Ramirez on the final bailout request

posted at 10:10 am on November 26, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

Michael Ramirez captured the bailout insanity perfectly in his Investors Business Daily editorial cartoon yesterday:

I have one quibble with this cartoon.  Ramirez should have drawn Hank Paulson smashing open Junior’s piggy bank, not Junior himself.  The bailout mania has already rung up $700 billion that Junior will have to pay, and some Democrats and Republicans want a second bailout that may equal the first — and Junior will have to pay that as well.  Junior should tell Dad that he won’t give out the $20 billion.

Of course, Junior doesn’t get a vote … which is why Junior will have to get used to breaking the piggy banks.

Ramirez has a new collection of his works: Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion, which covers the entire breadth of Ramirez’ career, and it gives a fascinating look at political history.  Read my review here, and watch my interviews with Ramirez here and here.


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“The bailout mania has already rung up $700 billion that Junior will have to pay”

Try more like $7 TRILLION

angryed on November 26, 2008 at 10:13 AM

I laughed outloud when I saw that the first time.

Angryed is right though – that kid has no idea that he and his younger citizens are going to be breaking those piggybanks for real.

To finance the bailout – not get one.

kybowexar on November 26, 2008 at 10:29 AM

Doh!

Sorry Ed, should have read your commentary instead of babbling the same point.

kybowexar on November 26, 2008 at 10:30 AM

Ed, why isn’t the GOP hammering that point home to parents? That their kids will suffer if the government continues spending like this? Isn’t this an issue that parents can understand and then rally to our side around? (That is, assuming that our side will stop the spending too…)

beatcanvas on November 26, 2008 at 10:30 AM

700 billion,7 trillion,what can we do to make it go away?
I know what to do. Lets print up a big batch of MONEY !!

jellybelly on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 AM

If the Fed subsidizes the big banks and so puts the small banks at a disadvantage, is that the beginning of the Walmartization of the financial industry? Will “too big to fail” lead to “too small to save”? I don’t like where this is going. Maybe this is one of those times doing nothing is better than doing something.

Paul-Cincy on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 AM

Let me add – how sick I am about hearing “too big to fail”!

kybowexar on November 26, 2008 at 10:39 AM

It’s “too big to fail” one day, and “too big to be trusted” the next.

Apparently nobody is interested in the fact that there is no Constitutional authorization for the US government to intervene in the economic thrill-ride.

The bailouts are illegal. Anyone care about that? Our government is acting illegally, yet we don’t have the integrity to care because it is being sold to our unthinking and lazy minds as being “for our good”.

LimeyGeek on November 26, 2008 at 10:45 AM

Ramirez stole my cartoon!!! RAMIRRRRRRRREZZZZ!!!!

robblefarian on November 26, 2008 at 10:49 AM

Ed, why isn’t the GOP hammering that point home to parents?

beatcanvas on November 26, 2008 at 10:30 AM

Same reason McCain wouldn’t hammer subprime loans – because they are neck-deep in it.

SlimyBill on November 26, 2008 at 11:08 AM

Same reason McCain wouldn’t hammer subprime loans – because they are neck-deep in it.

SlimyBill on November 26, 2008 at 11:08 AM

McCain isn’t neck deep into subprime loans. If he was, there would have been much rejoicing and gnashing of teeth by the Dems.

No, in fact lack of a Republican face and general silence on the issue tells me that there isn’t a single “culture of corruption” Republican they could single out to crucify.

McCain was silent because he felt like reaching across the aisle would get him elected. Worked well didn’t it? He was simply an idiot.

I think that what is true of many in the GOP, is that they lack the intestinal fortitude to let things fail for fear of not being re-elected. Wrong approach.

Sigh. We are in for a few very bumpy years.

Marine_Bio on November 26, 2008 at 11:22 AM

will bambi please shut up? he’s destroying my Thanksgiving appetite.

kelley in virginia on November 26, 2008 at 11:25 AM

Yep, sad to say, I think that cartoon did get it backwards.

Done That on November 26, 2008 at 11:36 AM

I sold my treadmill.
.
.
I will now become……
.
.
Too BIG to fail.
.
.

subbottomfeeder on November 26, 2008 at 11:44 AM

Ed, why isn’t the GOP hammering that point home to parents? That their kids will suffer if the government continues spending like this? Isn’t this an issue that parents can understand and then rally to our side around? (That is, assuming that our side will stop the spending too…)

beatcanvas on November 26, 2008 at 10:30 AM

Because for one we’ll be sounding like the Obama worshippers for the next 4-8 years (should his Obamaness [blessings upon him] get another bite at the apple) blaming Bush.
I sound like one of them as I’ve been holding Bush responsible.
The escape is that BHO (may the light he brings to us shine in our souls) and Bush are agreeing!

Amendment X on November 26, 2008 at 11:45 AM

The final bailout request? You are an optimist. The latest I could believe.

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 12:02 PM

The bailout mania has already rung up $700 billion that Junior will have to pay…….

……………. $7 TRILLION, and counting.

Seven Percent Solution on November 26, 2008 at 12:10 PM

It’s time for someone to create a new, private currency (backed by real value – not gold, but something else of true value). This would allow people to shift over to the new currency while our currency is in the process of being destroyed.

I know that this won’t happen, but it’s nice to dream a little in these darkening days.

progressoverpeace on November 26, 2008 at 12:11 PM

progressoverpeace on November 26, 2008 at 12:11 PM

There’s a lot of interesting thinking behind what constitutes “currency”.

I was toying with the idea of _human life_ backing a currency….

LimeyGeek on November 26, 2008 at 12:18 PM

perhaps we taxpayers should ask for our share of the bailout before it is too late.

kanda on November 26, 2008 at 1:05 PM

The underlying problem is US debt at every level. The world is realizing it and starting to cut us off. The government is not because they are trying to solve the problem by issuing more debt, devaluing the currency by printing more paper and urging debt-ridden consumers to spent more and get into more debt.

The quickest way out is a painful recession. If we keep trying to put off taking our medicine, it will be a devastating depression.

Laurence on November 26, 2008 at 1:07 PM

Ed, Ramirez knows what he wants to say and is adept at “saying” it. Criticizing his art is above your pay grade.

SKYFOX on November 26, 2008 at 1:15 PM

One picture is worth 10,000 words…. Nice job, Michael Ramirez….

DL13 on November 26, 2008 at 1:21 PM

There’s a lot of interesting thinking behind what constitutes “currency”.

Well, now’s the time for them to start coming out and being tried. It’s a difficult problem, since having a currency backed by real value would mean that one must generate that value before the currency can be printed, which means that there is extra value sitting behind each unit (1 piece sitting idle in safe-keeping for currency convertibility and another in the value of the currency, itself, as it were).

I was toying with the idea of _human life_ backing a currency….

LimeyGeek on November 26, 2008 at 12:18 PM

Funny, but I think that this is something more along the lines of how the thinking has to go. There has to be a backing to the currency that goes beyond some raw asset and some sort of a “living” backing is closer to what we need. Not human life, of course, but something not too different.

P.S. We could easily have a “human life”-backed sort of currency (a bit of a stretch, but close enough for the analogy) if we would be given full control of our citizenship, including the right to sell it (subject to the normal security checks, etc. that any immigrant must pass). I have been a big proponent of allowing Americans to actually own our citizenship and have markets for citizenship – instead of letting the Feds do with citizenship the same thing they do with the currency – print up as many as they want and give them away to anyone.

progressoverpeace on November 26, 2008 at 2:37 PM

If the stinking greedy bankers are getting bailed out with taxpayer money, they should be made to reduce the penalty and default rates on credit cards, all rates, back to the prime as part of the deal.

The executives are still intending to take their obscene salaries and bonuses. They owe the American citizen a reprieve

If we are keeping their businesses from becoming worthless we should be calling the terms.

The usury imposed on credit card holders has helped create the mortgage crisis

When a man loses his job, and misses a single credit card payment, his interest goes to 30 percent forever and he loses any chance to ever pay off the debt and possibly his home too

As far as I am concerned, any bank that speculated itsstock value to zero has lost the right to strangle its cardholders for their last drop of blood, when they are skinning those same card holders alive for the rest of their natural born lives to finance the bailout

entagor on November 28, 2008 at 2:14 AM