First US swine flu death confirmed

posted at 7:55 am on April 29, 2009 by Ed Morrissey

CDC officials confirmed the first US death from the swine flu outbreak this morning. A 23-month-old toddler succumbed in Texas, as the number of cases climbed to 66 across six states, but officials in New York think that hundreds of schoolchildren may be affected:

The first U.S. death from swine flu has been confirmed — a 23-month-old child in Texas — amid increasing global anxiety over a health menace that authorities around the world are struggling to contain.

The flu death was confirmed Wednesday by Dr. Richard Besser, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In an interview with CNN, he gave no other details about the child. …

The number of confirmed swine flu cases in the United States rose to 66 in six states, with 45 in New York, 11 in California, six in Texas, two in Kansas and one each in Indiana and Ohio, but cities and states suspected more. In New York, the city’s health commissioner said “many hundreds” of schoolchildren were ill at a school where some students had confirmed cases.

Cases have now popped up all over the world, including New Zealand, Israel, Britain, and Canada, among others.  Germany announced three cases today, becoming the latest addition to the list of nations affected.  Until now, all of the other deaths have been in Mexico, and for that matter, almost all of the severe cases.

To keep this in perspective, though, every flu outbreak causes deaths, even in the US.  The CDC told the media yesterday that 36,000 people die in the US each year from flu-related illnesses.  I had no idea that number was so high.  To put it in perspective, the CDC’s 2001 statistics showed 10,800 deaths from alcohol-related traffic accidents — and almost 6,000 alcohol-related homicides.

It will take at least two months to get a vaccine for this flu strain, so we will have to remain careful about contact, but not paranoid.  The very young and the very old will have to be protected, as will those with chronic immune-system disorders, such as the First Mate, who has to take immune-suppression medication for her transplant.  It shouldn’t prompt panic, but informed caution.


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the passage of a flu virus between species, enabled by closely confined quarters, would “regularly pass between the three host species”?

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:34 PM

Two at a time. Not all three at once. I gave a brief discussion of the biochemical details above (see wikipedia etc for that).

gh on April 29, 2009 at 1:36 PM

gh on April 29, 2009 at 1:33 PM

It was fortuitous.

And thank you for those who share information.

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:42 PM

Two at a time. Not all three at once. I gave a brief discussion of the biochemical details above (see wikipedia etc for that).

gh on April 29, 2009 at 1:36 PM

My understanding as well of the natural.

Hence the inference of lab involvement.

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:44 PM

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est.

Where charity and love are, God is there.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 1:26 PM

Ah, a blessing for the Zeitgeist.

I’ll ponder a choice jewel to share.

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:46 PM

You have to remember, when he gave his speech at the temple, he said; “This is the momemt when the earth began to heal.”

He didn’t say anything about people.

Star20 on April 29, 2009 at 1:10 PM

Good one!

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 1:48 PM

Mommypundit on April 29, 2009 at 1:34 PM

It is disturbing to everyone.
But calm down to be effectively on point.

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:49 PM

Dragging your dying kid across the border from Mexico doesn’t make for a US death. That would count as another Mexican death.

Nothing like twisting the facts to increase the unreasonable panic.

Common Sense on April 29, 2009 at 1:53 PM

Mommypundit on April 29, 2009 at 1:34 PM

Dear Mommypundit, I am a strong supporter of completing the border fence, and making sure it stops foot traffic, not just vehicles. I oppose socialized medicine. I want to reduce immigration, except for specifically needed highly skilled workers. So, unless I am mistaken, we are largely in agreement on those issues.

I just don’t see how Mexican Flu has anything to do with those issues. Except for that one death of a Mexican child in the US, all other US cases are of Americans who legally visited Mexico and returned, or people who were in close contact with such American tourists.

I don’t know whether increased scanning at airports would help. Some countries (at least Japan) are using thermo-imaging to check deplaning passengers for high temperatures, who are then pulled aside for further screening. But such screening is expensive and can cause needles delays.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:00 PM

Dragging your dying kid across the border from Mexico doesn’t make for a US death. That would count as another Mexican death.

Nothing like twisting the facts to increase the unreasonable panic.

Common Sense on April 29, 2009 at 1:53 PM

Reason we need to seal the border, with TROOPS NOW.

Lets face it folks, the border state hospitals will soon be over run by Illegals coming from Mexico.

Mexican Border hosptitals cannot handle the flood of cases that is about to hit them, and Care is FREE in America…

I know, under that situation, if I had a sick kid, I’d sure as heck be running the border.

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:02 PM

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:00 PM

Question is not what is happening now… but what will happen when there are tens of thousands… or hundreds of thousands… of cases in Mexico.

Border will be overrun as they come North to get care.

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:04 PM

I struggle with Spring time pollen related allergies and they tend to mimic flu feelings EVERY YEAR, minus the fever.

No, the symptoms are not the same. I’ve suffered from pollen allergies since high school, as do my children, siblings, etc.

Allergy symptoms are itchy, watery eyes and throat, and congestion.

Flu symptoms are fever, aches, cough, and you feel seriously ill.

Except for the itch, which drives me crazy, you don’t feel ill with allergies, just annoyed. Claritin D is a wonder drug.

And there are thousands of viruses out there that have the same symptoms as the flu but aren’t the flu.

Worldwide panic is not necessary and is driven by politicians who want more control over your life and the media, who doesn’t have a good day unless there’s a disaster to report.

Common Sense on April 29, 2009 at 2:10 PM

We understand our circumstances, and appreciate our calling to be strong in generosity while also being careful to protect our essence.

Matthew 5

13″You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled by men.

14″You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden. 15Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. 16In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.

Nearer, My God, to Thee” is a 19th century Christian hymn based loosely on Genesis 28:11-19,[1] the story of Jacob’s dream. Genesis 28:11-12 can be translated as follows: “So he came to a certain place and stayed there all night, because the sun had set. And he took one of the stones of that place and put it at his head, and he lay down in that place to sleep. Then he dreamed, and behold, a ladder was set up on the earth, and its top reached to heaven; and there the angels of God were ascending and descending on it…” [wikipedia]

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 2:15 PM

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:04 PM

Border will be overrun as they come North to get care.

Given the major impact the Mexican Flu has had on those infected, I think sick Mexicans will be too sick to overrun the border.

However, Mexico at times seems quite unstable, and if Mexico’s economy and/or government collapses, many healthy Mexicans may well head our way. Some will bring crime, others may spread infections they are incubating. So, if conditions deteriorate greatly there, then I could see a need to seal the border with troops. But since that would be an incredibly large undertaking, I suggest only doing it if and when Mexico is no longer functioning.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:18 PM

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:18 PM

Bird flu only has a major impact in the later stages… uring the first stages you still seem to abulatory.. which is why they are telling us if we get the first symptoms to head to the Doctor for the Tamiflu…

Problem is, for them, the Doctor is in America.

Also don’t forget, these folks have FAMILY…. which may help them cross…. just as they brought the baby who died across.

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:22 PM

Excuse me… meant Swine/Mexican/ whatever they finaly decide to call this/ flu.

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:23 PM

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:44 PM

Still don’t need a lab. If a swine/bird mixed virus gets into a human who has a human virus then all three variants can mix.

gh on April 29, 2009 at 2:27 PM

Border Fence? We need Wall.

Jerricho68 on April 29, 2009 at 2:29 PM

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 2:15 PM

Oh, dear.

My most vivid memory of “Nearer, My God, to Thee” is this version, which I hope you understand is not a memory that I prefer having in my head when discussing a possible flu pandemic!

I suppose it’s not possible on an anonymous posting board to post anything that is free from the unintended associations that they might generate in readers. I suppose that’s true of all human communication. So, I do appreciate your intent. And I also appreciate your continued support for the Hot Air Center for the Performing Arts. However, at the moment, I simply must get those disasterous images out of my head!

Deo gratias.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:48 PM

Romeo13 on April 29, 2009 at 2:23 PM
Excuse me… meant Swine/Mexican/ whatever they finaly decide to call this/ flu.

Please stop using such offensive language.

Inesway Uflay

or

Exicanmay Uflay

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 2:52 PM

I would like to see an objective analysis of the swine flu outbreak in Mexico. All I hear from the MSM is where the flu has spread and whether anyone has died. Here is an article on patient zero. They are trying to pin the blame on a US-owned (Smithfield) industrial pig production facility that is 12 miles away from La Gloria. What about the local pig farmers in Mexico? Do they treat their stock regularly with influenza virus vaccinations? Wasn’t the Mexican healthcare system once being touted as a model for the world? Felipe Calderon has promised them universal healthcare by 2011.

eigafan on April 29, 2009 at 3:22 PM

It is disturbing to everyone.
But calm down to be effectively on point.

maverick muse on April 29, 2009 at 1:49 PM

Uh…how is it that I am ineffective when I am mad? I am fairly certain that I’ve made valid points with or without emotion. thanks for your concern over my “effectiveness” though.

Mommypundit on April 29, 2009 at 3:32 PM

I struggle with Spring time pollen related allergies and they tend to mimic flu feelings EVERY YEAR, minus the fever.

No, the symptoms are not the same. I’ve suffered from pollen allergies since high school, as do my children, siblings, etc.

Allergy symptoms are itchy, watery eyes and throat, and congestion.

Flu symptoms are fever, aches, cough, and you feel seriously ill.

Except for the itch, which drives me crazy, you don’t feel ill with allergies, just annoyed. Claritin D is a wonder drug.

And there are thousands of viruses out there that have the same symptoms as the flu but aren’t the flu.

Worldwide panic is not necessary and is driven by politicians who want more control over your life and the media, who doesn’t have a good day unless there’s a disaster to report.

Common Sense on April 29, 2009 at 2:10 PM

Um, no really…I have the same issues every year. Pollen comes, I drive with the windows down, I have a near-immediate stiff neck, achy joints, stuffy nose, runny eyes, sore throat, lost voice, headache, weakness, sneezing and insane coughing. EVERY. SPRING. And it feels like death and often like the flu…but no fever. Just allergies.

Mommypundit on April 29, 2009 at 3:35 PM

despite my kiddings in previous post. I am very concerned about this. I hope I didn’t offend anyone. It was not the intent. I did upset one liberal on twitter however.

With nearby school districts closing and all Texas sports meets being canceled I want to take all the precautions I can. I’m going to feel silly taking antiseptic wipes for the grocery carts at Walmart but thats exactly what I’m going to do.

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 4:01 PM

I’m going to feel silly taking antiseptic wipes for the grocery carts at Walmart but thats exactly what I’m going to do.

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 4:01 PM

Wipe the seat area of the cart too. You wouldn’t believe the crud on those parts of shopping carts (think little kids in diapers). I know our local WallyWorld has antiseptic wipes, but there’s nothing wrong with keeping a bottle in the car, and pulling a few out on the way in. When people give you funny looks, just show them the sure-to-be-dirty wipes, and smile as you walk away. : )

Anna on April 29, 2009 at 4:07 PM

Two words: Lysol spray.

newton on April 29, 2009 at 4:12 PM

It would be appreciated by all (especially us Texans) if the original blog were updated to reflect that the death in Houston was of a child from Mexico and that his own family members have been tested and do not have it.

2nd Ammendment Mother on April 29, 2009 at 4:38 PM

That’s it. I’m going Cold War on this thing. Bombshelter, water purification system, 13 months supply of canned food, etc.

Rightwingguy on April 29, 2009 at 4:46 PM

Swine flu got it’s origin in the U.S. Congress with it’s porkulus spending and coughing up more our of “our” money.

They didn’t close the borders, which proves they aren’t that worried and just using another hyped “crisis” to keep the attention away from something. These people can’t be trusted. They are causing a run on the hospitals by people that have no insurance and forcing the hospitals into more debt. Could someone please just shut these people up?

suzyk on April 29, 2009 at 5:04 PM

Okay there seem to be some on here who really know what you are talking about.

Since the American version isn’t as deadly now wouldn’t it be better to get it now than in the fall?

I understand it will be a stronger virus be then and having it now would seem as good as an immunization?

I wonder if trying not to spread it while it is weakest is really the best solution.

petunia on April 29, 2009 at 5:21 PM

I just got done finishing this guy’s presentation.
Dr. Niman

This thing is following a very similar timing and pattern to the 1918 Spanish Flu. Small sprouting in the springtime (Flu season), dying off in the summer, then a massive resurgence in the Fall.

Holy Frack.

It’ll be interesting to watch the Southern Hemisphere and how they do.

Kai on April 29, 2009 at 6:16 PM

*eyes piggy bank suspiciously.. pretty sure it coughed…

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 6:17 PM

So far the grand total of deaths from all these “new” killer viruses in the past 20 years combined including Hanta, Ebola, West Nile, SARS, Machupo, Avian Influenza, Marburg and now Swine Flu hasn’t come close to matching the deaths from common flu in just one year in only the USA.

If we “cry wolf” enough we won’t get people to respond when a REAL medical crisis hits us.

I live in New York City where Swine Flu has just been discovered. I guess I should run down Fifth Avenue screaming “Oh my God, we’re all going to die!!!”

MaiDee on April 29, 2009 at 6:17 PM

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 4:01 PM

despite my kiddings in previous post. I am very concerned about this. I hope I didn’t offend anyone. It was not the intent.

I saw your humorous intent, so I think you did fine.

And as a Catholic, I forgive you kicking that nun and hold no hard feelings about it.

However, I caution you that nun’s never forget. And their delicate little fingers can pinch an earlobe so hard you’ll never forget either. So, I suggest you wear protective head gear, and watch out for any “black and whites” patrolling your neighborhood.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 6:28 PM

Just posted this in another thread:

Flu Buddy!

Ugly on April 29, 2009 at 6:40 PM

WHO raises pandemic flu alert level to Phase 5

“All countries should immediately now activate their pandemic preparedness plans,” Chan told reporters in Geneva. “It really is all of humanity that is under threat in a pandemic.”

A Phase 5 alert means there is sustained transmission among people in at least two countries. Once the virus shows effective transmission in two different regions of the world, a full pandemic outbreak would be declared.

WHO has confirmed human cases of swine flu in Mexico, the United States, Canada, Britain, Israel, New Zealand and Spain. Mexico and the United States have reported deaths.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 7:01 PM

California Marine has swine flu; 30 quarantined

The case was identified at the Twentynine Palms Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Centre and was confirmed by the U.S. Centres for Disease Control, the base said in a statement.

First case in the US armed services. No link yet to Mexico.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 7:05 PM

The following may explain why so many Mexicans have died:

First Mexico fatal flu victim sought help for days

The 39-year-old woman who was the first to die in Mexico’s swine flu epidemic spent the last eight days of her life going from clinic to clinic to find out what was wrong with her but doctors were baffled.

The woman, from the southern state of Oaxaca, died shortly after being admitted to hospital as an emergency case. Experts only identified the virus that killed her 10 days later.

So, this deadly strain was circulating among Mexicans for a very long time, and then they only took it seriously more than a week after the first death. Not a great health care system.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 8:48 PM

This thing is following a very similar timing and pattern to the 1918 Spanish Flu. Small sprouting in the springtime (Flu season), dying off in the summer, then a massive resurgence in the Fall.

For God’s sake, no no no! Is it Fall yet? No? Then how the F%&$ can anyone say it’s “Following the 1918 Spanish Flu”? Give me a break. If anything, it MAY be following the 1968 flu – but I’m starting to find that highly unlikely. This flu has been circulating in Mexico for a MONTH – and there are at max 160 deaths. Probably 200,000 infections (most non-hospitalized). STOP FEARMONGERING.

bilups on April 29, 2009 at 9:08 PM

Sorry about that.
According to that Dr. dude, it’s startpoint is *close* to the 1918 flu. Not to mention it’s suspected that they have similar subtypes.

A projected die-off is expected in the Northern Hemisphere due to the onset of summer. The backlash WOULD be in winter, IF there were to be one.

I’m not FEARMONGERING… but the WHO has elevated the alert status. The WHO believes that a Pandemic is imminent and that the illness is reaching sustained levels and in multiple countries.

The SEVERITY of the illness isn’t known quite yet. So, in that case, we’ll see what happens.

Kai on April 29, 2009 at 9:46 PM

The woman, who worked as a census taker in the city of Oaxaca, became ill with what was she thought was a severe case of pneumonia on April 4 but was not admitted to hospital until April 12.

“She went to several private clinics where she was given various diagnoses and various treatments. However, her condition worsened and she was taken to the hospital by emergency services on the 12th and the next day she died,” Miguel Angel Lezana, Mexico’s chief epidemiologist, told reporters.

There is a lot of spin going in this article note that she went to several “private” clinics before she was taken to a “state-run” hospital.

Mexican health officials are still scrambling to understand how the illness broke out. Attention has focused on a town in Veracruz state near a large pig farm where another confirmed case of swine flu in a human was detected.

But Lezana said the presence of Eurasian swine flu genes in the H1N1 virus makes it unlikely that the disease originated in a Mexican pig farm.

From this article from the Safari Club Foundation:

Twelve species of pigs are now recognized worldwide, all from Eurasia and Africa. No pigs are native to the Americas, their ecological niche being occupied by the peccaries; however, one species of wild pig, the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), has been introduced in North America, as have many breeds of domestic pigs (also S. scrofa) that have become feral in many areas. Eurasian wild boars and feral pigs have interbred where they have come in contact, producing hybrids of indefinite ancestry.

It was the Eurasian Wild Pig (Sus Scrofa) that was domesticated over 9,000 years ago into what is now known as the pig.

eigafan on April 29, 2009 at 9:50 PM

They just closed our school district till May 8th because of swine flu.

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:06 PM

They just closed our school district till May 8th because of swine flu.

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:06 PM

Why? Do you live in or near a community with a confirmed or suspected case?

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 10:18 PM

Great, the 14th amendment has now been expanded from creating “anchor babies” to creating “anchor deaths”. That poor sick child was brought across the border in a desperate attempt to save his life and now his death is “the first US swine flu death”? How the hell does that make sense?

TheCulturalist on April 29, 2009 at 10:20 PM

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 10:18 PM

Yes I do. Our county has 7 confirmed cases. A parent of one of the students at our local high school reportedly has it but no idea if thats true.

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:51 PM

GoodBoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:51 PM

Don’t panic. Keep your thinking cap on. And if you have questions, get advice from a medical professional.

I will keep you and your family in my prayers, and through you, those in your community. Take good care.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 11:01 PM

My husband of 31 years is a teacher. If they close his school for a prolonged period- leaving him home 24/7- just go ahead and add one more to the number of “swine flu deaths”… count on it: only one of us will emerge alive… *j/k*

NightmareOnKStreet on April 29, 2009 at 11:15 PM

NightmareOnKStreet on April 29, 2009 at 11:15 PM

As I recall, the proper response to this sentiment is:

Yes dear.

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 11:17 PM

NightmareOnKStreet on April 29, 2009 at 11:15 PM

.
My prayers are with all those suffering or affected by this virus, their families & all who are at risk. Let’s hope for the best & prepare for the worst. It won’t help to panic or lose our sense of humor… yet.

NightmareOnKStreet on April 29, 2009 at 11:23 PM

Loxodonta on April 29, 2009 at 11:17 PM

I totally agree! LOL!!!

NightmareOnKStreet on April 29, 2009 at 11:25 PM

DaBamanation says that 36,000 people die in the US each year from flu-related illnesses, so who cares if we add another 100,000. Just think how it will effect the jobless rate.

No matter how many Americans die, if you consider closing the border off from the country that origionated the Mexican Swine Flu then you are a raaaacist!

DannoJyd on April 30, 2009 at 12:22 AM

It would be appreciated by all (especially us Texans) if the original blog were updated to reflect that the death in Houston was of a child from Mexico and that his own family members have been tested and do not have it.

2nd Ammendment Mother on April 29, 2009 at 4:38 PM

Houstonians, specifically.

Poor child. I’m sure he was already sick by the time he crossed the border. It is possible that the parents, noticing a previous illness on him, crossed the border to reach probably one of the few hospitals in South TX, thinking he would get better care than in MX and recover.

As for now, I can tell you all that my mother has been officially taken over by plain hysteria. She has come to the point of saying to me, “I don’t care if you die, I just don’t want my granddaughters to die!“, and implying that neither my husband nor I know how to care for our own children in the face of this. I told her to calm down, but she hung up on me.

(I live near Houston, BTW. I know she will get worse after hearing this. I’m afraid she will indeed die, but not of the swine flu.)

newton on April 30, 2009 at 7:49 AM

See this WHO site for a 2003 report/fact sheet:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs211/en/index.html

Look down the page for this:

Pandemic influenza

Three times in the last century, the influenza A viruses have undergone major genetic changes mainly in their H-component, resulting in global pandemics and large tolls in terms of both disease and deaths. The most infamous pandemic was “Spanish Flu” which affected large parts of the world population and is thought to have killed at least 40 million people in 1918-1919. More recently, two other influenza A pandemics occurred in 1957 (“Asian influenza”) and 1968 (“Hong Kong influenza”) and caused significant morbidity and mortality globally. In contrast to current influenza epidemics, these pandemics were associated with severe outcomes also among healthy younger persons, albeit not on such a dramatic scale as the “Spanish flu” where the death rate was highest among healthy young adults.

Most recently, limited outbreaks of a new influenza subtype A(H5N1) directly transmitted from birds to humans have occurred in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China in 1997 and 2003.

Read the rest of the report and put it all in perspective.
If Dear Leader wants to use this outbreak to create pandemonium for some ulterior motive, let’s not oblige him, Okay?

OkieDoc on April 30, 2009 at 8:47 AM

I won’t be surprised that this disease was released by terrorists as a test, the governement knows they have placed America in a unsafe condition and are now covering it up. Strange that it the outbreaks are so distant.

Perhaps they coinside with where O Force one was after the trip to Mexico, perhaps Obama has released it.

workingforpigs on April 30, 2009 at 9:12 AM

Before everyone freaks out about the Mexican ManBirdPig Flu (which I would like to suggest should be called the Janet Napolitano Flu), I have not seen Dr. Sanjay Gupta reporting on any piles of burning dead bodies in Mexico City. He is walking around without a mask, people are concerned but not exactly dropping like flies there. Drudge had a post saying that rather than underrepoting deaths, the actual Mexican death toll may be less than what has been reported.

That does not mean Napolitano should get any credit. She is an idiot. But she is lucky this flu is not so deadly as reported.

Mr. Joe on April 30, 2009 at 10:20 AM

If this thing follows the 1918 model, the health system will be overwhelmed and we’ll be on our own. What we need to learn is how, under normal circumstances, a patient would be treated in a hospital and how to provide rough-and -ready DIY equivalents. In effect you and I may have to be our own damn healthcare systems. Any pro’s care to weigh in here?

Masks. They’re saying they don’t work. I’m not so sure of that. At the very least they’d help keep your sneezes from others. Is there some way to boost their effectiveness? Wear double? Spray the outer surface with bleach or something? Make them reusable by cooking them in the microwave for a minute or two? Any pro’s care to weigh in here?

Hand cleaners. They’re mostly made of alcohol. Can we make our own from bulk laundry or dishwashing fluid and rubbing alcohol? BTW do they know how long this virus can live on doorknobs and the like?

Hey HA, can you keep this thread open so we all can exchange ideas?

dhimwit on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 AM

I think this is the Javalina Flu…

An elementary school about five miles from here is closed today. Not our district. And I have a slight elevated temp… 100.4 I actually feel pretty good. No cough. Sigh. I’m not going to the stupid doc for a slight temp.

petunia on April 30, 2009 at 11:20 AM

The Mexican Plague?

Jerricho68 on April 30, 2009 at 4:01 PM

Look very carefully at the clusters, only in north america and europe, none in asia, middle east or africa. Mostly cities not agricultural areas. I suspect this was intentionally released to create havok in the world areas that do not support terrorists activity. We are completely unprotected in this country against domestic and biologic terrorism due to our current administration changes in how we collect information.

This may be a coverup by our government. Why else would they not lock up the borders to stop a spread of disease in our country.

Makes you think, now doesn’t it.

workingforpigs on April 30, 2009 at 5:11 PM

Go to the CDC site and look at the description of this virus, it is a combination of several viruses which is unlikely it is anything but a manufactured virus that was intentionally released on targets. This is scary.

workingforpigs on April 30, 2009 at 10:36 PM

How can the admin. advise us to avoid unnecessary travel to Mexico when they won’t take any steps to restrict people coming here from Mexico? They won’t even suspend flights coming in from Mexico.

As for Obama’s remark about “closing the barn door”, we have no barn door.

gary fouse on May 1, 2009 at 12:30 AM

Masks… Is there some way to boost their effectiveness?… Spray the outer surface with bleach or something?… Any pro’s care to weigh in here?

.
Hand cleaners. They’re mostly made of alcohol. Can we make our own from bulk laundry or dishwashing fluid and rubbing alcohol?…
.
dhimwit on April 30, 2009 at 11:19 AM

.
dhimwit, do you have these thoughts often? Do you have a “plan” to kill yourself via kitchen-chemistry?
.
I’m not a pro, but, please… JUST… B R E A T H E …

NightmareOnKStreet on May 1, 2009 at 12:52 AM

Hold up your hand if you are an Asian flu survivor from the H2N2 outbreak in the mid to late fifties.

Somehow the numbers on this epidemic seem anemic as yet. We have a factor of 1000 just to equate the deaths from the Asian flu in the US to the number of cases, healthy and dead, from this flu today.

(I got the vaccination. I got a mild case of the flu that night. I did the flashlight under the blanket routine because I was in a boarding school and the infirmary was full already. I could not sleep. So I read. The next day was “hell”. But I made it through, crashed after school, and was back up and running the next day.)

As for stronger powered soap – well – dish washing liquid gets more gunk off when you’re greasy than regular soap. And you don’t have to do anything exotic.

Or mix up some H2O2 and some vinegar – maybe 50/50 or so. That is a splendid cleaner and disinfectant for food preparation surfaces.

{o.o}

herself on May 1, 2009 at 4:20 AM

Nightmare:

To answer your question, nope. But one thing that really struck me about this week is how little practical information was given out.

The initial instructions given to those in the Twin Towers, you will remember, were to “stay put”. Katrina showed pretty starkly that you can’t just assume the authorities know what they’re doing. So you’re left with nothing but commonsense and your native wits.

If this thing turns out to be bs, then I’ve been the jerk. No problemo. If it doesn’t, well, besides breathing, what’s your game plan?

dhimwit on May 1, 2009 at 9:14 AM

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