Huh. Remember, she was given what we thought was a wrist-slap suspension for one month following the election. Not such a wrist slap after all, as it turns out: Not only is she out, two other managers involved in accessing Wurzelbacher’s records are gone, too.

Ah well. Jobs come and go, but there’s only one One.

Jones-Kelley was scheduled to return to work Monday following a one-month suspension without pay.

Today’s action comes just hours after the Senate approved a measure cracking down on state workers who improperly conduct checks involving people’s personal information. Republicans complained that Gov. Ted Strickland, who promised to set a high ethical standard as governor, was letting her off far too lightly…

The administration last night fired Doug Thompson, the deputy director of child support who was scheduled to return to work Monday following a one-month suspension without pay.

Fred Williams, assistant agency director, has resigned effective January 31. He recently returned to his job after a week suspension without pay.

I guess Thompson wouldn’t, ahem, “resign.” Question: Did Strickland intend to fire them all along and put them on leave to buy time until public interest died down so he could do it quietly? Or was he hoping to bring them back and had his hand forced by the prospect of another round of bad publicity after the Senate bill passed, replete perhaps with a civil suit filed by the JTP? (Cynical blogger says: The latter, of course.) Here’s her resignation statement, via the Dayton Daily News. She’s very worried indeed about politics becoming a distraction from urgent state business. Now, that is. During the campaign? Not so much.