Call it just a transient taste of irony, along with a surprising venue.  Thirty years ago, Iranian protesters broke into the American embassy in Tehran, starting a 444-day hostage crisis provoked by the Islamic revolution of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.  Yesterday, prompted by another uprising in Iran, another group of protesters attempted to sack an embassy — but this time an Iranian embassy in über-neutral Sweden:

Angry demonstrators broke into the Iranian Embassy outside Stockholm on Friday, climbing in through shattered windows and injuring one embassy worker, police said.

More than 150 people had gathered outside the embassy to protest against the Iranian regime, when some of them attacked the building with rocks and tore down a fence to enter the embassy grounds, police spokesman Ulf Hoglund said. …

“We want a regime change,” said Firouzeh Ghaffrpour, one of the organizers. “The Islamic system is not wanted by the people of Iran.”

The protesters, mostly Iranians, also demanded the embassy be closed.

This particular standoff hasn’t ended yet, either.  The protesters remain at the embassy gates, preventing the personnel from leaving.  One worker got evacuated to a hospital, where his condition is not yet known.

This may turn out to be nothing at all, but it’s not the first time disaffected Iranians attacked one of the mullahs’ embassies.  In 1980, the British had to put a violent end to a hostage crisis in London, although in that case there are strong indications that Saddam Hussein had a role in the attack.  Operation Nimrod established the bona fides of the SAS.  The Swedes may have to keep their own version on alert.

Update: The protesters have gotten more violent in Switzerland.  Gateway Pundit alerts us that the embassy fence has been torched, and the attack caught on tape: