Khamenei orders mullahs to probe vote count

posted at 8:47 am on June 15, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

The protests and violence over last week’s elections in Iran have made an impact on the mullahs who clumsily appointed Mahmoud Ahmedinejad to another term as their mouthpiece.  In an attempt to mollify Iranians taking to the streets over the ridiculous vote tallies published by the government, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei publicly recommended a Guardian Council probe into election irregularities.  They’re playing for time (via King Banaian):

Iran’s supreme leader ordered an investigation Monday into claims of fraud in the country’s presidential election, marking a turnaround by Iran’s most powerful figure and offering hope to opposition forces who have waged street clashes to protest the re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei ordered the powerful Guardian Council to examine the allegations by opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi, who claims widespread vote rigging and fraud in Friday’s election, state television reported.

“Issues must be pursued through a legal channel,” state TV quoted Mr. Khamenei as saying. The supreme leader said he has “insisted that the Guardian Council carefully probe this letter.” The day after the election, Mr. Khamenei urged the nation to unite behind Mr. Ahmadinejad and called the result a “divine assessment.”

So much for divine intervention.  Khamenei and the GC may need to find a way out of their predicament, and this could be the first signal that Ahmadinejad might have to go under the bus.  If the level of anger and unrest grows in Iran, the people will want to see some heads on spikes (perhaps literally), and the mullahs will want to ensure that theirs are not among them.

Of course, that’s why they have Ahmadinejad in the first place.  The mullahs use the president and the assembly for two reasons.  It gives the illusion of participatory democracy in a country strictly run by a panel of theocrats, which keeps the pressure off of the mullahs most of the time.   When the pressure becomes too intense, as it appears to be getting at the moment, this mechanism also provides handy patsies to toss to the crowds.

Don’t forget that the mullahs hand-picked these candidates from the beginning, including Mirhossein Mousavi, who apparently was meant to be a credibility-boosting loser for the Guardian Council but won a lot more votes than they had guessed he would.  The mullahs can put Mousavi in the office and still run the country just as they have done since 1979, as long as they don’t provoke a revolution by sticking with an unpopular mouthpiece and a badly-rigged election.  If the “probe” itself doesn’t calm the situation, the mullahs will discover (and undoubtedly “prove”) that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs — and to distract them from the real corruption in Iran.


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They have ACORN in Iran?

No wonder Bammy’s so calm about this. Dinner Jacket just followed his lead and imported “the Chicago Way” to Iran.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 8:52 AM

Preview of the 2012 election.

faraway on June 15, 2009 at 8:53 AM

Does anyone expect a real investigation? I believe it is done to appease the citizens, and legitimize the fraudulent results.

Rode Werk on June 15, 2009 at 8:53 AM

This is like Obama ordering ACORN to investigate its own voter registration practices.

AZCoyote on June 15, 2009 at 8:54 AM

They have ACORN and the “Americorps” in Iran, it’s called the IRGC & the “Basiji”!

And Barack HUSSEIN Obama (PBUH)(SWT)(SAW) will make sure they soon are all the same…

Dale in Atlanta on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

Nothing to see here, move along. The MFMSM (Mother E’ffing Mainstream Media) had it right all along, there is no story worth reporting here.

doriangrey on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

I’m shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here!

there it is on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

That’s the whole thing that blows my mind. The young Iranians may want change and revolution, but Mousavi is hardly an agent of change.

But that begs the question– why would the election be rigged at all if both candidates are effectively frontmen for the Iranian religious regime? Isn’t this a case of “Heads I win, tails you lose?”

Nethicus on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, the centrifuges spin.

Suckas.

ILB on June 15, 2009 at 8:57 AM

Khameni blinked. Divine dudes don’t blink. This is the beginning of the end, at the least.

JiangxiDad on June 15, 2009 at 8:58 AM

Ahmadummy will still be discovered to have “won”, just that there were some “errors” in the vote counting. They’ll just knock down his vote count. And anyone who protests at that point gets shot.

rbj on June 15, 2009 at 8:59 AM

hey iran has hopey/changey too.

SHARPTOOTH on June 15, 2009 at 8:59 AM

They might want to throw Ajehad under the bus but will he go that easily? He has his own base of support and reports indicated that he was rapidly surpassing Khomenei in support himself.

promachus on June 15, 2009 at 9:00 AM

Obama in hiding regarding Iran and North Korea.

albill on June 15, 2009 at 9:02 AM

Yeah, Mousavi helped to start the Iranian nuclear program
And you can bet that both are smarter than the
Obamas.

Well, what do you know? Theocracies suck.

thgrant on June 15, 2009 at 9:02 AM

The wheels on the bus go round and round…. Although not the revolution that the US needs, seeing the Holocaust denying midget get thrown under the bus would be a satisfying consolation prize.

Illinidiva on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

Bill Clinton’s favorite progressive/liberal democracy continues to act as the alter ego of the American progressive brown shirts, but Amir Taheri finds their rhetoric…unpersuasive.

Jaibones on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

Khameini orders mullahs to probe vote count

After which they will declare everything to be in order, and Jimmy Carter will certify the election as one of the most fair ever run.

MarkTheGreat on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

Smart move by Khamenei for the short term; this will take out a lot of the steam for the protest movement.

And the government can claim – with at least superficial legitimacy – that they’re “investigating the claims”.

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

A possible show down between the Mullahs and Ahmadinejad could happen… I’m for it. Let the wicked slay the wicked.

But are the Centrifuges still spinning?

Chaz706 on June 15, 2009 at 9:04 AM

At best, they will reduce dinner jackets vote totals by a few hundred, then declare the controversy to be over.

MarkTheGreat on June 15, 2009 at 9:04 AM

So I’m sure I’m following-
 
The Supreme Leader wants to be sure the elected leader was properly elected?

rogerb on June 15, 2009 at 9:05 AM

This “internal investigation” will be as deep and wide as Ogabe’s “internal investigation” into who on the WH staff was dealing with Blago…

Caper29 on June 15, 2009 at 8:44 AM
.
That is just what popped into my head when I read the article. Is the fix in or maybe not.

Americannodash on June 15, 2009 at 9:06 AM

Gee.. I wonder how that investigation turn out?

Itchee Dryback on June 15, 2009 at 9:06 AM

…the mullahs will discover (and undoubtedly “prove”) that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs…”

This would be an interesting turn of events.

Has anyone noticed that CNN has stepped up to the plate with the coverage after catching loads of criticism this weekend.

Fox is running a yacht story as the lede.

keebs on June 15, 2009 at 9:08 AM

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

Exactly.

Itchee Dryback on June 15, 2009 at 9:08 AM

Smart move by Khamenei for the short term; this will take out a lot of the steam for the protest movement.

And the government can claim – with at least superficial legitimacy – that they’re “investigating the claims”.

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

But not so smart in the longer term? Khamenei has really undermined his theocratic authority with this move as Jiangxidad pointed out. A couple of days ago he called Ahmadinejad’s ‘victory’ the product of a divine assessment. How can he now say he got that wrong and retain any credibility with his ‘base’?

Khameni blinked. Divine dudes don’t blink. This is the beginning of the end, at the least.

ProfessorMiao on June 15, 2009 at 9:09 AM

That’s the whole thing that blows my mind. The young Iranians may want change and revolution, but Mousavi is hardly an agent of change.

Nethicus on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

The change that a lot of the people want is a relaxation of their social oppression. It doesn’t even have to come in big gestures, just being allowed a wee bit of social freedom will placate them. A few less random searches of their homes looking for banned copies of The Great Gatsby perhaps.

Mousavi may allow for some relaxation of the oppression, which is where the Hope came in. But I doubt any of the voters believed they were going to get real, across the board Change.

myrenovations on June 15, 2009 at 9:09 AM

I still personally think it doesn’t matter who is in.

Ahmadinejad or Moussavi

blatantblue on June 15, 2009 at 9:09 AM

Phony, pre-rigged election in theocratic tyranny goes awry?

Gee, who’da thunk it?

profitsbeard on June 15, 2009 at 9:11 AM

Could just as well be an “Ok, what you gonna do about this Obama?” test by the Mullah’s. It’s not for nothing that chess was supposedly invented in Persia.

Aylios on June 15, 2009 at 9:11 AM

Since it would not have mattered to the real power in Iran who actually won the “election”, it must be presumed that this “investigation” is to find out if The Penguin is trying to mount his own coup. It has nothing to do with the accuracy of the vote per se, but more to do with who exactly instigated it.

They are looking for culprits, not justice.

OldEnglish on June 15, 2009 at 9:11 AM

Keep a sharp eye out and one ear close to the ground!

Geezer on June 15, 2009 at 9:12 AM

How can he now say he got that wrong and retain any credibility with his ‘base’?

He can say anything he wants and his base will not notice or care.
Kinda like Maobamas minions here and elsewhere.

Itchee Dryback on June 15, 2009 at 9:13 AM

And the government can claim – with at least superficial legitimacy – that they’re “investigating the claims”.

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:03 AM

That assumes the protesters believe there is some legitimacy in whatever process this investigation involves. IMO, that is a big assumption. If the “investigation” declares that 85% of the electorate really did come out to vote for the status quo…. then all bets are off as to what happens next.

The filthy liar in the White House is best advised to keep his damned mouth shut for a change and simply monitor what is going on for a while. To a certain degree he’s caused these riots by his commentary about supporting Democratic movements when he/the US is not in a position to do anything about it when those fighting for Democracy face the perils of the Iranian theocracy.

highhopes on June 15, 2009 at 9:14 AM

If Ahmadinejad is executed, I hope the execution is televised and the video is leaked online.

Get your popcorn ready!

SCOOPTHIScarlos on June 15, 2009 at 9:14 AM

Well, this isn’t right now about whether Ahmadinejad or Mousavi “runs” Iran (or is the President).

This is about getting in front of the protest movement which transcends this particular election.

Although I think, somehow, if Mousavi is named President (doubtful of course) what he represents to the Iranian people may be the problem for the regime.

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:15 AM

TMK on June 15, 2009 at 9:14 AM

belly shaking my laptop.

JiangxiDad on June 15, 2009 at 9:16 AM

Its quite possible that the Moderate Mullah will be installed in Ahmadinejad’s stead…but the prospect of the latter being arrested and executed? I doubt it.

aengus on June 15, 2009 at 9:16 AM

that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs — and to distract them from the real corruption in Iran.

I’m such a light weight…it’s been such a long time since we actually executed enemies of state that I just freaked out a little bit imagining them actually doing this. A world without ImADinnerJacket would be, uh, weird. I’m used to his “Sleezy, bad date” look.

Mommypundit on June 15, 2009 at 9:17 AM

That assumes the protesters believe there is some legitimacy in whatever process this investigation involves

It’s not the protesters that this is directed at, I think; it’s the potential supporters of the protesters – the majority of Iranians who probably are dissatisfied with the results but not enough to take to the streets.

Dare I say the “silent majority”?

SteveMG on June 15, 2009 at 9:17 AM

These demonstrations kind of remind me of what happened during protests of the Bush-Cheney regime.

Oh wait, it’s what the “protestors” imagined happened.

What actually happened is, well nothing.

Let’s see how the protestors of imaginary oppression support those who are actually being surpressed.

My guess is that ANSWER is on the side of the Mullahs against the college students.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 9:18 AM

I still personally think it doesn’t matter who is in.

Ahmadinejad or Moussavi

blatantblue on June 15, 2009 at 9:09 AM

Agreed. But what happens if the revolt continues and the Supreme Leader and The Assembly of Experts are overthrown? The last time the Iranians rose up, they overthrew what now looks like a benign emperor and got an increasingly restrictive and brutal theocracy. If they overthrow this theocracy, will they devolve even further into chaos and tyranny that threatens the whole region?

Loxodonta on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM

This is all about improving gay rights in Iran?

faraway on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM

This will calm the angry protests for a while, and then when the probe will “confirm” Dinnerjacket, the wind will have been knocked out of the protestors’ sails, and that’ll be that.

AlexB on June 15, 2009 at 9:21 AM

I would be amazed to see Ahmadinejad actually punished, as that would greatly diminish the state’s authority. Even if Ahmadinejad is just a figurehead, he is a very visible figurehead. So my money says Khameini is just setting up a face-saving whitewash. Let passions cool off, deflate the winning margin a little bit to something with a veneer of credibility, then back to business as usual.

jwolf on June 15, 2009 at 9:22 AM

If they overthrow this theocracy, will they devolve even further into chaos and tyranny that threatens the whole region?

Loxodonta on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM

It depends. A real overthrow of the establishment will most certainly not involve putting someone like Moussavi in power.

The previous revolution was many years in the making with all of the major power decisions being made by Iranians in exile in Paris and the mullahs exiled in Iraq. What the exiles in Paris worked for didn’t turn out to be what they ended up with. So really, there is no way to know what another full blown Iranian revolution would do to/for the country.

myrenovations on June 15, 2009 at 9:25 AM

This is all about improving gay rights in Iran?

faraway on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM
.
Agreed. They will be required to use smaller rocks when then stone them.

Americannodash on June 15, 2009 at 9:26 AM

they not then

Americannodash on June 15, 2009 at 9:27 AM

Isn’t this a case of “Heads I win, tails you lose?”

Nethicus on June 15, 2009 at 8:56 AM

Iranians are educated people. Though you nailed the cynicism that they could abandon all hope and assume, despite the weakness of the democratic premise for “election” within the Iranian theocracy, the public vote was proof positive AGAINST the entire regime. Though that was not on the ballot, that is what the people expressed in the tally and are expressing in the protests.

Khameini ordering mullahs to probe the vote count is the regime’s fake attempt to prove its devotion for the Iranian people in order to more easily demand devotion (at least obedience) from the masses. “Allah the Merciful” would demand the illusion at least; but how many have heard those words as the sword, stones or bullets mutilate the body?

Pantywaist/Pantywaste Obama (wait and see while feeding America the TOTUS propaganda) will shame everyone. He will not support the Iranian grassroots for human rights, students pleading for a word to reinforce their protests in Iran, any more than he supports the US Constitution at home for US citizens.

During the political upheaval in Iran, keep tabs on Iranian nuclear sales/purchases via world banks.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:28 AM

It’s a tiny country so they ought to wrap it up pretty quickly.

By the way, does anyone know how you say “The New Black Panthers” in Farsi?

jeff_from_mpls on June 15, 2009 at 9:29 AM

Excellent analysis in the article by Amir Tehari that made a lot of sense until today. Has Ahmadinejad overstepped?

ProfessorMiao on June 15, 2009 at 9:31 AM

I would be amazed to see Ahmadinejad actually punished, as that would greatly diminish the state’s authority. Even if Ahmadinejad is just a figurehead, he is a very visible figurehead. So my money says Khameini is just setting up a face-saving whitewash. Let passions cool off, deflate the winning margin a little bit to something with a veneer of credibility, then back to business as usual.

jwolf on June 15, 2009 at 9:22 AM

That is what I’d expect, as well.

While the re-count occurs, the regime’s fascist police will do their dirty work arresting all who dare protest (never to be seen again).

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:32 AM

This is all about improving gay rights in Iran?

faraway on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM

One of the candidates, during the debates, said that “Allah loves all his children, even the homosexual spawn of Vice President Cheney.

So it looks like they’re well on their way to their own “Reformation”!

Awesome!

jeff_from_mpls on June 15, 2009 at 9:32 AM

jeff_from_mpls on June 15, 2009 at 9:29 AM

excellent

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:33 AM

The filthy liar in the White House is best advised to keep his damned mouth shut for a change and simply monitor what is going on for a while. To a certain degree he’s caused these riots by his commentary about supporting Democratic movements when he/the US is not in a position to do anything about it when those fighting for Democracy face the perils of the Iranian theocracy.

highhopes on June 15, 2009 at 9:14 AM

I always enjoy your “filty liar” appellation for our douchebag-in-chief. Thank you for remembering. Here’s a recent column from Victor Davis Hanson you may have missed about Barry’s habitual lying. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

JiangxiDad on June 15, 2009 at 9:33 AM

If the “probe” itself doesn’t calm the situation, the mullahs will discover (and undoubtedly “prove”) that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs — and to distract them from the real corruption in Iran.

Then Obama will claim the regime change is a stunning victory for his own policies. Iranian problem solved. Now let’s get back to passing the socialized health care package.

petefrt on June 15, 2009 at 9:33 AM

If the “probe” itself doesn’t calm the situation, the mullahs will discover (and undoubtedly “prove”) that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs — and to distract them from the real corruption in Iran.

This assumes Ahmadinejad would be perfectly willing to throw himself under the bus (or onto a pike), and that the Revolutionary Guards would immediately be willing to go along with this. Ahmadinejad may love suicide bombers, but he strikes me as part of a long line of Middle East despots who love to see others give their lives for Islam, but plan to themselves die safely both in power and in bed.

If Mahmoud does in fact turn out to be the sacrificial lamb for the mullahs, I really don’t expect he or his most fervent supporters to go down without a fight — which if nothing else, would finally show whether or not the mullahs or Ahmadinejad are the real alpha males in the Iranian government.

jon1979 on June 15, 2009 at 9:36 AM

Since Khomeini’s Revolution enabled by Jimmy Carter’s administration (CIA), what’s happening in Iran is tragic for the Iranians. Don’t burden their legitimate plight for human rights for liberty and the Sharian abuse of women and children with gay jokes.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:40 AM

If the “probe” itself doesn’t calm the situation, the mullahs will discover (and undoubtedly “prove”) that Ahmadinejad corrupted the election, have him arrested, and likely executed quickly to sate the mobs — and to distract them from the real corruption in Iran.

And this would be a bad thing…how?

Harpazo on June 15, 2009 at 9:40 AM

Geezer on June 15, 2009 at 9:12 AM

Thanks. The latest from there:

# A silent protest by Mousavi’s supporters in Tehran now, with a huge crowd on the streets.This is much larger than yesterday’s Ahmadi Nejad’s39 minutes ago from web

# Hundreds of thousands of Mousavi’s supporters are marching toward Azadi Square. Mousavi, Khatami and Karoubi are among the crowd.about 1 hour ago from web

petefrt on June 15, 2009 at 9:41 AM

Several of you are right, in the long run it doesn’t matter which one wins. But in the short term, it matters a lot. This rival will have to consolidatte his power. Agencies and departments purged and staffed. Even if it only buys the west six months that is six more months the mullahs don’t have the bomb. As far as the Iranian people go, which is going to help turn more of them pro-American, Dinnerjacket or Mousavi having tea with Barry?

Limerick on June 15, 2009 at 9:48 AM

Soon we’ll have Jimmy Carter over there checking this out. I can see him now standing with the present dictatorial regime,
giving us the old two thumbs up.

Jeff from WI on June 15, 2009 at 9:51 AM

If they overthrow this theocracy, will they devolve even further into chaos and tyranny that threatens the whole region?

Loxodonta on June 15, 2009 at 9:19 AM

It depends. A real overthrow of the establishment will most certainly not involve putting someone like Moussavi in power.

The previous revolution was many years in the making with all of the major power decisions being made by Iranians in exile in Paris and the mullahs exiled in Iraq. What the exiles in Paris worked for didn’t turn out to be what they ended up with. So really, there is no way to know what another full blown Iranian revolution would do to/for the country.

myrenovations on June 15, 2009 at 9:25 AM

I’d be surprised if Khomeini didn’t get what HE wanted from the overthrow of the Shah. You’d be right to point out that he most certainly could not have done anything on his own without those who helped to organize the revolution who in turn were snuffed out if Khomeini didn’t “trust” them to obey without flinching.

But we should remember that Iran has a very literate and educated population. Their masses are not ignorant people. Until Khomeini, women enjoyed the same educational opportunities as men. These same women did not evaporate from existence; they are the mothers of today’s university students.

Obama would have them all obliterated in order to keep the “peace” aka status quo pro chauvinism and patriarchy.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM

Several of you are right, in the long run it doesn’t matter which one wins. But in the short term, it matters a lot. This rival will have to consolidatte his power. Agencies and departments purged and staffed. Even if it only buys the west six months that is six more months the mullahs don’t have the bomb.

They’re not going to be purging their atomic scientists. There’s no reason why Iran’s steady march towards nuclear weaponry should slow down.

aengus on June 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM

Several of you are right, in the long run it doesn’t matter which one wins.

I disagree, because if the Mullahs back down, they may not survive. You can’t keep a people in a chokehold by holding a do-over for an election you yourself fixed.

And I don’t think the Iranian people have any great love for Mousavi, it’s not about him. He was just the least unacceptable candidate the Mullah’s allowed the people to vote for and they couldn’t even tolerate him winning. So the entire election is a sham, especially when the Mullahs are telling the people that their leaders are devinely chosen.

The Mullah’s position is untenable. Their religious justification for holding onto power is in shambles and now they’ve been exposed as garden variety, secular thugs.

I don’t think there’s anything the west can do to lend credibility to the Mullahs by opposing them at this point. Obama’s approach is wrong, the US President should be giving a strong shove to the dictators in Iran.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 9:55 AM

Soon we’ll have Jimmy Carter over there checking this out. I can see him now standing with the present dictatorial regime,
giving us the old two thumbs up.

Jeff from WI on June 15, 2009 at 9:51 AM

Jimmy Carter already approved of the election “results” in a televised meeting with a Muslim official in the Middle East. The blurp did not contain any more information than the single moment on screen with Carter smiling with his companion on screen. Carter was “pleased” with the outcome.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:56 AM

blatantblue on June 15, 2009 at 9:09 AM

It doesn’t matter.

ladyingray on June 15, 2009 at 9:57 AM

Also say the Mullahs are overthrown and a new regime is put in place. Might not that new regime (Persian socialist for instance) not also want nuclear weapons? Will it be anti-Israel? Who knows.

aengus on June 15, 2009 at 9:58 AM

It doesn’t matter.

ladyingray on June 15, 2009 at 9:57 AM

In OUR interests, probably not.

I tend to think the Iranians will still pursue nukes no matter who wins.

I mean, Moussavi has been opposed to Ahmoody’s rhetoric on the Holocaust, and has come out with vague platitudes of “ending extremism.”

IDK — I am very weary of them all. Cause, again, candidates are chosen.

blatantblue on June 15, 2009 at 9:59 AM

aengus on June 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM

You are right, the scientists will probably stay in place, but in a fascist system nothing happens that isn’t directed from the top. Everything has a political overseer, military units, factories, frakkin chess clubs. A change in government will cause a bottleneck, at least for a time, and we can use any break we can get.

Limerick on June 15, 2009 at 9:59 AM

ladyingray: it doesn’t matter because nothing will really change. (only the names have changed to protect the ?innocent?)

kelley in virginia on June 15, 2009 at 9:59 AM

Ed, the Guardian Council has nothing to do with it. It’s a coup by the president and his Revolutionary Guard cronies. The mullahs are caught in the middle.

Vatican Watcher on June 15, 2009 at 10:02 AM

http://english.aljazeera.net/focus/2009/06/2009612102154262910.html

There will be no freeze and no halt to enrichment whatever inducements the US puts on the table. Enrichment to weapons grade uranium is on the table, he says.

But at the same time he confirms that his position on nuclear arms conforms with that of the supreme leader’s – that weapons of mass destruction are “haram” (forbidden).

“Building nuclear weapons is out of the question,” Mousavi tells me.

But no quarter will be given in the question of relations with Israel, nor will support be cut for Iran’s allies in the region. Backing of Palestinian Hamas and Lebanese Hezbollah is a mater of morality and self interest, he says, but this should not be interpreted as a signal of aggressive intent or a desire or confrontation.

blatantblue on June 15, 2009 at 10:03 AM

And I don’t think the Iranian people have any great love for Mousavi, it’s not about him. He was just the least unacceptable candidate the Mullah’s allowed the people to vote for and they couldn’t even tolerate him winning. So the entire election is a sham, especially when the Mullahs are telling the people that their leaders are divinely chosen.

The Mullah’s position is untenable. Their religious justification for holding onto power is in shambles and now they’ve been exposed as garden variety, secular thugs.

That assumption does not take into consideration the very REAL extinction facing any who oppose Khameini’s regime today.

Go view the government’s fascist thugs bashing the brains of a protestor. That’s what happens IN THEIR HOMES, not just out in public.

Fascists, as we are witnessing today in Iran (also developing in Russia via Putin’s alliance with the Orthodox Church) link politics arm in arm with divine right, USING religion to enslave the minds and spirits of followers. Whether secular or religious, there is no distinction as to modus operandi of authoritarians.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 10:03 AM

Might not that new regime (Persian socialist for instance) not also want nuclear weapons? Will it be anti-Israel? Who knows.

Perhaps, but it would help if they didn’t have a messianic suicide bomber as President. The current serving lunatic has said many times that he would sacrifice 15 million Iranians if he could just obliterate Israel.

The more turmoil in Iran the better.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 10:04 AM

Whether secular or religious, there is no distinction as to modus operandi of authoritarians.

Agree, but at least prior to this, they had some sort of pretense towards ruling.

Once a tidal wave of people reject this (as they did during the French revolution, etc.), the regime is seen as completely illegitimate. Don’t underestimate how important this is.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 10:07 AM

Come on Left-wingers everywhere, just say it.
“This is all Bush’s fault.
If he had not brought free elections to Iraq,
Iran would not have to go through the motions of an honest election and all this mess would not have happened”
Thanks again W for your legacy for freedom loving people everywhere!!!

sh221b on June 15, 2009 at 10:08 AM

Obama would have them all obliterated in order to keep the “peace” aka status quo pro chauvinism and patriarchy.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM

I care about the Iranian people and want the tyranny being imposed on them to stop. I just wonder how many Iranians there are who care enough about liberty to protect the liberties of those with whom they disagree. Jews, Christians, political opponents, the citizens of nearby states, to name just a few examples.

Loxodonta on June 15, 2009 at 10:09 AM

I’d be surprised if Khomeini didn’t get what HE wanted from the overthrow of the Shah.

maverick muse on June 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM

Khomeini got exactly what he wanted. Ghotbzadeh did not.

myrenovations on June 15, 2009 at 10:11 AM

This why there is a separation of “Church and State” clause in the Constitution. Even if the far left misuse/misunderstand the concept.

MSGTAS on June 15, 2009 at 10:25 AM

This is sooo US 2000 AND, AND 2004

pfft…

Upstater85 on June 15, 2009 at 10:30 AM

When Iran undertakes an election investigation, a “hanging chad” takes on a whole new meaning.

exceller on June 15, 2009 at 10:39 AM

This is just ‘Chicago’ politics Iranian style. After the investigation into the vote count, it will be announced that Mahmoud Ahmedinejad actually won by 110%.

Uniblogger on June 15, 2009 at 10:44 AM

This is sooo US 2000 AND, AND 2004

pfft…

Upstater85 on June 15, 2009 at 10:30 AM

Except for one big difference. No fraud was ever proven in US. Just a bunch of sore loser shitheads getting rid of their frustrations.

bluegrass on June 15, 2009 at 10:45 AM

AG Eric Holder will allow the New Black Panther’s to commit further election intimidation at polling places in America from now on. Why should they care when the Mullahs do it in Iran?

Bleed_thelizard on June 15, 2009 at 10:48 AM

AG Eric Holder will allow the New Black Panther’s to commit further election intimidation at polling places in America from now on.

I don’t they would be stupid enough to try this. If I saw one of these thugs at my polling place, I would cheerfully risk bodily injury and risk going to jail, by confronting one of them and I would not back down.

I think most of us feel the same way.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 10:52 AM

petefrt on June 15, 2009 at 9:41 AM

This “tweet” is up to the last few seconds, almost real time.

Geezer on June 15, 2009 at 10:58 AM

Try this.

Geezer on June 15, 2009 at 11:01 AM

Just what does it matter? It’s the mullahs who rule, it’s the mullahs who pick the candidates!!!!

MNDavenotPC on June 15, 2009 at 11:07 AM

Just what does it matter? It’s the mullahs who rule, it’s the mullahs who pick the candidates!!!!

MNDavenotPC on June 15, 2009 at 11:07 AM

This has become more than a question of one candidate over the other. I think the goal of the protests is regime change.

The people tacitly accepted the Mullahs picking the candidates, but now it’s evident that the Mullahs won’t even allow that meager choice, now they’re picking the winner to.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 11:15 AM

Perhaps, but it would help if they didn’t have a messianic suicide bomber as President. The current serving lunatic has said many times that he would sacrifice 15 million Iranians if he could just obliterate Israel.

The more turmoil in Iran the better.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 10:04 AM

A more moderate Iranian gov’t might want the nuclear weapons, but they also might be easier for the US to deal with than Dinner Jacket. I don’t think that Mousavi is some sort of radical democrat, but the U.S. and Europe might be able to dangle enough carrots to get him to agree to stop the nuclear program (U.S. recognition, European and American investment in the markets, etc.). It’s the difference between negotiating with the USSR vs. negotiating with Al Qadea.

Illinidiva on June 15, 2009 at 11:17 AM

They have ACORN in Iran?

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 8:52 AM

Yep. al-ACORN. They are specialists in “same day registration” . . . and voting, of course.

Trochilus on June 15, 2009 at 11:18 AM

NoDonkey

Understood, but my main concern is the lack of Western support should the protests and riots escalate. the cowardice shown over 10 years ago by us was shameful and I suspect it will show itself again. Good Lord, look how long it took the Kurds to trust us.

MNDavenotPC on June 15, 2009 at 11:26 AM

All he’s doing is buying time to cool down the masses and put the Rev Guard on the streets. Dinner Jacket will remain his puppet dictator. And Obama will disgrace us all by kissing Dinner Jacket’s a$$.

fleiter on June 15, 2009 at 11:28 AM

Understood, but my main concern is the lack of Western support should the protests and riots escalate.

Agree. The Shah basically resigned rather than kill his own people in ’79, I don’t think the lunatics in charge now, have any problem with slaughtering their own people.

But I’m sure Obama can tell us all how we’re all morally equivalent and that America is really to blame for all of this.

NoDonkey on June 15, 2009 at 11:29 AM

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