Peggy Noonan: The media wants to make Palin the face of the GOP

posted at 12:43 pm on November 26, 2008 by Allahpundit

It’s true, isn’t it? Palinmania’s always had a perverse “strange bedfellows” dynamic insofar as the base is convinced she’s the savior of conservatism while the left’s convinced she’s the ruin of it. Hence their mutual interest in raising her profile. (For a stark illustration of the point, hold your nose and watch the “Thank You” parody at HuffPo’s humor site.) It’s no mystery which camp Noonan’s in; what is a mystery is the extent to which each side’s simply reacting and overreacting to the other, goading each other into ratcheting up the praise and vilification in an endless backlash cycle. Douthat names that as a key omission from my post about the difference between Palin and Huck, in fact: While Huckabee’s always been chummy with the national media, notwithstanding the occasional Rolling Stone piece calling him a lunatic, she’s been derided since day one. Since there are few better gauges of conservative authenticity among the grassroots than press treatment — just ask Maverick — Huck will forever trail her in the great bona fides sweepstakes.

Long story short, the left’s laying a bet that she’ll be easy pickings down the line and the right’s laying a bet that she’s here to save the day. And the pot just keeps getting bigger and bigger. How lucky do you feel? Click the image to watch.


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I hate to do this, because I am on your side, but Reagan and AUH2O leaned toward social middle.

right2bright on November 26, 2008 at 5:00 PM

Respectfully I disagree.

“Our nation-wide policy of abortion-on-demand through all nine months of pregnancy was neither voted for by our people nor enacted by our legislatures — not a single state had such unrestricted abortion before the Supreme Court decreed it to be national policy . . .

“Make no mistake, abortion-on-demand is not a right granted by the Constitution. No serious scholar, including one disposed to agree with the Court’s result, has argued that the framers of the Constitution intended to create such a right.”

“Freedom prospers when religion is vibrant and the rule of law under God is acknowledged.”

“If we are not a nation Under God, then we are a nation gone under.”

“We have the duty to protect the life of an unborn child.”

“Within the covers of the Bible, are the answers for all the problems men face.”

“Society has always regarded marital love as a sacred expression of the bond between a man and a woman. It is the means by which families are created and society itself is extended into the future. In the Judeo-Christian tradition it is the means by which husband and wife participate with God in the creation of a new human life. It is for these reasons, among others, that our society has always sought to protect this unique relationship. In part the erosion of these values has given way to a celebration of forms of expression most reject. We will resist the efforts of some to obtain government endorsement of homosexuality. ”

–Ronald Reagan

Repeal of Fairness Doctrine which gave us Rush and others on talk radio.
Reagan required family planning to notify parents of children under 18 when they receive prescription contraceptive pills and devices.
Congress denies foreign aid funds to any group that supports or participates in management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization.
Pullout from UNESCO

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 5:33 PM

At the risk of a mixed metaphor, for criticizing the Messiah by saying he ‘pals around with terrorists’ Sarah will be eternally viewed by secular lefties as a Pharisee outcast who they will eternally ridicule and the leper who they would never invite to dinner for fear she would puncture their illusion of sophistication, that she would show her feminist self-reliance by bring her own meat with her, that she would actually not babble but utter winsome, coherent thoughts during dinner conversation and finally would leave the dinner without contaminating the environment.

technopeasant on November 26, 2008 at 5:36 PM

It’s amazing to me that while Obama is now the president-elect, EVERYONE is still buzzing about Sarah Palin.

It was strange enough that she drew far more people to her rallies that The One (Example Grand Junction: Obama 5,000 Palin 22,000). Or that more people watched her convention speech than watched BO’s. Or that more people watched the VP debate than the Obama-McCain debate.

She is a huge phenomenon. Obama is just some guy who won a presidential election because of a financial crisis and incumbent fatigue.

And Obama worshippers like Noonan, Parker & Co can’t handle it.

Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 5:40 PM

I think that the New York/Washington Republican pundits should spend most of their efforts criticizing the Dems. Goodness knows, these pundits have plenty of material to work with. While it’s good to be self-analytical in order to improve, the Republican columnists/talking heads spend too many column inches and “clever” sound bites in critical sniping of their own. Do you ever hear Dems doing that for public comsumption. Instead, the Dems spin, lie, and divert to avoid questions or (well-substantiated) criticism.

Well before Palin’s Gibson/Couric interviews that edited out any credibility of the governor, she was the object of hatchet jobs by the glossies and the tabloids. The contrast of magazine covers and stories in supermarket checkout lines told the tale of media bias. Sarah Palin’s photos made her look like a lightweight ditz, and the stories focused repeatedly on her daughter’s pregnancy and the non-scandal “scandal” of the “firing” in her administration. OTOH Obama, Michelle, and family were portrayed as GQ models of style, Rolling Stone examples of cool, and Ladies Home Journal exemplars of just the best family unit this side of Father Knows Best. Truly, the fawning was enough to provoke a diabetic coma.

onlineanalyst on November 26, 2008 at 5:59 PM

Here’s my bottomline on Palin: she is (so far) seemingly incapable of communicating the imperatives of conservative government. At a time when conservatism needs, more than anything else, an individual who can intelligently, concisely and passionately elucidate our ideas to the American people, we want to raise as our standard-bearer a woman who, quite frankly, speaks like a fool? Like a fool, ladies and gentlemen. She winks, grins, uh, ahs, ums, ‘like’s and ‘ya know?’s her way through every speaking engagment in which she participates. Her most successful outing, the VP debate, was little more than 90 minutes of cobbled-together stump speech, talking point, and campaign slogan. I would very much like to see more conservatives realize that although she may well agree with a great many of your beliefs, she is damn near useless to this movement until she can can convince others to agree with us. Commenters around here constantly decry the loss of Reagan while apparently missing entirely the source of his success: that aforementioned ability to intelligently, concisely and most importantly, to passionately elucidate conservatism’s ideas and ideals.

The people of this country will not vote center-right again out of nothing more than a sense of inevitability; we must persuade them that we are right, and that our ideas are worth their vote. For this difficult and critical task we can, and must, do better than Sarah Palin.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 6:05 PM

onetoomany, she was only the vice presidential candiate. I think you know better than anyone that she doesn’t control the campaign message. The only goal that Gov Palin had was defending and promoting McCain in her job as vice presidential candiate.

Give her a couple of years and then make your judgment.

In other news.. Another PAC has released a thank ad for the extreme social conservative who has a low IQ and is a diva as well.

An Era of Hate on November 26, 2008 at 6:24 PM

I like Palin, and I certainly liked her side of the ticket a lot more than McCain’s this year, which helped me to vote for him with a clearer conscience. But we’ve got better and more qualified people for 2012. Palin’s doing a great job in Alaska and should continue to do so for a few more years before trying to fix Washington.

Sign of the Dollar on November 26, 2008 at 6:25 PM

It’s amazing to me that while Obama is now the president-elect, EVERYONE is still buzzing about Sarah Palin.
Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 5:40 PM

I think that’s another thing the liberals and conservatives both want.

The liberals loved Obama – even worship him as a God – but the moonbat hearders know just as well as we do what an empty suit he is. Once he has to start making actual decisions (for the first time in his life) they’ll want to keep the heat off him as much as possible.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 6:26 PM

we can, and must, do better than Sarah Palin.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 6:05 PM

Put up or shut up. Show me someone better — and I’ll get on-board.

My collie says:

Of course, merely pointing to the existence of such an individual is woefully insufficient. They have to be ABLE to raise money, campaign endlessly, appeal to the base, appeal to people outside the base. Furthermore, they have to have the will/drive/fortitude to do it — and they have to be willing to pay the heavy price that it exacts on their personal life and on their soul, as well.

Even if we found such an individual, the chances of them getting the nomination are probably far less than any of us would like to admit. Furthermore, the MSM has a habit of gleefully torpedoing these people when we find them. Invariably, they have a skeleton in their closet, somewhere in their past, that the “journalists” use to discredit them or bring them down. (Just doin’ their job — so they claim.)

My collie says:

There’s no such thing as the perfect candidate. Reagan was not the perfect candidate, nor was he a perfect President.

CyberCipher on November 26, 2008 at 6:30 PM

Here’s my bottom line on Palin: she is (so far) seemingly incapable of communicating the imperatives of conservative government.

The Couric interview was reputedly her worst, and yet I thought she defended social conservatives quite eloquently here.

I cannot fault her for not being able to defend Rick Davis for taking $15,000 from FNMA or John McCain for voting for the bailout and then talking up the campaign’s fis-con creds or reform message.

John McCain didn’t sell himself well enough, and he was a hard sell for the base, anyway. Sarah Palin did a great job talking him up and representing conservatives. If she is a candidate in four years, I imagine she’d do even better.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 6:35 PM

Here’s the New Palin Thank you Ad…

http://www.freedomsdefensefund.org/videos.shtml

Cable buys Alaska, Iowa , New Hampshire

An Era of Hate on November 26, 2008 at 6:38 PM

But as long as we’re talking about Alaska’s budget, I don’t really know a lot of detail – I’m not from there. I think she’s going to have a real problem balancing her budget since the money from oil isn’t going to be coming in like it was… at least not for a quarter – maybe two – until inflation picks up again and it’s reflected in commodity prices

Fiscallyconservative: You don’t appear to be very informed, or else you rely on way-too-biased television for your news. In several post-election interviews on videos available outside of her home state, Governor Palin is a good steward of the budget and a knowledgeable executive in developing an effective budget, having set aside a surplus for the lean times that she knows come with the varying prices of oil.

Your talking points reveal much about you.

onlineanalyst on November 26, 2008 at 6:45 PM

onetoomany, it simply cannot be stated any better than that. Good on ya.

dakine on November 26, 2008 at 6:46 PM

It’s amazing to me that while Obama is now the president-elect, EVERYONE is still buzzing about Sarah Palin.

It was strange enough that she drew far more people to her rallies that The One (Example Grand Junction: Obama 5,000 Palin 22,000). Or that more people watched her convention speech than watched BO’s. Or that more people watched the VP debate than the Obama-McCain debate.

She is a huge phenomenon. Obama is just some guy who won a presidential election because of a financial crisis and incumbent fatigue.

And Obama worshippers like Noonan, Parker & Co can’t handle it.

Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 5:40 PM

You are an astute observer. You have expressed my sentiments as well.

Geochelone on November 26, 2008 at 6:48 PM

Long story short, the left’s laying a bet that she’ll be easy pickings down the line and the right’s laying a bet that she’s here to save the day. And the pot just keeps getting bigger and bigger. How lucky do you feel? Click the image to watch.

I’m sorry but I just don’t see real Republicans acting the way that all the morons that forced McCain on the party are suggesting (Noonan and not a few posters at HA included). Palin was a strategic decision by McCain’s hate-monkeys when he finally figured out that he couldn’t draw votes from disenchanted Democrats. He named her and then acted like the nomination alone would “shut those right wing bastards up.”

The reality is that real Republicans were energized because they saw somebody they could relate to on the ticket. Palin is living in the aftermath of that moment but anybody banking on her to be at the top of the ticket in 2012 is seriously deranged. Noonan and McCain’s hate-monkeys have done an excellent job of spiking the guns on the way out so Palin is damaged goods (with McCain not once defending her from his own staff’s lies to Carl Cameron).

The really interesting line-up I see her as part of is VP again with Bobby Jindal. Two conservative governors from states with heavy interests in oil production would be a solid offering if energy policy is important in four years.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 6:52 PM

Put up or shut up. Show me someone better — and I’ll get on-board.
CyberCipher on November 26, 2008 at 6:30 PM

This is what keeps pissing me off. Do we see Sarah Palin out there sniping at Romney and Huckabee? Can you even IMAGINE her being such a pathetic wannabe?

Of course not. She’s out there, advancing her own cause, supporting the Republicsan Party hook-line-and-sinker… Exuding enough positive energy and attracting enough followers to make Joan of Arc look like a wallflower.

Dim bulbs imagine that this lady can’t hold a candle to the crowd of pathetic losers we sifted through to finally end up with that gold nugget of a candidate: John Freakin’ McCain!

And, oh, my apologies to all the self-proclaimed geniuses here who think that some cut-and-paste interviews on TV prove Sarah Palin isn’t “intellectual” enough to fairly represent their gigantic mega-IQ’s. But so what? She can always hire one of their Introduction to Philosophy 101 professors as an adviser — Problem solved.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 6:56 PM

onlineanalyst on November 26, 2008 at 6:45 PM

Palin’s weakness lies in her lack of foreign policy national public policy-making experience. It’s a weakness that was overstated by the “rats” and understated by the GOP. And it’s not a rap at Palin either. She’s a great regional leader and has had her first glimpse at the bigger political environment in the last nine weeks of a failed Presidential campaign. What she does to answer the critics on her lack of experience will speak volumes about how interested she is in pursuing higher office.

As a point of comparison, Bobby Jindal is visiting Iowa next month.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 6:59 PM

Gov. Jindal is a serious individual. Assuming he wants it, he will be a formidable force in national politics in the coming years.

dakine on November 26, 2008 at 7:02 PM

Of course not. She’s out there, advancing her own cause, supporting the Republican Party hook-line-and-sinker… Exuding enough positive energy and attracting enough followers to make Joan of Arc look like a
wallflower.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 6:56 PM

I saw on some cable show that she’s a hot commodity on the lecture circuit right now. Hundreds of paying gigs and one invite to a five-year-old’s birthday party. If she’s serious about wanting something in DC after her current job ends, this is the way an ambitious politician makes the connections and builds the network to run for high office.

As I posted above, Bobby Jindal is using his name recognition and scheduling time in Iowa next month.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:05 PM

As I posted above, Bobby Jindal is using his name recognition and scheduling time in Iowa next month.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:05 PM

What has Jindal done? Is there a conservative source you know that talks about him?

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 7:10 PM

Sarah now has her own weekly internet radio show at WS radio network: http://www.SarahPalinRadio.com (on Monday 4-5PM PST)

technopeasant on November 26, 2008 at 7:10 PM

Gov. Jindal is a serious individual. Assuming he wants it, he will be a formidable force in national politics in the coming years.

dakine on November 26, 2008 at 7:02 PM

My sense is that he does but he also understood that you do it the old-fashioned way by building a record of accomplishment, a network of supporters and a favorable reputation- not jumping on a sputtering campaign in the waning weeks (especially when your presence helps affirm the idea that you really don’t need all that much experience to be at the highest levels of government).

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:11 PM

Palin’s weakness lies in her lack of foreign policy national public policy-making experience….

As a point of comparison, Bobby Jindal is visiting Iowa next month.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 6:59 PM

In the first place, how is that a “comparison?”

On second thought, never mind that. If you choose to adopt the newly-minted moonbat rule that no one can ever run for President unless he first has experience at personally executing American foreign policy and military strategy, then Obama could be the worst President in US history and, as an incumbent, he will automatically win reelection no matter who runs against him.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 7:19 PM

onetoomany, it simply cannot be stated any better than that. Good on ya.

dakine on November 26, 2008 at 6:46 PM

yeah, I thought he was drunk at the keyboard, too, a regular Joe Biden fan.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 7:21 PM

What has Jindal done? Is there a conservative source you know that talks about him?

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 7:10 PM

1. Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. That’s a big deal job down here and one of the paths to the Governor’s mansion. During his tenure as secretary, Louisiana’s Medicaid program went from bankruptcy with a $400 million deficit into three years of surpluses totaling $220 million.

2. Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services for Planning and Evaluation 2001-2003, resigning to run against Kathleen Blanco for governor (yeah the idiot that blew the state’s Katrina response).

3. US Congressman 2004-2007. He was appointed to the House Committee on Homeland Security, the House Committee on Resources, and the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. He was made vice-chairman of the House Subcommittee on the Prevention of Nuclear and Biological Attacks.

4. Governor of Louisiana 2008-present.

5. Pro-life, anti same-sex marriage, experience with energy issues, against burning the American flag.

Jindal’s not perfect, sharrukin, but he’s damned closer to my values than either John McCain or the bastard about to take office. You sneer at him from your own ignorance, not because he isn’t a serious contender in the GOP of the future.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:25 PM

not jumping on a sputtering campaign in the waning weeks

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:11 PM

Yeah, that “Go f#ck yourself. I’m looking out for no. 1″ brand of rugged individualism (selfishness) has served the GOP well.

Sarah Palin the team player? She’s just an opportunist.

Even though she still accomplished more as a governor than Jindal, represented the party well on a national ticket, doesn’t need to sick her fans on threads about Jindal, and she had kinder words for him than he ever offered on her.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 7:25 PM

Jindal has no name recognition and has publically stated he will not run.

A good VP pick for Sarah though.

Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 7:26 PM

I’m pretty sure Mr. Now Playing In Iowa was one of the catty anonymous governors, either him or Pawlenty. Let both of them duke it out with Palin in the primaries, but it’s bad form to see their names pop up right along with Huck and Romney in any thread where her supporters are called upon to defend her.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 7:29 PM

In the first place, how is that a “comparison?”

logis on November 26, 2008 at 7:19 PM

The point, you ignorant moron, was that Presidential campaigns begin long, long, before the actual event gets underway. If Palin is serious about running for high national office, the time to start putting the campaign in place begins even as the last campaign is ending. Bobby Jindal is headed to Iowa and starting the courting process necessary in our perverted primary system that gives Iowa and New Hampshire way too much influence. The comparison is really a question as to what Palin’s people are doing in these months.

And for the record, fool, wouldn’t having some experience in national security decision making, foreign policy, or some other national policy-making experience be helpful before getting elected?

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:35 PM

Jindal’s not perfect, sharrukin, but he’s damned closer to my values than either John McCain or the bastard about to take office. You sneer at him from your own ignorance, not because he isn’t a serious contender in the GOP of the future.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:25 PM

This is the first time I have even mentioned his name. How is that sneering? I simply asked what he has done.

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 7:35 PM

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 5:33 PM

Being a social conservative is more then one or two issues…I stated where he was more middle then conservative. He never pursued to eliminate abortion, many politicians say the don’t like it…few take a stand and demand a law.
I loved Reagan, he was right, but he was also a little loosey goosey on immigration.
I is considered the ultimate conservative, it is just that he was moderate in the right areas, not dogmatic conservative. He expanded social securities, and he supported dissidents that conservatives turned their back on.
The others you cited were political conservative views…don’t get so upset, relax, he was a great standard for all of us. He used moderation where it was needed. He just wasn’t the “hardliner” many liberals paint him, and many conservatives try to corner him.
I noticed you didn’t Google AuH2O, he was more social moderate then Reagan.

right2bright on November 26, 2008 at 7:38 PM

Jindal has no name recognition and has publically stated he will not run.

A good VP pick for Sarah though.

Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 7:26 PM

Jindal has no name recognition in 2008. The political landscape in 2012 will be different. He told McCain he wasn’t interested in the VP slot this year. Please show me where he’s said that he has categorically stated he’s not interested in running for higher office. I think what you’ll find his actual statement said was something along the lines that he’s in the job he wants now. That’s not dismissing the possibilty for a 2012 run and his visits to Iowa shows that he’s putting out feelers.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 7:38 PM

let’s just wait until 2012… Stop the fighting.

An Era of Hate on November 26, 2008 at 7:40 PM

technopeasant on November 26, 2008 at 5:36 PM

I am sure you saw some point to that post, somewhere…hope you enjoyed it.

right2bright on November 26, 2008 at 7:41 PM

Jindal has no name recognition and has publically stated he will not run.

A good VP pick for Sarah though.
Norwegian on November 26, 2008 at 7:26 PM

No can do. Jindal’s (so-called) supporters have already said that he will never take any “sputtering VP” appointment unless he knows for certain that the ticket cannot possibly lose. To do any less would beneath his dignity.

I’m pretty sure Mr. Now Playing In Iowa was one of the catty anonymous governors, either him or Pawlenty. Let both of them duke it out with Palin in the primaries, but it’s bad form to see their names pop up right along with Huck and Romney in any thread where her supporters are called upon to defend her.
chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 7:29 PM

Hehe. “Mr. Now Playing In Iowa.”

Clear your mind for a moment and try – just try – to picture a thread about Bobby Jindal being hijacked by Sarah Palin supporters screaming: “Pay attention to her! Pay attention to her!”

You just can’t do it, can you?

Don’t get me wrong; I don’t have a problem in the world with Bobby Jindal. And I don’t necessarily believe that he, Romney or Huckabee are personally responsible for a tenth of this knee-biting crap going on right now.

But I get the very strong impression that the supporters of these guys don’t have the faintest idea that they are doing their candidates a severe disservice. This kind of behavior is, in a word, pathetic. And that doesn’t win votes.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 7:44 PM

right2bright on November 26, 2008 at 7:38 PM

I agree regarding immigration. IIRC I believe Reagan made a statement about regretting that as well. As to the abortion issue he did what was possible, but given the SCOTUS in the US there is nothing that a President can do about Roe vs Wade, and state law is out of their hands.

I didn’t google Goldwater because he never served a day. He helped establish many of the tenets of modern American conservatism but he didn’t get elected, so it is less relevant IMHO.

sharrukin on November 26, 2008 at 7:47 PM

How many tens of thousands of people have lined up in freezing weather, pre-dawn, to see Sarah Palin speak? How many have driven for hours just for the possibility of seeing her? (I have seen this phenomenon happen with my own eyes.)

How many of them would do that for Bobby Jindal?

‘Nuff said.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 7:50 PM

Peggy dear you have had your say we consev. know you are not one of us.We don,t care what you say or think about Gov. Palin or anything else.So dear just go away and take David Brooks and McCain and all others like them with you.This is our party now .It does not belong to the wizzards of smart blue blood socal lib Rep anymore.

thmcbb on November 26, 2008 at 8:18 PM

Palin’s weakness lies in her lack of foreign policy national public policy-making experience.

highhopes: I will concede that point, but then ask in rebuttal, how in the world was Obama perceived as being qualified in the same area? After all, it was he, not she, running for POTUS.

onlineanalyst on November 26, 2008 at 8:32 PM

Does anyone really think the media is that smart? They couldn’t pull off a conspiracy to raise their own ratings/readership, let alone a conspiracy to rig an election in 2012.

I’m pretty sure Mr. Now Playing In Iowa was one of the catty anonymous governors, either him or Pawlenty.

It was Pawlenty and Crist but I haven’t seen anything to implicate Jindal.

kcewa on November 26, 2008 at 9:06 PM

Why is this old hag even relevant? So the strategy to stay relevant sort of… not really… for Noonan and Parker is to go to the MSM with a negative comment about Palin and then they get face time…and Allah posts it here?

If I wanted Palin bashing I’d wash MSNBC CBS NBC CNN ABC…

and no…I didn’t click and watch…just wanted to comment…

CCRWM on November 26, 2008 at 9:19 PM

How many of them would do that for Bobby Jindal?

‘Nuff said.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 7:50 PM

Um…

Not really for a couple of reasons the most important being that Bobby Jindal isn’t on the speaker’s circuit. He’s running Louisiana right now and exploring the possibilties for 2012. Palin is (rightfully) cashing in on her newfound fame.

Beyond that, Jindal is still exploring his options, testing the waters, and figuring out if he can create a successful political network. You are being obtuse to compare what he is doing to the residual adoration of Palin after the 2008 elections.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 9:29 PM

My point above had nothing to do with the search for the “perfect candidate” (something that I happen to view as the biggest white whale in politics). I am looking least of all for an individual who agrees with every single one of my beliefs (I doubt he exists anyway). I instead presented a measured and reasoned argument in favor of elevating an individual who has the passion to make our ideas and ideals a voting-booth preference for the majority of Americans. I was frank when I said that Sarah Palin sounds to me like a 13 year old girl explaining her history report (yes, now I am indeed being an ass). This is a harsh reality, and apparently some of you are having trouble grasping the fact that most Americans know a 13 year old girl when they hear one. Deal with it. You folks can sit here for 4 years with your hands over your eyes and ears, blaming the MSM and the left for all our troubles, and we can lose another election in a tidal wave of ignorance just like the one that rampaged through the 08 electorate. Or we can find a candidate who can make people understand why limited government works, and why lower taxes are better for everyone, and why welfare is a curse to the lower classes, and why the free market is the greatest economic force in the world, and and and.

Let me try saying it this way: Sarah Palin fires up the base. Great. I don’t believe, however, that her brand of politics is sufficient to convince those who are not among the base that conservatism is the best thing for this country. Ok? I am not in any way advocating a watering-down of conservatism; I want to make everyone, right, left and center, conservative. Try READING what I am saying before dismissing it. Conservatism is in major trouble, folks, and what I believe we need is a person that can communicate the basic tenets of our belief system to those who don’t understand it. Period. If Sarah Palin can start pulling that off, GREAT!

CyberCipher: The first line of your response makes you appear suspiciously jackass-ish. And anyway, how about Eric Cantor? He’s a smart mofo, and he understands fiscal conservatism better than most. I hope my above response makes clear to you the fact that I am looking more for some kind of conservative educator of the electorate than I am for a mere presidential candidate, but just in case: Hey CyberCipher, you made some good points there but I am looking more for some kind of conservative educator of the electorate than I am for a mere presidential candidate.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:30 PM

how about Eric Cantor? He’s a smart mofo, and he understands fiscal conservatism better than most.

yeah … he understands it so well that he voted for the bailout

nothing like approving of at least 350 billion dollars to sec. of the Treasury to show your fiscal conservatism!!!!!

give me a break

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:32 PM

Let me try saying it this way: Sarah Palin fires up the base. Great. I don’t believe, however, that her brand of politics is sufficient to convince those who are not among the base that conservatism is the best thing for this country.

yup … Reagan was the same way … no way that dude could ever be President either

Let me say it this way …. go your own way

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:33 PM

Beyond that, Jindal is still exploring his options, testing the waters, and figuring out if he can create a successful political network. You are being obtuse to compare what he is doing to the residual adoration of Palin after the 2008 elections.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 9:29 PM

Had Jindal been the one theoretically selected as McCain’s VP candidate, do you think he would have had the crowd draw that Palin had?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:35 PM

Reagan was the same way? I don’t think you know what “way” you’re talking about, bud. Try reading “Reagan in His Own Hand”. The man was formulating and building his ideas for years before he ran, and combined with his other qualities it made him uniquely able to communicate that stuff to the rest of the country. He made people get it. I’m not arguing with Palin’s beliefs, for the love of God. I’m arguing that she lacks the ability to efffectively communicate those beliefs to the electorate. You just….like ellipses….so much tho…don’t you? Thanks for the reminder that the internet comment section is the cement wall upon which so many people are perpetually bashing their head.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:40 PM

how about Eric Cantor? He’s a smart mofo, and he understands fiscal conservatism better than most.

Anyone who supported that freaking Bailoutpalooza is dead to me. Cantor not only supported it, he went out and pressured other Republicans into supporting it.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:40 PM

I’m not arguing with Palin’s beliefs, for the love of God. I’m arguing that she lacks the ability to efffectively communicate those beliefs to the electorate.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:40 PM

Ever been to a Palin rally and listened to her speak? Seen her ability to connect with voters?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:42 PM

highhopes: I will concede that point, but then ask in rebuttal, how in the world was Obama perceived as being qualified in the same area? After all, it was he, not she, running for POTUS.

onlineanalyst on November 26, 2008 at 8:32 PM

And I will respond with the comment that to a great extent Obama’s real qualifications were inconsequential in this election.

The reality is that the Constitution only stipulates a natural born citizen of a certain age as the qualifications for the Presidency. Because the idea of electing Obama’s “life story” was compelling, he got support despite the idea he is utterly unqualified professionally for the job.

Put another way, everybody got excited about the idea of a President Obama and were willing to ignore the significant flaws in his experience to make it happen. They were less forgiving when it came to Sarah Palin’s flaws. Throw in the fact that McCain and his people despised Palin and only put her on the ticket because the “Jesus freaks” weren’t coming around and neither were the PUMA’s who had wanted Hillary Clinton nominated and the picture becomes much clearer.

To summarize: The qualifications for high office are low. Up until this election, experience mattered. Palin wasn’t unqualified or completely out of her element when nominated as VP but she wasn’t the best choice either. Obama’s lack of experience will ultimately make his admistration more Carter-like than Reagan-like. The GOP really needs to figure out if the branch that got energized when Palin was nominated is the future or if the Party’s future is more akin to Noonan’s idea that the GOP should be Democrat-lite.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 9:42 PM

Ever been to a Palin rally and listened to her speak? Seen her ability to connect with voters?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:42 PM

of course not … not only that they probably no little or next to nothing about Palin’s record

typical drive by character assassination that has been going on here lately

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:43 PM

I certainly can’t argue with the disgust towards Cantor and the TARP. However, there were a lot of very smart people with very large heads and very impressive credentials declaring that the sky was falling. I think he acted out of a hope to avert what was being described as an imminent disaster.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:45 PM

I certainly can’t argue with the disgust towards Cantor and the TARP. However, there were a lot of very smart people with very large heads and very impressive credentials declaring that the sky was falling. I think he acted out of a hope to avert what was being described as an imminent disaster.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:45 PM

“smart mofos” make decisions based on emotion and fear?

they “hope” to avert something

sounds like Barry to me

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:52 PM

joey – Character assassination? Ha ha, dude give me your address, I’m sending you a dictionary.

Jim – No I haven’t. Without any scientific data at hand to back this up, I can only suspect ;that most people at rallies are a part of the base or at least pretty close to it. Since I lack the knowledge, I’m reluctant to comment further, except to say that I get your point. And I don’t mean to imply that Palin should be shelved back in Alaska and never heard from again; far from it. She is a tremendous asset to the Republican party. I am arguing primarily against appointing her as standard-bearer.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:52 PM

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:52 PM

She was able to keep up with the Messiah in terms of drawing the crowds

end of story

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:53 PM

I certainly can’t argue with the disgust towards Cantor and the TARP. However, there were a lot of very smart people with very large heads and very impressive credentials declaring that the sky was falling. I think he acted out of a hope to avert what was being described as an imminent disaster.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:45 PM

A bunch of idiots stampeded into an idiotic policy…I’m a Reagan Republican (voted for him in ’84) and I’m sad to say that my Democratic Congresswoman, Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, and my Democratic Senator, Tim Johnson, do a million times better at supporting fiscal conservatism than my Republican Senator, John Thune. That’s why I voted to re-elect my Democratic reps this year and will vote against Thune in 2010.

Thune, like Cantor, is a freaking Porkmeister RINO who never saw an earmark, subsidy, or bailout he didn’t like. Bitter pill to swallow after I helped him unseat Tom Daschle.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:54 PM

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:30 PM

I was frank when I said that Sarah Palin sounds to me like a 13 year old girl explaining her history report (yes, now I am indeed being an ass).

Being an ass is a great way to win people over to your POV.

most Americans know a 13 year old girl when they hear one.

Except that more people watched Sarah Palin’s convention speech than Obama’s and McCain’s combined. In a significant turnout for the Republicans in a bad year with a very weak candidate, 91% of Republican voters supported Sarah Palin.

I haven’t heard of anyone but hardcore Democratic voters who can’t tell the difference between Palin and Tina Fey calling her anything.

You folks can sit here for 4 years with your hands over your eyes and ears, blaming the MSM

We are very aware that Sarah Palin must show improvement over the next three years to win over independents, but she has enormous potential and quite a bit of political capital at her disposal – otherwise “folks” like you, or jackals, would not be here trying to break up her support.

we can lose another election in a tidal wave of ignorance just like the one that rampaged through the 08 electorate.

We also took a beating in 2006 and need to look toward 2010, if you care anything about the party, the dynamics of our government, the direction our country is headed or finding your Holy Grail. You should take advantage of politicians like Sarah Palin who can help downticket Republicans.

Let me try saying it this way: Sarah Palin fires up the base. Great. I don’t believe, however, that her brand of politics is sufficient to convince those who are not among the base that conservatism is the best thing for this country. Ok?

No one really knows what point you’re trying to make about conservatism, but it sounds like you’re a cheap white male NASCAR voter who liked Obama this time – the fickle middle.

And anyway, how about Eric Cantor?

His party hasn’t even promoted him to a leadership position in the House, and he damaged the party’s credibility during the bailout by playing into Pelosi’s hands: going on record that they voted against her out of spite, because she tried to pin the crisis on the GOP. In the end, he caved and voted for the “crap sandwich.” He needs time, and the last thing we need right now is more legislators running for President.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 9:55 PM

joey –
Argue over semantics? Pass.

Crowds? That really played out well on election day. Take a look at favorable/unfavorables, and the breakdown among party affiliation. Come on man.

And yeah I know the “Come on man” was weak, but it’s been a long day.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:55 PM

Yeah she is viewed pretty favorably by the Republican party

except for the RINO wing intent on bringing her and other conservatives liker her down

Graham-Cantor 2012!

Now … explain to me how Eric Cantor is a fiscal conservative

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 9:58 PM

She is a tremendous asset to the Republican party. I am arguing primarily against appointing her as standard-bearer.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at

How about letting the party decide who their standard bearer will be during the primaries in 2011 and just shutting up about Palin in the meantime. There’s nothing more pathetic than a grown man sending a “13 YO girl” out to work for him.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 9:59 PM

onetoomany – I get your point about the people at Palin rallies being her fired-up base. Who would be Jinal or Cantor’s fired-up base?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:59 PM

And yeah I know the “Come on man” was weak, but it’s been a long day.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 9:55 PM

Ask President-elect Obama for some time off. Isn’t everyone going out drinking tonight?

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:02 PM

onetoomany – I get your point about the people at Palin rallies being her fired-up base. Who would be Jinal or Cantor’s fired-up base?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:59 PM

Hold on … lol

I want a description of “Eric Cantor – Fiscal Conservative” first

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:02 PM

Had Jindal been the one theoretically selected as McCain’s VP candidate, do you think he would have had the crowd draw that Palin had?

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 9:35 PM

Interesting question. Living in Louisiana I may be slightly biased but I think he could have had the same draw since both were complete unknowns and Jindal is a “person of color” instead of another old white male. It would have been a different crowd that was drawn but in the aftermath of defeat it is interesting to speculate if Bobby Jindal’s positives would have done more to shore up John McCain’s negatives than the inclusion of Sarah Palin.

It is, of course, academic since Jindal opted out of consideration but I suspect that Jindal would have gotten McCain elected. In the first place, he has national policy-making experience as a US Congressman and an Assistant Secretary for HHS that Palin did not. Secondly, Louisiana is tied to the Southern vote while Palin is a powerhouse in one of the “freak states.” She’s a regional leader in a far smaller region (upper NW) than the effect of the GOP putting up a Southern governor in a campaign where race matters. Most importantly, Jindal has a clear voting record on the national level on fundamental issues that matter to conservative voters while Palin does not. With Jindal, McCain’s people wouldn’t have had to resort to pointing out her role as the CINC of Alaska’s National Guard or the proximity of Russia to suggest she has national security and foreign policy experience.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:03 PM

Chunderroad –

I was tyring to inject a little levity there. Relax.

I am not a jackal. I am not a cheap white male NASCAR voter (I honestly don’t even know what the hell that is). I am, however, a member of the special operations community of the US Army who would very much like to continue serving and bleeding for his country, but under rather different cirumstance than those under which I will be serving for the next four years. I am passionate about the restoration of our party because I believe that the leadership of the opposition is a direct threat to the national security of this country, in a great many ways. I don’t relate this as a cheap means of scoring points, but merely in the hope that I can somewhat explain my viewpoint. I love this country dearly, and right now I’m pretty terrified at its direction.

Most of the points above about Cantor are well thought-out and spot on. I sort of reached in my butt and threw out a name. Thanks for the education about a guy that I’ll have to do some more reading on.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 10:08 PM

Hold on … lol

I want a description of “Eric Cantor – Fiscal Conservative” first

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:02 PM

ha ha, yeah I’ll give ya that one.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 10:10 PM

So let me get this straight … the 2 term Rep and former state bureaucrat and current 37 year old governor of Louisiana gets McCain elected

through the financial thing and the horrible campaign that McCain ran

Now … I am not trying to bash Jindal, I like the guy … I’m not one of these Republicans who wants to destroy a promising member of the party … like some here are fond of doing

but come on now … McCain doesn’t win with Jindal as his VP

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:11 PM

Yeah I don’t think Jindal gets him to the WH either. Young, inexperienced, without the pizazz (however the hell you spell that) of Palin. It will reall be interesting to watch him develop over the next 4 years though.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 10:13 PM

highhopes, I do admire Bobby Jindal as one of the stars of the Republican Party, but I looked up and listened to some of his speeches when his name was being tossed out as a potential VP pick.

No offense, but listening to him speak is like watching paint dry. Don’t get me wrong, paint is an admirable and useful product, but it’s not interesting. About the only thing you can say for Jindal’s speeches is that they’re more interesting than Pawlenty’s speeches.

Out of curiosity, I went to a Palin rally in Omaha in September. She is mesmerizing on television (witness her convention speech and the reaction of the convention-goers), but in person she is absolutely electrifying. And I say this as a jaded political junkie who has watched a few decades’ worth of politicians come and go. It’s hard to explain, you have to experience it. But she’s a natural at demagoguing – Jindal and Cantor are not, at least not so far as I’ve seen.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:14 PM

I found this interesting (I apologize if this is linked somewhere else and I missed it): Washington Whispers has a post that says several conservatives from the Reagan and Bush administrations are quietly preparing to groom Palin for a 2012 run.

Bedard says that he’s heard from a “tipster” that “they have already purchased a Web address and are commissioning white papers from experts on how Richard Nixon and the Gipper followed defeats with victories. They are also drawing up a to-do list for Palin, including who she should meet with domestically and internationally for advice and a “candidate school” to get her up to speed on key issues and electioneering techniques.”

meltenn on November 26, 2008 at 10:14 PM

Well I’m heading to bed, but before I go I just want to apologize if any of my comments were a bit too…caustic, shall we say. I get fired up sometimes, and I don’t do much commenting on the internet so I may have lost sight of the fact that the echo chamber in my head is a bit different than everyone else’s. For the record, I do stand by all the points that I made. With the exception of Eric Cantor, however, who is about halfway under the bus in my backyard. Maybe if my comments above are read with an eye towards dry humor, they’ll make a bit more sense. In any case, you folks have a happy T Day.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 10:24 PM

Now … I am not trying to bash Jindal, I like the guy … I’m not one of these Republicans who wants to destroy a promising member of the party … like some here are fond of doing

but come on now … McCain doesn’t win with Jindal as his VP

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:11 PM

First off:

Yes you are trying to trash the party and attack specific individuals.

That being said, McCain was the wrong choice by a party held hostage by secular humanists. In the aftermath of defeat, the rise of an utterly incompetent President, I’m hoping the GOP can regroup, get rid of the secular humanists, craft a clear agenda and get back in the game in 2012 with gains in 2010.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:26 PM

Anyone who says they are a Republican should be treated with respect, and throwing these labels like “RINO” at people will amplify the marginalization of the party. Many are too quick to criticize and too slow to find out why other Repubicans have voted the way they did, or took a specific action.

There are many talented, dedicated public servants in the Republican Party on the national, state and local levels, and any number of them may emerge as party standard bears in the future. Much of this sniping back and forth about who that person (or persons) should be seems to consist of efforts to tear down Person A instead of building up Person B.

If our best arguments are negative positions about others’ actions and opinions, instead of positive suggestions and proposals about what our candidate can accomplish, we will continue to be the party of “NO”. This approach won’t win new party members or sway independents to embrace the basic values of the Conservative movement.

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:29 PM

First off:

Yes you are trying to trash the party and attack specific individuals.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:26 PM

how so?

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:31 PM

Anyone who says they are a Republican should be treated with respect, and throwing these labels like “RINO” at people will amplify the marginalization of the party. Many are too quick to criticize and too slow to find out why other Repubicans have voted the way they did, or took a specific action.

I’m sorry if I offended any liberal Republicans … I love the way they were able to hold on to their seats in New England

oops

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 PM

No offense, but listening to him speak is like watching paint dry. Don’t get me wrong, paint is an admirable and useful product, but it’s not interesting. About the only thing you can say for Jindal’s speeches is that they’re more interesting than Pawlenty’s speeches.

Well, Jim62sch, I should probably bookmark this comment when the bastard-elect has difficulty stringing more than three words together without long pauses. I suspect you’ll soon have a different appreciation of Jindal’s commentary.

Out of curiosity, I went to a Palin rally in Omaha in September. She is mesmerizing on television (witness her convention speech and the reaction of the convention-goers), but in person she is absolutely electrifying. And I say this as a jaded political junkie who has watched a few decades’ worth of politicians come and go. It’s hard to explain, you have to experience it. But she’s a natural at demagoguing – Jindal and Cantor are not, at least not so far as I’ve seen.

Have you seen Jindal or Cantor in context? Meaning, have you also seen them live or are you going off what you see on television. I suspect have not. Let’s be clear here. I’m not against Sarah Palin, I just don’t think she’s the best choice to lead heading forward. I’d like the field of consideration not limited to failed VP candidates of 2008.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:36 PM

I’m sorry if I offended any liberal Republicans … I love the way they were able to hold on to their seats in New England

oops

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 PM

lol

at least Olympia Snowe might get a cabinet position. I always liked her.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:37 PM

I’m sorry if I offended any liberal Republicans … I love the way they were able to hold on to their seats in New England

oops

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 PM

Sarcasm won’t build up the Party anymore than a witchhunt mentality that drives more people away, and discourages many from even considering a vote for a Republican.

Joey, maybe you should post your blueprint as to what the Party should do in New England to win seats, and what kind of candidate will appeal in those districts.

As I said, many are quick to criticize, but I’m not seeing a curiosity to understand the reasons why Republicans (like Cantor) voted the way they did on the Bailout. Wouldn’t it be valuable to, at the very least, understand their rationale for an action, even if you disagree with that action?

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:38 PM

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:14 PM

One final comment I didn’t want to add with my other comments. It really bothers me when the discussion becomes a personality cult (be it Obama or Palin or whomever) rather than a discussion about the most qualified candidate for a particular office.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:40 PM

Well I’m heading to bed, but before I go I just want to apologize if any of my comments were a bit too…caustic, shall we say. I get fired up sometimes, and I don’t do much commenting on the internet so I may have lost sight of the fact that the echo chamber in my head is a bit different than everyone else’s. For the record, I do stand by all the points that I made. With the exception of Eric Cantor, however, who is about halfway under the bus in my backyard. Maybe if my comments above are read with an eye towards dry humor, they’ll make a bit more sense. In any case, you folks have a happy T Day.

onetoomany on November 26, 2008 at 10:24 PM

Thank you for your service to this country. I come from a military background and served in the Navy. Best holiday wishes for a blessed and happy Thanksgiving. Good night.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:40 PM

Have you seen Jindal or Cantor in context? Meaning, have you also seen them live or are you going off what you see on television. I suspect have not.
highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:36 PM

I like listening to Jindal … very smart man

as for Cantor I think I remember his recent moment in the sun … when he went to House floor and whined because Pelosi was treating Republicans badly … boo freakin who

and then he voted for the bailout and is now trying to apologize for it

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:40 PM

sorry… military family

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:40 PM

Why is this old hag even relevant? So the strategy to stay relevant sort of… not really… for Noonan and Parker is to go to the MSM with a negative comment about Palin and then they get face time…and Allah posts it here?

If I wanted Palin bashing I’d wash MSNBC CBS NBC CNN ABC…

and no…I didn’t click and watch…just wanted to comment…

CCRWM on November 26, 2008 at 9:19 PM

No need to apologize for not clicking. I think pretty much every conservative nowadays sees the name “Peggy Noonan” and just skips right on past.

logis on November 26, 2008 at 10:41 PM

I’m sorry if I offended any liberal Republicans … I love the way they were able to hold on to their seats in New England

oops

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:32 PM

Yeah, me too. When I think how vociferously liberal Republicans like the Maine Sisters have defended conservative Republicans like Sarah Palin (help me out here – I’m sure it has happened somewhere), I feel ashamed.

After all, who stepped up to work for John McCain in his campaign? The social conservatives did nothing at all for the GOP ticket, while the liberal Republicans like Colin Powell, Christopher Buckley, and Michael Smerconish made every possible effort and sacrifice to get McCain to the Oval Office. I feel so guilty.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:41 PM

As a point of comparison, Bobby Jindal is visiting Iowa next month.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 6:59 PM

Jindal spent a day here in Iowa this past weekend. As for the whole discussion of who would have been the better veep candidate, it wouldn’t have mattered if McCain had Christ Himself for a VP nominee. He still would have lost, unless he by some miracle actually ran a great campaign and offered up a coherent argument for people to vote for him.

mcassill on November 26, 2008 at 10:43 PM

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:38 PM

Well I live in New Jersey so I know what a RINO is … when offered the choice between a liberal Republican and a democrat … the people of this state go with the real thing every time … I live in democrat hell

Cantor voted for the bailout because he was scared and pressured, that shows me he doesn’t have any faith in so called ‘fiscal conservatism” and basic constitutional government

Rep. Cantor … vote for this “700 billion” check for the Treasury Sec. to use so that he can go around picking and choosing which private banks fail and which don’t

fortunately my Rep voted against it twice

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:44 PM

Michael Smerconish made every possible effort and sacrifice to get McCain to the Oval Office. I feel so guilty.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:41 PM

don’t get me started on that fool lol

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:45 PM

One final comment I didn’t want to add with my other comments. It really bothers me when the discussion becomes a personality cult (be it Obama or Palin or whomever) rather than a discussion about the most qualified candidate for a particular office.

highhopes on November 26, 2008 at 10:40 PM

I completely sympathize and agree, but the message needs to be backed with personality and star power in today’s America, especially since Republicans have to overcome the media 15-point disadvantage to begin with.

It’s a lot easier to get Palin on the right message than it is to get women to faint at Bobby Jindal or Tim Pawlenty rallies.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:49 PM

Yeah, me too. When I think how vociferously liberal Republicans like the Maine Sisters have defended conservative Republicans like Sarah Palin (help me out here – I’m sure it has happened somewhere), I feel ashamed.

After all, who stepped up to work for John McCain in his campaign? The social conservatives did nothing at all for the GOP ticket, while the liberal Republicans like Colin Powell, Christopher Buckley, and Michael Smerconish made every possible effort and sacrifice to get McCain to the Oval Office. I feel so guilty.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:41 PM

I think it is shameful when Joe Lieberman supports the GOP presidential candidate and Colin Powell supports the democrat

tells you something about what happens when you run dem-lite v. democrat

people can’t tell the difference … which is exactly why states like NJ will never have a republican majority

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:49 PM

fortunately my Rep voted against it twice

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:44 PM

My Rep here in MD also voted against it both times. I’m just not convinced that the bluer Congressional Districts would elect a true, strong conservative. When you say

when offered the choice between a liberal Republican and a democrat … the people of this state go with the real thing every time …

are you saying that you believe they would elect a true conservative if given that choice?

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:51 PM

Guys and gals here’s an interesting story from Utah that shows how partisanship triumphs over one of the most enduring principles of modern Democratic Party philosophy, that of liberated women with children working full-time outside the home. A survey was recently done in Utah regarding Sarah that showed that Dems had more concern about Sarah being a working mother and the GOP became more accepting of the situation after she was selected by McCain. Whatever happened to “I am woman, hear me roar…”

technopeasant on November 26, 2008 at 10:52 PM

are you saying that you believe they would elect a true conservative if given that choice?

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:51 PM

I do believe that … for example in NJ … we have people who run for State Senate … like Nick Asselta who was a Republican and he ran against Jeff Van Drew

I worked for Asselta, there were no differences between them … Asselta even lost in the heavily GOP areas of Cape May County (who went for Bush twice)

New Jersey is corrupt as all hell, dual office holding, pensions etc. etc. Asselta basically ran on the platform that he would not cut the benefits for prison guards

and after he loses, what does he do? He applies for a governor appointed job on some stupid board!

If a conservative Republican would run against the dem’s policies here they would win

unfortunately the Republican platform is not different from the dems

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:55 PM

It’s a lot easier to get Palin on the right message than it is to get women to faint at Bobby Jindal or Tim Pawlenty rallies.

Jim62sch on November 26, 2008 at 10:49 PM

What about if Pawlenty grows back his mullet?

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:55 PM

What about if Pawlenty grows back his mullet?

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:55 PM

he would draw the Miami Vice crowd lol

good show BTW

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:58 PM

If a conservative Republican would run against the dem’s policies here they would win

unfortunately the Republican platform is not different from the dems

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:55 PM

Are there examples of well funded Conservatives running and winning in NJ? In MD, there is only one Congressional District left with a Republican Representative. I am prone to think that more moderate Republicans have a better chance in the bluer districts, but since I think you are saying the opposite, I’m curious if there are examples of this happening. if there are, these victories would be potential blueprints for conservative Republicans to win races.

Red State State of Mind on November 26, 2008 at 10:58 PM

joey24007 on November 26, 2008 at 10:55 PM

You’ve been making excellent points. “RINOs” in traditionally blue states can’t make too many waves, and we’re glad to have their support. When the GOP has been completely driven out of the NE, we know we have a problem, though. They have no right to lay their woes at the feet of the so-cons, though.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 10:59 PM

I’m getting loopier. Could night all, and enjoy your holiday.

chunderroad on November 26, 2008 at 11:00 PM

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