An anniversary to remember

posted at 10:44 am on December 13, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

Five years ago tonight, the United States military acted on a tip and peered into a narrow hole in the ground to find a cowering dictator hiding from the disaster he had wrought on his own country.   The capture of Saddam Hussein set off celebrations across the US and Iraq and brought us the apex of national unity on the military adventure that ended the reign of one of the bloodiest tyrants of our generation.  In the end, Saddam couldn’t even bring himself to fight with the pistol he held in his hand:

Eight months after Baghdad fell, U.S. soldiers found the disheveled former leader of Iraq six feet under, hiding in a hole in the ground. Saddam was captured Saturday night about nine miles from his hometown of Tikrit and on the other side of the Tigris River from one of his lavish palaces.

Saddam had a pistol but was taken into custody without firing it.

“Here was a man who was photographed hundreds of times shooting off rifles and showing how tough he was, and in fact, he wasn’t very tough, he was cowering in a hole in the ground, and had a pistol and didn’t use it and certainly did not put up any fight at all,” Rumsfeld said.

“In the last analysis, he seemed not terribly brave,” he said. …

U.S. forces found weapons and about $750,000 in U.S. $100 bills with the former dictator, said Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, who leads coalition troops in Iraq. Troops also found two AK-47s, a pistol and a white and orange taxi.

At the time, I had just started blogging, and I awoke to the news of Saddam’s capture the next morning, as did most everyone else.  I wrote this as a first reaction:

The Iraqis immediately broke out into spontaneous celebrations, firing guns into the air and chanting, “Death to Saddam!” Even the Iraqi reporters started screaming and celebrating at the press conference when video of him in custody was played.

This should put a stop or at least severely dampen the “insurgency” in Iraq. Without Saddam as either the symbolic or operational head to their efforts, and with the vast majority of Iraqis opposing the actions of the Fedayeen, it should be rather easy to roll up the rest of their operation.

But that’s later. For now, let’s celebrate a wonderful victory.

Unfortunately, that prediction proved wrong.  The US failed to follow up its spectacular military victory in 2003 with an occupation that built stability and put men to work.  Instead, we limped through the next two years until the insurgency exploded in 2006.  Not until late in that year did we finally resolve to undertake a serious counterinsurgency strategy and finally bring the terrorists under control in Iraq, a failure that cost thousands of lives and wasted time and goodwill from Iraqis.

Still, we have produced a stable and representative government in Iraq after years of fits and starts.  We ended the brutal reign of Saddam Hussein and his sons, who got killed by acting with a little more bravery than their father.  Iraqis now control their country, and while we remain in the country, we now do so with their approval and under conditions they negotiated.  Instead of having to decide whether to support a brutal tyrant against a messianic mullahcracy in Tehran, we now have a natural counterweight to all kinds of tyranny in the region, and eventually a natural ally, if not now already.

What are your thoughts on this fifth anniversary of Saddam’s capture?  What were your thoughts then? And thanks to Stop the ACLU for inspiring this post.

Addendum: In checking back on my post five years ago, I note with some amusement that one of my links went to Allahpundit, who’s now my partner on this blog.  Also, one of the best reactions I saw that week came from South Park, which folded it into a hilarious story line within four days of Saddam’s capture. Here’s the payoff from Season 7′s “It’s Christmas in Canada”:

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Ahhh, South Park… gotta love those guys!

Conservalicious on December 13, 2008 at 10:55 AM

I’ll never forget what one of the soldiers said down the hidey-hole when Saddam confirmed they’d found the one they were looking for:

“President Bush sends his regards.”

inviolet on December 13, 2008 at 10:58 AM

happy anniversary to the Iraqi people!

stormin1961 on December 13, 2008 at 10:59 AM

I remember that day rather distinctly, five years ago. My battery was pulling checkpoint detail at BIAP. A contractor in the outbound lane said he had just heard it on the radio that Saddam had been captured the previous night. All that day, local nationals rode by with their wrists together, happy that Saddam had been captured. A guy jumped out of the back of the truck he was riding in, and nearly got himself shot as he ran up to kiss our Bradley before climbing back into another truck. There was a palpable sense that the war might be drawing to a close.

Then that checkpoint got mortared that night. In the laugh of the day, crater analysis came out, looked at the mortar impacts, and said they were “probably celebratory in nature.” That just happened to land 40 feet from our Bradleys. I think I’ll always hold some amount of pride for having been in Iraq on that momentous day.

Spc Steve on December 13, 2008 at 10:59 AM

Ah, this explains why all the leftists are wearing black armbands in the coffee shops today.

Treason is patriotic!

jeff_from_mpls on December 13, 2008 at 11:01 AM

There was a palpable sense that the war might be drawing to a close.

Spc Steve on December 13, 2008 at 10:59 AM

It’s almost as if a perverted signal of hope, or encouragement, was somehow telegraphed to enemy insurgents in Iraq.

What might have been the origin of that signal? Oh wait, just read the congressional record of the United States Congress. It tells you everything you need to know.

I question Democrats’ patriotism, oh yes I do.

jeff_from_mpls on December 13, 2008 at 11:05 AM

jeff_from_mpls on December 13, 2008 at 11:05 AM

I don’t really hold anyone responsible for that feeling. I imagine it was probably similar to the feeling soldiers had immediately in the wake of Hitler’s suicide, though V-E day was still several months away. We wanted to believe that the source of the war was manifested in that one individual, and that when that individual is removed, the war would end. That’s just not how it goes sometimes.

Spc Steve on December 13, 2008 at 11:11 AM

What are your thoughts on this fifth anniversary of Saddam’s capture? What were your thoughts then?

My thoughts then and now? The same. Nothing can stop an unleashed a United States military operation. Our soldiers would make Homer’s Hector, Achilles, Ghengis Khan and Napoleon run for cover!
May God continue to Bless the USA!

Zorro on December 13, 2008 at 11:13 AM

Ah, yes, certainly brings back memories.

unclesmrgol on December 13, 2008 at 11:21 AM

My thoughts then and now? The same. Nothing can stop an unleashed a United States military operation. Our soldiers would make Homer’s Hector, Achilles, Ghengis Khan and Napoleon run for cover!
May God continue to Bless the USA!

Zorro on December 13, 2008 at 11:13 AM

Frame that thought. When The Obama™ and his friends get finished with the US military we’ll be lucky to win a sack race at the county fair.

johnsteele on December 13, 2008 at 11:23 AM

God Bless Our soldiers and coalition forces and save them from the democrats in Congress and the Executive Branch.

eaglewingz08 on December 13, 2008 at 11:25 AM

After Saddam’s capture, it was amazing to see how many were caught up in his power mystique, including even one Vatican official who objected to the requisite buccal exam and body louse check on grounds that they were degrading.

whitetop on December 13, 2008 at 11:27 AM

God Bless Our soldiers and coalition forces and save them from the democrats in Congress and the Executive Branch.

eaglewingz08 on December 13, 2008 at 11:25 AM

Amen. The worst enemy American soldiers face.

johnsteele on December 13, 2008 at 11:27 AM

Put a beard on Emanuel, and the similarities between Saddam and Rahm is fascinating… What hole will we pull Rahm from?

Seriously, I’m tankful that Saddam finally met his justice, and I thank our soldiers for this great service rendered upon the world.

Keemo on December 13, 2008 at 11:27 AM

The US of A laid its mighty hand on Europe in WWII and put an end to Hilter.
The US of A laid its mighty hand on Irag and put an end to Hussein.
Who will lay its mighty hand on the US when we too are under seige by our government soon to come. Or will we even notice we need saving as the soft tyranny gently envelops us?
I don’t think there will be many days like Dec 13rd 2005 ever again.

katy on December 13, 2008 at 11:29 AM

I don’t really hold anyone responsible for that feeling. I imagine it was probably similar to the feeling soldiers had immediately in the wake of Hitler’s suicide, though V-E day was still several months away. We wanted to believe that the source of the war was manifested in that one individual, and that when that individual is removed, the war would end. That’s just not how it goes sometimes.

Spc Steve on December 13, 2008 at 11:11 AM

Proving once again that soldiers have more class than most. I went for the cheap political shot and you took the thoughtful route.

Bless you, and thank you for your service to our country.

jeff_from_mpls on December 13, 2008 at 11:31 AM

and there are still folks wondering why we went into Iraq?
They just love to use the WMD argument and forget the murdering and slaughtering of 10′s of thousands not to mention getting his ass beat in Kuwait to and violating those cease-fire agreements or we would need to DO what we did.

johnnyU on December 13, 2008 at 11:34 AM

I fear you are correct John.

Zorro on December 13, 2008 at 11:43 AM

When this happened I was sitting with a couple friends at an Arab restaurant in the Arab district of Bangkok. When we saw the news come on Al Jazeera, we couldn’t believe it. We all shook hands. Great moment, and a very memorable one for me.

Dr. Manhattan on December 13, 2008 at 11:51 AM

Spc Steve on December 13, 2008 at 11:11 AM

Bless your heart for fighting for US.

I was up late when Fox News announced that Saddam was captured. I was so happy I ran out to the guest house and told hubby. I will never forget when the one Soldier said, President Bush sends his regards. I was elated that we had him. I cried tears seeing how happy a lot of Iraqi’s were. Then finally Justice was served the day Saddam was hung.

sheebe on December 13, 2008 at 11:59 AM

Our Soldiers ROCK!! I remember that day, I remember laughing at how pathetic hussein was, like a rat hiding in a hole, and how twisted liberals are!
Not much has changed.
I feel for our Soldiers, then- they had to hunt for a hussein, now- they will have to salute one.

christene on December 13, 2008 at 12:09 PM

A MUST read for anybody interested in the caputure of Saddam: “Mission Black List #1″ by SSgt Eric Maddox.

Tony737 on December 13, 2008 at 12:09 PM

Americas armed forces are splendid and unbelievably flexible and resilient. They have made the best of a bad lot.

Unfortunately Iraq , like a turd, will not shine no matter how hard you polish it.

BL@KBIRD on December 13, 2008 at 12:25 PM

Happy Anniversay Saddam.

Thank you American people for celebrating by electing his cousin President. We removed one Hussein and replaced him with another one.

lavell12 on December 13, 2008 at 12:39 PM

I remember watching this in the breakroom at work. Paul Bremer said “We got him” and half of my co-workers watching cheered. The other half were silent. One of the libs in the room said “Oh great, now Bush is gonna get re-elected!” Typical democrat. Party before country.

Tony737 on December 13, 2008 at 12:47 PM

I remember that day too. I woke up for some reason around 4am MST, turned on CNN. Something appeared to be going on. Then they cut to Bremner’s press conference. “Ladies and gentlemen. We got him.” Woo-hoo! That made my day.

Bless our troops – our nation’s finest.

KillerKane on December 13, 2008 at 1:11 PM

I remember seeing that SOB’s picture on the news that night, filthy, disheveled and with grinning soldiers all around.

My first thought was “You guys ROCK!!!!!”

My second thought was “Why bother with capture and a long-a** trial? Dump some C4 bricks in the hole, stuff him back in there, hit the remote detonator and see how high you can make him fly!”

Dark-Star on December 13, 2008 at 1:16 PM

Saddam’s capture was my 40th Birthday present.

It was an awesome day!!!!

13Girl on December 13, 2008 at 1:27 PM

13Girl on December 13, 2008 at 1:27 PM

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!………….: o )

christene on December 13, 2008 at 2:06 PM

Hell, yes this is an anniversary to remember :-)!!!!!

V FOR VICTORY!!!!!!!!!

HotAirJosef on December 13, 2008 at 3:28 PM

Have you no respect for the dead. Leave him alone. He’s with the virgins now.

Entelechy on December 13, 2008 at 3:32 PM

I was up late when Fox News announced that Saddam was captured.

sheebe on December 13, 2008 at 11:59 AM

Me too!

That was a great day. And I remember it was followed up in short order by this (Qaddafi Buckles after Eying Saddam in His Spider Hole):

Libya aided by North Korea was working on a nuclear weapons program at a top-secret underground site near the Kufra Oasis of the Sahara in southeastern Libya. The team was made up of North Korean scientists, engineers and technicians, as well as 200-300 Iraqi nuclear scientists, whose salaries are paid to this day – possibly out of Saddam’s secret bank accounts which are controlled by his cousin Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikrity.

The two Arab dictators were therefore partners in the development of a nuclear bomb. If Sharon’s intelligence was correct, the deposed Iraqi ruler would have been in a position to arm himself with a jointly-funded nuclear weapon at the same time as Qaddafi, by mid-2004. A small band of Iraqi scientists carrying the necessary items would have simply joined the traffic of Arab combatants and terrorists heading into Iraq through Syria and brought the weapons into the country.

How fortunate we were on the timing!

RD on December 13, 2008 at 3:58 PM

And I remember it was followed up in short order by this (Qaddafi Buckles after Eying Saddam in His Spider Hole) – RD

That’s true, he was like “Here’s my chemical weapons! Please don’t Saddamize me!” And still those on the left claim it was wrong to liberate Iraq.

Tony737 on December 13, 2008 at 4:19 PM

Instead, we limped through the next two years until the insurgency exploded in 2006.

Hmmmmmmmmmm…………. I wonder why that happened?

……….. couldn’t have been a political thing or anything, could it have been?

Some of us have memories…………….. the Internet just makes it easier.

Seven Percent Solution on December 13, 2008 at 4:20 PM

I always get a chuckle when I remember what Saddam said upon his capture: “I am Saddam Hussein, president of Iraq and I am ready to negotiate.”

Hahahahahahahahahaha!

Kafir on December 13, 2008 at 4:25 PM

BFD! Where’s the Ace of Spades Bush? Huh? Capturing Saddam was about as hard as getting Ed Morrissey to blog about anything anti-Obama. 4200 dead Americans, over 1/2 billion dollars and over 5 years invested without democracy or oil/payment for service.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 4:59 PM

BFD! Where’s the Ace of Spades Bush? Huh? Capturing Saddam was about as hard as getting Ed Morrissey to blog about anything anti-Obama. 4200 dead Americans, over 1/2 billion dollars and over 5 years invested without democracy or oil/payment for service.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 4:59 PM

If it was so easy,why didn’t Clinton do it instead of lobbying millions of dollars worth of hardware and coming up with nothing.He made regime change American policy.
Of course this is the same guy that let Osama walk over..and over…and over….and over….and over,even turned down having him delivered to us on a silver platter.
Just freaking brillant.
When you liberals come up with a way to defeat our enemies in war without it costing money and losing lives,let us see the plan.Until then,we’ll see if you hold your chicken hawk
president that wants to invade Pakistan,send more troops to Afghanistan,and blow Iran off the map with nuclear weapons,to the same standards that you hold Bush.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:17 PM

That’s true, he was like “Here’s my chemical weapons! Please don’t Saddamize me!” And still those on the left claim it was wrong to liberate Iraq.

Tony737 on December 13, 2008 at 4:19 PM

Yeah – and most of the media barely recalls “Libya’s” nuclear WMD program(s), and/or behave as if “Libya’s” nuclear program(s) had nothing to do with Iraq, when they most obviously did. It was worth invading Iraq and deposing Saddam Hussein for that reason alone, in my humble opinion (!).

RD on December 13, 2008 at 5:19 PM


If it was so easy,why didn’t Clinton do it instead of lobbying millions of dollars worth of hardware and coming up with nothing.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:17 PM

Because Clinton and Bush Sr. (whom you so conveniently left out) did not want to manage an entire country of losers. Capturing Saddam was the easy part, managing is the real challenge. That’s why we’re STILL THERE and forced to sign agreements that make us look like Iraq’s little bi!ch. Bush Jr., on the other hand, thinks jeezus speaks to him directly and told him to go and free those people like he was frickin’ Moses. Wiser men know when to fold. Why don’t YOU wise up Greenie?

dk on December 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM

When you liberals come up with a way to defeat our enemies in war without it costing money and losing lives, let us see the plan. Until then…

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:17 PM

Amen.

Christ, even *liberals* are supposed to know better.

No self-respecting liberal should buy into any of this overtly two-faced leftist nonsense. Apparently, ‘freedom fighters’ are entitled to the full arsenal of violent tactics and any manner of double-standards in being judged against us, but we Americans are simultaneously guilty / responsible for any inequities, material or otherwise, to be found in the world today, AND more ‘noble’ than our adversaries at the same time, for not defending ourselves against them effectively.

Weird, to say the least -

RD on December 13, 2008 at 5:32 PM

Should have shot the s.o.b. in his rat hole and saved us millions.

profitsbeard on December 13, 2008 at 5:36 PM

If it was so easy,why didn’t Clinton do it instead of lobbying millions of dollars worth of hardware and coming up with nothing.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:17 PM

Because Clinton and Bush Sr. (whom you so conveniently left out) did not want to manage an entire country of losers. That’s why… [difficulties in Iraq, real and imagined, deleted]

dk on December 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM

Wait a minute – in one breath you say something is easy, and then in the next, you suggest that not only is that something hard, but that it’s too hard even to try. So what are you saying??

RD on December 13, 2008 at 5:43 PM

If you have a problem with people who have conversations with God,than you need to take it up with your hero Obama
liberal:

“Its’ not formal, me getting on my knees. I think I have an ongoing conversation with God. I think throughout the day, I’m constantly asking myself questions about what I’m doing, why am I doing it.”
Obama on his conversations with God
2004,Chicago tribune

Bush Sr. won the Gulf war genius,the idea of letting Saddam
stay was worked out with the UN you and your liberal friends
are always stating should have the last word.It your “Global test” idiot,live with it.
I noticed you didn’t come up with any answers to your whining about wars costing lives and money.Typical liberal to sit on the sidelines and complain about something you can’t handle yourself.
Iraq has had 3 elections,has a representative government put there by the people.Millions are going to school and opening business’s they were not able to do before.
25 million people have been liberated and all you can do is
whine.
Go back and make another “save Darfur” bumper sticker and keep waving the peace sign to everybody,it has accomplished so much so far.

you might try educating yourself on a subject you appear to know nothing about,it’s called Freedom:

March 24, 2008
The Liberation of Karmah, Part I

http://www.michaeltotten.com/archives/2008/03/the-liberation.php
KARMAH, IRAQ – Just beyond the outskirts of Fallujah lies the terror-wracked city of Karmah. While you may not have heard of this small city of 35,000 people, American soldiers and Marines who served in Anbar Province know it as a terrifying place of oppression, death, and destruction. “It was much worse than Fallujah” said more than a dozen Marines who were themselves based in Fallujah.
“Karmah was so important to the insurgency because we’ve got Baghdad right there,” Lieutenant Andrew Macak told me. “This is part of the periphery of Baghdad. At the same time, it is part of the periphery of Fallujah.”

Yea right,freeing people from blood thirsty terrorist that your liberal heroes were to afraid to confront is just terrible.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:50 PM

Too bad the Left doesn’t comprehend the value that a picture like this has in future negotiations at the diplomatic table with tyrants and tin pot dictators.

Instead they enable the scum of the earth to feel emboldened, weakening the efforts of our military, endangering future missions, and needlessly increasing the risk for our heroic volunteers to advance the cause of freedom.

I don’t believe the Left when they say they support the military. If they did, they would never indicate to the enemy that anything less than total and complete victory is acceptable once our military has been engaged. They would NEVER show such a pathetic face.

We should argue our case for, or against, war before the troops are sent to battle. We should always deliberate fiercely before engaging, but the unity for victory should be ten-fold as fierce, once the fight is real. Then we should go back to arguing our national endeavors afterwards.

If we did this, we would be giving our precious braves the best armor of all…the notion that if you go up against a US ultimatum that clearly means war…you’re going to lose your ass every time.

Take a good hard look at the big bad wolf Hussein. Remember how so many millions trembled at the very thought of him.

Now, imagine how much easier our diplomats could do their jobs if the tyrants on the other side of the table knew that when troops leave our shores, the Left and Right of America unify for total and complete victory and will destroy you…every f**king time.

The Left DOES NOT understand how wars are won without firing a single shot. They think it’s done by paying tribute in an effort to avoid conflict, which eventually leads to catastrophic results. They’ve got it all backwards.

Saltysam on December 13, 2008 at 5:52 PM

dk on December 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM

What price would you pay for freedom, and what price is to high to stay in tyranny?

Seven Percent Solution on December 13, 2008 at 6:06 PM

No self-respecting liberal should buy into any of this overtly two-faced leftist nonsense. Apparently, ‘freedom fighters’ are entitled to the full arsenal of violent tactics and any manner of double-standards in being judged against us, but we Americans are simultaneously guilty / responsible for any inequities, material or otherwise, to be found in the world today, AND more ‘noble’ than our adversaries at the same time, for not defending ourselves against them effectively.

Weird, to say the least -

RD on December 13, 2008 at 5:32 PM

Your right.

But liberals don’t do things because they are right or because it is what’s best for the people.It’s all about advancing their political agenda:

Democrats Mull Politicizing Iraq War Intelligence
Wednesday, November 05, 2003

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,102206,00.htmlget_a(300,250,”frame1″);
WASHINGTON —

Fox News has obtained a document believed to have been written by the Democratic staff of the Senate Intelligence Committee (search) that outlines a strategy for exposing what it calls “the administration’s dubious motives” in the lead-up to the war in Iraq.
The memo, provided late Tuesday by a source on the Committee and reported by Fox News’ Sean Hannity, discusses the timing of a possible investigation into pre-war Iraq (search) intelligence in such a way that it could bring maximum embarrassment to President Bush in his re-election campaign.
Among other things, the memo recommends that Democrats “prepare to launch an investigation when it becomes clear we have exhausted the opportunity to usefully collaborate with the [Senate] majority. We can pull the trigger on an independent investigation of the administration’s use of intelligence at any time — but we can only do so once … the best time would probably be next year.”
The last paragraph of the memo reads, “Intelligence issues are clearly secondary to the public’s concern regarding the insurgency in Iraq.”

Congressman admits Democrats “stretched the facts,” misled anti-war supporters about supposed plans for ending War
Submitted by Jeff Emanuel on Thu, 05/22/2008 – 8:18pm.
http://jeffemanuel.net/paul-kanjorski-pa-11-admits-democrats-lied-about-being-able-to-end-war-in-iraq

You see, Paul Kanjorski has an honesty problem.
More specifically, Paul Kanjorski’s problem is that he was publicly honest about the intentional dishonesty of Congressional Democrats (and Democrat candidates) in the run-up to the 2006 election — particularly with regard to the War in Iraq.

So here we have democrats that spent most of the 90′s yelling and screaming about how dangerous Saddam was with his WMD’s/ties to al-qaeda,yelled and screamed about how he needed to be taken down up to the point that they voted for the war in Iraq to take him down.

But when the going got tough,they sold their country out,stabbed our Soldiers in the back and used the difficulties of war to win political advantage.

Now the “peace” and “anti-war” party leader Obama is keeping troops in Iraq based on conditions on the ground (like Bush),sending more troops to Afghanistan,wants to invade Pakistan,and has stated that he will wipe Iran off the map with nuclear weapons(that he told everybody that he wants to get rid of with the “Nuclear disarmament” plan that never seems to happen).

Real big “anti-war” candidate there.
Makes about as much sense as the people going around with their “war is not the answer” bumper stickers right beside their “Kerry/Edwards” bumper stickers for years.You know,the
same Kerry/Edwards that voted for the last two wars.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 6:10 PM

Yea right,freeing people from blood thirsty terrorist that your liberal heroes were to afraid to confront is just terrible.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 5:50 PM

You keep implying that I am a liberal. I never said I was a liberal. I’m not a registered Democrat. I’ve never voted for a Democrat before. You’re being incredibly judgmental. Where do you learn that bad habit? Oh yeah, you’re a christian.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 6:13 PM

Wait a minute – in one breath you say something is easy, and then in the next, you suggest that not only is that something hard, but that it’s too hard even to try. So what are you saying??

RD on December 13, 2008 at 5:43 PM

I said CAPTURING was the easy part and MANAGING THE COUNTRY was the challenge. If you can’t follow along it’s probably best not to try and chime in.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 6:16 PM

I don’t believe the Left when they say they support the military. If they did, they would never indicate to the enemy that anything less than total and complete victory is acceptable once our military has been engaged. They would NEVER show such a pathetic face.

We should argue our case for, or against, war before the troops are sent to battle. We should always deliberate fiercely before engaging, but the unity for victory should be ten-fold as fierce, once the fight is real. Then we should go back to arguing our national endeavors afterwards.

Saltysam on December 13, 2008 at 5:52 PM

I’m beginning to agree with you! The left (and that includes the press!) pays lip service to ‘unity’, and I’m convinced that even they understand the damage they do, so IMHO even they realize there’s no fair way for them to attack us and somehow pass it off as remotely ethical or sensible. Unless…

Unless, that is, they are somehow “betrayed” by Uncle Sam, lied to by Him, hoodwinked, given ‘filtered’ intelligence, or otherwise “victimized” in some manner. THEN, all’s fair. Even if, apparently, the victimization is made up from whole cloth by the perpetrators themselves.

That’s why – I predict – this pattern will become the template for all future conflicts between us, our adveraries, and the global left (including the press). At some strategic point in the conflict, the left will unilaterally conclude – no matter what the actual evidence suggests – that they were “lied to” in some way – whatever that means – and that this “betrayal”, funnily enough, gives them the license to do whatever they please, with complete immunity from any culpability. And I predict they will then use that “immunity”, as night follows day, to engage in all manner of activities, activities that will no doubt be fierce, vociferous, and – above all – deliberate. Including actions that will harm us and our troops. Including actions they know will harm us and our troops

Count on it.

RD on December 13, 2008 at 6:19 PM

I don’t believe the Left when they say they support the military. If they did, they would never indicate to the enemy that anything less than total and complete victory is acceptable once our military has been engaged. They would NEVER show such a pathetic face.
Saltysam on December 13, 2008 at 5:52 PM

Your right,the only time they talk about our brave men and
women in uniform,is when they can use their deaths in their
idiotic left wing talking points.

Here is how liberals support the military:

Special report: Tracing the Left’s escalating war on military recruiters
http://michellemalkin.com/2008/03/07/special-report-tracing-the-lefts-escalating-war-on-military-recruiters/

Context matters. Drawing on my past reporting and blogging, here is a brief history of the anti-military recruitment movement’s mounting acts of vandalism and violence (which is by no means comprehensive and which I’ll continue to amend as commenters and readers remind me of other incidents). Let the apologists and pooh-poohers delude themselves into believing that the Times Square bombing was a “lone” act. The facts speak for themselves:

FUCK THE TROOPS – “SO 4,000 RUBES ARE DEAD, SO CRY ME A TIGRIS”
http://patdollard.com/2008/04/left-blog-fuck-the-troops-so-4000-rubes-are-dead-cry-me-a-tigris/

So, 4000 rubes are dead. Cry me the Tigris. Another 30,000 have been seriously wounded. Boo fucking hoo. They got what they asked for—and cool robotic limbs, too.

The antiwar left — if it wants to be taken seriously, which is at best an open question — should disavow the likes of Rall. But it won’t, because too many of its supporters agree with him.

Ditto with ANSWER — they’re the indispensable core of the antiwar movement. You can try to dismiss them as a fringe, but no alternative group has been able to replace them because, in fact, they aren’t the fringe of the antiwar movement. Their hostility to America, their desire for America to lose, is just a more distilled version of something we see all over. Look at what Gary Kamiya wrote last spring:

I have at times, as the war has unfolded, secretly wished for things to go wrong. Wished for the Iraqis to be more nationalistic, to resist longer. Wished for the Arab world to rise up in rage. Wished for all the things we feared would happen. I’m not alone: A number of serious, intelligent, morally sensitive people who oppose the war have told me they have had identical feelings.
Kamiya gave this a redemptive spin, but I see plenty of examples where that’s entirely lacking.

Here’s

Tom Robbins:
Quite probably the worst thing about the inevitable and totally unjustifiable war with Iraq is that there�s no chance the U.S. might lose it. America is a young country, and intellectually, emotionally, and physically, it has been exhibiting all the characteristics of an adolescent bully, a pubescent punk who�s too big for his britches and too strong for his age. Someday, perhaps, we may grow out of our mindless, pimple-faced arrogance, but in the meantime, it might do us a ton of good to have our butts kicked. Unfortunately, like most of the targets we pick on, Iraq is much too weak to give us the thrashing our continuously overbearing behavior deserves

.

Then there’s Chrissie Hynde:
Between songs, the pugnacious Hynde, in a classic black T-shirt and jeans, bantered and battled with the crowd. She dedicated “You Know Who Your Friends Are” to “all you junkies and f–,” gave a shout-out to the late Joe Strummer, opined that she hopes the United States loses if it goes to war with Iraq (“Bring it on! Give us what we deserve!”), and introduced the song “Fools Must Die” with the self-deprecating quip, “I’ll show you how it’s done.”

Yea,these are the same people that get upset if you dare to
say Obama’s middle name “Hussein”.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 6:23 PM

I said CAPTURING was the easy part and MANAGING THE COUNTRY was the challenge. If you can’t follow along it’s probably best not to try and chime in.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 6:16 PM

Maybe you should try backing up your left wing idiocy before you tell other people what they need to do idiot.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 6:24 PM

I love it,its Christmas Day,and where in Canada!hahaha:)

canopfor on December 13, 2008 at 6:24 PM

I woke up early and cruised the internet for a bit. I always do that so I can tell my husband about the news of the day while we fix a big breakfast for the family.

I whooped, jumped on the bed, leaped to the television and turned it on. We snuggled and watched the glorious, joyful news.

dk, may you come to your senses before you face your fate. If a certain red-skinned former angel has a sense of wicked humor, which I suspect he does, you might find yourself being fed into a wood chipper every day for all eternity. The demons can shriek “BFD about Hussein, right? BFD!” And maybe they’ll let you choose feet first, or head first, for a change of pace.

Heh. I might have been watching too much Supernatural lately.

bonnie_ on December 13, 2008 at 6:28 PM

You keep implying that I am a liberal. I never said I was a liberal. I’m not a registered Democrat. I’ve never voted for a Democrat before. You’re being incredibly judgmental. Where do you learn that bad habit? Oh yeah, you’re a christian.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 6:13 PM

Could you be anymore of an idiot to make a post criticizing someone for assuming who you are by assuming who they are.

Once again,are you going to back up your left wing bullsh!t
that Iraq is not a free country and you know how to go to war and defeat an enemy without it costing money or losing lives.

Put up or shut up idiot.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 6:28 PM

Happy Anniversary to the Iraqi people!

And,

Kudo’s and thank-you America,for the LIBERATION

of Iraq!:)

canopfor on December 13, 2008 at 6:30 PM

You keep implying that I am a Liberal……

Oh ya,you’re a christian…..

dk on Dec 13,2008 at 6:13PM.

dk: Now,who is being incredible judgemental,like your
religion bashing crack about a Christian!!!!!!!!!!!!

canopfor on December 13, 2008 at 6:37 PM

I said CAPTURING was the easy part and MANAGING THE COUNTRY was the challenge. If you can’t follow along it’s probably best not to try and chime in.

dk on December 13, 2008 at 6:16 PM

Yes, but you didn’t suggest *why* CAPTURING Saddam would be easy, or even remotely possible, if there were not a military presence occupying the land physically.

Which leads inevitably to the question: If capturing Saddam was as easy as you suggest, why was it not tried beforehand, during the Clinton administration, when regime change was the POLICY?

If your comeback is that, well, Clinton didn’t want to MANAGE THE COUNTRY afterwards, then even you suggest the two can’t be done in isolation, which then means that capturing Saddam would necessarily be difficult, no matter how easy or hard the incremental cost once we control the territory. If controlling the territory is a necessary first step to capturing Saddam, and that step is difficult, then it makes capturing Saddam difficult, no?

BTW: I’d never heard there was anything “easy” about capturing Saddam, even *after* we defeated his military. Who, if anyone, is claiming that it was easy?

RD on December 13, 2008 at 6:38 PM

Count on it.

RD on December 13, 2008 at 6:19 PM

I do.

They’ve nothing in common with Wilson, FDR, Truman, and Kennedy with regards to understanding the importance of American sovereignty. The Left laughs at this notion.

Saltysam on December 13, 2008 at 6:43 PM

Here is a rundown of some of the success and accomplishments that are going on in a Free Iraq thanks to
President Bush/American Soldier:

A roundup of the past two weeks’ good news from Iraq.
by ARTHUR CHRENKOFF
Monday, December 6, 2004 12:01 A.M. EST
http://www.opinionjournal.com/extra/?id=110005986

It takes a lot to get a man of God annoyed, and Louis Sako, the Chaldean Archbishop of Kirkuk, is a very frustrated man these days. “It is not all death and destruction,” says the archbishop. “Much is positive in Iraq today. . . . Universities are operating, schools are open, people go out onto the streets normally. . . . Where there’s a kidnapping or a homicide the news gets out immediately, and this causes fear among the people. . . . Those who commit such violence are resisting against Iraqis who want to build their country.”
It’s not just the terrorists who, according to His Eminence, are creating problems for Iraq: Elections in January “will be a starting point for a new Iraq,” he says. Yet “Western newspapers and broadcasters are simply peddling propaganda and misinformation. . . . Iraqis are happy to be having elections and are looking forward to them because they will be useful for national unity. . . . Perhaps not everything will go exactly to plan, but, with time, things will improve. Finally Iraqis will be given the chance to choose. Why is there so much noise and debate coming out from the West when before, under Saddam, there were no free elections, but no one said a thing?”
The archbishop has this wish for the international bystanders: “Europe is absent, it’s not out there; the United States is on its own. . . . [Europe] must help the Iraqi government to control its borders to prevent the entry of foreign terrorists, [but] also provide economic help to encourage a new form of culture which is open to coexistence, the acceptance of others, respect for the human person and for other cultures. . . . Europe must understand that there is no time to waste on marginal or selfish interests: The entire world needs peace.”
Archbishop Sako’s frustration is increasingly shared by other Iraqis, who can hardly recognize their country from the foreign media coverage. Westerners, too, both military and civilians, upon their return are often finding to their surprise and concern they had lived and worked in a different country to that their loved ones, friends and neighbors back home saw every night on the news. “Our” Iraq is a place of violence, uncertainty, and frustration; “their” Iraq all that, but also so much more: work and renewal, hope and enthusiasm, new opportunities and new possibilities. Here are the last two weeks’ worth of stories you might have missed while watching “our” Iraq on the news:

• Economy. Alan P. Larson, the undersecretary of state for economic, business and agricultural affairs, provides an useful overview of the economic situation in Iraq before and after the liberation:
In 1979 Iraq had a per capita living standard on a par with Italy. By the fall of Saddam Hussein’s government, Iraq had the GDP of an impoverished developing country and had become the most heavily indebted nation in the world. This grim legacy, compounded by a serious security situation, poses big hurdles to economic development.
Despite these problems, the Iraqis are persevering and succeeding. Iraqi policies made it possible for economic output in the first ten months of 2004 to be 51.7% higher than in 2003. Per capita income in 2004 is projected to be $780, up from approximately $500 in 2003.
The Iraqi government has set forth a solid medium-term economic plan. The newly independent Central Bank is keeping inflation in check, with the consumer price index rising only 5.7 percent in the first eight months of 2004 compared with 46 percent in 2003. The new dinar has appreciated 27 percent against the dollar in the past year.
Says Larson: “The economic progress Iraqis have achieved so far, under very difficult circumstances, testifies to their competence and courage. This holds especially true for the men and women who make up the new Iraqi government, who, at great personal risk, are busy building their vision of a democratic and free Iraq.”

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 6:54 PM

Thanks Saltysam for your post & insight – when we (traditional conservatives, libertarians & libs) push the issue and the left cries ‘Foul’, it’s time to push even harder, to draw them out into the light of day.

Thanks Baxter especially for posting research on the run-up to the Democrats’ treason in late ’03 / ’04; I was hoping to run across it myself, if only to complete my initial post above, which remembers the day 5 years ago as a great day – one of the last days of relative unity in the country, one of the last days before the Democrats embarked on their calculated treason aginst the nation by inventing and then propagating the “Bush Lied, People Died” meme, including but not limited to the Joe Wilson / Valerie Plame farce, and other blood libels against the country and those defending it.

RD on December 13, 2008 at 6:56 PM

Here are some more accomplishments since the fall of Saddam:

Civil Society Is Beginning To Grow In Iraq
The surge is yielding major changes in Iraqi political life.

With security improving, local citizens have restarted the political process in neighborhoods, cities, and provinces. Grassroots movements have sprung up all around the country. These groups of citizens are determined to protect their communities, they are determined to fight extremism, and they increasingly participate in civic life.
Today, some 90,000 Iraqis belong to local citizens group bearing the name “Sons of Iraq.” The Iraqi Government has pledged to incorporate about 20 to 30 percent of these “Sons of Iraq” into the Iraqi army and police forces.
Leaders in Baghdad are responding and the legislative achievements in Baghdad over the past four months have been remarkable.
In December, the government enacted a pension law that will allow tens of thousands of Sunnis to collect the retirement benefits they were promised.
In January, leaders enacted a de-Ba’athification law that allows mid-level Baath party members to re-enter political and civic life.
In February, leaders enacted a budget that increases spending on security capital reconstruction projects and provincial governments.
The same day in February, leaders enacted an amnesty law to resolves the status of many Iraqis held in Iraqi custody.
Last week, leaders reached agreement on a provincial powers law that helps define Iraqi federalism, and sets the stage for provincial elections later this year. That is an important piece of legislation because it will give Iraqis who boycotted the last provincial elections – such as Sunnis in Anbar or Ninewa provinces – a chance to go to the polls and have a voice in their future.
The U.S. more than doubled the number of Provincial Reconstruction Teams. Karbala PRT helped local residents establish a women’s center to provide education and promote equality.
With support of PRTs, Ramadi now has a fully-staffed mayor’s office and neighborhood councils have formed. Judges are presiding over courts and restoring the rule of law.
Iraq Has Great Economic Potential
The improvements in security resulting from the surge are enabling Iraqis to make progress on their economy. Since the surge began:
Business registrations have increased by more than nine percent;
Total inflation has fallen by more than 60 percentage points;
Investment in energy and telecom industries has increased;
Oil production is up, particularly north of Baghdad;
The national government has announced a plan to reform the food rationing system; and
Economic growth is projected to be a robust seven percent this year.
Iraqis still have work to do in their economy. The reforms needed to transition from a command-and-control economy to a modern market-based system are complex and will take more time. Centralized electricity generation is now above pre-war levels, but it is not sufficient to meet the needs of Iraq’s growing demand. Other key infrastructure needs to be upgraded, especially energy pipelines and storage facilities. Unemployment is too high, and corruption remains a challenge.
Iraq’s Government Has Stepped Forward To Meet More Of Its Own Expenses
Early in the war, the U.S. funded most of the large-scale reconstruction projects in Iraq. Now the U.S. is focusing on encouraging entrepreneurship. The Iraqi government is stepping up on reconstruction projects. They have outspent the U.S. in recent budget 11 to one, and soon we expect the Iraqis will cover 100 percent of these expenses.
Initially, the U.S. paid for most of the costs of training and equipping the Iraqi Security Forces. Now Iraq’s budget covers three-quarters of the cost of its security forces, which is a total of more than $9 billion in 2008. Soon, we expect Iraq to shoulder the full burden of their security forces.
The national government has now committed $196 million to fund jobs programs so that brave Iraqis who stand up to the extremists and the murders and the criminals can learn the skills they need to help build a free and prosperous nation.
Iraq Is Strengthening Its Relationship With Other Nations
Iraq wants to solidify its relationship with the United States. Last year, Iraqi leaders requested to form a long-term strategic partnership with the U.S. This partnership would help assure Iraqis that political and economic and security cooperation between the nations will endure. This partnership would also ensure protections for American troops when the U.N. mandate for Multi-National Forces in Iraq expires this December. This partnership would not bind future President’s to specific troop levels. This partnership would not establish permanent bases in Iraq.
The surge is helping give Iraq’s leaders the confidence to expand their international engagement.
Iraqi leaders are working hard to meet the criterion required to join the World Trade Organization, which would help its entrepreneurs benefit from the opportunities of a global economy.
Iraq has taken steps to attract foreign investment, including hosting its first “Business to Business” expo since the Gulf War.
The government is meeting its pledge to reform its economy in exchange for development assistance and debt relief through the International Compact for Iraq.
Much of the world is increasing its commitment to Iraq. The United Kingdom, Italy, and South Korea are leading PRTs in Iraq. The United Nations is playing an expanded role in Iraq, and will help prepare for this year’s provincial elections.
Next month, the third Expanded Neighbors Conference will meet in Kuwait City to discuss ways the region and the world can further support Iraq’s political, economic, and security progress. This is a key diplomatic initiative. It will include all of Iraq’s neighbors, as well as the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, the G-8, the Arab League, and the Organization of the Islamic Conference.
The Progress In Iraq Is Real, It’s Substantive, But It’s Reversible
Helping Iraqis defeat their enemies and build a free society would be a strategic victory that would resound far beyond Iraq’s borders. If al Qaeda is defeated in Iraq after all the resources it has poured into the battle there, it will be a powerful blow against the global terrorist movement. If Iran is turned back in its attempt to gain undue influence over Iraq, it will be a setback to its ambitions to dominate the region. If people across the Middle East see freedom prevail in multi-ethnic, multi-sectarian Iraq, it will mark a decisive break from the long reign of tyranny in that region. And if the Middle East grows in freedom and prosperity, the appeal of extremism will decline, the prospects of peace will advance, and the American people will be safer here at home.
Retreating from Iraq would carry enormous strategic costs for the United States. It would increase the likelihood that al Qaeda would gain safe havens that they could use to attack us here at home. It would be a propaganda victory of colossal proportions for the global terrorist movement, which would gain new funds, and find new recruits, and conclude that the way to defeat America is to bleed us into submission. It would signal to Iran that we were not serious about confronting its efforts to impose its will on the region. It would signal to people across the Middle East that the United States cannot be trusted to keep its word. A defeat in Iraq would have consequences far beyond that country – and they would be felt by Americans here at home

And they have also achieved almost all of the benchmarks that were laid out for them,that is why we don’t hear democrats complaining about them anymore.

Remember Those Iraqi Benchmarks? Well, Guess What…

June 17, 2008 – by Abe Greenwald
URL to article: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/remember-those-iraqi-benchmarks-well-guess-what/

Way back in the dark days of 2007, when the only popular question about the Iraq war concerned the degree of tragedy, Congress’s Iraq “benchmarks” were all the rage among Democrats. Every argument against a continued U.S. presence in Iraq was constructed around the Maliki administration’s apparent inability to meet the political and security-based milestones as outlined by America’s Democratic-majority Congress.

Then something happened. The gains of the troop surge allowed the Iraqi government and citizenry to implement the security measures and legislative acts called for by the U.S. The benchmark line of argument quietly died. Here, then, is the brief life and glorious death of the great benchmark trope.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 7:00 PM

one of the last days before the Democrats embarked on their calculated treason aginst the nation by inventing and then propagating the “Bush Lied, People Died” meme, including but not limited to the Joe Wilson / Valerie Plame farce, and other blood libels against the country and those defending it.

RD on December 13, 2008 at 6:56 PM

Thank you for staying strong for our Country and Freedom around the world.

This might help with the “Bush lied” liberal drivel:

‘Bush Lied’? If Only It Were That Simple.

By Fred Hiatt
Monday, June 9, 2008; A17
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/08/AR2008060801687_pf.html

But dive into Rockefeller’s report, in search of where exactly President Bush lied about what his intelligence agencies were telling him about the threat posed by Saddam Hussein, and you may be surprised by what you find.

On Iraq’s nuclear weapons program? The president’s statements “were generally substantiated by intelligence community estimates.”

On biological weapons, production capability and those infamous mobile laboratories? The president’s statements “were substantiated by intelligence information.”

On chemical weapons, then? “Substantiated by intelligence information.”

On weapons of mass destruction overall (a separate section of the intelligence committee report)? “Generally substantiated by intelligence information.” Delivery vehicles such as ballistic missiles? “Generally substantiated by available intelligence.” Unmanned aerial vehicles that could be used to deliver WMDs? “Generally substantiated by intelligence information.”

But statements regarding Iraq’s support for terrorist groups other than al-Qaeda “were substantiated by intelligence information.” Statements that Iraq provided safe haven for Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and other terrorists with ties to al-Qaeda “were substantiated by the intelligence assessments,” and statements regarding Iraq’s contacts with al-Qaeda “were substantiated by intelligence information.”

Bush never lied to us about Iraq
The administration simply got bad intelligence. Critics are wrong to assert deception.
By James Kirchick
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe-kirchick16-2008jun16,0,4808346.story
June 16, 2008

This may sound like ancient history, but it matters. After Sept. 11, President Bush did not want to risk allowing Hussein, who had twice invaded neighboring nations, murdered more than 1 million Iraqis and stood in violation of 16 U.N. Security Council resolutions, to remain in possession of what he believed were stocks of chemical and biological warheads and a nuclear weapons program. By glossing over this history, the Democrats’ lies-led-to-war narrative provides false comfort in a world of significant dangers.

Only a partisan idiot would listen to democrats for about a decade say the same things Bush said about Iraq,then watch them vote to go to war,and then say it’s all Bush’s fault.

Baxter Greene on December 13, 2008 at 7:12 PM

If anyone wants to see Allah’s post at Allah is in the House, which Ed mentions in the update, check it here, courtesy of the Wayback Machine. The surrounding posts are found here.

By the way, a Blago warning on some of the language.

Attila (Pillage Idiot) on December 13, 2008 at 7:25 PM

What are your thoughts on this fifth anniversary of Saddam’s capture?

I don’t have new thoughts but I remember how dishevelled and pathetic Saddam looked after his capture. The US army doctors were checking his gums and putting things in his mouth as he sat passively.

aengus on December 13, 2008 at 7:55 PM

Attila (Pillage Idiot) on December 13, 2008 at 7:25 PM

Tks Attila – clicking through on the old link took me to a page pimping Russian Brides!

I remember how dishevelled and pathetic Saddam looked after his capture. The US army doctors were checking his gums and putting things in his mouth as he sat passively.

aengus on December 13, 2008 at 7:55 PM

Yes – that was the one good thing about not dropping C-4 into Saddam’s hidey-hole, or putting a bullet through him on the scene. We got treated to some of the best video, evah.

The pajama-clad Saddam docilely complying with verbal instructions? Priceless. Another really, really good day. (What’s the anniversary? Dec. 14? 15?)

RD on December 13, 2008 at 8:13 PM

I remember watching this in the breakroom at work. Paul Bremer said “We got him” and half of my co-workers watching cheered. The other half were silent. One of the libs in the room said “Oh great, now Bush is gonna get re-elected!” Typical democrat. Party before country.

Tony737 on December 13, 2008 at 12:47 PM

Yet so many liberals who think like this cannot understand why most Americans think they are such festering a$$holes!

Perhaps if Saddam had only try to sell a Senate seat, they could have mustered some concern for him.

91Veteran on December 13, 2008 at 8:29 PM

Wiser men know when to fold. Why don’t YOU wise up Greenie?

dk on December 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM

It was your buddy Clinton who was folding for years that led to 911. It was your buddy Clinton who was allowing the sanctions on Iraq to fall apart, and your buddy Clinton was supposed to be on watch during the Oil-for-food mess.

Wise man? D@mn fool fits better.

91Veteran on December 13, 2008 at 8:45 PM

That’s why we’re STILL THERE and forced to sign agreements that make us look like Iraq’s little bi!ch. Bush Jr., on the other hand, thinks jeezus speaks to him directly and told him to go and free those people like he was frickin’ Moses. Wiser men know when to fold. Why don’t YOU wise up Greenie?

dk on December 13, 2008 at 5:29 PM

I’m mostly going to address the fact that we are still there, in Iraq. We recently signed a Status of Forces Agreement (aka, SOFA), which allows us to operate, teach, train, and live in Iraq in partnership with the Iraqi government. Yes, it was a long, hard road to reach that point. But now, though the agreement is different in content, it is identical in principle to the SOFA we have with Germany, Italy, S. Korea, Japan, England, and a host of other countries where the US military stations and operates throughout the free world. This means two things: One, that the primary governance of Iraq is no longer American military personnel (otherwise, why make an agreement that is, effectively, with ourselves, that constrains our ability to fight independent of the Iraqi military), and two, that we will probably be in Iraq in some capacity for a long, long time. In other words, thanks to this SOFA, for as long as the Iraqi people will have us.

Spc Steve on December 14, 2008 at 2:27 AM

Bush makes surprise visit to Iraq

I’ve been expecting Bush to make this last visit but not like this!

Air Force One, the president’s distinctive powder blue-and-white jetliner, landed at Baghdad International Airport in the afternoon local time, after a secretive Saturday night departure from Washington and an 11-hour flight. In a sign of modest security gains in this war zone, Bush was welcomed with a formal arrival ceremony — a flourish that was not part of his previous three trips to Iraq.

Texas Gal on December 14, 2008 at 10:00 AM

Is Bush making his farewell run now becaue a little later this month he won’t be able to because Isreal will beating someones ass? eh I wonder. Oh where is that ass of a leader Alabalamalahad? Or whatever his name is? Havent seen him in a while.

johnnyU on December 14, 2008 at 10:38 AM

My thoughts then and now? The same. Nothing can stop an unleashed a United States military operation. Our soldiers would make Homer’s Hector, Achilles, Ghengis Khan and Napoleon run for cover!
May God continue to Bless the USA!

Zorro on December 13, 2008 at 11:13 AM
Frame that thought. When The Obama™ and his friends get finished with the US military we’ll be lucky to win a sack race at the county fair.

johnsteele on December 13, 2008 at 11:23 AM

You’re both right. Zorro is talking about an “unleashed” US military while you are talking about a hobbled one. I hope you’re wrong projecting what Obama will do but suspect you’re not.

TooTall on December 14, 2008 at 10:55 AM

Sure there were lots of mistakes prosecuting this war. After reading the history of all U.S. wars, its hard to find one that was planned and went without mistakes. Even wars fought by all other nations have ran into problems, mistakes and missjudgements. Either the nation learns from its mistake or then it will lose the war. So far I have not seen the leftist solution to anything but surrendering to Muslim law.

garydt on December 14, 2008 at 7:44 PM

You know…I cant help but look at that pic and laugh.

First thing I think of (for a caption) would be:

(word balloon coming from the soldiers mouth)

“DAMN G!! When we went to bed, I swear she looked like Haley Berry!!! Knew I shouldn’t have taken that SCOTCH chaser!”

Handel on December 14, 2008 at 9:30 PM

12/13/03 was the day my daughter was born. We got the news early Sunday morning in our hospital room. We celebrated the anniversary of Saddam’s demise with a Tinkerbell party yesterday.

America! F yeah!

Buck Turgidson on December 15, 2008 at 12:20 AM

inna lillahi wa inna ilaihi raji’un

mofo on December 16, 2008 at 1:18 AM