Video: The freaky double deaky “Pink Floyd asteroid impact” clip

posted at 12:15 pm on December 28, 2008 by Allahpundit

Further proof that there’s nothing “Dark Side of the Moon” can’t be synced to. I’m embedding the standard format clip because I know some of you are lazy and won’t click, but trust me when I say that you’ll want to watch this in widescreen HD. Preferably tonight, after you’ve imbibed some holiday cheer. Extinction events never tripped so hard!

Exit question: Looks like ground zero is smack dab in the middle of the Pacific. Japan just can’t catch a break, huh?

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but if you look at the clip about 1:00 in, you will see the actual Moon just above the horizon as the object hits Earth.

HTL on December 28, 2008 at 5:33 PM

Not clear. That may be the Death Star that attacked a Moon base and the material ejected from that explosion caused the Moon to lose orbital momentum.

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 5:44 PM

Couldn’t happen! Impossible! That thing had the Nippon Islands in the crosshairs, and we all know that Godzilla would have intervened and tail swatted that thing back into deep space!

But just in case I’m going to try and finish up my interdimensional wormhole generator! If anyone is interested in surviving I’ll be offering safe passage to a new planet for a small fee. Of course your political ideology will be verified before transit is allowed, don’t want to pollute a brand new pristine world with liberals right from the start.

BadMojo on December 28, 2008 at 5:46 PM

Hmmm, I think this could be a made into a movie with…..
let’s seee…. Bruce Willis and Ben Affleck….. oh… um… never mind.

Kini on December 28, 2008 at 5:56 PM

It’s about time we had something real to worry about instead of over population, increasing competition for resources, nuclear proliferation, regional hegemony, and insane suicidal terrorists.

davo on December 28, 2008 at 6:23 PM

uhhh… ground zero was somewhere in the northeastern US. The end of the video made it clear.

And no… Japan cannot catch a break. Nor should it. GOZZIRAAA!

AbaddonsReign on December 28, 2008 at 6:50 PM

Kaptain Amerika on December 28, 2008 at 3:27 PM

The subtitle text that appears from time to time is Japanese, not Chinese.

For example at about 3:54 you see ヒマラヤ which is Himalaya in Japanese and above that 3時間後 which means three hours later.

Herikutsu on December 28, 2008 at 6:58 PM

Being under the age of 60, I’m just not that attached to Pink Floyd. That must account for the nuance I lack.

Don’t feel you are an island onto yourself here, pal!

I’m in my mid 50’s and Pink Floyd has never been a favorite with me either. In fact, I’ve listened to Dark Side Of The Moon countless times and I’m still trying to figure out what all the shouting is about.

pilamaye on December 28, 2008 at 4:04 PM

This video reminded me why Pink Floyd Albums were not in my collection — some great compositions connected by lots of long screaming crap that went way longer then it should have.

4:46 seconds — must have seemed like an eternity of screaming bliss when you’re stoned (off the album or whatever else you happen to have that warps time)! To some of us it just sounded LONG and painful!
David

LifeTrek on December 28, 2008 at 7:05 PM

It is Apophis

redshirt on December 28, 2008 at 7:34 PM

HTL on December 28, 2008 at 3:01 PM

Gee, thanks, Capitain Buzzkill.

Farmer_Joe on December 28, 2008 at 7:36 PM

What the hell is that about. Really uplifting, especially since many say the end of the world is near, as in 2012. Thanks alot.

purgatory on December 28, 2008 at 8:11 PM

Count to 10

I saw it on TV, some science show or maybe The Simpsons. :)

BL@KBIRD on December 28, 2008 at 8:21 PM

So, the Barackopolis gets destroyed. Bummer.

Buy Danish on December 28, 2008 at 8:45 PM

So this is what it’s like when world collide.

I think someone already referenced the film, so let’s reference the song too.

Bonus.

Reaps on December 28, 2008 at 9:23 PM

That was no asteroid. That was a planetoid.

Isn’t this whole idea that Hawking was warning about? Man should colonize because otherwise all of humanity’s eggs are all in one basket.

Guardian on December 28, 2008 at 12:41 PM

Hawking has been talking to Colonel Graff? ;)

aikidoka on December 28, 2008 at 9:42 PM

Why would the world catch fire if an asteroid hit in the ocean? Even the deserts are in flames.

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 9:58 PM

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 9:58 PM

That’s not fire. That is water and other material being heated up to thousands of degrees by the energy of the collision. Recent calculations about the asteroid that took out the dinosaurs would have heated the atmosphere to the extent that the only animals in the world that survived were ones that burrowed underground to avoid being baked.

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 10:11 PM

The animators completely blew it… whenever you are doing an apocalyptic catastrophe clip, it is absolutely required that you include a fallen Statue of Liberty. Seriously, it is the recognized Standard for the End of the World As We Know It, all serious cinematographers know that.

Must’ve just been some college students with no grasp of metaphor and stuff. Amateurs! The ONLY Excuse I can think of is that it was originally included, but got edited out by the Head who sync’d it for Great Gig in the Sky.

Mr Michael on December 28, 2008 at 10:23 PM

Entertaining, but not terribly realistic. Unless that thing is Starship Sta-Puff and has a chewy marshmallow filling, an asteroid of that size would pretty much shatter the Earth into a bunch of fragments. Even if it was moving slowly, the g-force would rip Earth apart.

Paul_in_NJ on December 28, 2008 at 10:30 PM

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 10:11 PM

Hmmm, I just can’t see nuclear fission occurring at the event site. Do you know of any scientifically based experiments that demonstrate this?

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 10:36 PM

I know some of you are lazy and won’t click

You assume incorrectly.

It’s not laziness… it’s 3 seconds of video followed by 15 seconds of buffering followed by 2 seconds of video followed by 20 seconds of buffering followed by 5 seconds of video followed by 10 seconds of buffering… wash rinse repeat ad nauseum.

No other website does that like YouTube. I have a superbly fast, crisp, clean connection to the interwebs yet YouTube ALWAYS takes forever to buffer. I don’t even go to YouTube anymore.

That video’s old anyway.

If you want to watch some Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon synced to something, watch The Wizard of Oz synced to the full album. I swear, it’s like they wrote the album for that movie… and even if you’re sober as a Nun, you will trip out on how well it fits from the tune, to the tone, to the lyrics…

It will probably take you a few tries to get the synch lined up just right so be patient. First load the Dark Side of the Moon CD into your CD player and hit PLAY (>) and then immediately hit PAUSE (||) so it is cued up and ready to roll. Be sure also to set your CD player to continuous replay. This in most CD players is done by hitting the “REPEAT” button twice. Hitting it once will repeat only the presently playing track so hit the button two (2) times and it will replay the CD over and over. The CD will play roughly two and a quarter times through the entire length of the movie.

Now start the video and get past all the preview junk (about five minutes worth on the THX version) at the beginning and watch for the BLACK & WHITE MGM lion to roar. After the BLACK & WHITE MGM Lion roars for the THIRD (3rd) time IMMEDIATELY hit the play button on the CD player.

Be sure to turn down the sound on the TV because the dialogue and original soundtrack are not necessary. “The Dark Side of the Moon” will provide all the sound you need. Don’t worry if you have to restart it a few times. The effect is worth the trouble.

FlatFoot on December 28, 2008 at 10:48 PM

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 10:36 PM

No fission required. Someone posted this link earlier on the first page of comments to this post: http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects/

Try a 1km diameter iron meteor at 50 km/s. It will be 500 times as bright as the Sun at 100 km away.

Gravity seems kind of a weak force, but when you get two very large objects moving towards each other, the energy really adds up.

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 10:49 PM

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 10:49 PM

In your estimation, did that link qualify as a scientifically based experiment that proves the assertion?

I’d also like to see a scientifically based experiment that proves runaway greenhouse effects and other goreisms while you’re at it.

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 11:14 PM

The Parthenon still stands! Are you kidding me? What’s it going to take to knock that thing down?
Weight of Glory on December 28, 2008 at 3:14 PM

It wasn’t the Parthenon – it was the set from the Obama Dem acceptance speech.

eeyore on December 28, 2008 at 11:15 PM

It is Apophis
redshirt on December 28, 2008 at 7:34 PM

.
Well, not quite. As a rule a size of over 300km is required for space debris to form a sphere.
.

From the link provided…
Asteroid 99942 Apophis – first labeled as 2004 MN4 — is estimated to be roughly 1,000 feet (320 meters) in diameter. Were it to strike Earth, it would not set off global havoc but would generate significant local or regional damage, experts say.

.
For some fun with what ifs… go here.
http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects/
.
This is for a 300km (the smallest that the one in the video could have been). I’m only posting my input and the air blast data, but there is more
***
Your Inputs:
Distance from Impact: 10000.00 km = 6210.00 miles
Projectile Diameter: 300000.00 m = 984000.00 ft = 186.30 miles
Projectile Density: 1500 kg/m3
Impact Velocity: 15.00 km/s = 9.31 miles/s
Impact Angle: 45 degrees
Target Density: 1000 kg/m3
Target Type: Liquid Water of depth 609.60 meters, over typical rock.
***
Air Blast:
The air blast will arrive at approximately 30300 seconds.
Peak Overpressure: 468000 Pa = 4.68 bars = 66.5 psi
Max wind velocity: 493 m/s = 1100 mph
Sound Intensity: 113 dB (May cause ear pain)
Damage Description:

Multistory wall-bearing buildings will collapse.

Wood frame buildings will almost completely collapse.

Multistory steel-framed office-type buildings will suffer extreme frame distortion, incipient collapse.

Highway truss bridges will collapse.

Highway girder bridges will collapse.

Glass windows will shatter.

Cars and trucks will be largely displaced and grossly distorted and will require rebuilding before use.

Up to 90 percent of trees blown down; remainder stripped of branches and leaves. (6200 miles from impact!)
***
It did say that no fire ball was created with this input so I would say bigger… Or faster.
***
PS…. Pink Floyd for ever.

RalphyBoy on December 28, 2008 at 11:18 PM

Where Ground Zero was would matter only for about 5 minutes.

drjohn on December 28, 2008 at 11:19 PM

And now I see that the link I put up is already posted. Ah well.
***

It wasn’t the Parthenon – it was the set from the Obama Dem acceptance speech.

eeyore on December 28, 2008 at 11:15 PM

Glad I stuck around to see this one before bed. ; )

RalphyBoy on December 28, 2008 at 11:23 PM

Buddahpundit: you need to go back and review your high school physics. Specifically, the concept of kinetic energy. If you calculate the mass of the asteriod (at a diameter of 1300km), and assume its velocity in respect to the earth is 50 km/sec, you can easily calculate how much force will be released in bringing that object to rest (hint: F=MV). That’s actually what that website you are so skeptical of does, then translating the results via calculations of density and reactivity, to the rest of the earth. If you have a problem with that website, you have a problem with Newtonian physics in general, and we can’t help you.

Incidentally, the way they start fission in an a-bomb is by firing one non-explosive object at another, and relying on the energy released (see kinetic energy, above) to trigger the reaction.

HTL on December 28, 2008 at 11:28 PM

It is Apophis
redshirt on December 28, 2008 at 7:34 PM

In the link, in 2005, NASA’s Mary Cleave shelved any current response to the Apophis threat. So if anything happens in 2029, people can…blame Bush!

eeyore on December 28, 2008 at 11:38 PM

Try a 1km diameter iron meteor at 50 km/s. It will be 500 times as bright as the Sun at 100 km away.

pedestrian on December 28, 2008 at 10:49 PM

That’s not really big. We could make our own meteor with Earth’s iron and push it into another planet’s atmosphere, or into our own atmosphere. It would have to be built in space and would take a lot of shipments of iron.

Oh, hey, maybe that’s the solution for terraforming Mars!! Let’s hope the Heaven’s Gate Hale-Bopp survivors running NASA didn’t read that and are getting ideas.

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 11:40 PM

I’d also like to see a scientifically based experiment that proves runaway greenhouse effects and other goreisms while you’re at it.

Buddahpundit on December 28, 2008 at 11:14 PM

Believing that a massive object hitting another object at high velocities will release large amounts of energy as heat isn’t the same as believing in man-made global warming.

If you want a scientific demonstration of how kinetic energy can generate heat, try, um, rubbing your hands together?

R. Waher on December 28, 2008 at 11:45 PM

If you want a scientific demonstration of how kinetic energy can generate heat, try, um, rubbing your hands together?

R. Waher on December 28, 2008 at 11:45 PM

Interesting. Are you saying that the more humans rub their hands together, the more global warming ( no matter how infinitesimal ) will occur?

I think you proved my point that there is no experiment that the doomsayers can show that demonstrates these contentions regarding the top scare tactics of the day.

As I always like to point out, apocalypse scientists ( like their apocalypse religious preacher cousins ) need to generate fear to maintain an income. No scientist has ever willingly put himself out of business by assuring the taxpayer “relax folks, nothing to worry about”.

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 12:56 AM

I think you proved my point that there is no experiment that the doomsayers can show that demonstrates these contentions regarding the top scare tactics of the day.

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 12:56 AM

Are you claiming that the formula E = 1/2 mv^2 is a conspiracy to scare people?

pedestrian on December 29, 2008 at 1:06 AM

Cool video. I love that song, hell, that whole album is pretty bomb. Nice soundtrack to the Wizard of Oz as well.

Geronimo on December 29, 2008 at 1:16 AM

Yeah, anything big enough to have enough gravity to form itself into a sphere is a bit more than an asteroid. It certainly wouldn’t matter where it hit–nothing at all would survive.

Anybody know what TDC show the video came from? The CGI was pretty good for TV.

Blacklake on December 29, 2008 at 1:50 AM

Are you claiming that the formula E = 1/2 mv^2 is a conspiracy to scare people?

pedestrian on December 29, 2008 at 1:06 AM

Show me an experiment.

Here’s an experiment for you. If I were to drop a 50 m spherical chunk of iron from a height that would allow my homemade meteorite to gain terminal velocity, which wouldn’t be all that high actually, would it create the same impact damage as a same sized iron meteorite that entered Earth’s atmosphere traveling 50 km/sec? That foreign meteorite would be striking the Earth at the same velocity as my homemade one, wouldn’t you think? I’m not considering what broke off the earthbound meteorite as it encountered all the forces that determine the terminal velocity of an object striking earth, just the impact crater/earthquake. According to your website, that would be a 5.9 richter earthquake 5 km away from impact and a 1.4 mile diameter crater that is 1/2 mile deep.

I don’t think a 50 m diameter chunk of iron can impact the the ground like that traveling at terminal velocity. Where the parameter states “impact velocity”, I think they are calculating the speed of the meteorite in space as the speed of impact on Earth’s surface.

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 2:35 AM

That foreign meteorite would be striking the Earth at the same velocity as my homemade one, wouldn’t you think?
Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 2:35 AM

Here is your scientific experiment for an object that was much softer than iron, but about 50m: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event

It didn’t hit the ground, but was still “1,000 times as powerful as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan”.

A 50m ball of iron is basically a large bullet. According to your parameters, the website says

“The mass of projectile strikes the surface at velocity 37.6 km/s”

So it appears that a ball of iron would not have time between when it entered the atmosphere and hit the ground to slow down to anywhere near terminal velocity.

I did a quick calculation of how much energy it lost while it was in the atmosphere, slowing from 50km/s to 37km/s. If the heat stayed inside the iron, it would raise the temperature of the iron by about 1 million degrees C. Naturally most of that energy was lost to the atmosphere, but you get the point.

pedestrian on December 29, 2008 at 3:37 AM

uhhh… ground zero was somewhere in the northeastern US. The end of the video made it clear.

AbaddonsReign on December 28, 2008 at 6:50 PM

It impacted southeast of Japan. You can see Japan as well as Korea at the moment of impact. In the end the main crater is also shown in the former pacific, you can see former coast lines of Asia and Australia.

DarkCurrent on December 29, 2008 at 4:40 AM

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 2:35 AM

As pedestrian pointed out, the impactor will be traveling much faster than terminal velocity.

Terminal velocity is a function of atmospheric drag and this object spends all but the last few seconds accelerating towards the earth outside the atmosphere.

DarkCurrent on December 29, 2008 at 4:45 AM

Are you claiming that the formula E = 1/2 mv^2 is a conspiracy to scare people?

pedestrian on December 29, 2008 at 1:06 AM

Of course it is!

Everyone knows that energy is directly proportional to the inverse square of a person’s age. :)

OldEnglish on December 29, 2008 at 4:46 AM

Looks to me like the outer edges of the crater will result in an awesome ring of ski slopes.

Don’t know if my insurance covers giant azz rocks falling from the sky tho :o/

cntrlfrk on December 29, 2008 at 9:04 AM

*Yawn*

Aronne on December 29, 2008 at 9:40 AM

THAT DAMN BUSH!

rihar on December 29, 2008 at 11:10 AM

Women and minorities would bear the brunt.

Akzed on December 29, 2008 at 12:03 PM

The Dark Side of Oz, which I watch religiously on New Year’s eve (with an herbal accompanyment), is much less depressing.

lionheart on December 29, 2008 at 12:28 PM

So it appears that a ball of iron would not have time between when it entered the atmosphere and hit the ground to slow down to anywhere near terminal velocity.

pedestrian on December 29, 2008 at 3:37 AM

Perhaps, but I don’t have enough worry capacity to worry about it. I would like to see an experiment that proves the calculations though.

I should have been an apocalypse scientist. I think it’s one heckuva growth industry.

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 1:08 PM

Amazon Women on the Moon

Best… Movie…. EVAH!

Kini on December 28, 2008 at 4:30 PM

Hehe…not too many people know about that movie, I have it on an old VHS tape…hilarious movie!

Liberty or Death on December 29, 2008 at 3:08 PM

Am I the only old Pink Floyd fan who remembers “Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun”?

NeighborhoodCatLady on December 28, 2008 at 2:02 PM

Nope, I’ve been a PF fan for a long, long time. How about some other PF tites like “Adam Heart Mother” or “Umagooma.”

Don’t feel you are an island onto yourself here, pal!

I’m in my mid 50’s and Pink Floyd has never been a favorite with me either. In fact, I’ve listened to Dark Side Of The Moon countless times and I’m still trying to figure out what all the shouting is about.

pilamaye on December 28, 2008 at 4:04 PM

In my younger days in order to fully enjoy Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon one must first smoke a fattie and then listen to it with a good set of headphones…doing so will even make athiests see God…/figure of speech

I would also advise reading the lyrics while listening.

Ahh, the exquisite piano mastery of Richard Wright and the orgasmic vocals of Clare Torry. RIP Richard. I do hope Pink Floyd will continue on with David Gilmour and Nick Mason in some manner or form. Hell, bury the hatchet mates and invite Roger Waters back before you’re all ready for the old folks home.

kevcad on December 28, 2008 at 2:06 PM

I couldn’t agree more, she belts it out in that song for sure and you can just “feel” the emotion she puts into it, one of my fav tracks…great stuff!

I too wish the band would bury the hatchet and tour just one more time. The last time I saw them was at ASU’s Sun Devil Stadium, I was working for the university and volunteered to work the concert and had an all access pass, of couse I saved the pass!

Liberty or Death on December 29, 2008 at 3:25 PM

I would like to see an experiment that proves the calculations though.

Buddahpundit on December 29, 2008 at 1:08 PM

Here’s an example of an experiment along those lines. The impact effects were greater than expected.

DarkCurrent on December 29, 2008 at 10:19 PM

Pretty impressive graphics for pretty inacurate depiction.

Let’s count the mistakes, starting with:

The continents being pealed back with the wave as if they were paper thin. I thought CGI was supposed to do accurate modeling.

Oh, wait! I forgot about An Inconvenient Truth! Yes, I see it now.

This was produced by the who-cares-if-it’s-stupid-if-it-looks-good crowd.

Yep.

The Discovery Channel Network really whored any integrity it had when it merged with the New York Times.

Personally, I block the Discovery Times Channel.

Those Parental Controls come in handy when you use them the way you WANT !!!

For more good eyes, read this guy’s post:

An odd mixture of impressive graphics and scientific illiteracy. The creator of this apocalyptic “entertainment” clip may have started with a shot or two from Discovery or The Science Channel, but if we assume that 95% of this animation is “bad science” (and thus home-made), why wouldn’t they just create it all from scratch?

Just a few of the more problematic elements:

01. Objects that size, unless recently formed, are not geologically active. Thus, no sinister glowing craters on the planetoid as it approaches earth.

02. The view of outer space from anywhere near the earth does not show a giant glowing galactic plane/core.

03. The object is shown on a course pretty much set to hit the earth dead center, but then does one “victory lap” to show off its shadow over New York before landing in the Pacific Ocean. And no, the speed of the earth’s rotation would not account for this. Bonus hint: objects approaching from deep space do not have a shadow, because they are not between the sun and the earth.

04. The ejecta from the impact are shown starting to fall back to earth too soon. The one that happened four billion years ago, for example, formed the moon, so that may give you an idea of exactly how far out debris would be thrown.

05. The energy released from the impact of an object this size would melt the lithosphere. No fires, no Big Ben and the Parthenon in flames. Just magma everywhere.

I could go on, but you get the point. Also, because there is at least one other version of this video out there set to Terminator music that shows some Japanese subtitles midway through, I suspect that Count to 10’s theory about its origin is correct. Disappointing; I thought they were better educated in Japan.

HTL on December 28, 2008 at 3:01 PM

TimLenox on December 29, 2008 at 11:46 PM

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