Quotes of the day

posted at 11:00 pm on April 30, 2009 by Allahpundit

“The National Council for a New America launched with an open letter that’s notable for what it leaves out: The issues that a large segment of the party’s base are most passionate about. The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…

The council marks a new phase in the Republican Party’s effort to remake itself: A formal acknowledgement by top congressional and national leaders that the GOP needs to change its pitch and its ideas.”

***
“Arlen Specter made his decision to leave the party after years of being attacked by fellow Republicans. I can understand how he felt, but I believe that now, more than ever, it is important for us moderates to stay and work from within. One thing we can be sure of is that we will have no impact on the party’s direction if we leave.

Moderate Republicans should use Senator Specter’s switch as the impetus to force a re-evaluation of where our party is going — a review that can happen only from the inside. Besides, third parties in the United States don’t have a particularly successful history.”

***
“Another way to put the question is: Can the party, having accurately ascertained its position, and recognizing shifting terrain, institute a renewed and highly practical tolerance for the many flavors of Republican? Can it live happily and productively with all its natural if sometimes warring constituent groups?

It must…

But also, the people inside can’t always be kicking people out of the tent. A great party cannot live by constantly subtracting, by removing or shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of its beliefs, or who don’t accept every pole, or who are just barely fitting under the tent. Room should be made for them.”


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mmm… hard to argue with. but the delivery could use work

Drunk Report on April 30, 2009 at 11:02 PM

Jesus christ can we just agree on having a few core principles to come to an agreement on?

1. defending the constitution
2. balanced budgets
3. reforming the tax code
4. health care reform
5. individual rights
6. respect federalism

and respect opposing views on abortion, gay rights etc.

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

removing or shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of its beliefs

I’m not one for shunning, but I would shun “those who are not faithful to EVERY aspect” of our beliefs.

Attila (Pillage Idiot) on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

Maybe you could start “re-evaluating and renewing” by remembering that whether moderate or otherwise, there needs to be some basic beliefs to adhere to, otherwise the GOP is just a gaggle of special interests. In other words, demorats.

You can start with fiscal discipline; all you morons can at least agree on THAT particular bit, can you not?

Bishop on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

so just ignore the conservatives and try to make a deal with the democrats. Which has worked so well for us for the last 50 years.

Skandia Recluse on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

Can these nimrods not figure out why conservatives are p*$$ed at the GOP? We need to fire them all and start over. This time with mandatory term limits and once elected, they can’t run for any Federal office other than President/VP.

Nuts4koi on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

I agree.

Mark1971 on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

You can start with fiscal discipline; all you morons can at least agree on THAT particular bit, can you not?

Bishop on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

Yep. I think Specter would still be in the GOP today if he hadn’t voted for Porkulus.

Mark1971 on April 30, 2009 at 11:08 PM

A Senator votes for the stimulus monstrosity and falls out with his own Republican constituents. I don’t see very much “intolerance” there.

The GOP already is a bigger tent than the Democrat party. How many Democrat senators voted against the stimulus? How many pro-life Democrats are in leadership positions?

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:09 PM

^ Would we EVER have a pro-life Democrat candidate for president? Ever? Now, which party is it that makes a fetish of the issue?

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:11 PM

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

Those work for me. Although I would like a little more info on the health care reform and what that might entail.

Sen. Specter has done just fine in the Republican party for over twenty years being a pro-choice moderate. It was his vote for the stimulus package that got him in hot water but for some odd reason it’s is suppose to be the soc. conservatives who have run him off. Again we are allowing people with an agenda to frame the conversations. Who’s trying to get rid of who in this farce?

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:11 PM

Goodbye stranger its been nice
Hope you find your paradise
Tried to see your point of view
Hope your dreams will all come true

I think I now understand the quote: “I didn’t leave the party; the party left me.” Goodbye GOP, hello Constitution Party.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:11 PM

The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…

plus the “moderates” Specter, Snowe and Collins also supported porkulous, so I guess fiscal responsibility is out as well…

neuquenguy on April 30, 2009 at 11:12 PM

So, basically, we should be Democrat-Lite. Half the calories, all the pork!

That’s the advice, right? That and surrendering on abortion?

Techie on April 30, 2009 at 11:12 PM

Bishop on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

Yes. Who are you calling a moron? /

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:13 PM

“The National Council for a New America”

Let me guess……..

…. educated in Ivy League Schools, mainly work in the beltway of Washington D.C., like being invited to cocktail parties and social events sponsored by Liberal Democrats, don’t see Border Security as a “real” issue, believes that Water Boarding is actually a form of “Torture”, that actually taking the fight to the enemies of this country causes more enemies, so we should just apologize, can’t wait to get invited to the Sunday Morning News circuit, already has a book deal like Miss McCain, and throwing money at problems to enhance “Social Engineering” is something that we can all agree upon……….

……… that The National Council for a New America?

To close for The National Council for La Raza to me……

Seven Percent Solution on April 30, 2009 at 11:15 PM

I heard a clip of Limbaugh the other day laughing at the prospect of a “moderate revolt” within the GOP, per Specter’s “there should be an uprising”. LOL It is a funny thought.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:15 PM

The elite establishment owns your party and will move it as far left as it can. It will not even attempt to bring in those that honor the Constitution, instead it will do as it has always done, take libertarians and Christians for granted. Why shouldn’t they ignore them, there’s nowhere else for them to go.

When will pastors step up? They fear the government and treasure their tax exempt status. If Christians wake up we can make a difference.

True_King on April 30, 2009 at 11:16 PM

Everybody call DeMint and spur him on. I did. His staff was so nice and respectful and seemed truly grateful for the support.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:17 PM

can we just agree on having a few core principles to come to an agreement on?

1. defending the constitution
2. balanced budgets
3. reforming the tax code
4. health care reform
5. individual rights
6. respect federalism

and respect opposing views on abortion, gay rights etc.

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

Or we can “respect opposing views on”…
1. defending the constitution
2. balanced budgets
3. reforming the tax code
4. health care reform
5. individual rights
6. respect federalism
and agree upon the core principles of
1. opposing the slaughter of children
2. preserving the true meaning of marriage

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:17 PM

I keep saying it. I’ll take a Zell Miller Democrat Conservative or a Ronald Reagan Republican Conservative over any of the marxist defecrats or compassionate “conservative” republicans.

BowHuntingTexas on April 30, 2009 at 11:17 PM

The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…

Sounds like McCain-lite.

Same-sex marriage is an important issue, not least of all because of the underhanded and illegal way it was forced onto the nation to start it, and the insane method of pushing it when referendum after referendum denied it.

Immigration and illegal aliens are issues that go straight to our notion of national sovereignty. Small thing these days … I guess. That’s one hallmark of a nation about to implode.

Abortion, at the federal level, is the worst SCOTUS ever. The logic is tortured beyond belief and it has no business at the federal level. This is an important point for federalists (which all Republicans should be – you know, people who prefer a REPUBLIC, defined by the separation of powers as detailed in the Constitution). Personal opinions on abortion are state-level considerations.

Great stuff there …

progressoverpeace on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 PM

“We can’t win unless we dump the unborn under the bus & embrace leftist social experiments!”
Tell that to Reagan.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 PM

They’re just slapping a new label on a failed idea. The GOP is all over the board nowadays. Just drifting like jetsam at low tide. No direction and no purpose.

Guardian on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 PM

The GOP already is a bigger tent than the Democrat party. How many Democrat senators voted against the stimulus? How many pro-life Democrats are in leadership positions?

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:09 PM

Indeed. Isn’t it interesting that the Democrats never feel the need to be “moderate”, inclusive or tolerant of others’ ideas? I detest everything they stand for, but they sure have a lot more confidence, conviction and guts then the republicans.

neuquenguy on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 PM

take libertarians and Christians for granted. Why shouldn’t they ignore them, there’s nowhere else for them to go.

So don’t let them take you for granted! Show them with your vote. Vote 3rd party. They will keep taking us for granted until we show them. My God is bigger than their evil plans and will honor those who vote their conscience. 2Chronicles 7:14 says so.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:20 PM

When will pastors step up? They fear the government and treasure their tax exempt status. If Christians wake up we can make a difference.

Every pastor I know does “step up”.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:20 PM

So don’t let them take you for granted! Show them with your vote. Vote 3rd party. They will keep taking us for granted until we show them. My God is bigger than their evil plans and will honor those who vote their conscience. 2Chronicles 7:14 says so.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:20 PM

Which is what I’m planning on doing next time. I can see it now. Wait, this person is pro-life. We can’t run them. Oh now, they believe marriage is between a man and a woman, better not run them. I’m DONE with the GOP.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:21 PM

.

Vote 3rd party.
PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:20 PM

And let the Dems win 75 Senate seats & 75% of the House.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:22 PM

Yes. Who are you calling a moron? /
Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:13 PM

The politicians and professional pundits who are telling everyone that the GOP needs to reevaluate, realign, reinvent, reenlist, reenergize, reconstitute and reform.

You would think they could find one issue to use as their base and work up from there.

Bishop on April 30, 2009 at 11:22 PM

I’m DONE with the GOP.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:21 PM

Because 14 “leaders” let you down, you’re willing to hand over more power to the Dems????

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Who’s trying to get rid of who in this farce?

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:11 PM

Exactly, let’s not pretend this is about anything other than saving his sorry a$$. Signing that stimulus bill was an outrage, he refuses to take responsibility for his own actions.

msmveritas on April 30, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Hey, I know. Let’s panic into error.

We lost one election. It happens. It was even fairly likely, given Bush fatigue, and the aged, squishy nominee handed to us by open primaries *spit*.

How about we work on staying on message instead of shredding it?

TexasDan on April 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM

You can start with fiscal discipline; all you morons can at least agree on THAT particular bit, can you not?

Bishop on April 30, 2009 at 11:06 PM

That’s what it should be all about there, Bish.

Fiscal discipline, the rest will follow. Work from that common value — one, which I might add, Specter did not share.

blatantblue on April 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM

Don’t blame ME because Specter lost his way. He’s the one that abandoned conservative principles, not me.

SouthernGent on April 30, 2009 at 11:24 PM

GOPs just gonna keep gum slapping away and lose in 2010 and 2012.

blatantblue on April 30, 2009 at 11:25 PM

The GOP is all over the board nowadays

The Dems are, too. From blue-dogs to socialists to pro-lifers to libs to pro-2nd amendment.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:26 PM

Because 14 “leaders” let you down, you’re willing to hand over more power to the Dems????

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:23 PM

I really just said that out of anger. I’ll end up voting for the GOP, I do every time. I’m just sick of them.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:27 PM

Which is what I’m planning on doing next time. I can see it now. Wait, this person is pro-life. We can’t run them. Oh now, they believe marriage is between a man and a woman, better not run them. I’m DONE with the GOP.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:21 PM

And you are not the only one. I have talked to many, many Christians who feel exactly the same way. I’m taking a wait-and-see approach but it isn’t looking good. Life and marriage are litmus items for me and should be for all God-fearing Christians. I respect the freedom for others to not agree. I’m just saying these are my key issues and I will vote accordingly, even if that means “throwing it away” on a 3rd party.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:27 PM

House Minority Whip Eric Cantor and Senator John McCain laid out the details of the group on a conference call with reporters Thursday…

The group has a heavyweight cast, ranging from prominent members of Congress to an advisory board of premier national figures: former Govs. Mitt Romney and Jeb Bush, Govs. Haley Barbour and Bobby Jindal, and McCain, the former presidential nominee.

This looks like a broadly representative group to me. Am I wrong?

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:27 PM

The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…

The council marks a new phase in the Republican Party’s effort to remake itself: A formal acknowledgment by top congressional and national leaders that the GOP needs to change its pitch and its ideas.”

Beauty is only skin deep but ugly goes clear to the bone.

MB4 on April 30, 2009 at 11:28 PM

The GOP is all over the board nowadays

The Dems are, too. From blue-dogs to socialists to pro-lifers to libs to pro-2nd amendment.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:26 PM

But when push comes to shove, they’re right there with Obama; and I don’t hear quite as many Democrat pols and pundits wailing about how their party has moved too far to the left for their tastes.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:30 PM

I’m DONE with the GOP.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:21 PM

Because 14 “leaders” let you down, you’re willing to hand over more power to the Dems????

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Hmmm? Let me weigh those choices…. Hand it over to dems? Or hand it over to people like Spector, Bush, Graham, Snowe, and Collins? Hmmmm????

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:30 PM

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Life was mentioned first.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:30 PM

I really just said that out of anger. I’ll end up voting for the GOP, I do every time. I’m just sick of them.

deidre on April 30, 2009 at 11:27 PM

Most conservatives do, unfortunately the GOP knows they can take us for granted and therefore spend all their efforts on the precious “moderates” and “independents”. Sooner or later conservatives may have to break this co-dependency and start becoming more independent themselves, this would include voting for a conservative democrat (or conservative 3rd party candidate) rather than a wishy-washy republican. If they started to do that in significant numbers their clout would increase dramatically.

neuquenguy on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

Hand it over to dems? Or hand it over to people like Spector, Bush, Graham, Snowe, and Collins?

Think, please!
Was Bush better than BHO is?
Is Graham better than Barney?
Is Snowe better than Reid?
YES!

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

Here is the simple truth, that no one in the GOP seems to have the guts to shout out from the rooftops: on most issues, the public is in general agreement with the GOP. Obama and his minions are the ones outside the mainstream.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

Why are they still whining about losing a squish like Specter?
What we need are leaders more interested in making the tough principled decisions that will leave America a better place than in re-election.
Its sad but it seems that we have to educate our political class on what conservative principles and values are.
They not only have to challenge liberalism, but they have to espouse conservative vales to the people. Explain how small government, strong defense, defense of life, and defense of marriage are all related to the American Dream as laid out by our founders.

Iblis on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

If you want fiscal conservatism and indifference to cultural issues there is already a Libertarian party. If you think you need to compromise core values to get elected, check how many pro-life anti-illegal immigrant candidatees spoke at the Democrat Convention in Denver. Zero.

Really you need us a lot more than we need you. Conservatives can compete just fine without the “kill all the babies you want, just stay out of my wallet” crowd. You are useful to us but your agenda is not our priority.

Ted Torgerson on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

It must…

But also, the people inside can’t always be kicking people out of the tent. A great party cannot live by constantly subtracting, by removing or shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of its beliefs, or who don’t accept every pole, or who are just barely fitting under the tent. Room should be made for them.”

Well now, I can see, in the name of feline solidarity, Lions letting Tigers, Jaguars and Panthers in, but I think that kissing the arse of Hyenas and Jackals go a mite too far.

MB4 on April 30, 2009 at 11:34 PM

We should emphasize the things that unite us and make these the only ‘litmus test’ of what constitutes a Republican: our belief in restraining government spending, pro-growth policies, tax reduction, sound national defense, and maximum individual liberty… As to the other issues that draw on the deep springs of morality and emotion, let us decide that we can disagree among ourselves as Republicans and tolerate the disagreement.

– Ronald Reagan

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:34 PM

This sounds like a parody. I see a skit in which a WWII bomber named “Republican Party” has to lighten its load, to avoid crashing, so it throws out all of the heavy boxes marked “PRINCIPLES.’

Star20 on April 30, 2009 at 11:34 PM

If I promote fiscally conservative ideals, no one should give a flying flip if I am also a social conservative. I have no intention of pushing my personal views on social issues on anyone. But the fiscal part of our government can not continue on it current track.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:35 PM

I can’t quite work myself up to feeling bad that someone’s abortion stance is a litmus test for me. Unless and until we stop killing our babies, I don’t expect this country to be blessed by God.

Feel free to take a piss on my vote if you don’t need it. It won’t change my mind.

TexasDan on April 30, 2009 at 11:37 PM

The problem with these guys is this group is that they’re giving the impression of vaguely right-of-center uber-elitists heading out into the world in order to find out what they ought to think and say.

Like they can’t point the way to the restroom until they’ve talked to their lawyer and their pollster, and double-checked the dial-group results.

CK MacLeod on April 30, 2009 at 11:38 PM

Was Bush better than BHO is?
Is Graham better than Barney?
Is Snowe better than Reid?
YES!

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:32 PM

Yes! Yes!

Of course, I could only vote for Bush and against Obama cue to my location. Different states have different political ranges.

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:38 PM

This is just so much GOP BS. Specter got primaried because he is a Big Government Liberal, not for refusing to support some Social Con legislations. OBTW, can any so called moderates here name one big piece of legislations that the Social Cons wanted that the GOP has worked really hard to pass? I can’t think of one. But look at the Dems when they get power they go right to work implementing more socialism, and chipping away at the constitution.

What does the GOP do when they are in Power? They work on sending PORK back to their districts, and ………………. what exactly? George Bush did more to hurt the Conservative movement than any other single person I can think of in the last 10 years. Bill Clinton was to the Right of George Bush when it comes the size of Government, and that is a shame.

Kjeil on April 30, 2009 at 11:38 PM

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:34 PM

Reagan had a strong pro-life plank in his platform.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:38 PM

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:34 PM

Which is pretty much what Republicans have done for the past 20 years or so. Abortion is an issue only insofar as pro-life elements are blamed for electoral defeats. It’s designed to make anyone who is at all opposed to abortion seem to be out there on the fringes. But the view of a good many Republicans on abortion is more in accord with the view of the public at large than is the view of Obama and the NYT editorial board on the issue.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:39 PM

When both parties are really Democrats, which will you vote for?

remywokeup on April 30, 2009 at 11:40 PM

I don’t hear quite as many Democrat pols and pundits wailing about how their party has moved too far to the left for their tastes.

Have you surfed the Dem blogs & sites?

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:40 PM

When both parties are really Democrats, which will you vote for?

remywokeup on April 30, 2009 at 11:40 PM

I hope you’re not serious.
The most liberal Republicans in the Senate are much more conservative than most Dems senators. Same w/ the House.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:42 PM

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:38 PM

Reagan had a strong pro-life plank in his platform.

Yes, but unless I am remembering wrong, Regan didn’t go after and attack Republicans that agreed with what was then described as the core beliefs of Republicans. And that did not mention abortion, allowing those who favored and those who opposed to disagree on that issue but remain Republicans.

Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.

– Ronald Reagan (The Eleventh Commandment)

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:42 PM

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:35 PM

If I promote fiscally conservative ideals, no one should give a flying flip if I am also a social conservative. I have no intention of pushing my personal views on social issues on anyone. But the fiscal part of our government can not continue on it current track.

Pardon me, ma’am, but AMEN TO THAT!

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:43 PM

I have no intention of pushing my personal views on social issues on anyone.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:35 PM

Because your views are not convictions, & because you don’t really believe that they’re killing unborn children (but they are).

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:44 PM

I don’t hear quite as many Democrat pols and pundits wailing about how their party has moved too far to the left for their tastes.

Have you surfed the Dem blogs & sites?

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:40 PM

Not regularly; but what I hear from a lot of hard-core Democrats is that Obama is just wonderful or even not left enough.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:44 PM

Compared to the Republicans, the Democrats are a monolith.

When it comes to The Lust For Power, the Democrats play a much more unified long game. Absolutely ruthless. Excellent in successfully capturing the rhetorical high ground (they have help.)

On the other hand, Republicans are a stampede of kittens.

Greg Toombs on April 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:42 PM

Agreed. I’m not attacking Republicans either…in fact, I’ve been defending them all through this thread.

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM

But also, the people inside can’t always be kicking people out of the tent. A great party cannot live by constantly subtracting, by removing or shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of its beliefs, or who don’t accept every pole, or who are just barely fitting under the tent. Room should be made for them.

No one seems to propose “shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of [the Republican Party's] beliefs.” For a very long time, many of the Republicans have proposed shunning and replacing a few Senators and Representatives who have helped pass astonishingly bad bills. As long as one sees fit to argue about the issue, it seems just as well to argue about the actual issue.

Kralizec on April 30, 2009 at 11:47 PM

Yes, but unless I am remembering wrong, Regan didn’t go after and attack Republicans that agreed with what was then described as the core beliefs of Republicans. And that did not mention abortion, allowing those who favored and those who opposed to disagree on that issue but remain Republicans.

Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.

– Ronald Reagan (The Eleventh Commandment)

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:42 PM

How many Republican politicians over the past 30 years have made abortion THE issue? Not very many that I can name. Most of what I hear at election time is from the other side: “Elect far-right candidate X and women will be having back-alley abortions again!” It’s mostly a red herring, really.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:47 PM

Yes, but unless I am remembering wrong, Regan didn’t go after and attack Republicans that agreed with what was then described as the core beliefs of Republicans.
Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:42 PM

This is no different than what is happening now. Most RINOS are attacked not because of their position on the abortion issue but for their position on porkulous (Specter, Snowe, Collins), immigration (McCain and Company), campaign finance reform (McCain), education…

neuquenguy on April 30, 2009 at 11:48 PM

TexasDan on April 30, 2009 at 11:37 PM

Don’t feel lonely, you aren’t alone. The odd thing is that there are people on the other side that feel the exact same way about the choice to abort. I’d like someone to treat the decision like it matters and was hard. I don’t think any politician runs on promise to try to reverse it any longer.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:48 PM

I will not submit to giving up my core beliefs. When do the democrats do it? They never seem to nominate a candidate that is prolife and the same with the other social issues. Next they will want me to convert to Islam and thats not going to happen. Lets keep our principals.

garydt on April 30, 2009 at 11:49 PM

Compared to the Republicans, the Democrats are a monolith.

When it comes to The Lust For Power, the Democrats play a much more unified long game. Absolutely ruthless. Excellent in successfully capturing the rhetorical high ground (they have help.)

On the other hand, Republicans are a stampede of kittens.

Greg Toombs on April 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM

They surely do. Where are the Democrat versions of David Brooks, Peggy Noonan, Kathleen Parker and Chris Buckley? Even when the Democrats were suffering defeat after defeat?

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:49 PM

Great. If we have principles, we’re intolerant. If we don’t have principles, we’re democrats. Some choice.

JohnJ on April 30, 2009 at 11:50 PM

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:44 PM

Your wrong, I do believe that’s what they are doing and given the opportunity I would vote accordingly or encourage my representatives to vote with my beliefs. But we aren’t being given that opportunity.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:51 PM

This is no different than what is happening now. Most RINOS are attacked not because of their position on the abortion issue but for their position on porkulous (Specter, Snowe, Collins), immigration (McCain and Company), campaign finance reform (McCain), education…

neuquenguy on April 30, 2009 at 11:48 PM

And then to turn attention away from their liberal economic policies, they whine that they’re being persecuted by all those nasty socons. It’s gotten pretty old.

ddrintn on April 30, 2009 at 11:51 PM

tow sack + cinder block + worthless cat (current RINO leadership) + deep river = better world

These b@stards are clueless.

Put the power of governing back into the hands of state and local governments and let the Fed worry about NATIONAL security.

saltyrover on April 30, 2009 at 11:52 PM

On the other hand, Republicans are a stampede of kittens.

Greg Toombs on April 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM

Support the right to arm cats!

FeralCat on April 30, 2009 at 11:52 PM

jgapinoy on April 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM

Yes. I read you.

Now, I am a Catholic, opposed to abortion, opposed to Gay Marriage, and I will support and defend anyone as a good Republican who disagrees with me on those issues, regardless of Christian denomination or faith or atheist or agnostic, or of any sexuality, or any race or color or national origin, IF they agree with:

restraining government spending, pro-growth policies, tax reduction, sound national defense, and maximum individual liberty.

And I understand that there may be tactical and other slight differences within those broad goals, and I am willing to make reasonable compromises.

However, when it comes time to vote on the divisive cultural and moral issues, winner takes all. And I’m voting my conscience. And that doesn’t mean I hate homosexuals or atheists or anyone else.

Loxodonta on April 30, 2009 at 11:54 PM

“No person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” Article V of the U.S. Constitution.

I here some people say defend the Constitution in one breath and then with another say that we shouldn’t be concerned with abortion. Pull your head out of your a$$.

Germany prior to Hitler’s (and Nazi) rise to power supported abortion and euthanasia.

Liberals/progressives/socialists encourage a pro-death culture. We must distinguish ourselves from them on this issue or our stance on the other issues doesn’t hold much weight.

If you won’t care about life for the least among us then I can hardly believe you’d care about much of anything else.

nwnelson on April 30, 2009 at 11:58 PM

This thread is almost the perfect example of how this gets turned around. The complaints about Congress, in general and Sen. Specter, in particular is the total lack of fiscal responsibility but all of the sudden it turns into an abortion argument. Abortion legislation isn’t even on the table and there are no candidates, pro-life or pro-choice to be elected right now. When that is the issue make the stand.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

I think I just discovered that I’m not a Republican.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

I’d like someone to treat the decision like it matters and was hard. I don’t think any politician runs on promise to try to reverse it any longer.

Cindy Munford on April 30, 2009 at 11:48 PM

Hard? It’s actually not hard. You decide not to kill your own baby. Let’s not elevate that to some sort of Hobson’s choice. The only motive to kill the child is pure selfishness. How about let’s not facilitate the rationalizations of those considering doing it by offering them some sort of twisted sympathy.

Raising children can be hard, and I’m all for lending all the aid and comfort we can to those who are making the effort to do so. Those who murdered their children do also need comfort and grace, once they have realized what they’ve done–I’m not into condemning them. But I’m not going to pretend it’s not an evil thing to choose, either.

TexasDan on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

Was Bush better than BHO is?
Is Graham better than Barney?
Is Snowe better than Reid?
YES!

The most sensible thing on this blog. Don’t expect the Texan wingnuts to get it though. They would rather lose than compromise on their ideological purity.

rightistliberal on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

I think I just discovered that I’m not a Republican.

PrincipledPilgrim on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

I discovered that when McCain ran.

Upstater85 on May 1, 2009 at 12:00 AM

They would rather lose than compromise on their ideological purity.

Bingo. But I’m not from Texas.

PrincipledPilgrim on May 1, 2009 at 12:00 AM

The most sensible thing on this blog. Don’t expect the Texan wingnuts to get it though. They would rather lose than compromise on their ideological purity.

rightistliberal on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

Texan Wingnuts as Ideological Puritans? Who?

Upstater85 on May 1, 2009 at 12:01 AM

Republicans seem to be stuck on the wrong problem. They have been losing the PR war for decades. Their ideas and solutions are far superior than the left’s and proven to work (while the left’s ideas are proven to fail) but they have not been able to articulate and contrast since Reagan, or perhaps the Contract with America. Instead of figuring out how to become effective communicators they think they have to change their message.

neuquenguy on May 1, 2009 at 12:02 AM

I have no intention of pushing my personal views on social issues on anyone.

I do believe that’s what they are doing (killing unborn children) and given the opportunity I would vote accordingly or encourage my representatives to vote with my beliefs.

I’m sorry, but I don’t see how these 2 quotes of yours line up.

jgapinoy on May 1, 2009 at 12:03 AM

TexasDan on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

My point was meant to be the callousness of those who choose to abort or at least their presentation of the act as if it is nothing. I am hoping that despite the rhetoric the decision is harder than they portray.

Cindy Munford on May 1, 2009 at 12:04 AM

The problem with this country isn’t the politicians. It’s the voters who elect them.

JohnJ on May 1, 2009 at 12:04 AM

They would rather lose than compromise on their ideological purity.

rightistliberal on April 30, 2009 at 11:59 PM

I love how the cry to all get along so quickly turns into painting those who disagree with you with the “idealogical purity” brush. Way to lead on that whole “discussion” thing.

TexasDan on May 1, 2009 at 12:05 AM

If you won’t care about life for the least among us then I can hardly believe you’d care about much of anything else.

nwnelson on April 30, 2009 at 11:58 PM

Have you never met someone who disagrees with you on abortion who was otherwise a good, honorable and reliable person? I have. I disagree with them about abortion. I agree with them on a hundred other issues. Is this not possible for you?

Loxodonta on May 1, 2009 at 12:05 AM

The problem with this country isn’t the politicians. It’s the voters who elect them.

JohnJ on May 1, 2009 at 12:04 AM

Yep. I don’t remember the exact quote or which founder said it but it is true: “We get the government that reflects who we are as a people.”

Unprincipled people get unprincipled civil government. You can take it to the bank.

PrincipledPilgrim on May 1, 2009 at 12:06 AM

TexasDan on May 1, 2009 at 12:05 AM

Is he wrong?

jgapinoy on May 1, 2009 at 12:06 AM

My point was meant to be the callousness of those who choose to abort or at least their presentation of the act as if it is nothing. I am hoping that despite the rhetoric the decision is harder than they portray.

Cindy Munford on May 1, 2009 at 12:04 AM

I really didn’t get that from your earlier posts, but okay.

TexasDan on May 1, 2009 at 12:06 AM

neuquenguy on May 1, 2009 at 12:02 AM

Well, with the Contract With America, they put forward some very good ideas and ideals that they promptly failed to follow through with all too often. Term limits were a big item. My Congressman at the time, a Republican who was elected in the 1994 tidal wave, vowed during his campaign to serve only two terms. He’s still there.

ddrintn on May 1, 2009 at 12:08 AM

Fiscal conservatism won in 1980, 1984, 1988, and 1994. Perhaps we should try that again.

Buford Gooch on May 1, 2009 at 12:08 AM

TexasDan on May 1, 2009 at 12:05 AM
Is he wrong?

jgapinoy on May 1, 2009 at 12:06 AM

No. It just sounds like he thinks it’s a bad thing.

TexasDan on May 1, 2009 at 12:08 AM

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