Quotes of the day

posted at 11:00 pm on April 30, 2009 by Allahpundit

“The National Council for a New America launched with an open letter that’s notable for what it leaves out: The issues that a large segment of the party’s base are most passionate about. The letter, signed by 14 congressional Republican leaders, makes no mention of same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion…

The council marks a new phase in the Republican Party’s effort to remake itself: A formal acknowledgement by top congressional and national leaders that the GOP needs to change its pitch and its ideas.”

***
“Arlen Specter made his decision to leave the party after years of being attacked by fellow Republicans. I can understand how he felt, but I believe that now, more than ever, it is important for us moderates to stay and work from within. One thing we can be sure of is that we will have no impact on the party’s direction if we leave.

Moderate Republicans should use Senator Specter’s switch as the impetus to force a re-evaluation of where our party is going — a review that can happen only from the inside. Besides, third parties in the United States don’t have a particularly successful history.”

***
“Another way to put the question is: Can the party, having accurately ascertained its position, and recognizing shifting terrain, institute a renewed and highly practical tolerance for the many flavors of Republican? Can it live happily and productively with all its natural if sometimes warring constituent groups?

It must…

But also, the people inside can’t always be kicking people out of the tent. A great party cannot live by constantly subtracting, by removing or shunning those who are not faithful to every aspect of its beliefs, or who don’t accept every pole, or who are just barely fitting under the tent. Room should be made for them.”


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Keep It Simple

Uphold the Constitution: constitutional government, constitutional duties of government, constitutional responsibilities of all government employees, all participants within the government obligated by Constitutional rule of law, Constitutional premise trumps subsequent judicial precedent prejudice, Bill of Rights

Uphold Local Government: Mandates, funded or not, are not Constitutional. Keep Federals Out of the entire spectrum of prejudicial legislation regarding personal choice issues.

Limit the exercise of federal government to the explicit Constitutional requirements. Maintain the distinctions between the branches of government. The Legislative is not the Executive, the Judicial is not the Legislative, and the Executive is not Big Brother.

FLAT TAX.
CONTRACT LAW.
Contractor responsible for any cost over-run, and must only be paid according to the contractual agreement.

maverick muse on May 1, 2009 at 7:54 AM

Watch whose lips are moving the most on the “council” and decide accordingly. It’ll be a no-brainer for remaining GOP conservatives as to what to do next.

Fletch54 on May 1, 2009 at 7:56 AM

You win back power by focusing on the big issues: economy, foreign policy, energy, national security. Once you’re there, you push your social issues. This should be a no-brainer. Those who identify with the GOP at its current nadir are already on board with the social issues. The point is to attract people by promoting general concepts. The hot button issues can wait.

frode on May 1, 2009 at 7:57 AM

It’s things like this: pbundy on May 1, 2009 at 12:12 AM that really bug me. That is a false choice proposed and PROMOTED by people like this: athensboy on May 1, 2009 at 7:22 AM

Do we really want to take advice from liberals? If so then the Democrats would love to have you.

I’m tired of the relentless leftward creep of the GOP to the point where it has become Democrat-Lite.

Can the trend be stopped or reversed? Not as long as we keep growing the left side of the tent and alienating the right. I propose that the problem isn’t that conservative ideas are flawed and need to be changed, but simply that liberalism is cool. It’s NOT cool to be a conservative.

Most people are not well informed, and yet they still vote. Barak Obama is the POTUS because men want to be him and women want to be with him. He’s the high school quarterback, the leading man, etc. These voters don’t give a hoot about his policies.

Conservatives need to become cool. Instead of conservatives wanting to be like liberals we need to make liberals want to be like conservatives. How? Well I haven’t figured that out yet, but a nice first step would be having our own leading men and women on the big screen. Trend setters. People the dumb masses really look to for guidance.

Onus on May 1, 2009 at 7:58 AM

Try using “stay out of our daily lives & pocket books” as a starter. All moderate/conservative rep’s should boycott the current meeting dealing with “whether or not the college football’s championship process is fair”. What the hell do we need your input or (dear God) more legislation on this type of issue. Get the hell out of town and check out what the real people think about the direction of this country. D’s & R’s are nothing but “A’s”.

hillbilly on May 1, 2009 at 8:02 AM

I just love the smell of a gop civil war. That fresh aroma of a smaller and smaller gop tent. Hey goopers, your self destructing. Maybe purging the party isn’t such a great idea afterall.
athensboy on May 1, 2009 at 7:22 AM

Perhaps, but what might come next will make you yearn for the days when you could live comfortably and publicly with your gay lover and have a cute house with a white picket fence.

btw, I mean that sincerely. The “destruction of the GOP” and the utter marginalization of the hundred million or so people who look towards it as home will not be something that will benefit you in the long run.

The current alliance of social, ethnic, and sexual minorities may indeed succeed in bringing traditional America down, but I wonder if you’ve fully considered the consequences. I suspect not. In any case, we are all about to find out, because of the efforts of people like you.

Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind.

JiangxiDad on May 1, 2009 at 8:02 AM

National Council for a New America is a perfectly HORRIBLE name! First, it doesn’t make a good acronym. Second it reminds me of the National Council of La Raza. Third, I don’t want a freaking “New America”! I want the old America back.

Buy Danish on May 1, 2009 at 8:03 AM

Room should be made for them.”

I agree, maybe we should be digging holes in the tent floor for them…

doriangrey on May 1, 2009 at 8:07 AM

Cut the GIVE AWAY programs.

Lower Taxes.

NO TAX DOLLARS FOR ABORTIONS

SECURE ABORTIONS.

Cap trial attorney fees.

That should be a good start.

stenwin77 on May 1, 2009 at 8:11 AM

SECURE ABORTIONS. OUR BORDERS

Cap trial attorney fees.

That should be a good start.

stenwin77 on May 1, 2009 at 8:11 AM
I hate it when that happens – it’s the teleprompter.

stenwin77 on May 1, 2009 at 8:12 AM

you know, as much as i would love to comment here, i am afraid if i mention that single issue voters don’t move the party forward or create a winning party, i will be shouted off this thread.

but one person said it–the would rather preserve the right to life & eliminate abortion in all its forms than anything else; that issue is more impt to that person than national security, illegal immigration, anything else.

i hope that that narrow view is not a majority of those the Republicans hope to cobble together to create a vibrant & fiscal conservative & strong nat’l defense party.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:13 AM

The current alliance of social, ethnic, and sexual minorities may indeed succeed in bringing traditional America down, but I wonder if you’ve fully considered the consequences. I suspect not. In any case, we are all about to find out, because of the efforts of people like you.

Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind.

JiangxiDad on May 1, 2009 at 8:02 AM

People like him never think of the consequences of their actions–they don’t care about the past or the future–only the “now” matters. Like the grasshopper, they consume everything they have and produce nothing and when lean times come, they will pay the price. They’re fools, pure and simple.

Do we really want to take advice from liberals?

See–this is what gets me about liberals–do they honestly think I’m going to seriously consider their suggestions for how a conservative party should be structured? Anytime a liberal tells me to do something, my first instinct is to do the exact opposite. What this tendency of liberals to “offer advice” does point towards is what I view as the “evangelical missionary” element of the secular religion of modern liberalism–and this is a very important thing to understand about liberals–liberalism is very much a religion to them. Having pretty much rejected traditional faith, many liberals have glommed on to liberalism as a form of faith or religion, with many of those coming on to conservative forums such as this viewing themselves as missionaries trying to “convert” us, or as crusaders doing battle against us “unbelievers” and “blasphemers” against Bambi, or as inquisitors seeking out those holding “heretical” views and/or any possible apostates from the liberal standard–especially minorities or women who “stray” from the liberal plantation. Once you understand this element of modern liberalism and combine it with the lack of critical thinking and poor historical education they are/have received in the public school system as well as the general “juvenilization” of our current culture and society, liberals such as athensboy and the other trolls here become very easy to understand.

Matt Helm on May 1, 2009 at 8:22 AM

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:13 AM

It’s like I said in a posting yesterday, I really think that federalism could be the glue that holds everything together–and this is what’s making the Modern Whigs attractive to me–they’re advocating a federalist approach to social conservative positions such as abortion and gay marriage. Added to that, the Modern Whigs have a rather intriguing approach to handling taxes in that they want to, after the necessary federal expenditures on such elements as national defense etc. are taken care of, return tax moneys back to the states in the proportion to which the individual states contribute the taxes–no earmarking and it ends up with the individual states being responsible for meeting any necessary infrastructural and other needs. The Republicans need to do the same thing or we might end up seeing a historical irony as the same GOP that rose from the ashes of the Whigs in the 1850s dissolves only to be replaced by the modern successor of the Whigs today.

Matt Helm on May 1, 2009 at 8:28 AM

Where have the pundits and politicians have gone wrong? With this Big Tent concept. The “smaller the tent” the better. The more the GOP strictly adhere’s to its core belief’s the more it will attract back millions of estranged voters. If its not already too late. DD

Darvin Dowdy on May 1, 2009 at 8:38 AM

Once again, we can only have a “strong” Republican Party if the social conservatives shut up. Why? Are our priciples so repugnant to you, AP, that you can’t stand to be near us? Specter wasn’t “forced out”. He left because his poll numbers were tanking and he wants to be a senator more than he wants to stand for something. Is that the type of person we must embrace to have a strong party? Hell no.
The principles we embrace are the one’s this country was founded upon. I will not be brow-beaten by some effeminate, effete, effing elite.

SKYFOX on May 1, 2009 at 8:40 AM

Leading does not mean asking “where is everyone else going” and then running there ahead of them.

DavidM on May 1, 2009 at 8:47 AM

matt: i agree with you. but have you ever been to a polling place in a poor, minority neighborhood? those people don’t know what federalism is. however, they do know all there is to know about how much money they can get from the govt. in the form of hand outs. we will not be able to get this voting bloc.

so we have to cobble together the rest of the people who actually work, pay taxes & have an 8th-grade-education (or lower) ability to understand issues.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:50 AM

See–this is what gets me about liberals–do they honestly think I’m going to seriously consider their suggestions for how a conservative party should be structured? Anytime a liberal tells me to do something, my first instinct is to do the exact opposite. What this tendency of liberals to “offer advice” does point towards is what I view as the “evangelical missionary” element of the secular religion of modern liberalism–and this is a very important thing to understand about liberals–liberalism is very much a religion to them. Having pretty much rejected traditional faith, many liberals have glommed on to liberalism as a form of faith or religion, with many of those coming on to conservative forums such as this viewing themselves as missionaries trying to “convert” us, or as crusaders doing battle against us “unbelievers” and “blasphemers” against Bambi, or as inquisitors seeking out those holding “heretical” views and/or any possible apostates from the liberal standard–especially minorities or women who “stray” from the liberal plantation. Once you understand this element of modern liberalism and combine it with the lack of critical thinking and poor historical education they are/have received in the public school system as well as the general “juvenilization” of our current culture and society, liberals such as athensboy and the other trolls here become very easy to understand.

Matt Helm on May 1, 2009 at 8:22 AM

Hey Matt. These comments apply well to Islam as well. Honestly, and I shouldn’t be saying this, but the “progressives” would get further faster if they created a deity to lend supernatural credence to their beliefs. So far, they are still stymied when someone uses a religious argument against their beliefs. I think they will become more overtly “religious” if and as they succeed further. The Taliban threatens Pakistan. We have our own Taliban threatening us here.

JiangxiDad on May 1, 2009 at 8:55 AM

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:50 AM

I have to disagree because that scenario sets up folks that understand issues against folks that don’t understand issues. Since the vast majority of voters fall into the later it doesn’t sound like a winning strategy to me.

We need to adopt the tactics of the left. Not their policies. We need to make conservatism the new “in thing” so that people will want to identify with conservatism. Even if they don’t fully comprehend how that helps them.

Onus on May 1, 2009 at 9:04 AM

Matt – I’m with you and Kelly. The only way I can see the GOP winning is by assuring people of what they’re actually going to do and nothing beyond that. The real sin of W’s era and now Barry’s is that they overreach on behalf of their hardline constituents because they’re the loudest.

W did it with Rove’s “wedge issues” and Dobson’s heavy-handedness on things like gay marriage amendments and Schiavo. No matter what you believe to be right in those cases, that belief has to give way to the first principle of no federal interference. Barry’s moves have been cloaked by the slagging economy, but the overreach will be felt soon enough.

The issues aren’t hard to solve. For example, the majority do not want gay marriage, they want all couples to have equal rights and protection that state marriage provides. The majority do not want a federalized medical system, they want all legal citizens to have access to a health care safety net. We split on abortion because it feels like an intrusion on privacy. Show how federal intrusion complicates these questions, and how the removal of federal involvement solves them. That’s at the core of Beck’s popularity.

budfox on May 1, 2009 at 9:11 AM

National Council for a New America is a perfectly HORRIBLE name! First, it doesn’t make a good acronym. Second it reminds me of the National Council of La Raza. Third, I don’t want a freaking “New America”! I want the old America back.

Buy Danish on May 1, 2009 at 8:03 AM

Yeah. I hate it too. It doesn’t bode well that these “moderates” seem to be suffering from such a disconnect that they can’t even get this much right.

The soft fascism of the Obama administration should have our Republican representatives cringing at the word “national”. We don’t want a “national” government. We want a federal one, one that is cognizant of it’s limitations as defined by the U.S. Constitution.

And you’re exactly right about the use of “New America”. We want the America we had BEFORE our politicians decided to engage in a perpetual game of ‘Let’s Reinvent the Wheel’, like they know better than our founding fathers or something. We’re suffering from a level of political PTSD that Republican leadership doesn’t seem to appreciate. Obama’s clear wish to “remake” America in his own image is making a nervous wreck of us. And here we have Republicans echoing his words.

I’m not at all opposed to a “Big Tent” approach if what they’re talking about is defining a handful of CORE PRINCIPLES on which we can find common ground as Republicans. That said, morality is always subjective. Principles, as applied to ideology, are not. These are finite. So, I don’t want to see a platform built around social issues. I want to see some Republicans with core principles which they use consistently to base their decisions upon.

If they’re talking about limited central government, adherence to the Constitution, strong national defense, free market solutions, and things like that… great. If they’re talking about gay marriage and abortion, immigration and free college tuition, or even a jot more of nanny-state government… they can pull a Specter for all I care. I’m not looking for Dem-lite.

Murf76 on May 1, 2009 at 9:11 AM

Onus: i’m on board with you. now, how can we do it?

i had hoped that Ahh-nold would have brought some “coolness” to our cause but he has proven to be exactly what he is: a Kennedy in-law.

no matter what you think of Sarah Palin, she does look cool holding guns.

personally, i think dick cheney is very cool. yes, i realize that i am in a small minority of the voting public with that one.

the teaparties were cool, no matter what the libtards said.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:14 AM

Any “revolutionary” movement that is based on the Arlen Spector principle is doomed to fail.

Arlen Spector HAD no principles.

Further … any “revolution” that has the Republican Party kicking out conservatives or marginalizing them is doomed to fail also.

These people are scared. This happens in battle. The “scared” ones are the ones that start doubting the mission objectives the moment contact with the enemy is made and the bullets start flying. Seeing the opposition – they’re always the ones telling the squad leader that “we need to fall back here”.

A Good Squad Leader presses on.

Press On.

HondaV65 on May 1, 2009 at 9:15 AM

why can’t “freedom” be cool? is that too much to ask?

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:16 AM

Career suicide for Cantor. If you do not have set values, what do you have?

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:21 AM

Besides, third parties in the United States don’t have a particularly successful history.

Third parties? Who brought that up?

Here’s something for these clowns to consider: The Whig Party. Where’d it go? It was just here a few years ago. Huh.

Akzed on May 1, 2009 at 9:23 AM

SKYFOX on May 1, 2009 at 8:40 AM

+1,000,000

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:24 AM

“Let’s be just like the Democrats, only smarter.” The temptation is so alluring because it seems to be so easy.

Akzed on May 1, 2009 at 9:26 AM

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:13 AM

Kelley,
There is nothing wrong with those of us that place life as the most precious issue we have. It is a firmly held belief and way of life for some of us. I think we have a responsibility to protect those that cannot help themselves. Believe it or not, there a lot of people out there for which this is a core belief that we will not budge on.

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:28 AM

cantor’s district is trending a bit more blue, but otherwise, i would say he is pretty safe.

after i return from the virginia Republican Convention, i will give a full report on the religious right v. “regular” right as i see it.

what to call myself since i am not one of the religious right?

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:29 AM

Career suicide for Cantor. If you do not have set values, what do you have?

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:21 AM

Values by committee

Dasher on May 1, 2009 at 9:31 AM

texas mom: i am proud of you & take your core beliefs seriously.

and i don’t want to fuss with you or insult you. but i want the Republican party to win. i want fiscal conservatism & strong nat’l defense. and your core beliefs, if a talking point of the entire party, might not win elections everywhere.

this is my issue. the winning. not your beliefs.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:32 AM

matt: i agree with you. but have you ever been to a polling place in a poor, minority neighborhood? those people don’t know what federalism is. however, they do know all there is to know about how much money they can get from the govt. in the form of hand outs. we will not be able to get this voting bloc.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 8:50 AM

You’re right–we’ll never get them–they’re chained to the Democrat plantation just as surely as slaves were chained to their plantations in the old South. Our best hope here is through a combination of educational reforms and providing education and incentives for those who are willing and able to participate in society rather than drawing from it–and I’m afraid that will be a generational process and again, we’d have to fight the Democratic machine every inch of the way.

so we have to cobble together the rest of the people who actually work, pay taxes & have an 8th-grade-education (or lower) ability to understand issues.

That has to be the primary goal–to reach out to the silent majority and make them understand what’s going on and why. Simple, direct, clear language and principles works best.

Matt Helm on May 1, 2009 at 9:33 AM

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:28 AM

No one’ asking you to give up your views–by all means you should express them. But, would you be willing to accept the idea that it should be the people of the states through their legislatures and/or through referendums that should decide issues such as abortion and gay marriage rather than the federal government? If so, then we’ve found an important area of compromise that would also be acceptable to many libertarians.

Matt Helm on May 1, 2009 at 9:36 AM

If you want to be liberal/left, then dammit, COMMIT to the Democrat Party. It’s already there. If you don’t like some of the things it does, then change the Democrat Party.

The rest of us want an alternative, and the GOP COULD provide that. Right now, every indication is that the leadership is moving further towards the Dem positions. They should quit being cowards and follow Arlen. Of course, it would be difficult for most of them to get elected to their current cushy jobs competing with real Dems…

Yeah, I’m rambling, but dammit, I want a GOP that is DIFFERENT from the Democrat party in significant ways. Otherwise, all the current leadership is offering is the frontage road to hell as opposed to the Interstate to hell. It does little good to take the slow road if the final destination is the same…

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 9:38 AM

while we are all here, let’s say “abortion” out loud, then try to work with all the different reactions to it.

in virginia, the anti-abortion crowd is strong in the Republican party. no one can say the word “abortion” aloud anymore so the party fusses with itself without naming the issue.

why can’t we all get along? i certainly don’t want to abort all your fetuses, but i do want to stop this runaway spending. these policies can exist together.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:38 AM

I am all for strong national security, border enforcement, fiscal responsibility. But, I do not want to win at all cost, by selling out my core beliefs. By the way, I wasn’t attacking you or trying to insult you either. Their are a lot of people on the left, minorities for example, to who life could be an issue that we can connect on. By emphasing family values, we can draw in people of all faiths and ages.

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:41 AM

I wish Republican politicians had the guts to stop pandering to the most fanatical elements in our party. As the United States keeps progressing forward, the GOP gets stuck in neutral weighed down by 35 year old Supreme Court decisions and other divisive social issues.

If we want to be the party of anti-big government, we need to start with getting out of the business of meddling into the private lives of our citizens when it comes to reproductive choices as well as the type of private end-of-life issues which surrounded the Terry Schiavo case.

The GOP needs visionary leaders that can grow and expand the party — not let it rot on the vine in order to appease the most extreme party members. Steele isn’t that guy. He’s too flaky and wrapped up in his own celebrity to be an effective leader.

Christina_M on May 1, 2009 at 9:42 AM

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 9:38 AM

Here here!

Onus on May 1, 2009 at 9:43 AM

What is extremist about being prolife? I guess you agree with us being put on the terror watch list by DHS. Just because someone is prolife doesn’t mean we are going to go “Rudolph” and blow up an abortion clinic. I have personally never harrassed or dragged someone out of a clinic either. Where is the tolerance for people who have conservative beliefs?

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 9:47 AM

texas mom: there is a black woman i know who worships & adores obama. her 2 daughters have had so many babies that they’ve had to give some up for adoption to other family members. i mentioned birth control to this black woman once & she got really angry at me:

she said black people don’t believe in abortion. i’ve heard several blacks say that. this is preached in their churches. and 95% of them voted for bambi because he is black.

this woman told me it was all a lie about bambi supporting (or not blocking) infanticide in illinois.

that is where we are with the some minorities.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:51 AM

Jesus christ can we just agree on having a few core principles to come to an agreement on?

1. defending the constitution
2. balanced budgets
3. reforming the tax code
4. health care reform
5. individual rights
6. respect federalism

and respect opposing views on abortion, gay rights etc.

therightwinger on April 30, 2009 at 11:04 PM

The most important reform of all would be; Term Limits for Congress – 2 terms Senate, 4 terms House sounds good.

Dasher on May 1, 2009 at 9:53 AM

National-security issues trump the abortion issue. Let’s take care of the folks that have already been born before we worry about the folks that haven’t been born yet.

I am not talking about “partial-birth abortion,” by the way. That’s just freakin’ infanticide.

bulgaroctonus on May 1, 2009 at 9:54 AM

texas mom: the answer for the Republican party is for you as a pro-lifer & me as one who doesn’t hold that as a top issue to figure out how to move forward to win on the other issues we hold dear.

if we can do that, we can take our country back.

kelley in virginia on May 1, 2009 at 9:54 AM

I do not consider myself a Republican. I am a Conservative. My beliefs just align me more with the Republican party of fiscal issues.

TXMomof3 on May 1, 2009 at 10:07 AM

Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

You do not uphold the sanctity of life, the rest crumbles.

You know what i wish we’d hear? Someone say on national television again and again until it sinks in that Planned Parenthood is a racist, corrupt organization, that anyone with any sanity cannot look at the mangled bodies of dead humans and not see Autzwitch, and, no, it’s not really ok to redefine man and woman hood so drastically to appease homosexuals wanting nothing MORE than to level down civil society’s basic framework of the nuclear family. WE ALREADY HAVE ENOUGH TROUBLE AS IT IS WIT DIVORCE. We will cede no more ground. And, also, it ISN’T OK to do nazi experimentation with human embryos and we support adult stem cell research. So, DO NOT ELECT ME if you do not want tested, honorable principles.

Mommypundit on May 1, 2009 at 10:21 AM

with.

Mommypundit on May 1, 2009 at 10:22 AM

Also, tell me again why the left is allowed to become more and more strident in their views and we, just like with the jihadis, continue to appease and appease and appease until, *poof* all our ground is gone with our moral standing? Why does that happen? WHO RESPECTS A PERSON LIKE THAT??? Why would the public respect US?

See, it doesn’t matter if we are shunned or ridiculed or marginalized. If all we care about is electability, we have lost more than elections.

I care about something greater than elections. If we toss aside truth HERE, we will have an easier time tossing aside truth in fiscal areas, as we CLEARLY see with RINOS with no compass. They do not realize that fiscal restraint and conservatism goes hand in hand with a social conservatism.

Again, notice how little the left ever loses. When we WIN, they still gain because we water down everything to be more PALATABLE to corrupt human nature. It will NEVER be on our side if we stand for truth.

Remember William Wilberforce? Yeah. real popular guy, huh?

Mommypundit on May 1, 2009 at 10:28 AM

Why does that happen?

Because compromise has become a more important way of “resolving” conflicts” than crushing your enemy before you and hearing the lamentations of their women…

OK, sorry for that last part: to much testosterone flowing today. Must be those dammed pills…

But you get the point: we’re no longer a nation of winners, just whiners.

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 10:33 AM

crushing your enemy before you and hearing the lamentations of their women…

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 10:33 AM

Hear, hear. We need more of that kind of talk.

bulgaroctonus on May 1, 2009 at 10:36 AM

Because compromise has become a more important way of “resolving” conflicts” than crushing your enemy before you and hearing the lamentations of their women…

OK, sorry for that last part: to much testosterone flowing today. Must be those dammed pills…

But you get the point: we’re no longer a nation of winners, just whiners.

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 10:33 AM

It all started in earnest when the left CONSTANTLY required “apologies” from people for saying the wrong thing or printing the wrong thing during the Bush administration. Now, that is standard procedure. I hate it.

Mommypundit on May 1, 2009 at 10:38 AM

It all started in earnest when the left CONSTANTLY required “apologies” from people for saying the wrong thing or printing the wrong thing during the Bush administration.

Yeah, I’m starting to take more of a “OK, what part of that insult didn’t you understand?” sort of approach. I mean, I’m already guilty of crimes against humanity for being a conservative so damn the torpedoes of political correctness and full speed ahead!

And F-em if they can’t take a joke.

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 10:49 AM

I have said before on other threads, the issues of gay marriage and abortion are red herrings designed to throw us off our game. I agree with Maverick Muse that we need to put ourselves forth as the party of the Constitution, fiscal responsibility, and individual freedom. Those issues resonate with almost everyone.

I just saw the President of the American Small Business Association, a man who campaigned heavily for Obama because he believed the spin, on FNC saying that Obama lied and has reneged on all his promises to help small business. So, the pigeons are coming home to roost, especially since Obama has decided to cast his lot with the unions. We need to hammer on Obama for the campaign promises made and broken. Because conservatives have always tried to conduct ourselves in a more civil, courteous fashion, we have not been able to fight effectively. Now, the gloves need to come off…

College Prof on May 1, 2009 at 10:52 AM

mean, I’m already guilty of crimes against humanity for being a conservative so damn the torpedoes of political correctness and full speed ahead!

And F-em if they can’t take a joke.

karl9000 on May 1, 2009 at 10:49 AM

Absolutely. At this point, all we can do is force their hand. Ultimately, I think they want us silenced at all cost. If we force them to do what it is that they really WANT to do, fast and hard, I think more people will see their real agenda. Most people saw the tea parties as positive events. It was hard for any regular person in any town not to have known someone involved or seen someone involved. It wasn’t at all what the left tried to paint it. It WILL trickle out. We have to be pretty aggressive upfront (with words and peaceful actions) and utterly unapologetic if we want to stem this tide at all. They will continue to erode the nation with or without us. What will it be?

Mommypundit on May 1, 2009 at 10:55 AM

SKYFOX on May 1, 2009 at 8:40 AM

No one is asking you to change your values, but the time is long past that traditional social mores can be enforced on others by goverment and frankly it never should have been. Continue down this path and you will get the opposite liberal views enforced by government when you fail again and again to win back power.

Victory is achieved by simple popular narratives that captivate the middle ground. The left and right are already comitted.

Look at it this way, if you can’t get the heavily Cathlic Latino Population to vote on social issues, who will follow you? The Omish? Good luck with that.

Constitutional rights
Free Market
Free Minds
Opporunity
Strong defense
Ethics
Rule of Law

Hochmeister on May 1, 2009 at 1:44 PM

I wait to see what transpires. So far, the group that’s involved isn’t pushing my hot buttons, anyway.

Jindal is boring, folks. And opportunistic.

And Palin is becoming an issue. What’s up with that?

AnninCA on May 1, 2009 at 1:46 PM

every aspect of its beliefs

What beliefs?

The GOP wants goodies for its members’ districts.

spmat on May 1, 2009 at 2:37 PM

Abortion is a federalist issue, not a social one.

The Feds have NO AUTHORITY to trump the states on the issue, period.

The justices who ruled otherwise should have been removed from the bench.

DavidM on May 1, 2009 at 3:15 PM

The most important reform of all would be; Term Limits for Congress – 2 terms Senate, 4 terms House sounds good.

Dasher on May 1, 2009 at 9:53 AM

Amen (although I’d prefer 2 terms each). This should be the priority of all of us. I believe it’s our only chance for responsive government and reducing corruption. But to make it succeed will require a HUGE movement in this country. Maybe the Tea Parties are a start. If Term Limits is the only thing that comes from them, it would still be great!

Christian Conservative on May 1, 2009 at 3:30 PM

I just love the smell of a gop civil war. That fresh aroma of a smaller and smaller gop tent. Hey goopers, your self destructing. Maybe purging the party isn’t such a great idea afterall.
athensboy on May 1, 2009 at 7:22 AM

Actually, it could be the Democrat party that’s self-destructing. Obama doesn’t pan out, Democrats could be discredited for a generation or more. It’s that big.

ddrintn on May 1, 2009 at 5:12 PM

same-sex marriage, immigration — legal or otherwise — or abortion”

I don’t see any of these as “Republican” issues

People seem to be confusing social values with political values.

crosspatch on May 1, 2009 at 2:44 AM

They are conservative issues, not merely a social values.

Some republicans think a nation can function equally well moral, or debauched but conservatives disagree.

Abraham Lincoln, for instance, did not make his decisions against slavery simply seeking a better business model, or a fairer taxation

Rule of law has been an important part of the American success story, and illegal immigration (which is not immigration but importation) has greatly corrupted the rule of law in this nation.

When the President, or the Congress decide to solve a problem by pretending a law has not been broken instead of changing the law, they are either conspiring to defraud the public trust, or they are refusing to be accountable.

This may not be an issue to some people calling themselves republicans, but it is a serious issue to people calling themselves ethical

entagor on May 2, 2009 at 3:15 AM

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