Film review: Up

posted at 11:49 am on June 7, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

Last night, the First Mate and I went to see Up, the latest Disney/Pixar collaboration, which has been out for a week and garnering great reviews.  Up pairs an unlikely set of heroes on a most unlikely adventure, and will delight audience members of all ages.

In fact, it starts off with a surprisingly poignant and touching sequence, which gives the film more emotional depth than one might expect in a movie aimed at children.  It opens with two children in the Depression era, meeting and playing in a dilapidated house in which they pretend to be their common hero, famed explorer Charles Muntz, traveling through South America.  They grow up, get married, and grow old together without ever having the adventures of their childhood dreams.  When Carl Frederickson becomes a widower, however, developers scheme to take his house — and they push him into his adventure, but with an unwitting stowaway.  I appreciated the back story, as it made Carl much more than just a cantankerous old man.   At times, especially in the beginning, Up reminded me of the classic European short The Red Balloon, and not just for the obvious reason.

We spent the extra money to see this in 3-D, and it was worth it.  Up would be just as charming in the traditional format, but Pixar has made 3-D a very effective format.  Monsters vs Aliens also used it to great effect.

Up is rated PG, which I found curious.  There is no objectionable subject matter in the film, so I assume it got the rating for some intense action sequences.  Except for the very youngest children who might be inclined to be frightened by these, I’d say that Up is a great film for the entire family.  Our audience had the widest range of ages, and even the teenagers seemed enchanted by the film.

One last note: I would swear that the artists who created Carl and Muntz deliberately made them look like the older versions of Spencer Tracy and Kirk Douglas, respectively.  Did anyone else notice the resemblance?

Update: Here’s Spencer Tracy in his last film, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner:

And here’s Kirk Douglas from late in life:

I hope it’s true, anyway.  A fine way to give a subtle tribute to both great actors.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

I saw the previews for this and will buy it when the DVD hits the stores. It looked awesome.

Cindy Munford on June 7, 2009 at 11:54 AM

My wife and I saw it last weekend. Its a great movie. One of the best animated films Ive seen. It had more depth then a lot of live action movies.

offroadaz on June 7, 2009 at 11:57 AM

more emotional depth than one might expect in a movie aimed at children.

The secret to Pixar’s sucess is that it does not aim its movies at children. Rather, it makes movies that everyone can enjoy, including children.

BTW, I suspect the PG rating is also due in part to the opening sequence Ed mentions, which deals with topics that might be a bit tricky/disturbing for young children.

Karl on June 7, 2009 at 11:59 AM

I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. It was really good.

FontanaConservative on June 7, 2009 at 12:06 PM

It looks wonderful. And yes, I definitely can see the characters’ resemblance to Spencer Tracy and Kirk Douglas.

Kim Priestap on June 7, 2009 at 12:06 PM

I almost hate to give this “idea” out, but I’d venture to say Schwarzenegger will be adding a movie-tax to balance his budget soon. You think his “buddies” in Holy-wood would go for this?

Thanks for the review Ed.

Rovin on June 7, 2009 at 12:09 PM

Though I thought “Doug” in Up was funny, I’m getting kind of tired of what I call a “Show stealer”. That is, when the minor character is getting more attention than the main character.

FontanaConservative on June 7, 2009 at 12:11 PM

My review: Nothing short of brilliant.

Editor on June 7, 2009 at 12:16 PM

We saw it yesterday. The whole family loved it (kids are 6-yo girl and 12-yo boy). It has plenty of pixar’s usual charm. A nice twist on the buddy movie.

aero on June 7, 2009 at 12:18 PM

Now that I look at that trailer again, he does look like Kirk Douglas…

Disney/Pixar puts out some great animated films, as enjoyable for kids as they are for adults. Glad the two companies got back to collaboration after their little “spat”. If anything proves that Disney needs Pixar, it’s Chicken Little.

JetBoy on June 7, 2009 at 12:23 PM

Dennis Miller did an awesome interview with one of the writers of Up! last week, Pete Docter.

daesleeper on June 7, 2009 at 12:23 PM

My family saw this on Friday and loved it. My husband declared that it was, “still not better than Toy Story, but it was really good.” I actually got very teary, which isn’t that astonishing as I can cry at commercials, but it was unexpected. That sequence was a very pleasant and touching surprise.

We saw it in standard format and I honestly didn’t see anything that made me feel we had gypped ourselves by not seeing it in 3-D. I don’t know where it could have been more beautifully done, but then, I haven’t seen it in 3-D. *shrug* My 11 year old went and saw it a second time with a friend last night and they saw it in 3-D. She said it wasn’t very different. We saw Journey to the Center of the Earth in 3-D and felt it was definitely helped with the 3-D special effects simply due to the action sequences. Up may or may not be better with them, but it definitely doesn’t need them to be a great film.

Anyway, the graphic design/animation was amazing. My favorite visual part was the light shining through the balloons into the apartment with the little girl playing. Just exquisite…

pannw on June 7, 2009 at 12:23 PM

I took my niece yesterday and loved it. The opening sequence was brilliant and, much like they did with Wall*E, Pixar knows how to make characters say a great deal without using words.

As always, the Pixar short that preceded the movie (Partly Cloudy) was also very clever.

landshark on June 7, 2009 at 12:27 PM

“The Red Balloon”? I saw that in Jr. High School.

/geezer

It wasn’t new then, but it’s old.

Attila (Pillage Idiot) on June 7, 2009 at 12:27 PM

The secret to Pixar’s sucess is that it does not aim its movies at children. Rather, it makes movies that everyone can enjoy, including children.

Karl on June 7, 2009 at 11:59 AM

They were obviously following the advice of legendary Warner Bros. animator Chuck Jones, best known for creating the Road Runner cartoons. Chuck always said that he and his fellow maniacs didn’t make Looney Toons for kids, they made them for themselves.

Del Dolemonte on June 7, 2009 at 12:28 PM

I liked it but there was something about it that kept it from being a GREAT movie for me.

Maybe it was the constant refrain of the “he has to let go and move on” aspect of the story. It was great at the beginning but they kept coming back to it. It’s like if they had done Finding Nemo where about every 10 minutes they’d interject “I miss mom” and then we’d get another flashback of her getting eaten.

That plus the other aspects of the story didn’t seem as well fleshed out as this one part of the story emphasized it even more.
Which is unfortunate because I really wanted to like to this movie more than I did.

(But don’t let that dissuade you from seeing it… it’s still a GOOD movie by anyone’s standard)

Skywise on June 7, 2009 at 12:29 PM

3-D was nice, but dimmed the color a bit, so if you didn’t see it in 3-D, you have that as a consolation prize.

Yes, the movie was awesome. I’ve really REALLY REALLY been craving to see it again, but I don’t even dare suggest that to my husband. It cost us a bundle to take the four of us the first time.

My review: One of the greatest movies of all time, animated or not.

Alana on June 7, 2009 at 12:29 PM

It’s a truly Uplifting movie – i teared up during the opening credits cause it reminded me of my grandfather who lost his wife when he was 40 and never re-married. I have never stopped to think how he coped with that personal loss but always took it that raising his 4 young children consumed his time and took his mind away from that loss.

Carl Fredrickson unfortunately does not have children but he decides to pursue his wife’s dream to take his mind away and what follows is a truly endearing and entertaining movie.

It’s amazing that two animated movies Wall-E and Up have moved audiences more than any movies involving actual humans in the last couple of years – the Wrestler and Gran Torino were probably the only ones that could compete with these two.

nagee76 on June 7, 2009 at 12:43 PM

By the way, if anyone wants the background story on the inspiration for Mr. Muntz’s house and the friendly forman (John Ratzenberger’s character) here is the latest update I had found.

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/403025_ballardhouse11.html

Editor on June 7, 2009 at 12:44 PM

Gaawwwddd… Mr. Fredrickson’s house

Editor on June 7, 2009 at 12:45 PM

I’m fairly certain that Pixar doesn’t know how to to make a bad movie.

They’ve made 10 feature length films and all of them have been good.

Chaz706 on June 7, 2009 at 12:49 PM

William Amos on June 7, 2009 at 12:02 PM

Thanks for the post, I will be keeping my eye out for this film.

Cindy Munford on June 7, 2009 at 12:59 PM

I’m fairly certain that Pixar doesn’t know how to to make a bad movie.

They’ve made 10 feature length films and all of them have been good.

Chaz706 on June 7, 2009 at 12:49 PM

Have you forgotten “Cars” or did you actually enjoy it?

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:09 PM

I saw it last night as well. We walked out talking about how much we enjoyed it!

I noticed the Muntz/Kirk Douglas resemblance right away. I kept looking at Carl thinking “who does he remind me of”? I think you’re spot on with Spencer Tracy connection.

I highly recommend it for all!

IrishGirl17 on June 7, 2009 at 1:16 PM

Have you forgotten “Cars” or did you actually enjoy it?

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:09 PM

I’ve enjoyed ALL of them, including CARS. What’s your point?

As to UP, I cried through the opening sequence. And I’m not afraid to…SQUIRREL!!… I cried through the opening sequence, and I’m not afraid to admit it. :)

(I admit also that DOUG made the movie for me.)

Oh, and unfortunately, I missed a good bit of the short before the film. Tell me, Folks, that this situation doesn’t irritate the snot out of you…
I went early as I always do. I sat in the back as I always do. A lady came in with 3 small children after the movie had started and sat down RIGHT next to me – no buffer seat. The little boy sitting next to me was fine, held his drink, enthralled with the screen. The little girl tho, around 2 or 3, proceeded to talk loudly. I tried to ignore it, but 20 mins in, I couldn’t take it anymore and turned to the lady and said “Ma’am, do you mind?”
“I’m trying.” She said. And all I could think to say after that was, “Look, I didn’t pay $17.50 to sit in your living room.” After that, she tried her best to keep the girl quiet, but luckily she was talking mostly in loud parts of the movie.

Why does it never occur to parents anymore to take children out when they can’t be quiet? Others pay good money..and end up having to listen to loud children.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:19 PM

Why does it never occur to parents anymore to take children out when they can’t be quiet? Others pay good money..and end up having to listen to loud children.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:19 PM

I meant SOME parents. Sorry to sound like I was blaming all parents.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:21 PM

I am continually amazed at how effectively the Pixar artists are able to use light in their movies. The sunlight shining through the balloons, as mentioned earlier; the sunrise and sunset sequences; the brilliance of the balloons themselves. I’ve been involved in computers all of my life, and know a little bit about image rendering. And it still blows me away what Pixar does.

The kids re-watched “A Bug’s Life” a few days ago, and I sat with them for part of it. Still a great movie. All ten of the Pixar movies really hold their own. And yes, even “Cars” was a great movie. Maybe not the best (I’d say “The Invincibles” or “Up” would be at the top), but certainly still holds its own in the pantheon.

Oh, good catch on Tracy and Douglas, Ed. Spot on.

nukemhill on June 7, 2009 at 1:24 PM

We’ve not seen it, but I enjoy ADD (I don’t suffer it) and the Roommate is ADHD. I’ve been annoying her with ill times ‘squirrel!’ moments.

The_Livewire on June 7, 2009 at 1:36 PM

I’ve been annoying her with ill times ’squirrel!’ moments.

The_Livewire on June 7, 2009 at 1:36 PM

I LOVE it!

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:37 PM

My co-worker said the movie gave his 5-yr-old neice nightmares, but that he and his sister and brother-in-law thoroughly enjoyed the movie. I think some of the chase scenes were a bit much for the little girl.

ocbrat on June 7, 2009 at 1:39 PM

I may be in the minority here, but I thought Cars was pretty bad, though I definitely think Pixar has a great track record otherwise. It just seemed to me to break the mold of being enjoyable for everyone and except for a throwaway line or two to be geared exclusively towards young kids.

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:44 PM

As an apostle of all things that Steve Jobs is connected with, I saw UP the day it came out and loved it. That was in spite of the fact that the concept as seen in the trailer (crotchety old man launches his house with balloons and has a stowaway child) was not that great. And add to that, Ed Asner, one of Hollywood’s most annoying Reds, was the voice of the main character. But I was not prepared for the emotional impact of the opening sequence concerning Carl and Allie. NOW I had a reason to watch it.

I challenge you to name any other studio who can create 10 super hits in a row without one single flop. One thought – Hollywood, in general, has lost its creative soul. Now, even high school kids can look at the calendar and tell when the big studios will put out the movies they want to make the money for the year. And because they have no creativity on the story side, we get bigger explosions and cooler effects, but no characters that move us. We have been shown so much dreck (Shrek) by Hollywood, that they expect to keep us coming no matter what.

That may be why Pixar is so important. We hear about their next movie a year or so out. And if you are like me, you go: “Cars? How can they make a great movie about cars? A robot in a garbage dump???! Are you kidding?!!!” It is not the trailer. It’s not the big sell of the big star (are you listening Land of the Lost?). It is the story and the characters that make Pixar special. God love ‘em.

Spike72AFA on June 7, 2009 at 1:46 PM

Have you forgotten “Cars” or did you actually enjoy it?

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:09 PM

I’d put Cars higher than Up. Up is more dramatically/thematically powerful and Cars certainly drags but I find Cars to be very rewatchable…

Skywise on June 7, 2009 at 1:49 PM

Why does it never occur to parents anymore to take children out when they can’t be quiet? Others pay good money..and end up having to listen to loud children.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:19 PM

It amazed me how many parents would drag their toddlers in to see Fantasia when it showed at the theaters…

Always the same: Kids run up and down the aisles, mom’s in hushed whispers saying “Mickey is coming, mickey is coming” then right after the Sorcerer’s Apprentice sequence, >bam< most of the parents with kids leave.

(Or maybe they knew about Chernobog…)

Skywise on June 7, 2009 at 1:52 PM

Skywise on June 7, 2009 at 1:52 PM

Yeah, Fantasia was a questionable one. As most folks don’t teach their children about classical music, it seems a waste. It was mostly for those that remember the first one.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:55 PM

Cindy Munford on June 7, 2009 at 11:54 AM

I saw the previews for this and will buy it when the DVD hits the stores. It looked awesome.

The 3D effects won’t be anywhere near as good, so you’re cheating yourself.

The wife and I purchased Journey to the Center of the Earth on blu-ray to see the 3D effects. Unfortunately, even in HD, televisions aren’t able to utilize the full color, polarized light technique available to theaters, and instead need to resort to the colored cellophame.

That being said, the 3D effects in Journey… were far more impressive than Creature From the Black Lagoon.

ynot4tony2 on June 7, 2009 at 1:57 PM

The secret to Pixar’s sucess is that it does not aim its movies at children. Rather, it makes movies that everyone can enjoy, including children. — Karl on June 7, 2009 at 11:59 AM

That’s the trick to all good children’s literature. If you read The Wind in the Willows as an adult, you realize that the themes are ageless, and the vocabulary and grammar are way above anything that’s specifically aimed at elementary school (or younger) children these days.

LibraryGryffon on June 7, 2009 at 1:57 PM

I saw LAND OF THE LOST yesterday. Felt that I had to, since I was a Sid & Marty Krofft kid. And they barely touched the original in storyline, but there were just enough references to make it interesting for me.

Funny, I was discussing it with a coworker the other day, and he was annoyed that they “didn’t take it seriously”. I reminded him that the original was far from something you could take seriously. I mean, SciFi’s been playing the originals in marathon lately, and wow, were they dumb. But as I was a kid when they came out…I loved them then.

Next…it’s HR Puffinstuff. Eek. But at least Sid and Marty are producing them, and making money on them again. I can’t wait for Sigmund and the Sea Monsters. :) Ok. kidding.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:59 PM

I don’t think I should have to explain death to a 4 year old when taking them to see “Disney’s first 3D Full Feature”…

Kaptain Amerika on June 7, 2009 at 2:02 PM

The secret to Pixar’s sucess is that it does not aim its movies at children. Rather, it makes movies that everyone can enjoy, including children. — Karl on June 7, 2009 at 11:59 AM
That’s the trick to all good children’s literature. If you read The Wind in the Willows as an adult, you realize that the themes are ageless, and the vocabulary and grammar are way above anything that’s specifically aimed at elementary school (or younger) children these days.

LibraryGryffon on June 7, 2009 at 1:57 PM

Totally agree. In film, there have been few that understood that. Walt Disney understood it. Chuck Jones understood it. Pixar understands it. That is why they are so successful. Entertainment that an entire family can enjoy is hard to attain, but those that pull it off, become classics. (I’d say that was why Disney World and Disneyland were so successful at one time. Family entertainment, not just exhibits that split the family up based on age group. That is how amusement parks operate these days.)

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 2:04 PM

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:19 PM

What we do is go to see flicks like this during the week, or later in the evenings when most of the smaller rug rats are at home and hopefully in bed. And we wait a week or so after the movie is released hoping there is not going to be such a crush of crumb crunchers.

Older kids can also be a problem as well. We have had gone to movies where they are constantly texting during the movie, or horsing around and throwing popcorn. When we went to see the last “Lord of the Rings” movie, some teenage girl shouted out, “Look out Frodo! It is behind you!” It seemed she was very into the movie.

freeus on June 7, 2009 at 2:06 PM

I don’t think I should have to explain death to a 4 year old when taking them to see “Disney’s first 3D Full Feature”…

Kaptain Amerika on June 7, 2009 at 2:02 PM

Aw, Ellie had to go away. And Carl is sad. He misses her.
Does it have to be more serious than that, really?

How do you explain where Nemo’s mother went?

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 2:07 PM

freeus on June 7, 2009 at 2:06 PM

It’s a logical arguement, however, trust me, going at those other times doesn’t work either. If a parent cares so little for others in the theater, they often are the type of person to drag a kid out at night on a weekday. I’ve experienced it then too.

Times have changed, and people are just rude and uncaring of others. They are used to watching at home and being loud. The theater just isn’t “sacred” anymore.

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 2:10 PM

freeus on June 7, 2009 at 2:06 PM

Oh, and I’m equally annoyed by parents, children, teens, adults on the loud and rude in theaters. An equal opportunity annoyed. :)

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 2:11 PM

I may be in the minority here, but I thought Cars was pretty bad, though I definitely think Pixar has a great track record otherwise. It just seemed to me to break the mold of being enjoyable for everyone and except for a throwaway line or two to be geared exclusively towards young kids.

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:44 PM

One of the problems with Cars was you kept wondering, where are the people? Which was distracting.

That said, the worst Pixar movie is still head and shoulders above anything else on the planet. Well, just about! Well, that’s kind of a ridiculous thing to say. Still!

Alana on June 7, 2009 at 2:12 PM

don’t think I should have to explain death to a 4 year old when taking them to see “Disney’s first 3D Full Feature”…

Kaptain Amerika on June 7, 2009 at 2:02 PM

I guess you missed those scenes in Bambi or Old yeller ?

William Amos on June 7, 2009 at 2:17 PM

That’s the trick to all good children’s literature. If you read The Wind in the Willows as an adult, you realize that the themes are ageless, and the vocabulary and grammar are way above anything that’s specifically aimed at elementary school (or younger) children these days.

LibraryGryffon on June 7, 2009 at 1:57 PM

Which is another thing so wonderful about what Pixar does – making films for truly the whole family. My kids knew I wanted to see these as much as they did, and got INTO them as much as (and perhaps more!) than they did.

Now that my kids are over 18 and in college, they still come back to me to see these movies together. Now that’s something.

Alana on June 7, 2009 at 2:17 PM

BTW, I suspect the PG rating is also due in part to the opening sequence Ed mentions, which deals with topics that might be a bit tricky/disturbing for young children.

Karl on June 7, 2009 at 11:59 AM

Agreed, that plus the menacing dogs sequences, esp the first one, earned this a PG rating IMO. I cried during opening sequence too.

But I think even extremely young children would enjoy this IF their parents are there also. You guys are right: Pixar’s for all ages.

And they’re constitutionally incapable of making a bad movie. Yes, Cars was my least favorite but still an entertaining, good movie. The Incredibles is their BEST so far. Can’t wait to own Up on DVD. Thanks, Ed, for the review.

inviolet on June 7, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Oh that dog was great. I swear that is my collie and her possum obsession.

conservnut on June 7, 2009 at 2:37 PM

We saw it a few days after it opened. We loved it. Doug reminded me of our beagle kind hearted and needing to please. Of course for here it’s…GOPHER.

boomer on June 7, 2009 at 2:45 PM

I can’t believe you mentioned “The Red Balloon.” I haven’t seen that in years.

gator70 on June 7, 2009 at 3:45 PM

I saw this movie the day it came out…it was fantastic in evry way. I really want to see it again.

Emily M. on June 7, 2009 at 3:59 PM

I saw Up opening night in a mall theater where the line snaked through the lobby and out an emergency exit. It was a late night screening, so there were more adults than children in attendence, but it was packed.

Pixar always runs a short film before their feature that has no dialogue, and while the one before Up was hilarious, it didn’t match up to the ROTFLOL Presto (with the magician’s hungry hat rabbit) that preceded Wall-E. The beginning of Up was similar to Wall-E in that there was a long stretch when the pictures told the story; no dialogue was written or necessary, and when the story of Carl took that turn, the theater was silent except for a few sobs.

Cherish a movie like Up while you still can. After it’s over, you might reflect on how the familial relationships it held up as ideals in three respects (think hard) are being challenged. One wonders how long it will be before political correctness coupled with the social engineering experiments on kindergarten kids will result in some misguided movement to “equalize” families in family films. After celebrating the nuclear family and stay-at-home moms in The Incredibles, Pixar showed in the otherwise excellent Wall-E it is not immune to such leftward pushes; Up gives me hope that if the trend should begin, it will not just give up and follow blindly.

L.N. Smithee on June 7, 2009 at 4:23 PM

Tip on the 3-D specs: DON’T TRY TO POLISH THE LENSES. They’re designed for one-time use, they’re cheap, and they scratch easily.

L.N. Smithee on June 7, 2009 at 4:25 PM

LOVED THIS MOVIE!!

And I’m not afraid to…SQUIRREL!!… I cried through the opening sequence, and I’m not afraid to admit it. :)

(I admit also that DOUG made the movie for me.)

tickleddragon on June 7, 2009 at 1:19 PM

Me too… Dug (how is name is listed on IMDB) reminds me of my golden Jack so much. SQUIRREL~! lol

Ugly on June 7, 2009 at 5:00 PM

Oh and we saw Drag Me to Hell yesterday… also excellent, but not for the young ‘uns

Ugly on June 7, 2009 at 5:02 PM

Wife and I saw UP, very good movie.

fossten on June 7, 2009 at 5:58 PM

JetBoy on June 7, 2009 at 12:23 PM

i loved Chicken Little. =(

Ghoul aid on June 7, 2009 at 6:02 PM

Cars has been on TV a few times lately, in HD. I’ve seen things I missed watching it on DVD.

The secret to Pixar’s sucess is that it does not aim its movies at children. Rather, it makes movies that everyone can enjoy, including children.

That is appreciated soooo much! I was shaking my head today watching the TV show Phineas and Ferb today–they used the line “Ancient Chinese secret” and I had to explain to my son that it was a line from a commercial in my childhood. Really not something anyone under 30 would pick up on, is it?

MamaAJ on June 7, 2009 at 6:17 PM

Ed, you are correct regarding Carl vs. Spencer Tracy. On Spencer Tracy’s page on wikipedia it says, “The main character Carl from Pixar’s film Up was primarily based on a combination of Spencer Tracy and Walter Matthau, because, according to director Pete Docter, there was “something sweet about these grumpy old guys.”" There’s also a link to a movie review the quote is sourced from.

youngturk on June 7, 2009 at 6:50 PM

I saw Spencer Tracy in the movie poster right off the bat and commented that the movie had better measure up to his performance standard.

youngturk, from the clip it seems they put the Matthau personality into Tracy’s caricatured body, sent off to a masculine Oz.

maverick muse on June 7, 2009 at 6:58 PM

Godlywood producing more hits than Hollywood

William Amos on June 7, 2009 at 12:02 PM

Thanks for the link. Good story.

jgapinoy on June 7, 2009 at 7:38 PM

We took the family to see either “UP” or “Night at the Museum” today. I was out voted and we saw “Night at the Museum”.
A big mistake.
The best review for “Night” is from my wife, who fell asleep during the movie. That says a lot as we went to the matinee showing at 11:20 AM.

mechkiller_k on June 7, 2009 at 8:03 PM

My daughter and I plan to see UP this coming week,
even though she is nearly twenty,we have managed to
see all Pixars movie’s on the big screen,and UP looks
really good!

canopfor on June 7, 2009 at 8:40 PM

I’m definitely gonna see it sometime. Still have to see Wall-E and I need to re-watch A Bug’s Life. I’ve never been disappointed by Pixar, they’re just amazing.

OneGyT on June 7, 2009 at 9:07 PM

Have you forgotten “Cars” or did you actually enjoy it?

thecountofincognito on June 7, 2009 at 1:09 PM

“Cars” was good… in more ways than one.

Of course, I saw it as I was going through a momentous time in my life… and I have a love for my hometown. So those are two very good reason why my review of it might be skewered…

But “Cars” was good. I really did like it.

Chaz706 on June 7, 2009 at 9:25 PM

As for the Kirk Douglas/Spencer Tracy likeness… I definitely see it.

Chaz706 on June 7, 2009 at 9:31 PM

youngturk on June 7, 2009 at 6:50 PM

I was thinking Walter Matthau myself – and marveling that Pixar made Carl such a real character, not just a grumpy old man. That Carl/Ellie opening sequence may be the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen on film. Worth the price of the whole movie.

I loved Up, but I have to say I didn’t care for the supersmart dogs (loved all the dog jokes though … “My name is Dug. I have just met you, and I love you!”). To me part of the enchantment of Up is that you should be almost able to believe it could really happen. Maaaaybe an old man could tie a thousand balloons to his fire grate and float the house away. Okay. Maaaaybe a stowaway with a GPS could steer them to a specific spot in South America. Well, maybe they started from Miami. But then the dogs show up, and they can talk. All right … a little suspension of disbelief here … but then they start flying little planes, and that’s where they lost me. I guess I’m not as into big long action sequences as I used to be either.

God, I’m getting to be such a curmudgeon … I hated the start of the cartoon at the beginning too. Way too twee.

But after the Carl/Ellie sequence, the next best part is where the house takes off and all the jewel colors of the balloons make beautiful shadows as it moves along. Gorgeous – and so imaginative!

Rosmerta on June 7, 2009 at 10:19 PM

I will NEVER go see this movie good or no. With the communist piece of garbage, Ed Asner, as it’s lead voice? N way will I put money in that scumbag’s pocket.

Warner Todd Huston on June 7, 2009 at 11:45 PM

My daughter called me from the other coast – in tears, begging me to see “UP” – she loved it. My teen son saw it last week – rating it with a shrug – preferring he saved his money and went to the gym instead.

My spouse thought “UP” was too emotionally complicated for our ten year old son who agreed with dad. His best friend who accompanied us, viewed “UP” for the second time and also wasn’t a big fan – specifically noting he just thought it was an ‘ok’ film.

Personally, I LOVED this film. I especially appreciated the effort to fully develope the characters to the point where the audience was emotionally invested in them. Creativity was top notch.

This is the kind of animation style that can keep my attention. — [I despise the pathetic animation style of cartoon network (Ben10, Camp Lazlo, chowder, cow & chicken - ew!)]

Perhaps the emotional component of “UP” renders this film a chick flick. My daughter and I are the only two in my family that absolutely loved it. The fellas in my clan thought it was just ‘ok’.

heroyalwhyness on June 7, 2009 at 11:58 PM

I will NEVER go see this movie good or no. With the communist piece of garbage, Ed Asner, as it’s lead voice? N way will I put money in that scumbag’s pocket.

Warner Todd Huston on June 7, 2009 at 11:45 PM

Are you using a PC or a Mac?

You do know, don’t you, that Bill Gates and Steve Jobs are both people you would disagree with politically? Yet, you are utilizing one or the other’s computing system to communicate on the Internet… right?

Can say you will never use the Internet again because they hold different political ideals than you? Or maybe you will just Twitter via Blackberry. BUZZZ nope again, you’ll find a liberal.

Your reasoning is all messed up, man.

Just go see Up. Trust in the many positive short reviews here, and in Ed’s very positive review. Lighten up, dude. Ed Ansner is only one voice in an extremely delightful movie.

Ugly on June 8, 2009 at 2:12 AM

Ugly on June 8, 2009 at 2:12 AM

Your reasoning is all messed up, man. Gates doesn’t own PCs, just Windoze. Those of us with a conscience will always find a way. Everyone else is just an indolent turd making feeble excuses.

NO$ LINUX GUI FTW.

TMK on June 8, 2009 at 2:42 AM

Your reasoning is all messed up, man. Gates doesn’t own PCs, just Windoze.

TMK on June 8, 2009 at 2:42 AM

Did I say Gates owns PCs? What kind of retard would I have to be, to suggest such a thing?? OH I KNOW… a retard like you, whom implied that I suggested such a thing.

Linux huh. You run that on a PC or a Mac? I’ve seen it on both.

Those of us with a conscience will always find a way. Everyone else is just an indolent turd making feeble excuses.

TMK on June 8, 2009

How’s that salvia divinorum treating you?

Ugly on June 8, 2009 at 2:59 AM

Yes Pixar is a very talented company and yes the new breed of computer animated movies are very technically impressive.

But am I alone in thinking that these modern animated characters are a little generic looking and lack character? It just seems like once you start from the same basic 3D primitives and add layers of digital processing, the results look similar no matter who makes the movie or does the design.

I can find one single Calvin and Hobbes drawing funnier and more touching than a hundred thousand computer generated frames. That’s because the character and the love of the artist flows directly from ink to paper. It’s this human touch that makes a hand drawn picture easier to connect to. Remember the old English movie “The Snowman”? There is no way in the world you could produce something quite so cosy and magical on computer.

Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against computers (I program in my spare time and love it)…it’s just I think that somewhere along the line, a deeply human element of art has been lost under layer after layer of digital processing and automation.

Sharke on June 8, 2009 at 3:17 AM

OH I KNOW… a retard like you, whom implied that I suggested such a thing.

Are you using a PC or a Mac?

Quote: You do know, don’t you, that Bill Gates and Steve Jobs are both people you would disagree with politically? Yet, you are utilizing one or the other’s computing system to communicate on the Internet… right?

You do know, don’t you, that people can read what you posted, right?

TMK on June 8, 2009 at 3:43 AM

TMK on June 8, 2009 at 3:43 AM

Oh… did I leave out the word OPERATING?

BTW – “LINUX GUI FTW” is some kind of oxymoron or joke. You’re having one over on us, aren’t you? Because that would be funneh.

Ugly on June 8, 2009 at 3:55 AM

Oh… did I leave out the word OPERATING?

Yes, you did. “Computing System” is the long way of saying “computer,” just like “Glorified See n’ Say” is the long way of saying “Mac.”

BTW – “LINUX GUI FTW” is some kind of oxymoron or joke.

Ugly on June 8, 2009 at 3:55 AM

We can’t all be Appletards. Some of us like computers.

TMK on June 8, 2009 at 7:32 AM

Took Mrs. Crazy Legs out on a movie date Friday to see it. It was brilliant. Made Mrs. Crazy Legs cry more than once. That’s a sure sign of heartstrings being successfully pulled.

crazy_legs on June 8, 2009 at 8:02 AM

The Spencer Tracy look was definitely intended for Fredrickson. I read the director saying he wanted the character to reflect Tracy and also modeled the character on several senior Disney animators who had recently passed away (the old men of Disney) that he knew. As he noted, they were guys who could get away calling a waitress “Honey”. I noticed the Kirk Douglas likeness too for Muntz, but I am not sure that was intended (although I assume it was, Pixar is deliberate in what it does).

Excellent movie. Saw it the day it came out. Medved declared it the best Pixar movie ever (which is saying a lot). I agree.

Mr. Joe on June 8, 2009 at 8:15 AM

I will NEVER go see this movie good or no. With the communist piece of garbage, Ed Asner, as it’s lead voice? N way will I put money in that scumbag’s pocket.

Warner Todd Huston on June 7, 2009 at 11:45 PM

Where I completely agree with you in many ways on the Political Scumbag List. Ed made his money already, so boycotting to avoid paying him is a bit late. The movie is worth seeing, and truly, I didn’t even realize I was listening to Ed Asner during the movie.

Speaking of which…I saw LAND OF THE LOST, and didn’t realize until I was watching the credits that Leonard Nimoy was in it!! Yes, Leonard Nimoy does a voice in LOTL.

tickleddragon on June 8, 2009 at 10:42 AM

Spencer Tracy meets Calvert DeForest?

YYZ on June 8, 2009 at 10:44 AM

Walter Matthau?

unclesmrgol on June 9, 2009 at 11:44 AM