure. Good light. WAAAY less energy used on lighting. I must be a Commie.

INFDL on October 6, 2009 at 11:42 PM

Wrong assumption. You switched of your own free will, not because some government hack mandated you do so.

I maintain that the cost calculations for the CFLs is flawed. They are more complex to manufacture. I don’t believe that the total impact of manufacturing the additional parts along with the transportation and assembly of those parts has been taken into effect.

Also, when they break during the winter and you open your windows, you are still circulating poisonous mercury vapors throught the return air ducts of your forced air system. Just the treat for the newborn baby in the next room and the preteen kids in the other adjoining room.

bullseye on October 7, 2009 at 6:30 AM

CFLs are a useless, “feel good” measure that will end up hurting the Chinese workers since they are the ones at the “coalface” of the mercury mining industry.

Siren46 on October 7, 2009 at 7:06 AM

And here’s the link I meant to include…

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article6211261.ece

Siren46 on October 7, 2009 at 7:06 AM

Must I now throw out my X-file collection ?

James M on October 7, 2009 at 7:16 AM

We replaced all of our bulbs to CFLs. Besides the worse lighting and danger involved, THEY DON’T SAVE MONEY in energy and DON’T LAST NEARLY AS LONG as promised, not even as long as our incandescent bulbs do.

Until the likes of Vegas and every big city’s downtown districts cut out the excess lighting for commercial attraction sake, tell the “Gangreen” Global Warmingers where to screw their CFLs.

I noticed a month ago a Drudge headline story regarding Germans hording the incandescents. This week the German headline story regards a huge fine assessed against those still using incandescents vs. CFLs.

There’s a market for American quality made incandescent bulbs; the cheap ones from China don’t measure up in durability.

maverick muse on October 7, 2009 at 7:21 AM

Come on. Embrace the mercury.
faraway on October 6, 2009 at 5:08 PM

Growing up in the 50’s we played with mercury. All houses had lead paint. We had BB gun battles. No bike helmets. Never had a bike stolen. Exposed bolts on school yard swings mounted on hard asphalt. Lots of skinned knees. Had my own army surplus .45 Auto Pistol at 14 and never shot anyone. No car seat belts.
Most stores closed on Sunday. With such “horrid” conditions, how the hell did I live to be 63 years old? Common sense, personal responsibility and a unified culture. . . that’s how! All gone now. . . thanks, Socialist Democrats.

scullymj on October 6, 2009 at 8:36 PM

I long for those daystoo.
You can thank low down scum sucking, evil, rotten, I hate them so much, disgusting lawyers for most of those changes. You can thank atheists for the Sunday change.

Jeff from WI on October 7, 2009 at 7:22 AM

Was it a slow day..light bulb threads? What’s next…low flush toilet threads?

Jeff from WI on October 7, 2009 at 7:37 AM

A couple of years ago, we had a mercury spill in a fifth grade class – the resultant Chinese fire drill was on par with clean up after a mega disaster.

To think we used to play with this stuff as kids — my favorite was coating an old dime and making it appear shiny new. Between that and biting lead fishing sinkers on and off the line for over sixty odd years, it explains my odd deterioration. Throw in a few questionable wild mushrooms,and eating a zillion pounds of mercury and PCB laden fish, I’m beginning to feel the results. In winter I’m colder, in summer I’m warmer, my 74 year old hands shake a bit when I tie a fly or sight in on a nice buck. I just finished writing my fifth book-length story, and I put in a good active 15 – 18 hour day. Anecdotal evidence to be sure, but I do suspect we are carrying this entire thing too far.

Don L on October 7, 2009 at 7:46 AM

Only last month did my local utility company start mentioning in their newsletter that the “green” bulbs must be taken to special recycling centers; they helpfully provided a Web site that lists them. For more than a year, the utility has simply told us to buy the bulbs, with no mention of the disposal problems.

I’ve bought a supply of good ol’ incandescents at Big Lots, but must admit that I like CFLs in a couple of places: We have a flood light that’s very high on the outside of the house, and we haven’t had to change the CFL for more than three years now. And I like one in the overhead fixture in my bathroom, because it’s a bit dimmer when it first comes on. That’s nice in the middle of the night, when my eyes don’t want to be zapped by bright light.

KyMouse on October 7, 2009 at 7:50 AM

My personal clean up and disposal for the CLF’s – pack them up and mail them to the EPA!

FedUp on October 7, 2009 at 8:40 AM

My personal experience with CFLs is that they don’t last much longer than incandescents. I’m no longer buying CFLs.

hogfat on October 7, 2009 at 9:35 AM

What realy infuriates me about these lightbulbs is the fact that in a few years, we will be hearing about the horrible effects these things are having on the environment, as more and more of them are thrown away and end up in landfills. The need for special disposal at a recycling center has not been widely advertised, and the true extent of the toxicity of these things has been downplayed. It’s just crazy to force everyone in the country to start buying these toxic bombs. So how much did the manufacturers of these new bulbs donate to congressional compaigns?

mbs on October 7, 2009 at 9:50 AM

I forgot to mention, the CFL’s I’ve bought do not last nearly as long as advertised. I’ve had a couple burn out in 6 months, one lasted a year.

mbs on October 7, 2009 at 9:51 AM

SG1_Conservative on October 6, 2009 at 11:22 PM

You’re a lighting designer? I’m an electrical design engineer. We should talk.

Snowed In on October 7, 2009 at 10:18 AM

In Ohio the electric company is forcing us to change. They are charging us for two of these bulb and then sending two bulbs to us to use. I assume they are sending a coupon or something and we go pick them up ourselves, but talk about a lack of freedom. Where there is force, there is no freedom.

ConDem on October 7, 2009 at 10:23 AM

The Age of Stupid, indeed.

Perhaps this confederation of small minds needs a name. How about “Duncekins”?

Dr. Charles G. Waugh on October 7, 2009 at 11:10 AM

So the marketplace is socialist now?

cozmo on October 6, 2009 at 4:59 PM

Nice red herring, but no cigar.

The marketplace can enable stupid products that the environmentalists love to be made mandatory. Do you think if maybe only 10 people bought CFLs that Congress would still consider banning incandescents?

ICBMMan on October 7, 2009 at 11:29 AM

Psh. CFL’s are fine.

It’s being forced to use them that’s the problem.

TheUnrepentantGeek on October 7, 2009 at 11:38 AM

So the marketplace is socialist now?

cozmo on October 6, 2009 at 4:59 PM

Nice red herring, but no cigar.

The marketplace can enable stupid products that the environmentalists love to be made mandatory. Do you think if maybe only 10 people bought CFLs that Congress would still consider banning incandescents?

ICBMMan on October 7, 2009 at 11:29 AM

Not a red herring, I went back and reread your post to make sure. You blamed free choice for a bad government regulation.

Nobody bought enough of the cars to allow the CAFE standards to be raised last time.

Same thing will happen with incandescent bulbs.

People who prefer a Prius or CFL are not the enemy and attacking them will not help your cause.

cozmo on October 7, 2009 at 12:27 PM

Do you think if maybe only 10 people bought CFLs that Congress would still consider banning incandescents?

ICBMMan on October 7, 2009 at 11:29 AM

Yes, most definitely.

MarkTheGreat on October 7, 2009 at 1:06 PM

Not a red herring, I went back and reread your post to make sure. You blamed free choice for a bad government regulation.

Nobody bought enough of the cars to allow the CAFE standards to be raised last time.

Same thing will happen with incandescent bulbs.

People who prefer a Prius or CFL are not the enemy and attacking them will not help your cause.

cozmo on October 7, 2009 at 12:27 PM

Actually, I was blaming the people who by the very fact that they bought those items legitimized them. It’s not an attack, it’s the truth. And after reading some of the other posters here, they also have bought them, further feeding GE and the environmentalists who propagate the false premise that those items will reduce costs and save ze planet.

You’re right in that Congress and liberals in business and government would probably push these items and initiate the ban anyway. But why contribute to them? Why not stick to incandescents and regular cars, regardless of what people say?

I hope it’s not because these people want to “keep up with the Joneses” or to keep up with current trends. I’m afraid that’s why several here have made these decisions. I hope I’m wrong.

ICBMMan on October 7, 2009 at 2:13 PM

But why contribute to them? Why not stick to incandescents and regular cars, regardless of what people say?

Because that is the same logic that the left is using to push the incandescent ban and tiny cars. Just from the other side.

I use CFL’s because I like them. I like the light, I like the lack of heat they put out and I like the savings. I haven’t had any of the horror stories others have noted anecdotally, except I once had a cheap one heat up and burn. It never caught fire and near as I can figure, it was the transformer that heated up, shorted, and then quit. I changed it and never had another problem. This is in a house full of them and I burn the lights a lot.

My dad cannot ever remember voting for a democrat yet has a Smart car…because he likes it and it is a lot easier to take to the store than his F-250 dualie.

We don’t insist all people use CFL’s or eco-cars, or even care. But don’t tell us, or any other person who likes the freedom of choice, we cannot.

I once again say, that people who chose to buy these things are not the enemy, congress critters are. So you are better off going after them and not alienating us.

cozmo on October 7, 2009 at 3:38 PM

I once again say, that people who chose to buy these things are not the enemy, congress critters are. So you are better off going after them and not alienating us.

cozmo on October 7, 2009 at 3:38 PM

I will completely agree that we should go after the Congress idiots on this and other BS legislation. However, that does not mean we shouldn’t hold each other accountable.

ICBMMan on October 7, 2009 at 8:54 PM

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