Honduras suspends constitutional rights

posted at 10:56 am on September 28, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

The interim government of Honduras has attempted to ignore Manuel Zelaya as much as possible while he sits in the Brazilian embassy, which was a smart idea.  Unfortunately, Roberto Micheletti ran out of patience last night and suspended civil liberties, which will give new impetus to Zelaya’s supporters and further isolate Honduras:

The de facto government that took power here three months ago suspended constitutional civil liberties late Sunday in an attempt to keep the supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya off the streets Monday.

Zelaya, holed up at the Brazilian Embassy with about 70 supporters and journalists after his clandestine return to Honduras a week ago, called on his supporters on Monday to launch “a final offensive.”

It’s not clear whether Zelaya meant this as a show of support or an effort to cause the de facto government of President Roberto Micheletti to buckle and allow Zelaya to return to power.

The decree could allow the government to shut down pro-Zelaya radio and TV stations and arrest his supporters at will. Sunday night’s decree indicates a hardening line by the Micheletti government, which refused to allow four diplomats earlier in the day to enter Honduras. They were from the Washington, D.C.-based Organization of American States and had come to Honduras to organize an upcoming OAS mission.

Until now, the only mistake Honduras made was to exile Zelaya instead of trying him for his crimes.  The fact that Honduras had operated normally, allowing full constitutional protections for its citizens while Zelaya blathered about the “coup” presented an embarrassing situation for the US.  They tried to treat Micheletti as a man bent on seizing power, when Micheletti replaced the real culprit in this crisis.

This changes that situation.  At best, it puts Micheletti on the same level as Zelaya, as least temporarily.  It certainly gives the Obama administration another argument for its full-throated support of Zelaya over the last few weeks.  It will make it more difficult for Honduras’ defenders in Congress to argue against that White House policy now.  Given that American pressure or a lack of it could make the difference in Honduras, that may be a very costly suspension of civil liberties for the Micheletti government.


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Bad move.

Vashta.Nerada on September 28, 2009 at 10:58 AM

Does this suspension also apply to the Israeli mercenaries operating the stealth raygun?

Vashta.Nerada on September 28, 2009 at 10:59 AM

Dumb, Zelaya and his supporters was getting nowhere.

Rocks on September 28, 2009 at 10:59 AM

Well, darn.

Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:00 AM

This just plays into the hands of Chavez and Chavez.

Oh yeah and Obama and Hillary too.

Mr. Joe on September 28, 2009 at 11:00 AM

Does this suspension also apply to the Israeli mercenaries operating the stealth raygun?

I had the exact same question.

radioboyatl on September 28, 2009 at 11:01 AM

Communist Revolutionary doctrine advocates the disruption of daily life and security to force the target government to suspend civil rights, in order to “prove” that it is oppressive.

The alternative is to meet massive social disruption with force and arrests, etc, which leads to the same end, of course.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:01 AM

I disagree. The more Micheletti acts like a tyrannical dictator, the more likely it is that Obama will support him.

Daggett on September 28, 2009 at 11:01 AM

Really, really dumb.

beatcanvas on September 28, 2009 at 11:02 AM

OT: Today is Jerry Clower’s birthday… he would have been 83…

http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=jerry+clower

Some guy tweeted that I just thought I had to share…

ninjapirate on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

Communist Revolutionary doctrine advocates the disruption of daily life and security to force the target government to suspend civil rights, in order to “prove” that it is oppressive.

The alternative is to meet massive social disruption with force and arrests, etc, which leads to the same end, of course.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:01 AM

I wonder how much wiggle room this has.

Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

Oh that was incredibly stupid. It sounds like something zero would do.

You don’t fight socialist fascists by acting like a socialist fascist.

Spiritk9 on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

Yeah, this was a dumb move…

ninjapirate on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

Former president Mel Zelaya is calling for his supporters to come to Tegucigalpa from all over the country for a huge protest on Monday, September 28. He supposedly is asking for a peaceful protest to call for dialogue − at least that is what he says publicly to the media.

This call for dialogue is a ‘show’ for the OAS delegates who may arrive this week and the international community, which seems to readily ‘buy’ whatever story Zelaya is selling, no matter how outrageous or ridiculous.

However, talking directly to his followers and through his ‘sub-commanders,’ a much different message is sent. There is much talk on various resistance websites and blogs about violence, weapons, and assassinations. Reportedly, gangs have infiltrated the zelayistas’ marches. Zelaya continues to incite his followers with chants of “Restitution or Death!”, “Out with the golpistas”, and tells them to “maintain the battle” on daily local radio and television interviews.

From La Gringa’s Bogicito.

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 11:04 AM

stupid, not a good idea to go the Pinochet route while Obama is in power, idiot

now the MSM will sound the horns for the One, ‘he was right all along to back Zelaya’

jp on September 28, 2009 at 11:04 AM

While Daggett finds the humor in this (thanks), this was a dumb move. Hope Micheletti quickly ends the decision, the longer he suspends rights, the stupider this action becomes.

batter on September 28, 2009 at 11:05 AM

Kinda sorta like what goes on in this country with the Muslim Administration

bluegrass on September 28, 2009 at 11:05 AM

civil war in the offing courtesy of the Obama/Chavez doctrine.

rob verdi on September 28, 2009 at 11:05 AM

From Wikipedia, for what its worth:

The Sedition Act of 1918 (May 16, 1918) was an amendment to the Espionage Act of 1917 passed at the urging of President Woodrow Wilson, who was concerned that dissent, in time of war, was a significant threat to morale. The passing of this act forbade Americans to use “disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language” about the United States government, flag, or armed forces during war. The act also allowed the Postmaster General to deny mail delivery to dissenters of government policy during wartime.

Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:05 AM

I wonder what, if any, activities Chavez’s intel are engaged in. We don’t know the full story, Micheletti might be trying to prevent a bloodbath. He definitely needs a better press agent.

Bill C on September 28, 2009 at 11:05 AM

Zelaya, who’s been holed up at the Brazilian Embassy for the past seven days with about 70 supporters and journalists after his clandestine return to Honduras, had called on his supporters to launch “a final offensive” Monday.

This is what they are dealing with.

rob verdi on September 28, 2009 at 11:06 AM

The decree could allow the government to shut down pro-Zelaya radio and TV stations and arrest his supporters at will. Sunday night’s decree indicates a hardening line by the Micheletti government, which refused to allow four diplomats earlier in the day to enter Honduras. They were from the Washington, D.C.-based Organization of American States and had come to Honduras to organize an upcoming OAS mission.

Unless I am wrong, the U.S. denied visas to Honduran officials.

Johan Klaus on September 28, 2009 at 11:06 AM

They better do what is necessary to stop a Zelaya/Obama coup in the making. Pretending everything is hunky dory is not an option.

Buddahpundit on September 28, 2009 at 11:06 AM

This changes that situation.

How so? Honduras considers Zelaya’s presence and support by foreigners and their embassy to put the country at risk. Is that difficult to understand? I guess so. Sheesh.

At best, it puts Micheletti on the same level as Zelaya, as least temporarily.

This is pretty strained logic. Do we not acknowledge emergency situations? Just because you think Zelaya’s presence presents no risk to Honduras doesn’t mean much of anything. You still can’t even bring yourself to call Zelaya’s attempted coup (and ongoing attempted coup) an attempted coup. The whole world is coming down, illegitimately, on Honduras. They consider their nation threatened.

“Same level” … really? What level would that be?

progressoverpeace on September 28, 2009 at 11:08 AM

I was right then. I am right now. The mistake Honduras made was in not killing the dictator wannabe immediately.

corona on September 28, 2009 at 11:09 AM

This is very similar to Lincoln suspending habeas corpus for Confederate sympathizers. United States citizens mostly take for granted our ability to peacefully change governments, at least since the Civil War. It’s hard for us to imagine situations where political legitimacy is completely up for grabs. We got a tiny taste of the feeling during Gore v. Bush. And wasn’t that a time of calm introspection? Just kidding of course.

I’m not saying Michelleti did something ‘right’, but in the case of what’s rapidly evolving into civil war it’s to be expected. Now imagine the world community had respected the Honduran constitution and mechanism for preventing El Presidentes for life. This never would have become necessary.

I wonder if non-interventionist (at least with respect to US enemies) Obama will send the USMC to Honduras now?

Beagle on September 28, 2009 at 11:10 AM

Not good.

Let the Left show the violence inherent in its philosophy, then react. I do understand the desire for order and safety, but not at the expense of civil liberties.

rbj on September 28, 2009 at 11:11 AM

Johan Klaus on September 28, 2009 at 11:06 AM

Good point!

notropis on September 28, 2009 at 11:11 AM

if you were in there shoes, what would you do?

rob verdi on September 28, 2009 at 11:11 AM

Beagle
exactly.

rob verdi on September 28, 2009 at 11:12 AM

Zelaya, holed up at the Brazilian Embassy with about 70 supporters and journalists after his clandestine return to Honduras a week ago, called on his supporters on Monday to launch “a final offensive.”

Not the best move, but the blod kind of forced his hand. That’s pretty much a decleration of war right there. It won’t look great, but since the international community isn’t honestly reporting on the situation, i don’ t think the honduran govt had many options.

todler on September 28, 2009 at 11:12 AM

Don’t give Zero any ideas.

Mr. Grump on September 28, 2009 at 11:13 AM

September 27, 2009. It was just announced on the news that US Ambassador Hugo Llorens is assisting ex-president Mel Zelaya to set up a parallel government led by Zelaya within Honduras. They showed Llorens big toothy grinning face over and over again.

Have the United States of America led by President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lost their minds?

Are they trying to start a war in Honduras?

Are they going to assist Zelaya in accessing the $165 million in international aid funds to finance his revolution of violent supporters?

This is foreign intervention in a sovereign country by the no longer great United States of America, who is still the great bully of the world − except where it is needed. The difference now is that at least in the past, the US stood up for its allies.

I hope all the countries who stood by and let this happen never have to face this in their own country.

Also from LaGringa’s Blogicito (an American living in Honduras).

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 11:13 AM

Is he even a citizen? I thought that was stripped automatically That makes quite a difference, particularly if this is true.

However, talking directly to his followers and through his ’sub-commanders,’ a much different message is sent. There is much talk on various resistance websites and blogs about violence, weapons, and assassinations. Reportedly, gangs have infiltrated the zelayistas’ marches. Zelaya continues to incite his followers with chants of “Restitution or Death!”, “Out with the golpistas”, and tells them to “maintain the battle” on daily local radio and television interviews.

a capella on September 28, 2009 at 11:15 AM

At the outset Obomanation was NOT in favor of Zelaya and he and Hillary have turned as they usually do saying “as I said previously”….blah blah. Indecisive and completely over his head. Completely unaware of the world issues and how to handle them. Yet another failed call by the dirty liar. What do we expect, he’s not from around here….. he has NO idea of American thinking and culture and he denies American exceptionalism. Never to be boasted but for God’s sake acknowledge it you scum bag excuse for a leader.

highninside on September 28, 2009 at 11:17 AM

Communist Revolutionary doctrine advocates the disruption of daily life and security to force the target government to suspend civil rights, in order to “prove” that it is oppressive.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:01 AM

Hence the need for Obama to refer to his enemies as “racists’, “mob”, “violent”, etc.

faraway on September 28, 2009 at 11:17 AM

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 11:13 AM
Great posts. I would not be so quick to condemn Honduras. Zelaya knows he has the support of Obama and there is no telling how far he is willing to go to get his power back.

fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 11:18 AM

Maybe they’re cracking down in an attempt to buy favor with President Obama.

But seriously, bad move.

BadgerHawk on September 28, 2009 at 11:18 AM

When you are dealing with evil (Lelaya) on this magnitude, who has the support from this many dictators, it is hard to determine what course of action to take to protect your country. To allow violent riots to take place can only create havoc and be beneficial to the those wanting displace the rightful government. “Suspending” constitutional rights may be the best method of securing the country until Zelaya can be disposed of.

volsense on September 28, 2009 at 11:19 AM

This changes that situation. At best, it puts Micheletti on the same level as Zelaya, as least temporarily.

Excuse me, Ed, but that seems to be an uninformed assertion, or at least one based solely on what McClatchy decided to tell you in the story.

Before running off half cocked, you might want to wait to see if there are constitutional provisions for doing this.

As for the part, “which refused to allow four diplomats earlier in the day to enter Honduras”, five diplomats arrived, four of which were unannounced to the Honduran government. The four were refused entry at the airport and the fifth, who had arranged beforehand it’s entry, was allowed to stay.

Brazil has recalled it’s envoy. Honduras, citing international diplomatic protocols/(laws?) made official the call to close down the embassy, removing the Brazilian flag and emblem. Brazil told them to go pound salt. Who is in the right there based on what is required?

There’s more but that is enough, except back to the civil liberties once more. What is the likelihood that those who might march in protest are even citizens of Honduras? Maybe Honduras knows more about the status of those attempting to create instability, than we do right now and have announced this suspension for this reason.

Those of us who support Honduran democracy and the rule of law need more information before asserting that the Honduran government is acting stupidly.

Dusty on September 28, 2009 at 11:19 AM

It really is amazing how much you people hate democracy.

greggish on September 28, 2009 at 11:19 AM

OT: Today is Jerry Clower’s birthday… he would have been 83…

http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=jerry+clower

Some guy tweeted that I just thought I had to share…

ninjapirate on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

The country needs more Ledbetters.

hoosiermama on September 28, 2009 at 11:20 AM

Whoops. The first sentence should have been in quotes and offset.

Dusty on September 28, 2009 at 11:20 AM

MODERATOR!
Can you check the problem with pajamasmedia.com?
Having problems getting connected.

Cybergeezer on September 28, 2009 at 11:21 AM

It is only a stupid move if there is no free and fair election in November. Otherwise, rhe move was correct. Obama couldn’t get it right unless the move was left.

Big Nicholas on September 28, 2009 at 11:22 AM

OT Politico:

The new stimulus-tracking website at Recovery.gov is up and running, the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board announced Monday. The site features a map showing disbursements from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and tools allowing citizens to track spending by state and agency.

faraway on September 28, 2009 at 11:22 AM

Better to have rallied the people to support the Constitution … watch the American Tea Parties for how it’s done.

tarpon on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

How does that crow taste HA? Another conservative talking point down the drain…

crr6 on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

I have a lot of Honduran friends living here in the U.S. Some of them lean left, others right, so I decided to ask them who they thought the “good guy” in this scenario was, Zelaya, or Michiletti. All of them said the same thing…why assume than any of them are good guys?

We should say a prayer of thanks for living in such a great country. I’m no Obama fan, but he is a far cry from the sort of people that line up for public office in Latin America, where the big difference between parties is who gets to rape the country for the next several years.

tlclark on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

Hrm.

Martial law is, on its face, a REALLY bad idea. Micheletti better have good intelligence about what Zeyala, Chavez, etc., have planned in order to do this.

teke184 on September 28, 2009 at 11:25 AM

Lincoln suspended habeas corpus as well as other civil liberties.

Jdripper on September 28, 2009 at 11:26 AM

I wonder how much wiggle room this has.
Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

A-r-g-e-n-t-i-n-a.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:26 AM

Honduras is not as image sensitive as the United States. They can afford to be the bad guy in the eyes of the MSM if that’s what it takes to deal with Zelaya and his cronies. In fact, they don’t have to play the holier than thou game at all. That game is for cocktail party scene brown nosers to play. You know, the kind of people who infest Washington in both parties.

keep the change on September 28, 2009 at 11:27 AM

This cannot end well.

infidel4life on September 28, 2009 at 11:27 AM

Whatever the actual case is on the ground or the actual wisdom of this particular action, I say it is Obama’s fault.

aikidoka on September 28, 2009 at 11:27 AM

How does that crow taste HA? Another conservative talking point down the drain…crr6 on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

Slice it howwever you want, Obooba is supporting a lawless dictator. Michiletti’s in a damned if I do/don’t box. He wouldn’t be there w/o Obooba’s duplicity.

Hey, see ya on the next ACORN child sex slave facilitation thread.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:29 AM

rob verdi,

And you were exactly right to highlight the term “final offensive.” It’s hard to read much nuance into that one, though I’m sure our State Department could spin it into the desire for a ‘peaceful two-state solution.’

Beagle on September 28, 2009 at 11:29 AM

Obama would like to set up a regional OAS “Peacekeeping” force, similar to what the AU (formerly OAU) has in Africa.

This is a great opportunity. Troops from the US, Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil — all working together to enforce an OAS mandated “cease-fire.”

Lovely.

notropis on September 28, 2009 at 11:29 AM

I don’t know all the facts, but is clear the Honduran government acted stupidly.

-Ed Morrissey

keep the change on September 28, 2009 at 11:31 AM

And it’s a great chance for Obama to establish some “street cred.”

This should show the world, once and for all, that he really is not Bush.

notropis on September 28, 2009 at 11:31 AM

So far the restrictions seem relatively focused, ie targeted at genuinely disruptive speech and behavior, and those arrested are to be delivered to civilian, not military custody. Not a pleasant scenario, and susceptible to abuse, but it does seem that the government is attempting a graduated response. I hope it works better for them than it did for McNamara.

Seth Halpern on September 28, 2009 at 11:32 AM

I’m no Obama fan, but he is a far cry from the sort of people that line up for public office in Latin America,

tlclark on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

No he’s not. The Precedent is even worse, as he is looking to actively destroy the wealth of the US and turn us into a Latin American sh!thole. The Precedent is exactly the sort you expect to find in most Latin American countries – an anti-capitalist, anti-liberty, strong-arm wannabe … he could have been raised in Argentina, seeing his moronic political ideas.

You can give thanks after The Precedent is gone, if the US remains intact, which I highly doubt will be the case.

progressoverpeace on September 28, 2009 at 11:32 AM

We should say a prayer of thanks for living in such a great country. I’m no Obama fan, but he is a far cry from the sort of people that line up for public office in Latin America, where the big difference between parties is who gets to rape the country for the next several years.

tlclark on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

Oh! Are you in exile too?

Cybergeezer on September 28, 2009 at 11:33 AM

I have alot of respect for what happened in Honduras, but Ed is right. This doesn’t help their cause one bit. They have basically decided that they cant trust the people to decide for themselves between Zelaya and Freedom.

And it’s this distrust that will hurt him. He now sounds like big government that is out to tell you what you believe.

therightscoop on September 28, 2009 at 11:36 AM

O just seeped a little ‘precious fluid’ at the thought of suspending Constitutional rights.

“That Micheletti cat is alright after all! Invite him to the White House for some lines a beer.” – Barry O

Monica on September 28, 2009 at 11:38 AM

It really is amazing how much you people hate democracy.

Damned straight. It’d nothing but mob rule. Give me a Constitutional Republic any day!

Crawford on September 28, 2009 at 11:39 AM

I don’t enjoy saying “I told you so” about these things… but any fellow that leads off his administration with the extra-legal midnight-exile of his predecessor probably isn’t much more dedicated to niceties like civil liberties and constitutions that whoever he is replacing…

dieudonne on September 28, 2009 at 11:40 AM

They should back off this folly fast.

They have gained popular support for following their laws.

Not being Zelaya without the hat.

profitsbeard on September 28, 2009 at 11:40 AM

Chavez stated in his UN speech that Zelaya was transported to a US base in the process of being removed from power. Does anyone know if this was confirmed or denied?

LevStrauss on September 28, 2009 at 11:40 AM

Damned straight. It’d nothing but mob rule. Give me a Constitutional Republic any day!

Crawford on September 28, 2009 at 11:39 AM

Don’t confuse pure democracy with democratic ideals. Our constitutional republic sinks or swims on our ability to uphold democratic ideals.

dieudonne on September 28, 2009 at 11:41 AM

Obama thinks: 2nd look at Honduras!

profitsbeard on September 28, 2009 at 11:42 AM

They have basically decided that they cant trust the people to decide for themselves between Zelaya and Freedom.

I think you’re missing something here. It doesn’t take a huge percentage of the population to start rioting and cause enough havoc to ensure the need for a “peace-keeping” presence.

I have a friend with friends in Tegucigalpa (how’s that for an impeccable source?) who says the main fear of the anti-Zelaya crowd is that he will be returned to power via outside (UN, OAS, etc) force. “We already have peace. We don’t need peacekeepers” is what they are apparently telling him.

notropis on September 28, 2009 at 11:42 AM

I wonder how much wiggle room this has.
Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:03 AM

A-r-g-e-n-t-i-n-a.

Akzed on September 28, 2009 at 11:26 AM

I meant, “Are we getting the full story?”
I saw something on this earlier, and most of what was being restricted didn’t look like a “civil right”, even if the reporter was calling it as such.
One thing bothered me in particular, though: the line about restricting speech that “attacked the dignity of politicians”.

Count to 10 on September 28, 2009 at 11:44 AM

Shocking that the isolated government of Honduras is acting like an isolated government with nowhere else to turn. Who pushed them to these extreme measures?

Who is it that “mediated” a solution by dictating terms totally favorable to Zelaya? Who brought back Zelaya into the country? Who is allowing him to ferment violence from their embassy? Who is enabling Zelaya to run a shadow government? Who is cutting off the only real solution to this crisis by delegitimatizing the coming election for no reason?

Anything the Micheletti government does is twisted and turned against them, so why not just get it over with?

AverageJoe on September 28, 2009 at 11:53 AM

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 11:13 AM
Dusty on September 28, 2009 at 11:19 AM
keep the change on September 28, 2009 at 11:31 AM

All these things called FACTS need to CLEAR before I will issue a judgment. Others, I guess, have better tin hats with antennas that provide clarity on right and wrong on any issue sans FACTS than myself.

Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 11:54 AM

Suspending the constitution, huh? You can rest assured knowing that Obamalinsky and Hillary Clintonalinsky are watching with baited breath on this extraordinary turn of events.

long_cat on September 28, 2009 at 11:55 AM

How does that crow taste HA? Another conservative talking point down the drain…

crr6 on September 28, 2009 at 11:23 AM

It’s nice having stupid trolls who never read the analysis in the comments. Makes us look like like geniuses by comparison.

Beagle on September 28, 2009 at 11:59 AM

All these things called FACTS need to CLEAR before I will issue a judgment. Others, I guess, have better tin hats with antennas that provide clarity on right and wrong on any issue sans FACTS than myself.

Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 11:54 AM

I made no claim in my posts that they were factually accurate news reports. In fact [:)], I noted that they were coming from a blog kept by a foreigner in Honduras.

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 12:01 PM

Ed, I remember when your original reaction to the “coup” was negative. At the time, you didn’t have all the facts yet; you only had what the MSM was telling you. Once you found out that the removal of Zelaya was done in accordance with the Honduran Constitution, you came around nicely.

I will reserve comment until Fausta weighs in.

The Monster on September 28, 2009 at 12:03 PM

Hurry, call Lincoln, call FDR.

Onager on September 28, 2009 at 12:04 PM

This is nothing short of a disasterous move by the Hondurans. The only rationale for this action, by those that until now had demonstrated the best democratic principles, is some fear of outside military interfence by Nicaruaga or Venezuela in overthrowing the government. Do they have intel that we are not privvy to?

Regardless, this none-the-less plays into the very hands of Castro, Chavez, Ortega and Obama.

Even more depressing than hearing this, is the fact that it now comes so naturally to lump the POTUS in the same ideological as those two. Ramirez sums it up best….

http://www.cagle.com/politicalcartoons/pccartoons/archives/ramirez.asp?Action=GetImage

Archimedes on September 28, 2009 at 12:05 PM

[Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 11:54 AM]

Yeah, and since the LSM won’t do it, others have to. I’ve been rummaging around the Honduran newspapers trying to get real news. It’s hard, since I don’t speak Spanish and need to use Babelfish translation. Since the situation is fluid and unfolding, I’m not sure of the order of everything, but here goes:

– Michelleti(sp?) early last night “suspended” demonstrations without a permit. IOW, he is requiring/preventing the same damn thing we do here.

– Michelliti(sp?) did declare a suspension of some civil liberties after Zelaya called for an insurrection. Yeah, that was Zelaya’s word “insurrection”. An Honduran paper (La Prensa) noted that the decree will need to be passed by Congress. (Me: I presume it was a request by Michelleti(sp?) and further Congress is acting on it.)

– I did read that a radio station that was disemminating the advocation of insurrection was taken off the air. Maybe Congress passed the declaration, but probably not. However, IIRC, Michelleti had been the leader of the majority party before accepting the temp position of President. I have to think he’s already discussed the declaration with all parties.

Viva the Honduran Patriots! Down with the Zelayan traitors and foreign saboteurs!

Dusty on September 28, 2009 at 12:08 PM

AverageJoe on September 28, 2009 at 11:53 AM

With President Obama acting worse than former Pres. Jimmy Carter, and Iran launching nuke capable missiles, getting things wrong in our hemisphere is NOT a good idea. The ability of our own media to play sock puppet and to confuse people on the FACTS plus cause normally “logical” people to have knee-jerk reactions based SOLELY on political correctness and how things LOOK, in a cursory glance, to the outside world is an amazingly dangerous turn of events in the last two decades.

I just got done watching Pres. Ronald Reagan’s ‘Tear Down This Wall” speech on YouTube with my son. Pres. Reagan’s foresight was amazing. With political correctness and poll lovers, there seems to be very few people in politics like him. There certainly are none with the cajones to stand in front of The Wall and make demands. I miss him SO MUCH it makes me cry and gives me goose bumps. Will I ever see someone, again, like that in my lifetime? I hate to say it but the CHANGES are leaving me with less and less HOPE.

Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 12:10 PM

Sorry bad link.
Soldiers raid Honduran media outlets
By MARK STEVENSON (AP) – 50 minutes ago

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — Honduras’ coup-installed government silenced two key dissident broadcasters on Monday just hours after it suspended civil liberties to prevent an uprising by backers of ousted President Manuel Zelaya.

Dozens of soldiers raided the offices of Radio Globo. Officials also shut down Channel 36 television station, leaving it broadcasting only a test pattern.

Rene Zepeda, a spokesman for the interim government, said the two outlets had been taken off the air in accordance with a government emergency decree announced late Sunday that limits civil liberties and allows authorities to close news media that “attack peace and public order.”

from the aryicle.

fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 12:11 PM

fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 12:11 PM

And Chavez is against this guy?

LevStrauss on September 28, 2009 at 12:13 PM

fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 12:11 PM

And Chavez is against this guy?

LevStrauss on September 28, 2009 at 12:13 PM

The two stations may have been the pro-Zelaya ones advocating “insurrection” against the Micheletti government.

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 12:17 PM

The two stations may have been the pro-Zelaya ones advocating “insurrection” against the Micheletti government.

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 12:17 PM

And I am sure Chavez says the same when he does the same exact thing.

LevStrauss on September 28, 2009 at 12:19 PM

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 12:01 PM

You mis-read what I’m saying to Ed. You’re right, you didn’t claim it as facts. But the newspapers don’t have all the facts and Ed even states he doesn’t have ALL the facts. So him make a determination about right or wrong at this point with all sorts of different and varying reports is not a good idea. Honduras is isolated enough as it is. I’d like to know more before we make a blanket statement that this is NOT good is all.

Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 12:19 PM

[fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 12:09 PM]

On first read, a pretty good report, but it wasn’t very clear here:

The Organization of American States in Washington called a high-level emergency meeting on Monday to discuss the Honduras crisis after the interim government expelled at most members of an OAS advance team that had arrived Sunday to try to restart negotiations.

Four of five were denied entry. IIRC, it was two Americans, a Canadian and an Argentine. Honduras was not notified beforehand that they would coming. A Chilean, who had been in the mediation efforts in Costa Rica was allowed to continue as he had notified Honduras in advance of coming.

Dusty on September 28, 2009 at 12:20 PM

And I am sure Chavez says the same when he does the same exact thing.

LevStrauss on September 28, 2009 at 12:19 PM

Right … and a guy who pushes an old lady into traffic and a guy who pushes an old lady out of traffic are both just pushing old ladies …

Get a brain.

progressoverpeace on September 28, 2009 at 12:21 PM

Soldiers raid Honduran media outlets
By MARK STEVENSON (AP) – 50 minutes ago

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — Honduras’ coup-installed government silenced two key dissident broadcasters on Monday just hours after it suspended civil liberties to prevent an uprising by backers of ousted President Manuel Zelaya.

Dozens of soldiers raided the offices of Radio Globo. Officials also shut down Channel 36 television station, leaving it broadcasting only a test pattern.

Rene Zepeda, a spokesman for the interim government, said the two outlets had been taken off the air in accordance with a government emergency decree announced late Sunday that limits civil liberties and allows authorities to close news media that “attack peace and public order.”

Supporters of the deposed leftist president vowed to march in the streets Monday in defiance of the emergency order and carry out what Zelaya calls a “final offensive” against his ouster on the three-month anniversary of the coup.

“They took away all the equipment. This is the death of the station,” said Radio Globo owner Alejandro Villatoro, describing the dawn raid on the station.

Station employees scrambled out of an emergency exit to escape the raid that Villatoro said involved as many as 200 soldiers.

He said the office remained surrounded by soldiers. It was the second time soldiers have barged into the station — the first was June 28, the same day Zelaya was ousted.

The interim government has long argued it is trying to preserve democracy in Honduras, and even cited the fact that pro-Zelaya media such as Channel 36 were operating freely as proof.

But the emergency decree showed a tough new stance domestically and internationally, a reversal from last week, when interim President Roberto Micheletti indicated his administration was willing to hold talks with Zelaya, who has taken shelter at the Brazilian Embassy after sneaking into the country a week ago.

The Organization of American States in Washington called a high-level emergency meeting on Monday to discuss the Honduras crisis after the interim government expelled at most members of an OAS advance team that had arrived Sunday to try to restart negotiations.

Micheletti’s Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez said the team had not given advance warning of its arrival and said it did not come “at the right time … because we are in the middle of internal conversations.”

Officials also issued an ultimatum to Brazil on Sunday, giving the South American country 10 days to turn Zelaya over for arrest or grant him asylum and, presumably, take him out of Honduras.

Lopez said Brazil had broken relations by withdrawing its ambassador and said if it does not restore ties, the diplomatic mission would become a private office — implying it could be raided by police.

Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva responded, saying that his government “doesn’t accept ultimatums from coup-plotters.”

Micheletti has pledged not to raid the embassy where Zelaya has been holed up with more than 60 supporters.

The building is surrounded by armed police and soldiers, who have been there since baton-wielding troops used tear gas and water cannons to chase away thousands of his backers when he returned to the country Sept. 21.

Protesters say at least 10 people have been killed since the coup, while the government puts the toll at three.

The government’s suspension of civil liberties limits rights guaranteed in the Honduran Constitution: The decree prohibits unauthorized gatherings and allows police to arrest without a warrant “any person who poses a danger to his own life or those of others.” It also allows officials to shut down media outlets for “statements that attack peace and the public order, or which offend the human dignity of public officials, or attack the law.”

The Honduran Constitution forbids arrests without warrants except when a criminal is caught in the act.

In a nationally broadcast announcement, the government explained it took the steps it did “due to the calls for insurrection that Mr. Zelaya has publicly made.”

Zelaya is demanding to be reinstated and has said that Micheletti’s government “has to fall.”

While many nations have announced they would send diplomatic representatives back to Honduras to support negotiations, the interim government said Sunday that it would not automatically accept ambassadors back from some nations that withdrew their envoys.

Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
The entire article:

fourdeucer on September 28, 2009 at 12:21 PM

From fourdeucer’s link:

The Organization of American States in Washington called a high-level emergency meeting on Monday to discuss the Honduras crisis after the interim government expelled at most members of an OAS advance team that had arrived Sunday to try to restart negotiations.

The Honduran government believes that an OAS “peacekeeping” takeover is imminent. It could have been brought on by a riot. Now it will probably be brought on by these “unconstitutional” activities, instituted to prevent the riots.

At least as long as there is no chaos, there is the possibility that someone other than either Zelaya or a Chavez-backed ally will be in office after the November elections.

And the precedent of “legitimate” governments shutting down news outlets is already well-established in this hemisphere.

notropis on September 28, 2009 at 12:22 PM

It would be quite ironic for Chavez to criticize the closing of two pro-Zelaya media outlets.

Aug 2, 2009 – Chavez Closes 34 Radio Stations

AverageJoe on September 28, 2009 at 12:22 PM

Couldn’t this all have been avoided had Obama stepped in at the right time and defended/supported the constitutionally correct Honduran government (Micheletti)? Just sayin’.

long_cat on September 28, 2009 at 12:23 PM

Sultry Beauty on September 28, 2009 at 12:19 PM

I wasn’t commenting on what you said about others’ posts. only mine.

Wethal on September 28, 2009 at 12:24 PM

This is pretty strained logic. Do we not acknowledge emergency situations?
progressoverpeace on September 28, 2009 at 11:08 AM

As with everything liberals do, it all depends on your definition. Obama defines the “emergency situation” here as the fact that Zelaya was going to be Constitutionally evicted from power.

In the liberal mind, any force used to defeat that “coup” is justified – even up to and including sanctions more strict than those facing Iran and Hamas. And therefore, of course, any force used to stop Zelaya is pure evil.

This is the strength of subjectivism: If you have the power to control definitions (which liberals still do), then for all political purposes you control reality.

logis on September 28, 2009 at 12:26 PM

Fascism ftw… and I especially like the tacit admonishment in this thread because people can’t bring themselves to chastise “their guy”.

Yes suspending constitutional rights ftw. I mean at first they were enforcing the constitution and now they are all of sudden throwing it out the window. lol so much for that.

Norvell on September 28, 2009 at 12:26 PM

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