Limbaugh to Specter: Do me a favor and take the McCains with you

posted at 4:46 pm on April 28, 2009 by Allahpundit

The quote’s slightly ambiguous but I think we can safely assume this is Rush’s own view, as it seems to reflect grassroots sentiment on Twitter and elsewhere. With the filibuster gone, there’s nothing left to lose. Purge ‘em all!

“A lot of people say, ‘Well, Specter, take [Sen. John] McCain with you. And his daughter [Meghan]. Take McCain and his daughter with you if you’re gonna…” he told listeners, dissolving in laughter.

“…..It’s ultimately good. You’re weeding out people who aren’t really Republicans,” he said.

Limbaugh did concede the downside of Specter’s defection. “It makes the Senate essentially as big a slam dunk for Obama and the Democrats as the House of Representatives already is,” he said.

McCain, Snowe, Collins, Grahamnesty: There are easily another five or six who could be “weeded out.” Of course, the bigger the Democrats’ advantage in seats, the longer it’ll take to recover the filibuster, let alone a majority. How long are you willing to wait for a backlash to Great Society II to sweep conservatism back to power? Bear in mind that the programs they pass while not even having to make minor concessions — health-care and amnesty, to name just two — won’t be un-doable once the GOP’s back in control, so every day we’re in the minority is one day closer to a permanent European model.

Here’s Benedict Arlen’s presser while you mull. This is a “painful decision” for him, blah blah blah. Pay attention especially to his surprising candor about how heavily the polls showing Toomey beating him like a drum weighed in his decision. At around 8:20, he all but admits that he made the switch to save his own ass after his internal polling last week showed he was finish. A true man of principle.

Update: Rock bottom for the GOP:

What’s notable about the Republican collapse is not simply its depth but its velocity. It was just a few years ago, in the wake of George W. Bush’s reelection, that books were being written on whether Republicans had acquired a virtually unbreakable hold on the levers of political power. After 2004, Republicans held a ten-vote advantage in the Senate.

The last time a political party suffered such grievous losses in the Senate during a compressed period was from 1976-1980, when the Democrats went from a post-Watergate high of 61 seats after Carter’s first election, to 45 seats as Ronald Reagan came in. The numbers are almost perfectly reversed: in the last four years, the Democrats have gone from a 45-55 deficit in the Senate after Bush’s reelection to 60 seats (or 59 with an asterisk) today.

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The nation is dying for it.

itsspideyman on April 29, 2009 at 12:03 PM

right4life on April 29, 2009 at 12:55 PM

Two Choices:
1)Get rid of/encourage defections of all people like Specter, Snowe, McCain, etc. and start over with a REAL conservative party. (This could be done by stating our beliefs and ideals in a revamped party platform that lays it out and make it our “line in the sand” and watch the chaffe begin to fall away)

2)Create (or jump on existing Constitution Party)a third party and let the Republicans flounder in their finger to the wind politics.

Where am I wrong? How is anything less drastic going to save conservatism in time to save the country?

Goodeye_Closed on April 29, 2009 at 1:24 PM

But the GOP crashed because, although the country voted them into office and gave them a majority, THEY ACTED LIKE DEMOCRATS!

Just remember all the spending, ethics investigations, etc. Makes me sick to my stomach …

And the current Democratic majority is absolutely a reaction to the RINOs plus an infatuation with Obama personally.

- HiredGun

HiredGun on April 29, 2009 at 1:26 PM

Rush needs to be told that he needs to cut the false attacks on John McCain, and all you posters who have joined in Rush’s chorus need to be told to get real.

John McCain just voted with 31 Republican Senators AGAINST the confirmation of radical pro-abortion Kathleen Sibelius for HHS Secretary. McCain has voted AGAINST every Obama budget bill, calling Obama trillion dollar deficit spending “generational theft” and being very visible in the media speaking out in opposition to Obama’s insane spending. McCain has voted AGAINST all the bailout bills Obama has proposed. McCain voted AGAINST the confirmation of Timothy Geithner as Treasury Secretary. In short, McCain has as good a voting record as any Republican this year!

What is more, if you read John McCain’s latest e-mails, you will see that his message is is a harsh condemnation of the Democrat Administration and Congress for reckless deficit spending and for actions endangering our national security.

There is no place in the Democrat Party for a pro-life fiscal conservative who is a hawk in foreign policy and national security matters. There is in the Republican Party, and that is why John McCain is and will continue to be a Republican.

Rush Limbaugh is talking about McCain as if McCain is constantly defecting to vote with the Democrats. The short answer to Rush is that is as false as alse can be. As much as I very much appreciate Rush’s insightful analysis of the Democrats and the mainstream media, Rush has an anomosity toward McCain that really is not justified by the facts and that causes the kind of attacks on McCain that are counterproductive to the GOP. We need to be focusing our attacks on Obama and the Democrats.

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 1:45 PM

There is no place in the Democrat Party for a pro-life fiscal conservative who is a hawk in foreign policy and national security matters. There is in the Republican Party, and that is why John McCain is and will continue to be a Republican.

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 1:45 PM

There is no place in the Republican Party (or shouldn’t be, anyway) for a hyperventilating patsy of the illegal-immigrant movement who suspends his campaign to show his “leadership.” Word to McCainiacs: as the One might say, your guy lost. Now please go away and help Newt Gingrich save the planet from global warming or something.

bulgaroctonus on April 29, 2009 at 2:01 PM

After these last few tumultuous years when the dust finally settles….I will come out a changed man as far as my views are concerned.

Right now I would take Ron Paul conservatism over the GW Bush variety.

I never thought that would be possible given Paul’s views on foreign policy, but now I’m ready for some draw back there.

Goodeye_Closed on April 29, 2009 at 2:06 PM

Gotta love Rush.

Jerricho68 on April 29, 2009 at 2:32 PM

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 1:45 PM

oh yeah John TARP CARBON CREDIT MCCAIN-FEINGOLD mccain is one of us..right…

right4life on April 29, 2009 at 2:33 PM

Going left put us where we are now. Going right and chucking the Rockefellers is what got us into power, first with Reagan, then in ’95. Playing pattycake with Snowe, Collins et al. (i.e. giving them control of the party) will only consign us to the days of Bob Michel:

‘Every day I wake up, I look in the mirror, and I say to myself, “Today you’re going to be a loser.” And after you’re here awhile [freshmen], you’ll start to feel the same way. But don’t let it bother you. You’ll get used to it.’

That’s the kind of party Specter, Collins and Snowe want to be in. As long as they get their goodies, they don’t give a hot damn whether or not conservatism is fought for.

Yeah, we need to let them control the party.

spmat on April 29, 2009 at 4:51 PM

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 1:45 PM

You’re talking about the same guy who was almost running a presidential campaign last year, right?

BobMbx on April 29, 2009 at 5:05 PM

They sought a response from Liberman about Specter blaming the (R) conservatives for wanting purity in the party. I find that very ironic since the dems forced Liberman to move into the (I) party.
So the dems can advocate for purity but the (R) are supposed to become like the dem party. Don’t think so.

lwssdd on April 29, 2009 at 5:21 PM

Now, the question is: Will Meghan take the bait?

Christien on April 28, 2009 at 5:02 PM

The answer is: if the “bait” is two pounds of pasta and a diet coke, then yes, definitely!!

Sweet_Thang on April 29, 2009 at 5:51 PM

To BobMbx re you post on April 29, 2009 at 5:05 PM: Yes, I am referring to the same guy. You can check out the votes at the U.S. Senate web site. No post since mine of today at 1:45 PM seems to want to deal with the facts I cite.

Losing causes us to forget some things. McCain was the advocate of the surge in Iraq before it was implemented and was responsible for beating back Democrat efforts to lose the Iraq War, which would have been very bad for the country. Polls showed that in 2008, McCain was the only GOP candidate close in a race against Obama or Hillary; polls showed that all other GOP candidates were way, way behind Obama or Hillary. During the campaign, McCain beat Obama at the Saddleback Forum soundly and outpointed Obama in the debates moderated by “mainstream media” persons. McCain clearly showed Obama to be inexperienced and naive concerning foreign policy and in the third debate, commanded the substance. McCain’s film clips were terrific. In September 2008, before the financial “crisis” hit, McCain was going into the lead.

There were, however, a lot of factors at work that hurt McCain. The McCain campaign stumbled when the election focused on economics, which is not McCain’s strong suit. Imagine if the election had focused on foreign policy, military matters and national security, which are McCain’s strong suits. But other things determined the election.

The financial “crisis” created economic uncertainties that historically favor Democrats and very much did in 2008; the Bush bank bailout muddied the waters as to the difference perceived by the public between the two parties on economics; Bush was unpopular, albeit unfairly so; the Obama money paid for what was false Obama campaign advertising (how do you win against a 7 to 1 money advantage?); and the media bias for Obama was such that the media acted day in, day out as a propaganda machine for Obama.

I mention all these factors because in the future, don’t think that a sharper conservative message alone will win elections. It is one part, but just one part of what needs to be addressed. Leftist money, ACORN operatives and media bias are not going away. Rush’s McCain bashing is not gong to solve anything.

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 6:19 PM

Phil Byler on April 29, 2009 at 1:45 PM

Excellent comment.
Too bad most HAers can’t read it cuz their eyes are crossed with irrational hatred.

jgapinoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:10 PM

Too bad most HAers can’t read it cuz their eyes are crossed with irrational hatred.

jgapinoy on April 29, 2009 at 10:10 PM

Not irrational at all. Really not even hatred. It’s more like disgust for the guy that bailed on us when we needed someone to oppose blowbama the most. “Oh, lets rush back to Washington and make sure that porkulus package passes, to hell with the campaign”

Let’s just ignore blowbamas past and all his nasty anti American “aquaintences” in favor of running a kissy huggy campaign. I’m sure conservatives won’t mind me losing as long as I never say anything bad or truthful about the 0ne.

Spiritk9 on April 29, 2009 at 11:57 PM

This is what the lazy and stupid people of America voted for. So be it.

You do reap what you sow. Nothing new there.

DannoJyd on April 30, 2009 at 12:43 AM

The bonus is that if he takes McCain with him, Lindsey Graham follows them right out the door as Uncle Creepy’s been permanently affixed to Johnny’s ass since the day he arrived in the Senate!

I keep coming back to something Mitch McConnell said during the shamnesty debacle: “It WILL get passed and NOBODY’S going to lose their job over it.”

Uh, Mitch?

Seems like an awful lot of people DID lose their jobs over it…hell, you yourself have pretty much lost a party over it.

Starting to sink in yet?

SuperCool on April 30, 2009 at 3:01 AM

To jgapinoy re your April 29, 2009 10:10 PM post: Thanks. Your point was then quickly demonstrated by the posts by Spiritk9 at April 29, 2009 at 11:57 PM and SuperCool at April 30, 2009, at 3:01 AM.

To posters citing immigration: remember that the 2007 bill was 1000% supported all along by President George W. Bush and that the problem was really in how it would have worked — e.g., if the law enforcement provisions were not enforced (as they were not in the Reagan-era law), then the 2007 bill would have effectively allowed for an amnesty. Also remember that the last immigration reform law was during Reagan’s Administration.

Personally, I softly say good riddance to Specter because he is very pro-abortion and he has been instrumental the passage of Obama’s insane multi-trillion dollar deficit spending. The future of the GOP does lie in stitching back together the Reagan coalition of economic conservatives, national security conservatives and social conservatives; and Specter is too far a field from that coalition. But it is beyond stupid and destructive for Rush to call on an American military hero in McCain to leave the GOP and to be constantly running anti-McCain parodies on his show. McCain is a national security conservative and has shown this year to be true to his professed fiscal conservatism. I remember the guy who spoke at the Saddleback Forum; he was (and is) someone to whom social conservatives can relate. McCain is well within the old Reagan coalition and is well respected. Rush is out of bounds.

Phil Byler on April 30, 2009 at 7:36 AM

To posters citing immigration: remember that the 2007 bill was 1000% supported all along by President George W. Bush and that the problem was really in how it would have worked — e.g., if the law enforcement provisions were not enforced (as they were not in the Reagan-era law), then the 2007 bill would have effectively allowed for an amnesty. Also remember that the last immigration reform law was during Reagan’s Administration.

Personally, I softly say good riddance to Specter because he is very pro-abortion and he has been instrumental the passage of Obama’s insane multi-trillion dollar deficit spending. The future of the GOP does lie in stitching back together the Reagan coalition of economic conservatives, national security conservatives and social conservatives; and Specter is too far a field from that coalition. But it is beyond stupid and destructive for Rush to call on an American military hero in McCain to leave the GOP and to be constantly running anti-McCain parodies on his show. McCain is a national security conservative and has shown this year to be true to his professed fiscal conservatism. I remember the guy who spoke at the Saddleback Forum; he was (and is) someone to whom social conservatives can relate. McCain is well within the old Reagan coalition and is well respected. Rush is out of bounds.

Phil Byler on April 30, 2009 at 7:36 AM

There are a lot of us that would like to kick both McCain and Bush out of the party. The illegal immigration issue was the watershed moment for Republicans. You can point directly to that debate as when the Republican coalition fractured. Conservatives were already disgusted with the fiscal irresponsibility of the Republicans. We had already seen a huge increase in entitlements with the medicare prescription drugs benefit. That was the last straw.

The revilement of McCain is really based on two different moments. McCains little bipartisan group of Senators that ran the Senate around by the nose over the filibuster issues, and immigration reform. These two issues proved to the conservatives that McCain was willing to toss away national security, fiscal sensibility, and the rule of law in order to get elected.

THAT is why we are mad.

Hawthorne on April 30, 2009 at 8:24 AM

I do find the lashing against McCain distasteful. I do not like McCain’s position on the torture or the Amnesty issues, but I don’t think he should be drummed out of the party for it. I can understand the ill feelings toward him though, he has made some choices that many conservatives have trouble reconciling with.

That said, the vitriol within our own party is too prevalent and too bitter right now.

ManInBlack on April 30, 2009 at 11:44 AM

oh yeah John TARP CARBON CREDIT MCCAIN-FEINGOLD mccain is one of us..right…

right4life on April 29, 2009 at 2:33 PM

lol.. that there is the truth. And you left out the Stimulus of 2008 (aka redistribution of wealth since it only went to lower and middle income taxpayers).

popularpeoplesfront on April 30, 2009 at 12:49 PM

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