Remembering 9/11

posted at 9:37 pm on September 11, 2009 by Allahpundit

People who follow my Twitter feed have been asking for a post collecting my ramblings from last night about what happened to me that day. Andy Levy was kind enough to copy/paste them into the Greenroom, so I have no excuse not to bring them over here to the blog. Forgive the poor punctuation and occasional profanity; it was late and I was rattling them off stream-of-consciousness style.

***
Eight years ago, I remember opening my eyes at 8:46 a.m. in my downtown Manhattan apartment because…

…I thought a truck had crashed in the street outside

I remember pacing my apartment for the next 15 minutes thinking, stupidly, that a gas line might have been hit in the North Tower…

…and then I heard another explosion. I hope no one ever hears anything like it.

All I can say to describe it is: Imagine the sound of thousands of Americans screaming on a city street

It was unbelievable, almost literally

I remember being on the sidewalk and there was an FBI agent saying he was cordoning off the street…

…and then, the next day, when I went back for my cats, they told me I might see bodies lying in front of my apartment building (I didn’t)

We held a memorial service in October for my cousin’s husband, who was “missing” but not really…

He worked for Cantor Fitzgerald. They found a piece of his ribcage in the rubble not too long afterwards.

This is the guy who conspired to murder him: http://is.gd/38h7y

Had a friend from the high school speech and debate team who disappeared from the 105th floor

Had another friend of a friend who worked on the 80th floor or so, married six weeks before the attack…

Speculation is that he was right in the plane’s path, and was killed instantly when it plowed through the building

Did a bit of legal work for a couple whose son worked in the upper floors. Was dating someone else up there at the time…

I was told that she managed to call her parents while they were trapped up there and that the call “was not good”

Never found out if it was cut off by the building collapsing or not

I remember opening my eyes at 8:46 a.m. thinking “I hope that was just a pothole.” Then I heard a guy outside my window say, “Oh shit”

Opened the window, looked to my left, saw huge smoke coming out of the WTC

Left at around 9:30, decided to walk uptown thinking that the buildings would never collapse and that…

…I’d be back in my apartment by the next night. I never went back. It was closed off until December.

I remember thinking when I was a few blocks away that the towers might collapse, and so I walked faster…

…although I sneered at myself later for thinking that might be true and for being a coward. Although not for long.

To this day, you can find photos of thousands of people congregated in the blocks surrounding the Towers, seemingly…

…waiting for them to fall that day

When I got to midtown, rumors were that Camp David and the Sears Tower had also been destroyed. I remember looking around…

…and thinking that we had to get out of Manhattan, as this might be some pretext to get us into the street and hit us with some germ

I callled my dad — and somehow miraculously got through — and told him I was alive, then headed for the 59th street bridge

To this day, the scariest memory is being on that bridge, looking at the Towers smoking in the distance,

and thinking maybe the plotters had wired the bridge too to explode beneath us while we were crossing it.

I remember talking to some guy on the bridge that we’d get revenge, but…

…you had to see the smoke coming from the Towers in the distance. It was like a volcano

I remember being down there two months later. There was a single piece of structure…

…maybe five stories tall of the lattice-work still standing. It looked like a limb of a corpse sticking up out of the ground.

They knocked it down soon after

At my office, which I had just joined, I was told that…

…some people had seen the jumpers diving out the windows to escape the flames that morning

There was a video online, posted maybe two years ago, shot from the hotel across the street,,,

…and it showed roughly 10-12 bodies flattened into panackes lying in the central plaza

Maybe it’s still online somewhere

You have to see it to understand, though. You get a sense of it from the Naudet brothers documentary hearing…

…the explosions as the bodies land in the plaza, but seeing it and hearing it are two different things

I remember after I got over the bridge into Queens, I heard a noise overheard…

…that I’d never heard before. It was an F-15, on patrol over New York. Very odd sound. A high-pitched wheeze.

I remember on Sept. 12, when I got on the train to go downtown and try to get my cats out of the apartment…

…the Village was utterly deserted. No one on the streets. Like “28 Days Later” if you’ve seen that

We made it to a checkpoint and the cop said go no further, until my mom intervened. Then he took pity…

…and agreed to let me downtown IF I agreed that any exposure to bodies lying in the streets was my own fault.

Didn’t see any bodies, but I did see soldiers, ATF, FBI, and so on. The ground was totally covered by white clay…

…which I knew was formed by WTC dust plus water from the FDNY. It look like a moonscape.

There was a firefighter at the intersection and I flagged him down and asked if I could borrow his flashlight, since…

…all buildings downtown had no power. He gave me a pen flashlight.

The doors to my building at Park Place were glass but had kicked in, presumably by the FDNY, to see if there were…

…survivors inside. When I got in there, all power was out. No elevators, no hall lights…

…I had to feel my way to the hall and make my way up to my apartment on the third floor by feeling my way there…

…When I got there, the cats were alive. There was WTC dust inside the apartment, but…

…for whatever reason, I had closed the windows before I left to walk uptown that day, so dust was minimal. I loaded them…

…into the carrier and took them back to Queens. That was the last I could get into the apartment until December 2001,…

…and then it was only to get in, take whatever belongings were salvageable (i.e. not computer), and get out. I lived…

in that apartment from 7/2001 to 9/2001, but given the diseases longtime residents have had…

…I’m lucky I decided to move

My only other significant memory is being in the lobby of the apartment building on 9/11…

…and trying to console some woman who lived there who said her father worked on the lower floors of the WTC. I assume…

…he made it out alive, but she was hysterical as of 9:30 that a.m. Who could blame her?

I do remember feeling embarrassed afterwards that…

…I initially thought the smoke coming out of the North Tower was due to a fire or something, but…

…it’s hard to explain the shock of realizing you’re living through a historical event while you’re living through it.

For months afterwards, I tried to tell people how I thought maybe the Towers…

…were going to be hit by six or seven or eight planes in succession. Which sounds nuts, but once you’re in the moment…

…and crazy shit is happening, you don’t know how crazy that script is about to get.

When I left at 9:30, I thought more planes were coming.

I left because I thought, “Well, if these planes hit the building the right way, it could fall and land on mine.”\

I remember getting to 57th Street and asking some dude, “What happened?”

And he said, “They collapsed” and I couldn’t believe both of them had gone down. Even after the planes hit…

…I remembered that the Empire State Building had taken a hit from a military plane during WWII and still stood tall

So it was never a serious possibility that the WTC would collapse. I assumed…

…that the FDNY would get up there, put out the fire, and the WTC would be upright but with gigantic holes in it

It took an hour for the first tower to go down, 90 minutes for the second.

Even now, despite the smoke, I’m convinced most of the people trapped at the top were alive…

…and waiting, somehow, for a rescue. The couple whose legal case I worked for told me that…

…their son and his GF contacted her father very shortly before the collapse. Which makes sense. As much smoke as there was…

…if you have a five-story hole in the wall to let air in to breathe, you’re going to linger on.

So for many people, the choice probably quickly became: Hang on, endure the smoke, or jump

If you listen to the 911 calls, which I advise you not to do, some of them chose “hang on”

Although needless to say, if you ever saw the Towers…

…you know how dire things must have been up there to make anyone think the better solution was “jump”

They were ENORMOUS.

Another weird memory: Shortly after I got my apartment in lower Manhattan, on Park Place…

…I remember taking my brother to see “The Others,” which had just opened.

And afterwards I remember taking him up to the rooftop of my building to admire the Towers. According to Wikipedia…

“The Others” opened on August 10, 2001, so this must have been within 10 days or so afterwards. Very eerie.

And I remember we also went to Morton’s and Borders right inside the WTC complex to celebrate my new job

That Borders was gutted, needless to say, on 9/11. You could see the frame of the building in the WTC lobby after the attack

I was reading magazines in there the week or two before

One of the weirdest feelings, which I’m sure everyone can share, is that I remember distinctly feeling…

…in the month or two before the attack that “important” news no longer existed. It was all inane bullshit about…

…shark attacks and Gary Condit and overaged pitchers in the Little League World Series. To this day…

…I try never to grumble about a slow news day because the alternative is horrifyingly worse

After the attack, maybe a month after, I remember going to see “Zoolander” in Times Square and…

…coming up out of the subway tunnel having the distinct fear that…

…the sky would light up and a mushroom cloud would appear instantly above my head in my lost moment of consciousness. No joke. In fact…

…I ended up going to bed around 6:30 p.m. for maybe three months after 9/11.

Even when I ended up working downtown for years after that, with a luxurious view of upper Manhattan from the top floors…

…I always feared looking out the window because I was paranoid that at that precise moment, the flash would go off…

…and that’d be the last thing I see. And in fact, for a moment in 2003 when the power went out city-wide,

…I did think that was what was happening. The wages of 9/11.

I leave you with this, my very favorite film about the WTC. If you’re a New Yorker, have a hanky handy. No. 3 is golden http://is.gd/38qsT

One more note: If you’ve never seen a photo of the smoke coming from the Trade Center after the collapse, find one.

Watching it from the 59th bridge, it looked like a volcano. There was so much smoke, it was indescribable. Just *erupting* from the wreckage


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As Mayor Giuliani (God Bless Him) said “We met the worst of humanity with the best of humanity, and we shall emerge stronger than ever.” Truer words have seldom been said. God Bless America.

KillerKane on September 11, 2009 at 9:39 PM

Thanks AP.

Ugly on September 11, 2009 at 9:40 PM

Thanks AP…

katy on September 11, 2009 at 9:40 PM

No man is free who is not master of himself. ~ Epictetus

Ugly on September 11, 2009 at 9:41 PM

yep. nice to read, again. It has taken over the internet. also,would be nice to not hold grudges on this day.

I_C on September 11, 2009 at 9:41 PM

I followed along last night as you wrote this AP. Thanks.

Guardian on September 11, 2009 at 9:41 PM

Good post. Thanks for sharing Mr Pundit.

Skandia Recluse on September 11, 2009 at 9:42 PM

oh, and I don’t mean grudges against the people who caused the attacks. I mean silly, petty, mean grudges.

I_C on September 11, 2009 at 9:43 PM

Thanks for sharing your recollections, AP. Powerful stuff.

marc@hubsandspokes on September 11, 2009 at 9:43 PM

(import comments?)

Thanks for sharing your unique experience…it was quite touching. The 9/11 jumpers have been the one thing I still cannot wrap my mind around. Simply unfathomable.

On a happier note, I’m glad you got your kitties.

Diane on September 11, 2009 at 9:44 PM

I’ve cried a lot today, reading great posts like this. But amazingly, I feel better than I did yesterday. We are an amazing country with great people and we shall prevail.

LASue on September 11, 2009 at 9:44 PM

Those 3000 dead don’t care if we remember them. They want JUSTICE.THey also don’t want America turning to crap like it is.

Jeff from WI on September 11, 2009 at 9:44 PM

Watching the home video now on History Channel…and reading your post here now…

As usual on this anniversary, I’ll go to bed with tears in my eyes. I hope no one anywhere in the world has to go through this.

But in this world, it’s almost a guarantee.

It’s not easy reflecting on the memories of that day. But we should never forget.

JetBoy on September 11, 2009 at 9:46 PM

Thanks AP. Also glad that the kitties survived.

catlady on September 11, 2009 at 9:47 PM

Thank you for sharing your experience of 9/11, Allah.

Lance Murdock on September 11, 2009 at 9:47 PM

Thanks again, AP.

steveegg on September 11, 2009 at 9:47 PM

Thank you AP.

fesofee on September 11, 2009 at 9:48 PM

Great post AP.

elduende on September 11, 2009 at 9:48 PM

That was very intense, AP. Thank you for sharing.

Anna on September 11, 2009 at 9:50 PM

Tks AP…Never Forget.

califdreamnred on September 11, 2009 at 9:50 PM

Good stuff, AP. Glad you posted it.

LibTired on September 11, 2009 at 9:52 PM

Also: Glad to know you went back and and safely retrieved your cats.

Anna on September 11, 2009 at 9:52 PM

Glad your cats survived, and glad you were able to get them. Small mercies.

Spirit of 1776 on September 11, 2009 at 9:52 PM

Thanks for the play by play, Allah, you and Doc Zero should hook up for a cold one…

Seven Percent Solution on September 11, 2009 at 9:53 PM

My niece was in Manhattan and it was a couple of days before we knew where she was. Our family had been split by divorce, but at the time all I could think of was the little girl she had been. I am so sorry for all the people who were lost and their families and friends.

Good Post AP.

Terrye on September 11, 2009 at 9:53 PM

First, it is beautiful. Second, punctuation and profanity? It’s Twitter.

Cindy Munford on September 11, 2009 at 9:53 PM

After all that horror, it’s somehow ‘bad’ in the minds of some to revile our enemies?

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 9:56 PM

We need to remember this. Shot after shot of the third tower hit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lKZqqSI9-s&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fbighollywood%2Ebreitbart%2Ecom%2F&feature=player_embedded#t=213

katy on September 11, 2009 at 9:56 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lq-MuEms00w&feature=related

Damn I miss this man

gophergirl on September 11, 2009 at 9:57 PM

Eight yuears later and still just a big hole in the ground.
That is a national disgrace.
If I was in charge I would have taken the property by eminent domain and built the two biggest most gaudiest, bodacious towers the world has ever seen.
I would name one the Courageous Tower and the second the Kiss my ass Tower.
Bush should have made it his mision to rebuild those towers.
Now we are stuck with that wussy design that only has one big tower that is mostly antenna.
It ain’t right.

NeoKong on September 11, 2009 at 9:58 PM

We need to remember this. Shot after shot of the third tower hit.

katy on September 11, 2009 at 9:56 PM

Second tower… sorry. don’t know what I was thinking..

katy on September 11, 2009 at 9:59 PM

Thanks for sharing.

clorensen on September 11, 2009 at 9:59 PM

Amen AP, I was there and it was complete chaos for my family. We couldn’t reach my mom so we had to pick her up from work. While traveling to queens I could remember seeing the smoke from the towers from the car side window….

TimeTraveler on September 11, 2009 at 10:00 PM

AP, i remember reading you “in the house” back in the day and thinking to myself “that is some seriously righteous anger”.

now i understand.

glad you made it through with your kitties, and thanks for sharing.

homesickamerican on September 11, 2009 at 10:00 PM

Never forget, never forgive. When your country is attacked, you don’t run down to the candle store. You grab your shotgun, go out into the street, and say, “We’re coming, you sons of bitches.” We’re coming. We’re coming. We will never stop coming.

DrMagnolias on September 11, 2009 at 10:00 PM

AP, I know it isn’t much but I’m sending you a hug. Thanks for your post.

TN Mom on September 11, 2009 at 10:00 PM

I tremble with anger. Sadness. Guilt. Fear. Patriotism.

SouthernGent on September 11, 2009 at 10:01 PM

Nothing more needs be said than…

Dude.

And I mean..

Dude.

Ok, one more thing..

God Bless

Markvike on September 11, 2009 at 10:01 PM

One of the most touching things I’ve read on 9/11 in a long time. Thank you so much for sharing Allah.

cubachi on September 11, 2009 at 10:02 PM

Allah, I had no idea how close you were to all that. I’m sorry you had to go through it all. Thank you for sharing that with us.

4shoes on September 11, 2009 at 10:03 PM

NeoKong on September 11, 2009 at 9:58 PM

Environmentalists, Unions, lawyers and politicians has stopped progress all across the nation. The Empire State Building broke ground 1/30 and opened the doors 5/31.

thomasaur on September 11, 2009 at 10:03 PM

While i disagree with you on everything political, I have to agree with everyone else by saying this is a very nice and touching post.

I remember being at my college library when the planes hit. I could see the thick black smoke from my college campus in Long Island City NY. What a sad day that was.

I will continue to pray for those who lost their lives that day. A few people who managed to escape before the towers collapsed came over to church the next Sunday to give testimonies to our lord Jesus Christ for saving them.

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:03 PM

Thanks AP. Like Ed, I live in the midwest(if Kentucky is to be considered Midwest). My entire experience revolves around how I and others REACTED to the events of that day. When you and others share their direct experience, particularly as openly and transparent as you have here, I am reminded of the definition of Bravery. Being scared to death, knowing you are scared to death, alittle ashamed to show that fear but you can’t help it, and moving forward anyway.

I cannot imagine the terror you felt that day. The uncertainty. The dred. The righteous anger. The simple act of walking across the 59th street bridge reveals a bravery and courage that I hope I find when I need it.

Thanks again for sharing.

Pilgrim on September 11, 2009 at 10:05 PM

Thanks AP. That was moving. Thanks for sharing. Can’t imagine the PTSD stuff New Yorkers and others struggle with.

Glad your cats were ok. Thank God for your mom.

Park Place? I know from Monopoly that’s high end. Dude.

conservative pilgrim on September 11, 2009 at 10:05 PM

Thank you, Allah, for the story. It is almost too big to feel its impact except when one person tells his story.

I will never forget. Nor will most others. Let’s not be too impatient, though: we are turning around 40 years of anti-Americanism and it will take some time.

PattyJ on September 11, 2009 at 10:06 PM

Thank you for sharing, AP.

LEBA on September 11, 2009 at 10:07 PM

Wow, AP. Thanks for sharing. I had been on Long Island the week prior at a scientific conference at Cold Spring Harbor. My boss was a scientist there before moving to Michigan. It was a great meeting. I was able to bring a technician that worked in our laboratory. She was in her early 20s and had spent the majority of her life in Michigan and had never taken any real long distance trips. On the Saturday of the conference (9/8), we bailed and took the LIRR into Manhattan. I lived in Jersey for 5 years so I was familiar with the trains and the boroughs. I took her to see the landmarks, and we rode to the top of the Empire State Building. It was foggy that morning and you could only make out the thinnest outline of the towers. I took a picture with my digital camera just for the hell of it. I didn’t have time to actually take her downtown to see the towers. I was bummed that she couldn’t see them from the Empire State. We left to head back to Michigan on the next day (9/9). We flew out of La Guardia. After we were airborne, the plane made a turn around the southern tip of Manhattan. The weather was clear. I pointed out the Towers to her. It was a spectacular site. Little did we know the events would unfold in less than 48 hours.

My boss took time off from the meeting to visit his son old friends in the area. He told us he was staying behind after we went home on the Sunday (9/9). He told us he would be in lower Manhattan the following week of the meeting and gave us his cell phone number in case we needed him. After the attacks, we could not reach him. Everyone in our research facility was worried. He didn’t get a call through until 2 days later. He had to walk across a bridge to Queens and then rented a car to get back to Michigan. Needless to say, we were very happy to see him. He did tell us that he saw the second plane hit and thought he was imagining the whole thing.

Dr.Cwac.Cwac on September 11, 2009 at 10:09 PM

I read it last night. Very moving. People should not forget, though one of the main thrusts from the left, these days, is to make the memories all disappear and pretend that nothing ever happened.

progressoverpeace on September 11, 2009 at 10:13 PM

katy on September 11, 2009 at 9:56 PM

Every Democrat and other libratf*ck should be tied to a chair and made to watch that video at least once a week.

Every Truther, like Rosie and that ratf*ck Hussein Obama just fired, should have his eyelids taped open and watch it 24/7 until he chokes on his own words.

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:13 PM

Thanks, Allah. I hadn’t realized how close you were.

I was packing out of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area with five buddies after a five day trip. Even in there, cut off from civilization, you could tell something was wrong. After awhile we realized that we had never met anyone coming in all day. When we finally did, they told us what was happening, and I remember thinking nah, they’re bullshitting us. How wrong I was. It became a very clear dividing line in my life.

—————————- NEVER FORGET! —————————–

2ipa on September 11, 2009 at 10:14 PM

I had no idea. Thanks for sharing this, AP

Sekhmet on September 11, 2009 at 10:15 PM

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:13 PM

Don’t worry.. Your wish will come true.

You just described hell…

katy on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

Every Democrat and other libratf*ck should be tied to a chair and made to watch that video at least once a week.

Every Truther, like Rosie and that ratf*ck Hussein Obama just fired, should have his eyelids taped open and watch it 24/7 until he chokes on his own words.

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:13 PM

You are an idiot for invoking politics into this. What kind of person are you? Can’t you give it a rest for at least one day? Jesus Christ!!

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

I’m sorry for your losses Allah and very greatful to to be the continued beneficiary of your daily doses of incite, wisdom, humor and theological taunts. Keep up the great work here because you are cherished as corny as that might sound.

Zetterson on September 11, 2009 at 10:20 PM

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

There a lot of people who are still pissed off about 9/11 here A.L.! Everybody vents in their own way.

Give it a rest!

katy on September 11, 2009 at 10:21 PM

afrolib, politics is an undeniably important part of this day. About time for you to realize that.

Zetterson on September 11, 2009 at 10:22 PM

Thanks for the teary eyes at work, but seriously Thank you.
also- glad your cats were ok.

Greed on September 11, 2009 at 10:24 PM

Tears…

Zorro on September 11, 2009 at 10:25 PM

katy on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

Won’t come soon enough. I watched that 2nd plane go on TV.

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

I’m not the political one, you POS. YOU libs make it political. Don’t even try telling me you feel any pain over those 3000 dead. You’re a lib, by your own admission, which means you’re like all the other libs in America: we deserved it, right? We had it coming, right?

Call me on anything you want. I’ll tear your soul apart

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:27 PM

A Glen Beck thread just opened up. Lets debate there and not here please.

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:27 PM

I’m not the political one, you POS. YOU libs make it political. Don’t even try telling me you feel any pain over those 3000 dead. You’re a lib, by your own admission, which means you’re like all the other libs in America: we deserved it, right? We had it coming, right?

Call me on anything you want. I’ll tear your soul apart

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:27 PM

Idiot. That’s all i have to say to you. Peace out.

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:29 PM

Thanks for sharing AP.

Viper1 on September 11, 2009 at 10:29 PM

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:29 PM

Just calling you on your own standard, and you hate that. I’m also not wrong, and you haven’t claimed I am.

Care to try again?

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:32 PM

Thank you for sharing, AP. Very moving.

Ponz on September 11, 2009 at 10:36 PM

I am watching the history channel right now its showing footage, bastards.

rob verdi on September 11, 2009 at 10:36 PM

Hugs, AP.

Anwyn on September 11, 2009 at 10:37 PM

AP
by the way, good work all day and your a credit to the country and humanity for all the work.

rob verdi on September 11, 2009 at 10:37 PM

9-9-2001 : Sunday , worked the graveyard shift,to cover for an employee who was ready to deliver a baby
9-10-2001 : Monday , worked 2nd and graveyard shifts
9-11-2001 : Tuesday, so tired, went to sleep on a chair, trying to finish a cup of tea
Minutes later I get a call from my brother (who lives abroad ) to watch TV. Heartbreak. Tears. Fatigue and Pain. An hour later, employee who was in labor, delivers a baby girl
What a day it was

macncheez on September 11, 2009 at 10:38 PM

That was very moving. Thank you.

JimRich on September 11, 2009 at 10:43 PM

Allah,
You are the reason i keep coming back to HA. Thank you for sharing your memories. I came from India to the US just one year before 9/11 and was attending college at SUNY, Buffalo at that time and still wont forget that day – the way i learnt the news (at ESPN.com of all places) or the fact that students were crowded in the library around the TV monitors and I was casually wondering why exactly they were doing so.

I read your post and the sadness returns… I still cannot forget the fact that most of these bastards were on student visas. International students in the US at that time had more than a tinge of fear that they would be targeted… But none of that ever came to pass – in this beautiful country.

I wont forget the 2001 baseball season post 9/11 – or how i became a full fledged Yankee fan in that period and still continue to be. I wont forget the words to God Bless America after hearing it in every playoff game at Yankee stadium.

After 8 years, the memories are still there – and i am not even American. This will always be a part of my life. Being in Western New York at that time only makes it even more prominent for me.

God Bless those innocent souls who were ruthlessly massacred on that day – and those firefighters, police men who defended their country that day – and the military which stepped right in after that and continues to do so today.

Thank you, AP. This may be your most endearing and memorable post at HA.

God Bless America – the land that I love – stand beside her and guide her through the night with the Light from Above – from the mountains to the Prairies – to the oceans, white with foam…… God Bless America – my home, sweet home.

God Bless America – my home, sweet home.

Thank you Ronan Tynan for lending your powerful voice to the sweetest song celebrating America.

nagee76 on September 11, 2009 at 10:45 PM

Thanks Allah. It was great to follow along on Twitter. I remember the day starting on the Upper West Side and finally making my way down to around Houston street.

I remember the aftermath and the days that followed. How every siren caused people to look to one another with concern. How every time I woke up I’d feel relief that Manhattan had survived another day, if only that.

There was a feeling that they would come back…that there had to be more and life would be forever punctuated by buses blowing up, subways poisoned, and every public place a no man’s land.

As a Mets fan, a lapsed one anyway, I remember watching all of the Yankee playoff games that year and rooting like I hadn’t in years for them to keep winning, to keep extending the baseball season in NY for a little while longer. At least it would let me pick up the NY Post and see a headline about something that offered reassurance that life went on.

dedalus on September 11, 2009 at 10:45 PM

Very moving posts and comments. I’m a Manhattan native and old enough to remember seeing the red steel frame of the WTC towers going up, 1969-72. I was a few miles uptown when I saw the towers collapse. It felt like a punch in the gut and, like many people, I still feel a twinge of sorrow and anger every time I see the now-empty downtown skyline, like the constant reminder of a lost friend. It’s just as well that Minoru Yamasaki was long-dead in 2001; if he’d lived to see the towers he designed destroyed in that way, it probably would have killed him.

Travis Bickle on September 11, 2009 at 10:46 PM

nagee76 on September 11, 2009 at 10:45 PM

People like you are what make America so great.

Liam on September 11, 2009 at 10:47 PM

You paint a chilling and powerful portrait, Allah.

Thank you for giving us the benefit of a first-hand account.

MadisonConservative on September 11, 2009 at 10:49 PM

Thanks for sharing AP.

I was following it last night as you were tweeting and I couldn’t go to sleep until it was over. And I had planned on an embarrassingly early night.

marmaran on September 11, 2009 at 10:53 PM

Dude.

wowrob on September 11, 2009 at 10:54 PM

youre a good person, AP.

blatantblue on September 11, 2009 at 10:58 PM

I just can’t imagine AP, as shell-shocked as the rest of us were on that day, just how horrible it was to live it like you and so many of our brothers and sisters in NYC.

God Bless

conservnut on September 11, 2009 at 11:00 PM

i mean really
youre a good man

you do a really good job here, and so does ed

we really have a lot to be grateful for.

blatantblue on September 11, 2009 at 11:02 PM

Thanks to the heroes of 9/11: The NY and DC police, fire departments, and emergency workers. Thanks to Rudy, Pataki, and W also. Continue to prey for the familys of the victims and our heroes. May we never forget.

lavell12 on September 11, 2009 at 11:03 PM

nagee76, but you are an American. An American is made not born!

PattyJ on September 11, 2009 at 11:04 PM

I’ll never forget 9-11. I have been thinking about it all day. I was in the coffee shop Akbar’s cafe on the PATH train level, reading the NY Post, knowing there was no rush to get to work; it would be a quiet day. There was a BOOM and the doors to the cafe blew in and I felt the shock wave brush through my hair. The alarms were going off and the workers and customers ran out. I was kind of bemused and wondered what had happened. I threw my cup and paper away and went up the escalator, the area there was smoky and a PA cop told me to go out the Vescey St. exit. As I stepped outside I saw twisted steel in the street and broken glass. As I got in front of the Millennium Hotel I could look up and see what happened. The sky was filled with floating paper, there was a huge hole on the side f the building and I asked no one in particular, “how did they get a bomb that big up there?” A woman in a grey PA jacket was staring up with tears in her eyes and told me it wasn’t a bomb, it was a plane. I knew in my heart and head it was no accident, the hole was too big for it to have been a small craft. A minute or two later the 1st fire truck pulled up. I will always remember them suiting up and preparing to head into the buildings.

I was trying to call my wife because she was supposed to be driving into the city, past the WTC that morning, but I could not get the call out. I was walking slowly along Trinity Place across from the WTC staring up and thinking to myself that the bastards usually try to make matters worse by attacking the responders, and there might be more to come. There were cabs and cars dented and with pieces of the building on them. I stood in the Park on Liberty and Trinity, I noticed many of the papers landing around me were stock reports and I knew that some of the people killed were in the same business as me. I hoped, fruitlessly it turned out, that I wouldn’t know any of them. As I stood there I saw someone jump from the building. I don’t think I can describe the anger and frustration I felt then.

I couldn’t take anymore and thought I had better get to my office and use the phone there to call my wife, as I hurried along Broadway, I heard a second BOOM. I couldn’t see what happened but I knew it couldn’t be good. I got into my office to find out it was a second plane. We stayed in the office through the nightmare of the collapsing of the towers, with day turning into a grey cloudy night, the office building was pre-war with double hung windows that opened onto B-way, and the concrete dust seeped in almost mist like. I was able to get through to my wife and some friends so they could let people know I was ok. We stayed in the office, the owner of the firm’s son ran a bar a block from the towers. He made it up to our office after the second tower came down. He couldn’t tell us much because he had made his way over by feel through the dust cloud. We stayed in the office until about 1pm when the police had us evacuate. I walk down Broadway to Battery Park wondering how I would get home to Jersey City. Each step raised a dust cloud from the inch deep concrete dust. At the park they had tugboats nosed into the wall and people were climbing over the fence and onboard. That’s what I did, the tug took us across the river to an old pier were JCPD and paramedics and volunteers were waiting. There were 2 French woman with babies on the boat. I helped them off and turned them over to some cops and the police Chaplin, all of whom I knew pretty well.

I walked until I was out of the frozen zone in downtown Jersey City. After the stillness and silence of walking through lower Manhattan I was surprised that buses were running and people were milling around. I hopped on a bus that took me close to home and my wife and children were waiting at the bus stop. I was never happier to see them, and to be able to hold them all. I still feel the catch at my heart and the sting of tears when I think of what happened and of the torture those poor people in the buildings went through.

That’s my 9-11 Story. I just wanted to get it out there.

JCJim on September 11, 2009 at 11:06 PM

i mean really
youre a good man

you do a really good job here, and so does ed

we really have a lot to be grateful for.

blatantblue on September 11, 2009 at 11:02 PM

Entirely agreed.

I love Ed’s columns, but I was hooked on Hot Air weeks after it started, partly because of Bryan, partly because of Vent, but mostly because of Allah’s brilliant analysis, diction, and 14-year-old oak barrel aged 100 proof snark.

From a horrible experience comes a true warrior for our culture.

MadisonConservative on September 11, 2009 at 11:06 PM

nagee76, but you are an American. An American is made not born!

PattyJ on September 11, 2009 at 11:04 PM

Perhaps the truest statement I have ever heard.

conservnut on September 11, 2009 at 11:08 PM

nagee76 on September 11, 2009 at 10:45 PM

You have, no doubt, heard the old saying that many Indians are more British than the British. You are more American than many Americans.

OldEnglish on September 11, 2009 at 11:10 PM

Revising somewhat what I posted in the Greenroom:

Andy Levy: Thank you for collecting these for AP.

Allahpundit: Thank you for posting this in the main blog. Thank you for taking the time to share your most personal reflections and memories of that terrible day. And a very big thank you for taking the risk of opening up. You are brilliant, talented, and clever with words, but so much more. There’s much goodness in you. You’re a mensch, an admirable human being.

And for all who experienced the horror of that horrible day, whether in person or from afar, regardless of politics or any other personal characteristic, may peace be with you. And may we work, each in our own way, to ensure such a day never happens again.

Loxodonta on September 11, 2009 at 11:12 PM

Thank you for sharing such a powerful recount of the terrorist attack.

I remember being at work and the TV in the waiting room was carrying the story, and watched the second plane hit live.
It was devistating and took a long time (too long) before I found out my sister who lives and works in Manhattan was safe, but was close enough to be evacuated and was among those leaving while in the midst of huge billowing clouds of broken glass dust and plaster.

My wife and I held each other and our newborn baby (1 month old at the time) and wondered what kind of world we were bringing her into.

A day that can never be forgotten nor forgiven no matter what.

I remember en mass the medical staff deciding if we should all go downstate to help, but sadly realizing with more information being disclosed that there just weren’t people alive to save. I recall authorities specifically requesting that people STOP trying to arrive to help because it was adding to the confusion.

We entered a rediness stage because we lived near major water reservoirs (a reasonable potential terrorist target). And we took special training in how to respond to a biological attack.

There can never be enough thanks for all the hard work and dedication that has kept another attack from happening all these years. And with the passage of time, it’s too easy to forget. Too easy to let the outrage dissapate as complacency sets in. Too easy to worry about morgages and school loans, etc.

That’s why I thank you again AP for sharing such a vivid account of the attack, because it should always be remembered. And the lives lost should always be honored and have yet to be fully avenged.

DrAllecon on September 11, 2009 at 11:16 PM

Thanks, AP. Riveting!

exhelodrvr on September 11, 2009 at 11:21 PM

Sombody please make nager76 a citizen now! More like you please. Oh oh, I hope saying that wasn’t too political for afrolib.

Zetterson on September 11, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Nagee76 rather

Zetterson on September 11, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Being in Michigan I was affected little by 9-11. No one I knew was hurt or harmed. Yet every year I cry, for just a moment, when I remember the events of that terrible day.

I read your account and find myself tearing up again. And while it is stupid to think it, I have always felt that there was something I could have done to stop what happeded that day. It is an unexplained sense of guilt I guess for not having lost anyone or anything that day.

Thanks for shareing.

mechkiller_k on September 11, 2009 at 11:26 PM

Glad you’re here.

Speakup on September 11, 2009 at 11:27 PM

Thank you for remembering

Giuliani was great help for the entire nation

I thank the NYT for keeping this item available to the public. Periodically I go back to this link for a reality check

A friend wrote this about the link I posted:

They Tipped Their Hats to God and Men
a poem written on viewing the list of fallen rescuers on 9-11

With every name I shed a tear
For the bravest angels pictured here.
Dearest darlings one and all
They marched into the buildings tall
Knowing well the story’s end
They tipped their hats to God and men.
How can I honor them at all?
By thanking God He made them all.
My heroes.

entagor on September 11, 2009 at 11:27 PM

Allah,

It is no secret that I have many issues with your stances when it comes to trashing Christians for your own purposes. I’ve also posted that there must be something more than your Christ-bashing persona because of the people I respect who respect you. This is one of those glimpses into the Allah that is not out there when you focus on attacking the followers of Christ.

My Brother was living on South End Ave. on 9/11/01 and his story is very similar to yours although it took much more effort for him to rescue his cat (including a military escort into his apartment). Not to get into the dynamics of my family but it was clear that the whole experience freaked him out to the point that he mended fences long ignored.

Thank you for sharing your story.

highhopes on September 11, 2009 at 11:32 PM

I followed this as you tweeted it, Allah, and was very moved. Thanks for your thoughts and to Andy or compiling this very poignant memoir.

Photom
(TomConJr on Twitter)

photom on September 11, 2009 at 11:33 PM

MadisonConservative on September 11, 2009 at 11:06 PM

Amen. Allah’s perspective and thoughts, alongside the critical lenses Ed and others have offered in the past, are invaluable.

Thank you for sharing this, AP. It brought a yet unknown dimension to my eyes and those of many others.

Black Yoshi on September 11, 2009 at 11:37 PM

You are an idiot for invoking politics into this. What kind of person are you? Can’t you give it a rest for at least one day? Jesus Christ!!

Afrolib on September 11, 2009 at 10:17 PM

Your side started politicizing 9/11 before the ashes were even cold.

getalife.

Del Dolemonte on September 11, 2009 at 11:39 PM

.

Every year I add to my memorial.

http://religiopoliticaltalk.blogspot.com/2009/09/never-forget-ever.html

.

papa_giorgio on September 11, 2009 at 11:47 PM

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