Conservatism on the upswing in Minnesota, Midwest?

posted at 2:55 pm on May 29, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

My friend Eric Ostermeier at the University of Minnesota has been parsing 160 polls taken recently in Minnesota and the Upper Midwest, and found a surprising result.  Despite having elected Barack Obama by wide margins in most of the states, voters in the region have become more conservative over the past two years.  Self-identifying conservatives have reached their highest levels in at least four years (via Mitch Berg):

In 2006, the percentage of Minnesotans identifying as conservatives plunged 5.3 points (15.9 percent) to just 28.1 percent of Gopher State residents. Self-identified conservatives in Iowa also declined by 5.1 points (13.9 percent) to 31.5 percent that year, with the largest drop occurring in Wisconsin, with a 6.1-point decline (16.9 percent) to 29.9 percent. In that November’s election cycle, Republicans lost control of the Minnesota House, the Iowa House, the Wisconsin Senate, as well as three U.S. House seats (MN-01, IA-01, WI-08).

The percentage of residents identifying as conservatives declined again in 2007, by 1.6 points in Minnesota (to 26.5 percent), by 3.0 points in Iowa (to 28.5 percent), and by 2.2 points in Wisconsin (to 27.7 percent).

However, during the last two years, conservatism seems to be mounting a comeback in the Upper Midwest, even though the 2008 election cycle saw Republicans lose control of the Wisconsin Assembly, and lose additional seats in the Minnesota House, Minnesota Senate, Iowa House, and Iowa Senate.

In Minnesota, those Gopher State residents identifying as conservative increased by 1.3 points in 2008 (to 27.8 percent) and by another 1.2 points to 29.0 percent in an aggregation of polling data through the first five months of 2009. This marks the largest percentage of Minnesotans viewing themselves as conservative since 2005.

In Iowa and Wisconsin, the conservative resurgence has been even more pronounced.

Obviously, that didn’t help much in 2008, but part of the answer for that may be in the candidates fielded by the Republicans.  John McCain did not identify with the conservative wing of the party at all until he needed them in 2008, for instance, although McCain has been a fiscal conservative during his Senate career.  The GOP for the most part moved away from conservative principles in order to seem more moderate to voters, and got rewarded with a shellacking.

This could also explain one Congressional victory for MN Republicans.  We heard a great deal about how MN-03 was a transitional district, and that Eric Paulsen was too conservative to win with its voters.  Instead, Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.

Barack Obama’s aggressively statist policies will likely accelerate this reaction, especially if the American economy continues to shrink.  Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.  If every action produces an equal and opposite reaction, Obama’s radical restructuring of the American economy gives conservatives a great opportunity to take seats in Congress at the midterms.


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Instead, Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.

Amazing. Even conservative bloggers have taken to referring to conservative principles as a negative.

Despite? Why not “because of”?

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I think the primary reason that Conservatism dropped was because of how the media successfully painted Bush as the ideal conservative. Bush was certainly conservative in some areas but others he was anything but. If we can manage to field honest conservatives again I bet we will make a pretty good comeback.

txaggie on May 29, 2009 at 3:02 PM

Barack Obama’s aggressively statist policies will likely accelerate this reaction, especially if the American economy continues to shrink. Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles. If every action produces an equal and opposite reaction, Obama’s radical restructuring of the American economy gives conservatives a great opportunity to take seats in Congress at the midterms.

That’s exactly what I think too. I’m very worried about the current crop of GOP ‘leaders’ though (Cornyn, Steele, Graham, etc.). They don’t seem to know or care about this trend and the opportunity Obama and the Democrats are offering the GOP. The GOP will not win elections by moving closer to the soon-to-be widely discredited policies of the Democrats.

AUINSC on May 29, 2009 at 3:02 PM

They voted for the man…not his ideals, his beliefs…only that he was there chance to show that America is not racist….just 53% dumb.

right2bright on May 29, 2009 at 3:04 PM

So much of this is about the pocket book. Many will change their way of thinking based on who they connect the current economic condition. The more OBAMA owns this mess the more Cons you will find.

BTW the Economy is likely the biggest reason among many that MCCAIN lost.

Jamson64 on May 29, 2009 at 3:05 PM

We heard a great deal about how MN-03 was a transitional district, and that Eric Paulsen was too conservative to win with its voters. Instead, Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.

ummm…could it be because of his conservatism???

(Jeez Ed, where do you pundits go for reeducation anyway- your disdain for conservative ideas is git’n embarrassing.)

ExTex on May 29, 2009 at 3:05 PM

Despite? Why not “because of”?

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I’d like to hear the answer myself.

bridgetown on May 29, 2009 at 3:07 PM

Al Franken effect?

BPD on May 29, 2009 at 3:08 PM

Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.

Amen!

Rocks on May 29, 2009 at 3:10 PM

Robert George of Princeton has founded a new group, American Principles Project. You should check out their resources. I’m really excited about this new group. George was busy debating Kmiec yesterday.

I just wrote about the APP, American Principles Project: Winning on Principle. It looks really good.

INC on May 29, 2009 at 3:13 PM

They voted for the man…not his ideals, his beliefs…only that he was there chance to show that America is not racist….just 53% dumb.

right2bright on May 29, 2009 at 3:04 PM

Nutshell…and the supposed “cool factor.”

BuckeyeSam on May 29, 2009 at 3:15 PM

Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.

In other words, those who hope Obama fails!

Rogue on May 29, 2009 at 3:15 PM

Oh Nose! Shut up!

kahall on May 29, 2009 at 3:20 PM

Normal political cycles favor Repubs in 2010 as regards winning some House seats. Whatever that average is, if bettered, that would be saying something. Actually it better be surpassed otherwise we are in worse shape than acknowledged.

Meanwhile enjoy Al as your Senator!

patrick neid on May 29, 2009 at 3:21 PM

Obviously, that didn’t help much in 2008, but part of the answer for that may be in the candidates fielded by the Republicans.

Gosh, ya think?

Zetterson on May 29, 2009 at 3:22 PM

ExTex on May 29, 2009 at 3:05 PM

bridgetown on May 29, 2009 at 3:07 PM

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I understand how you guys are reading it, but I don’t think that was Ed’s point. He wasn’t saying that he won, despite being a real conservative. He won, despite the conventional wisdom being that he was too conservative.

strictnein on May 29, 2009 at 3:24 PM

Despite? Why not “because of”?

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I was being ironic, but maybe it was too subtle.

Ed Morrissey on May 29, 2009 at 3:24 PM

Could you give me a week for a proper exploration of this vis-a-vis Wisconsin? I would do one now, but I’m preparing for a vacation as of tomorrow.

steveegg on May 29, 2009 at 3:25 PM

Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.

Sound like races we know? Rubio vs. Crist? Toomey vs. Specter–before he sprinted?

The GOP might want to consider two things.

First, follow the pro sports teams and administer intelligence tests, current events tests, historical policy tests, and personal position tests. Find out how smart and deep these idiots are.

Second, enlist the help of some of the conservatives in the acting community to help these clowns out. Screen test them for crying out loud. And get them involved in some of the national presentations. Remember McCain’s speech against the green background in NO? Even at the convention, he spoke with an unexplained background for several minutes–some moron had taken a photo off the Web without confirming that it was a school that had some relationship to McCain. They got it wrong! Remember poor old Jindal’s presentation.

The point is to polish the substance and the style. Too often the GOP comes up with candidates with neither.

BuckeyeSam on May 29, 2009 at 3:27 PM

sorry if this was already said, but, wasn’t there voter fraud in your state, Ed? Given all that Michelle M. has been exposing on her site, I am doubting the entire election.

I think this country is STILL conservative. But, you doubt yourselves when you see the opposite on news all the time. I think this coup was in the works for some time now. ACORN-SOROS-OBAMA have been setting us up for this for some time now. It’s a fascist takeover and I am wondering just how rigged the entire thing was.

Doesn’t anyone REMEMBER election day???

Mommypundit on May 29, 2009 at 3:28 PM

I understand how you guys are reading it, but I don’t think that was Ed’s point. He wasn’t saying that he won, despite being a real conservative. He won, despite the conventional wisdom being that he was too conservative.

strictnein on May 29, 2009 at 3:24 PM

Could this then be evidence that “conventional wisdom” likes a guy who takes a stand for principles and means it? Not being from MN (used to, Rosemount/Farmington 95-01) anymore, I don’t have a read on the local atmosphere. But I think that if a Congressman is expected to lose because of the Party ideology, but instead wins easily, doesn’t that count for something other than “gee, well whadda ya know!”?

Maybe it means that a true conservative, one the people have trust in, is what the electorate wants. Lacking that, they vote for the guy that promises them the moon.

Sounds like human nature to me.

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:35 PM

We will send Murtha and Pelosi up there. They will schmooze the independents. What a piece of work the Dems have in leadership.

seven on May 29, 2009 at 3:35 PM

“Instead, Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.”

You would think others would take notice……….

Seven Percent Solution on May 29, 2009 at 3:42 PM

Despite? Why not “because of”?

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:00 PM

I was being ironic, but maybe it was too subtle.

Ed Morrissey on May 29, 2009 at 3:24 PM

Let’s face it, the democrats and other leftists have the political winds at their backs right now.

So, Ed, you are correct to say, “despite.”

UltimateBob on May 29, 2009 at 3:48 PM

strictnein on May 29, 2009 at 3:24 PM

Well said, Mr. Rat Poison. :-)

UltimateBob on May 29, 2009 at 3:49 PM

OK cool. So according to Noonan, Frum, Powell et al the way to take advantage of this change is to run a liberal Republican in 2012. Yeah, yeah that’s the ticket see.

angryed on May 29, 2009 at 3:52 PM

Just saw a post over at FoxNews.com saying that McCain has endorsed Meg Whitman for California Governor. I sent my campaign donation to Steve Poizner last week, thank God.

Kalifornia Kafir on May 29, 2009 at 3:53 PM

Let’s face it, the democrats and other leftists have the political winds at their backs right now.

So, Ed, you are correct to say, “despite.”

UltimateBob on May 29, 2009 at 3:48 PM

Weather vanes always point the right direction.
Stop paying attention to who’s got the wind direction right. Start watching for the approaching storm.

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:53 PM

from INC’s link:

“The message of the 2006 and 2008 elections is not that the American people want to be governed by the ultraliberal and statist ideology of Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid; rather it is that Americans will not tolerate Republicans and “conservatives” who refuse to honor in practice the principles they purport to affirm — Republicans and “conservatives” who expand government, spend our tax dollars wantonly, do nothing about out-of-control judges who undermine democracy, and sit idly by as marriage is redefined and further weakened.”

Finally some other voices saying the same thing.

patrick neid on May 29, 2009 at 3:54 PM

Hrm. So running GOP candidates who are Conservative might win?

What does Colin Powell say about this? Robert Gibbs and Chuck Schumer seem to care a lot about the party, what are their views?

hawksruleva on May 29, 2009 at 3:56 PM

Mommypundit on May 29, 2009 at 3:28 PM

I agree, and it’s interesting how little we’ve heard about this since then. Despite the credit card fraud by Obama’s campaign, despite the voter fraud by ACORN and the Obama campaign’s donations and connections to them, despite Tony Rezko, despite George Soros, few have dared question the legitimacy of the election since it happened. Some may say, what could we do about it? The answer is investigate, and hold them accountable. But alas, it won’t happen.

This country is still conservative, looking at recent polls on specific issues like bailouts, abortion, etc. As some have said already, it’s only when the man (Barackstar) markets his horrid ideas to the fickle public that they actually like them.

OneGyT on May 29, 2009 at 3:56 PM

The more OBAMA owns this mess the more Cons you will find.

BTW the Economy is likely the biggest reason among many that MCCAIN lost.

Jamson64 on May 29, 2009 at 3:05 PM

I disagree. The MSM and Obama have done a superb job of blaming Bush for the economy. Even when the economy was good, most people thought it was bad thanks to the MSM.

Now when the economy is in the toilet, the first response is “it took Bush 8 years to mess it up, it will take us a few years to fix it”. And when that fails to convince anyone, the MSM will just ignore reality. It’s already happening. Look at the headlines these days. Do you see any mention of unemployment at 9%? Nope. All you hear is this garbage about GREEN SHOOTS and how 6 people were hired in Rhode Island thanks to the stimulus.

angryed on May 29, 2009 at 3:57 PM

Why Mommypundit, whatever could you be talking about? Everyone knows this was the most honest, fairest election in US history!

(Did the guy with the club leave yet?)

Blacksmith on May 29, 2009 at 3:59 PM

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 3:53 PM

All I’m saying is that things are rosy for the Dems right now (Obama’s approval ratings are above 50%, last I heard). I’m definitely not saying that they’re taking the country in the right direction. The tide will turn against them, to be sure, when America sees what frauds they are.

So yes (to continue the weather metaphors), that storm is coming. And we conservatives will be the lightning bolts that knock them on their a$$es in the next election.

UltimateBob on May 29, 2009 at 4:06 PM

And people (the media) just KNEW Michelle Bachman was gonna lose, too!

SouthernGent on May 29, 2009 at 4:07 PM

I think Obama might make people more conservative.

But I don’t buy the argument about McCain not being conservative enough for these people so they voted for Obama instead or let him win or whatever…the truth is anyone who considers himself or herself a conservative should be a lot more afraid of Obama than McCain. McCain might only be what they want 80% of the time, but Obama will be the opposite of what they want 80% of the time. If you get my drift.

Terrye on May 29, 2009 at 4:13 PM

I notice the same trend here in CO.

The GOP is poised to win back the governor seat, state legislature and several house seats in 2010. Polls are just getting better and better each month.

Norwegian on May 29, 2009 at 4:33 PM

Maybe Midwesterners will vote for conservatives who are consistent and can articulate the conservative message. Here in Iowa our westernmost district keeps re-electing Steve King, possibly the most red-meat conservative in the state. The Des Moines Register hates him, which is generally a pretty good sign.

nkviking75 on May 29, 2009 at 4:34 PM

We need to borrow an idea from (gasp!) Bill Clinton:

It’s the Economy, Stupid!

Steve Z on May 29, 2009 at 4:43 PM

Hey Terrye

McCain would have given us Cap and Trade, Immigration Reform, high taxes, a liberal judge, grow the federal government ect.

It is somewhat good that McCain lost.

BroncosRock on May 29, 2009 at 4:44 PM

If the GOP does not seize this opportunity to recruit new blood in this economic fiasco created and perpetuated by Hussein, then the party is lost. Forever.

madmonkphotog on May 29, 2009 at 4:58 PM

I had no idea that Al Franken was a conservative! Boy do I feel dumb!

orlandocajun on May 29, 2009 at 5:15 PM

Given the Franken fiasco, no doubt Minnesota conservatives are waking up to face the necessity to speak out as well as to vote. When in pain, there’s motivation to do something, and taking an aspirin with bed rest didn’t help.

Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.

+1

maverick muse on May 29, 2009 at 5:20 PM

I’ll take AP’s role as Eyeore here, noting that conservatives in MN are still four points down from where they were before 2006.

I mean, give President Obama time, of course–he’s bound to make a conservative out of 75% of us–but taking one step forward after five steps back is hardly reason to celebrate.

(And it’s only when you take two steps forward and I take two steps back that opposites attract, or something.)

cackcon on May 29, 2009 at 5:21 PM

patrick neid on May 29, 2009 at 3:54 PM

I can’t tell you how excited I am to see that Robert George has started this group. Here’s an article on him:

Conservative Heavyweight: The Remarkable Mind of Robert P. George

…George’s classes on constitutional interpretation and civil liberties are huge by Princeton standards and always jammed despite his reputation as a tough-grading GPA-wrecker.

George is that oddest of odd ducks on an Ivy League campus — especially in the politics department: a conservative…

…During regular duels with secular opponents, he delights in sending philosophical wrecking balls through flimsy claims that secularist ideology — feminism, multiculturalism, libertinism — is the only “reasonable” position and that Judeo-Christian moral teachings are simply an irrational set of prejudices. In fact, George asserts, Judeo-Christian teachings are rationally superior to secularist moral teachings. Arguments like these make George Princeton’s conservative foil to pro-infanticide, pro-euthanasia, pro-bestiality bioethicist Peter Singer, whose campus offices are within sight of George’s.

…George’s no-nonsense style and love of fiery debates made his lectures “the only ones at Princeton that kept me awake each week from start to finish,” Hess adds.

Students are not the only ones being jolted awake by George. He’s one of the key figures — probably America’s most prominent — in the revival of natural-law theory as an approach to ethical and political issues.

INC on May 29, 2009 at 5:31 PM

I disagree. The MSM and Obama have done a superb job of blaming Bush for the economy. Even when the economy was good, most people thought it was bad thanks to the MSM.

angryed on May 29, 2009 at 3:57 PM

I really think the “blame Bush” strategy has a limited shelf life, but only IF the GOP puts up an effective opposition and alternative. That’s a huge “if”, though.

ddrintn on May 29, 2009 at 5:37 PM

Maybe those in the midwest are reacting to what the “real experts” think is happening in our country:
http://english.pravda.ru/opinion/columnists/107459-0/

elduende on May 29, 2009 at 5:50 PM

elduende on May 29, 2009 at 5:50 PM

I just read that today and sent an email to the HA tips!

It was quite eye-opening for a Russian to say what he did about what is going on here.

tru2tx on May 29, 2009 at 5:56 PM

This is from Iain Murray at The Corner:

Conservative Revival in the U.K.

…Also note that if you add the result for the U.K. Independence Party to the Conservatives’ numbers in the EU elections poll (the elections are next week, on Thursday in the UK’s case) you get to 49%. As UKIP self-identifies as a libertarian party, this demonstrates that solid, identifiable conservatism is back with a vengeance over there. My long national nightmare may soon be over . . .

INC on May 29, 2009 at 6:03 PM

elduende on May 29, 2009 at 5:50 PM

Thank you. Those who’ve been there recognize the scenario.

INC on May 29, 2009 at 6:04 PM

So yes (to continue the weather metaphors), that storm is coming. And we conservatives will be the lightning bolts that knock them on their a$$es in the next election.

UltimateBob on May 29, 2009 at 4:06 PM

I need an umbrella. It looks like rain.

BobMbx on May 29, 2009 at 6:16 PM

Self-identifying conservatives have reached their highest levels in at least four years…

Where are these conservatives coming from?

If they are like me, they’ve learned in the last few years that they are conservatives, NOT Republicans, so this may not be good news for the Republicans since it’s a division of their voting base.

If the Republicans run conservative candidates I’ll be happy to vote for them, if not, I feel no need to vote for “moderate” Democrat-lite rinos.

RJL on May 29, 2009 at 6:23 PM

…Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite because of his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.

gryphon202 on May 29, 2009 at 7:40 PM

If every action produces an equal and opposite reaction, Obama’s radical restructuring of the American economy gives conservatives a great opportunity to take seats in Congress at the midterms.

Opportunity? Yes, but I can’t take it for granted until the 2010 election returns are officially in. The 1994 Republican sweep proved that Bill Clinton was not immune to certain political considerations that forced his hand in welfare and government spending reform.

Somehow, at least in the media, Obama seems absolutely innoculated to these concernes. All we can do is cross our fingers and hope like all-get-out that the media’s spin doesn’t reflect electoral reality…this time.

gryphon202 on May 29, 2009 at 7:43 PM

During the last two weeks days of October 2008, MN was swamped with an avalanche of negative TV campaign ads – paid by George Soros – that trashed Norm Coleman in every way imaginable. Coleman didn’t have any money left at that point to rebut the incredible tide of negative ads. The raft of paid ads swung the election from +4% Coleman to even.

Gideon7 on May 29, 2009 at 7:53 PM

I can’t tell you how excited I am to see that Robert George has started this group. Here’s an article on him:

Conservative Heavyweight: The Remarkable Mind of Robert P. George

INC on May 29, 2009 at 5:31 PM

Finding out about him through your links has made my day/month/year. I had given up. If the Repubs in DC had a clue they would bring him in once a week to give them a lecture on ethics, spending and small government in daily life.

I know, I need to put down the bong.

Thanks again.

patrick neid on May 29, 2009 at 8:47 PM

Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles.

Well said. It conforms to the ideas of Quint Hillyer in the article linked at the top of the HotAir home page which can also be found at the following address.

http://spectator.org/archives/2009/05/29/no-patty-cake-please

burt on May 29, 2009 at 8:59 PM

Rather than retype my whole post from the Cornyn thread as it fits just as well here.

He lost this Texan voter next round(unfortunately not until 2014)
I keep hearing “A conservative can’t win in X district or state”. How do we know this is true when the R party hasn’t supported a conservative in those areas for decades. All they ever do is try to run moderates and they keep losing ground. They need to separate themselves from the democrats yet they keep moving to the center left. Right now they are the most moderate group of politicians that I remember (in my limited lifetime). Yet they keep talking about moving to the center left. And they keep losing more ground.
Hey, let’s try a new route. Run conservatives in EVERY district and state race for the next three election cycles and then if they lose I will listen to you when you say conservatives cannot win in those liberally screwed up areas. We did the opposite for the last three (possibly more) election cycles and lost.
Hey, we can’t do much worse than the moderates are doing.
A leader does not follow the conventional wisdom of the day. They don’t govern by polls. They stand on principles and do what is right – not follow the Washington crowd so they can be liked inside the beltway.

Corsair on May 29, 2009 at 2:04 PM

Corsair on May 29, 2009 at 9:14 PM

Silly. The Republicans would never give them free overpasses!

Dr. ZhivBlago on May 29, 2009 at 11:20 PM

After they elected Al Franken (or came within a few votes of it, if you want to get technical) I wouldn’t use “conservative” and Minnesota in the same sentence. He is the most vile, disgusting far-left individual ever elected.
You may have a few conservatives, but there are enough left-wing looney tunes to more than offset them in that state. Oh, and don’t forget Keith Ellison.

chris999 on May 30, 2009 at 2:10 AM

The quality of the GOP candidates will make a big difference. I remain convinced that McCain was, in fact, hitting the mark on policy issues. However, his age really was a big question mark. And his erratic behavior toward the end of the campaign brought the spotlight onto that in a big way.

AnninCA on May 30, 2009 at 1:40 PM

This very much jibes with what I have been seeing nationwide over the past few years. I was trying to argue the point that the country is becoming more conservative.

Even if you figure the pendelum has to swing sometime and having two succesive generations of neo-liberalism and multiculturalism foisted upon us and a false sense of security under the Reagan years, you knew it had to happen sooner or later.

Also information is now moved about quite freely. Whenever information gains speed political freedom is sure to follow. The internet is having the same effect on politicis that the printing press had.

Gun laws have been moving toward the liberal (old school freedom type liberality) for some time. Polls are now confirming this.

Gay marriage, despite the rhetoric has always been a political loser. Even Howard Dean was remiss to have his state described as having gay marriage, when pressed he clarified forcefully that CT had civil unions not gay marriage.

Culture, black people have moved away from some of the more vile rap and r&b artists. Their sales plummeting the industry shifted from the Tupac/Biggie thing to more party and dance type music.

Education, a neo-liberal stronghold is now seeing competition from it most devoted voting block. Black parents are frustrated with two generations of awful education with only empty promises to show for it.

Their are many signs that conservatism is one the comeback and has many ways to become the domiant political philosophy in the country.

As Obama burns it down we nee real leaders to build it back up. The real conservatives of the Republican party must be promoted via primaries.

Theworldisnotenough on May 30, 2009 at 2:58 PM

There’s about to an even larger uptick in conservatism when franken puts his hand on the Bible. Or, is he using a coloring book?

oakpack on May 30, 2009 at 3:26 PM

patrick neid on May 29, 2009 at 8:47 PM

I just saw your comment. I don’t know if you’ll be back here or not, but I’m glad you were encouraged. I know I was when I read about George and his work. There are still leaders in this country! Godspeed to Robby George and his colleagues!

INC on May 30, 2009 at 7:57 PM

I think the primary reason that Conservatism dropped was because of how the media successfully painted Bush as the ideal conservative. Bush was certainly conservative in some areas but others he was anything but. If we can manage to field honest conservatives again I bet we will make a pretty good comeback.

txaggie

Despite some conservative leanings, GW proved he was a standard progressive in a conservative suit. He and his ilk are freedom vampires, slowly sucking the life blood out of this country by dancing along the fence that divides conservatism and liberalism, blurring the definitions and paving the way for a big-eared statist freak to take power.

SKYFOX on May 30, 2009 at 8:00 PM