Corporate begging in style

posted at 9:30 am on November 19, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

If industry leaders need to convince Congress that their plight is so desperate that they need $25 billion in taxpayer cash to rescue them, what mode of transportation would best underscore that crisis?  Flying coach?  Traveling by train?  Horse and buggy?  ABC News reports that the Big Three automakers sent their CEOs to Washington DC by private jet instead:

The CEOs of the big three automakers flew to the nation’s capital yesterday in private luxurious jets to make their case to Washington that the auto industry is running out of cash and needs $25 billion in taxpayer money to avoid bankruptcy.

The CEOs of GM, Ford and Chrysler may have told Congress that they will likely go out of business without a bailout yet that has not stopped them from traveling in style, not even First Class is good enough.

All three CEOs – Rick Wagoner of GM, Alan Mulally of Ford, and Robert Nardelli of Chrysler – exercised their perks Tuesday by flying in corporate jets to DC. Wagoner flew in GM’s $36 million luxury aircraft to tell members of Congress that the company is burning through cash, asking for $10-12 billion for GM alone.

The price of a coach ticket between Detroit and DC goes for $288 on a non-stop Northwest flight.  Granted, one has to fly Northwest, but Wagoner could have improved the experience by spending an extra $600 on a first-class ticket.  Instead of spending $900, Wagoner instead burned through $20,000 — the cost of the single flight on the private jet.

Alan Mulally hasn’t flown commercial since beginning his stint at Ford.  He refused to relocate to Michigan from Seattle, so his contract with Ford includes the unlimited use of a private jet.  He commutes every weekend from Seattle to Detroit for his job.  Yesterday, Ford had three private jets in flight with various executives flying to Los Angeles and Nebraska as well as Mulally’s flight to DC.

None of the automakers have plans to shelve their fleets.  In fact, they’ve already called their private jets “non-negotiable” at the same time they’re demanding that taxpayers pay the bills for their extravagance.  They’re running out of cash and can’t sell their cars, but Ford and GM refuse to fly coach or even first class.

When the management of these automakers start acting like they’re in crisis, then perhaps we’ll believe them.  They’ve come to Congress not to rescue their companies but to salvage their lifestyles.  This is an industry that desperately needs bankruptcy and collapse to put an end to unrealistic labor deals and obnoxious executive behavior.  The American taxpayer doesn’t have any business subsidizing this failure.

Update: Seattle, not Detroit.


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Rick Wagoner is a career GM guy. He has a total tin ear for stuff like this. He is used to being treated like royalty. GM is very insular and has always done a crappy job at PR and government relations.

I would have thought Nardelli and Mulally would be smarter though.

rockmom on November 19, 2008 at 11:27 AM

UAW lug nut tighteners get $73 an hour in wages, pension and health costs. They do not perform anywhere close to $73 worth of labor in that hour. Simple economic theory dictates this cannot last. All a bailout does is prolong the agony of the patient. It is time to pull the plug and let GM, along with the UAW die.

angryed on November 19, 2008 at 11:28 AM

Unions are not perfect, but their job is NOT to secure the corporation has long term sustainable growth. That’s the job of CEOs and we can say that there has been a horrible failure for corporate America to think about the long term and we’re seeing the results of it. Defending bonusus. HA!
DeathToMediaHacks on November 19, 2008 at 10:20 AM

So their job is to get as much as possible ASAP even if it destroys their employers? That’s kinda short-sighted.

Actually, the job of unions is to limit the supply of available workers by artificially driving up wages and benefits, making full employment in their industries more difficult. Unions are not organized against management or corporations, they are organized against non-union workers.

Akzed on November 19, 2008 at 11:32 AM

DeathToMediaHacks on November 19, 2008 at 11:17 AM

Imagine that corporations no longer payed or subsidized health insurance. Imagine that instead of the $8,000 dollars or so that is payed for family insurance was instead paid to the employee. Imagine that said employee could then choose what type of insurance he wants, whether blanket coverage or ala carte. Imagine if the insurance companies had to actually compete for customers.

Currently, consumers have no choice. If I choose not to enroll in employer health coverage and elect to pay privately for insurance, I will not get from the company a commensurate raise in pay. All I have done is save the company money and added to my own costs. I believe that employers should get out of the health insurance business.
Most employer subsidized insurance is poorly run, they reject treatment and people are forced to fight them for payment or coverage of recommended treatment.

You are right the actual cost of care is what drives the overall costs so high. Insurance companies and the middlemen are the reason this is so. Free market competition would solve some of the overpricing in the health care industry.

Jvette on November 19, 2008 at 11:34 AM

Email your senator/congressman

http://www.conservativeusa.org/mega-cong.htm

reshas1 on November 19, 2008 at 11:38 AM

I just spoke to the Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper and asked if he would be willing to take Michigan for Canada. His answer was they were happy to get rid of that canadian who became Michigan’s governor and the only thing they would be willing to have from Michigan are the Detroit Red Wings. Everything else in Michigan was a great big financial problem.

amex on November 19, 2008 at 11:39 AM

Deathtomediahacks — OMG —

I am agreeing with you and I am not a union member or Democrat.

My earlier comment:

Most of what the foreign automakers do is more socialist than the UAW. That includes their care of workers, sharing technology, outright government subsidies and selling under cost when necessary.

Meantime, their shops over here let the US taxpayer pay for health benefits and are generally tough places to work in the middle of nowhere where the employees have no alternative.

In the industry, most of the jobs are actually in parts (not assembly, which is what they mostly do here) and I have been told that some parts of your Toyota (or the liberal’s Subaru) come from places that make the Nike death camps look good.

IlikedAUH2O on November 19, 2008 at 11:39 AM

Doesn’t matter. The Dem Congress will bail them out. Then they’ll do it again in a couple of years months, which they’ll need to do because the Big 3’s business models are unsustainable. The unions and the Big 3 are mugging screwing us, and they’re having the federal government hold the gun vaseline.

aero on November 19, 2008 at 9:48 AM

Fixed it for ya!

Knucklehead on November 19, 2008 at 11:42 AM

Dumb….

DL13 on November 19, 2008 at 11:49 AM

And as you know health insurance isn’t what’s expensive, it’s healthcare COSTS i.e. the treatments, the drugs, the surgeries etc. Toyota doesn’t have to pay that outside of its U.S. plants. There’s no way around that.

GM doesn’t pay that outside of its US plants either.

Although you said workers in other countries get health care from the government, you seem to now be saying that health care is too expensive in the US and employers have to pay high insurance premiums because of that.
It isn’t that we need universal health care, it’s that we need health care cost controls. Is that right?

One problem is that GM has negotiated with the UAW to provide health insurance that makes health care practically free to union employees. It is very expensive for GM. There are no incentives to the worker to cut back on health care spending. Retirees are currently covered by this plan, rather than by government-provided, cost-controlled Medicare. The country did not make GM or the UAW do this.

It will be interesting to see if there are moves made to curtail US healthcare costs. But the idea that foreign countries don’t expect employers to pay for employee’s insurance has to die.

MayBee on November 19, 2008 at 11:50 AM

The Big 3 has atrocious management. If you know anyone who works there (or work there yourself) you know how inept they are. This comes as no big shock.

OneGyT on November 19, 2008 at 11:59 AM

Throw the bums out, cut the crazy enviro standards, and chop the unions off at the knees. POOF affordable cars that people want.

marklmail on November 19, 2008 at 12:24 PM

Ital79 on November 19, 2008 at 10:02 AM

+1

It is ludicrous to put the CEO of any organization onto a commercial flight when you have the resources to fly them privately. It’s a foolish waste of their time.

Irrespective of the merits of a “bailout” for these companies, keying in on CEO compensation and travel expenses is missing the forest for the trees. And I agree with Ital79 that it sets a very bad precedent.

Y-not on November 19, 2008 at 12:27 PM

Sweet ride, I wonder if it has a stripper pole that rises out of the floor like Tony Stark’s?

Alden Pyle on November 19, 2008 at 12:27 PM

Most Americans, even “conservatives”, don’t appreciate how markets reflect value. The fact is you could buy all three automakers for 10% of the loan amount at current stock prices. The reason they’re so cheap and that no investor or competitor is making an attempt to buy them at this low price is because the value isn’t there.

The pensions are fully funded, I believe, but they need to scrap all labor contracts and any retirement benefits they can legally shed in bankruptcy. The current management needs to be fired. Once the bankruptcy is in progress and the impossible commitments to the UAW have been tossed suitors will start lining up.

If the government steps in the changes will never be made and they’ll bleed billions year after year like a Super Post Office. The Congress couldn’t even run their own cafeteria at break even. If they step in here it will be the Onion’s Money Hole bit come true.

rcl on November 19, 2008 at 12:27 PM

New Orleans with Snow
highhopes on November 19, 2008 at 10:27 AM

New Orleans with Snow is really very pretty (if only for 4 hours)

nolapol on November 19, 2008 at 12:35 PM

More information on the Japanese system:

“Premium contributions are set at a fixed rate and evenly split between employees and employers. Cost-sharing includes a 20% coinsurance for hospital costs and 30% coinsurance for outpatient care.”

Right now, I’m paying about 25% of the total healthcare insurance cost, with a 10% or 20% coninsurance payment for most items. If that’s common, the US is already about halfway to the way costs are split in Japan. So where’s the cost-savings in eliminating employer-paid health insurance here in the US?

jim m on November 19, 2008 at 12:39 PM

Here’s the bottom line that I don’t think anyone seems to want to address. Bailout or not, the UAW is going to have to re-negotiate their contracts or go away….permanently!!!

I know they don’t want to do this but at some point they are not going to have much choice. They can re-negotiate now and maybe still get some benefits for their retirees and other personnel or, they can refuse to budge and get nothing later when the company goes belly up.

It’s not pretty….but it’s the truth!

Scorched_Earth on November 19, 2008 at 12:39 PM

I pay $5000 a quarter for health care. And I resisted Hillary and The One every chance I got, despite knowing that they would pass it all to the taxpayer.

Of course, imagine the care we would get with a Bawney Fwank clone running it..

IlikedAUH2O on November 19, 2008 at 12:45 PM

Meantime, their shops over here let the US taxpayer pay for health benefits

The people I know who work at the Marysville OH plant get health insurance from Honda. They pay some of the insurance cost, like everyone else who doesn’t have a UAW (or some public sector) job, but they have good health insurance coverage. It is a very desirable job in that region because the pay and benefits are very good.

Perhaps you mean that they don’t offer health insurance to retirees who are eligible for Medicare? Why should they?

and are generally tough places to work

I haven’t heard any complaints from the people I know who work at Honda about it being a “tough” place to work. In fact, those jobs are quite competitive. Unless you mean mean it’s tough to get in because you have to prove you’re a good worker through a temp agency before they offer you a full-time position? (I know people who have gone through this process.. it weeds out problem employees before they’re officially on the payroll).

Or perhaps you mean it’s tough when you actually get fired when you don’t do your job right? Or it’s tough when you get laid off when there isn’t enough work, rather than be paid to stay home? (another acquaintance is currently being paid to stay home from his job at a Ford plant because they don’t have work for him).

in the middle of nowhere where the employees have no alternative.

IlikedAUH2O on November 19, 2008 at 11:39 AM

So what’s wrong with putting factories in places where there are more workers than jobs? Those are the EXACT places you should build factories because a) the business gets a supply of available workers and b) those people need the job opportunities more than workers in other locations with many available jobs.

vermillionsky on November 19, 2008 at 12:47 PM

The effects of GM going under would be devastating to Ford

Snapiron on November 19, 2008 at 9:51 AM

I fail to see how this could possibly be true. If GM folds Ford is a natural to pick up its sales. Yet of course they will still have to compete with toyota.

But I say if they must go to Washington then let Washington pick the survivors just like the banks. This is clearly a ‘save my job’ (mgmt) and ‘save my job’ (unions) begging expedition with lots of colusion thrown in.

Let’s also not forget that Daimler couldn’t make Chrysler work and they have made it work in socialist Germnany. (clearly the big 3 mgmt is incompetent and the unions are taking full advantage of that.)

nolapol on November 19, 2008 at 12:48 PM

The reason that the big three are all in this together is the suppliers. Most of the suppliers sell to all of the big three. And the big three have squeezed the suppliers so much that most of them have little cash or credit cushion. So a failure of a substantial number of suppliers would mean that the other two couldn’t quickly and easily make cars for quite a while.

BTW, the whole thing with the big three is likely to be moot in the next month. Most banks are now probably looking for reasons to call in loans/stop credit to most US auto suppliers. And many credit agreements allow banks to stop funding if material adverse changes happen.

jim m on November 19, 2008 at 12:54 PM

I am not taking up for the CEO’s. But I thought I should point out that post 9/11 alot of insurance companies will not cover the CEO and other “key persons” if they fly commercial. This is because Raytheon lost for of it’s top men on 9/11.

IMO, I think it’s stupind to put all of your top people on the same flight (re: the Raytheon 9/11 situation) but I also think it’s stupid to not allow them to fly commercially.

Why not just make it part of the policy that they take seperate, commercial flights…hell I wouldn[t even bitch if they flew first class!

Pulchritudinous Patriot on November 19, 2008 at 12:56 PM

It is easy to target the CEO’s of these companies. Truth is we all want as much as possible for ourselves. These men have negotiated their compensation with boards entirely willing to give it to them. The unions have done the same. The problem I have is when the CEO does such a bad job of directing the company and still gets a large compensation. They should be let go without the golden parachute. And the unions who have contributed to this failure should be cut off as well.

Jvette on November 19, 2008 at 12:57 PM

The effects of GM going under would be devastating to Ford

Snapiron on November 19, 2008 at 9:51 AM
I fail to see how this could possibly be true. If GM folds Ford is a natural to pick up its sales. Yet of course they will still have to compete with toyota.

We share many suppliers. If GM fails, and pulls many suppliers down with them, that effect will domino over to Ford since they will be unable to get the parts they need. That is the devastating effect.

Snapiron on November 19, 2008 at 12:58 PM

New Orleans with Snow is really very pretty (if only for 4 hours)

nolapol on November 19, 2008 at 12:35 PM

That’s because everybody knows it will only last a few hours and is too freaked out to get on the roadways.

Detroit has all the same social problems and snow is decidedly not as picturesque in massive piles as opposed to a dusting of white stuff on Jackson Square. Everytime Nagin opens his mouth to talk about why the city’s problems are somebody elses fault or Chief Riley makes another excuse for why the crime cameras aren’t operating but those cameras installed by a private company to catch red light runners on Canal Street are working just fine; I see a city in complete collapse. Detroit today is what New Orleans (outside the Quarter and tourist areas) is going to be like in another few years and what New Orleans East and the Lower 9th already are.

highhopes on November 19, 2008 at 1:02 PM

With respect to the much-touted German health care system. I have a little experience with it, having worked there briefly and several friends over there. It’s not that great. Whenever I’ve visited my friends (mostly British and Swiss successful scientists who lived/worked for several years in the U.S., so they have a point of comparison) all wound up digging through my suitcase for any leftover over-the-counter medicines I might have, especially cold medicines. Apparently, it’s quite common to have to resort to herbalists for cold remedies over there.

(The other hot commodities were ziplock bags and toilet paper. I never brought the latter, but they always wanted it. German toilet paper is like John Wayne — rough, tough, and it doesn’t take any sh1t.)

Y-not on November 19, 2008 at 1:04 PM

None of the automakers have plans to shelve their fleets. In fact, they’ve already called their private jets “non-negotiable” at the same time they’re demanding that taxpayers pay the bills for their extravagance.

I know the gutter and I know the stink of the street
For years I have put up with your festering heat
All you royal beauties who lord above me
You who give me the smack of your rod
Now I will give you the gutter
I will give you the judgment of God!

Vengeance victorious
These will be glorious days
Royalty of Detroit, come get your bloody bouquets!
Now gaze on our goddess of justice
With her shimmering, glimmering blade
As she kisses you traitors she will sing you a last serenade

Tav on November 19, 2008 at 1:11 PM

I have worked in the auto industry for a decade, both on the OEM and supplier side. From the supplier side, Ford is by far the worst of the companies to work with, and the model they have currently cannot sustain itself any longer than the other two
ConservativeLawStudent on November 19, 2008 at 10:09 AM

One of the great unmentionables is the nepotism practiced in both union and management. Jobs are held for friends and relatives. Do not look for a ‘Hiring’ sign. Outsiders are brought in to the company to feed the tech side with brains. I know two people brought in to be sacrifices to the hatchet man who is always brought in to fire someone when others mess up.

I knew a (non photographer) lady who got a job as a photographer for some (unnecessary) newsletter at the company via friendship. She lasted a year. I always wondered if her photos were ever used.

A car designer relative told to me about a bozo idea his bosses had to replace experienced designers with young blood. The replacements designed van doors that fell off. No input was requested from the experienced

So what they take private jets to work/DC/etc? That’s part of their compensation for their position at their respective company. Cry & moan as much as you please…class warfare isn’t going to solve the problem.
Ital79 on November 19, 2008 at 10:02 AM

Wrong. When they are borrowing money from me they have to prove they do not have unnecessary assets they can liquidate first. If the CEOs cannot let go of the jets which they call perks, we fire these execs and hire new ones (I will take the job)

or let them eat jets.

They wouldn’t go to ch. 11, by the way. They wouldnt have the money or be able to get a loan to sustain them during restructing. They’d go to ch.7 and the whole company would be liquidated. lodge on November 19, 2008 at 10:11 AM

Why can’t the government loan them the money for a Ch 11?

The lender could put requirements on the money – like ending jets as part of the restructure, and ending exec bonuses and perks until the loan is repaid?

Mitt Romney has an excellent op-ed a bailout. It is a shame McCain ran instead of this articulate and reasoned man

entagor on November 19, 2008 at 1:11 PM

Why not just make it part of the policy that they take seperate, commercial flights…hell I wouldn[t even bitch if they flew first class!

Pulchritudinous Patriot on November 19, 2008 at 12:56 PM

I’m not defending the CEOs but IMO the story is probably somewhat slanted. People like CEOs of the “Big Three” don’t even use the restroom without an entourage. While the story makes it sound as if they were the sole passenger on the flight, I suspect the reality was more akin to a group of execs having a strategy session on what exactly they would be saying to Congress. I could be wrong and this is definitely a perq the execs could forego if the company is running out of money BUT as I said on my first post on this thread-

No matter what the reality is, this is a PR problem more than anything else. That $20K flight doesn’t even pay the six months’ salary and benefits for one of GMs unskilled unionized wrench turners. It truly is a drop in the bucket. A big drop but a drop nonetheless. Still, like AIG partying in Phoenix while Congress was figuring out how to give them more money- private jets send the wrong message.

highhopes on November 19, 2008 at 1:12 PM

The big problem here is the UAW… …They need to realize that they are a parasite that is close to killing off their host…

Snapiron on November 19, 2008 at 9:51 AM

I sell to suppliers of Ford in the machining process. I agree with your parasite analogy.

Kevin in Washington State on November 19, 2008 at 1:13 PM

I have worked in the auto industry for a decade, both on the OEM and supplier side. From the supplier side, Ford is by far the worst of the companies to work with, and the model they have currently cannot sustain itself any longer than the other two
ConservativeLawStudent on November 19, 2008 at 10:09 AM

One of the great unmentionables is the nepotism practiced in both union and management. Jobs are held for friends and relatives. Do not look for a ‘Hiring’ sign. Outsiders are brought in to the company to feed the tech side with brains. I know two people brought in to be sacrifices to the hatchet man who is always brought in to fire someone when others mess up.

I knew a (non photographer) lady who got a job as a photographer for some (unnecessary) newsletter at the company via friendship. She lasted a year. I always wondered if her photos were ever used.

A car designer relative told to me about a bozo idea his bosses had to replace experienced designers with young blood. The replacements designed van doors that fell off. No input was requested from the experienced

So what they take private jets to work/DC/etc? That’s part of their compensation for their position at their respective company. Cry & moan as much as you please…class warfare isn’t going to solve the problem.
Ital79 on November 19, 2008 at 10:02 AM

Wrong. When they are borrowing money from me they have to prove they do not have unnecessary assets they can liquidate first. If the CEOs cannot let go of the jets which they call perks, we fire these execs and hire new ones (I will take the job)

or let them eat jets.

They wouldn’t go to ch. 11, by the way. They wouldnt have the money or be able to get a loan to sustain them during restructing. They’d go to ch.7 and the whole company would be liquidated. lodge on November 19, 2008 at 10:11 AM

Why can’t the government loan them the money for a Ch 11?

The lender could put requirements on the money – like ending jets as part of the restructure, and ending exec bonuses and perks until the loan is repaid?

Mitt Romney has an excellent op-ed against a bailout. It is a shame McCain ran instead of this articulate and reasoned man

entagor on November 19, 2008 at 1:14 PM

Email your senator/congressman

http://www.conservativeusa.org/mega-cong.htm

reshas1 on November 19, 2008 at 11:38 AM

Somehow I think Carl Levin and I will never be on the same side of this issue. I say that before getting one dime the unions and auto manufacturers need to come to Congress with a real plan that cuts out all the fat from operations and slashes labor costs. Carl Levin is a paid political whore for the UAW.

highhopes on November 19, 2008 at 1:14 PM

Well, I have to go, nice talking with you folks. Until next time or as my friend Betty would say, to be continued…

Jvette on November 19, 2008 at 1:17 PM

Excellent article, Ed. It again goes to show how conservatives have moved away from the golden principle of fiscal responsibility and accountability. In fact, CEO’s like Mullaly and Donald Trump feed in to the massive popular backlash against the conservatives in this election cycle.

Basic economic theory: if you believe in unrestrained free market capitalism, *even if* you start with equal weightage, you would ultimately end up with a pareto distribution of wealth where >90% of the nation’s wealth will be concentrated in the hands of 3% of the population. Hence the need for the government to balance things by taxation and enforcing fiscally responsible behavior amongst the industry leaders, to prevent social unrest.

I will be willing to talk to folks in depth about the above point. Please be analytical when responding to this, though.

Cheers,
The Family Guy.

peter_griffin on November 19, 2008 at 2:20 PM

In the style of Marie Antoinette, “Let them eat airplane food.”

shick on November 19, 2008 at 2:51 PM

peter_griffin on November 19, 2008 at 2:20 PM

The role of government in a capitalistic society should be to prevent unfair business practices by large businesses (and monopolies) and to put small businesses out of business.
You know you live in a Fascist society when you have businesses that are too big to fail.

Corsair on November 19, 2008 at 3:10 PM

We don’t have a say in any of this……we lost.

jay12 on November 19, 2008 at 3:11 PM

We don’t have a say in any of this……we lost.

jay12 on November 19, 2008 at 3:11 PM

Yep, that’s what it boils down to. Doesn’t matter a bit what we think anymore.

aero on November 19, 2008 at 3:22 PM

We don’t have a say in any of this……we lost.

jay12 on November 19, 2008 at 3:11 PM

Yep, that’s what it boils down to. Doesn’t matter a bit what we think anymore.

aero on November 19, 2008 at 3:22 PM

Yep, we lost. Only one thing to do. Make a snazzy logo of a fist and go protest on the streets!
/sarc

Y-not on November 19, 2008 at 3:27 PM

If we give the big 3 a handout and the unions get it… We will be fund the Dem’s next election cycle.. ARGGHHHHHHHHHH

http://www.conservativeusa.org/mega-cong.htm

reshas1 on November 19, 2008 at 3:44 PM

These are horrible, bad people. Let’s bury each of them in an unsold Suburban.

anniekc on November 19, 2008 at 4:39 PM

What a CEO earns, in relation to the total payroll of large corporations is chump change… And, he earns every g’damn penny of it.

Really? So all these companies being bailed out are run by CEO’s who earned every “every g’damn penny of it”? You could put a monkey in those CEO seats, have the same outcome and it would only cost a few bananas a week. The monkeys would earn “every g’damn penny of it” just by not crapping up the place.

Guardian on November 19, 2008 at 6:19 PM

You know you live in a Fascist society when you have businesses that are too big to fail.

Corsair on November 19, 2008 at 3:10 PM

Hmmm – interesting observation. However, isn’t breaking up companies against the basic principle of a free market system? I do agree that a free market system *should* create “perfect competition” as opposed to a monopoly or oligopoly, which is why US may appear to be a contradiction of sorts. However the contradiction can be explained if you factor in the differences in starting capitals of the parties which initially partake in the market, which makes the competition imperfect and will eventually culminate in a monopoly.

Sorry for the rant. I just love to be on a blog where folks can have an intelligent exchange of ideas without being mean.

Cheers,
The Family Guy.

peter_griffin on November 19, 2008 at 6:48 PM

I haven’t read the thread yet, but couldn’t they have jet pooled?

Cindy Munford on November 19, 2008 at 7:04 PM

The Big 3 and the UAW deserve each other. Bankruptcy is the answer. The only answer.

Zorro on November 19, 2008 at 7:59 PM

I haven’t read the thread yet, but couldn’t they have jet pooled?

Cindy Munford on November 19, 2008 at 7:04 PM

Heh, heh. Good one

anniekc on November 19, 2008 at 9:31 PM

hear here…

Kaptain Amerika on November 19, 2008 at 9:38 PM

I really have no problem with using their private jets – and think it was pretty pathetic attempt to use that against them.

The second question about them selling their jets and returning home on commercial planes was just silliness.

Gee….who do you think would buy a private jet in DC? A Congressman, perhaps?

Will they bring this up the next time Al Gore goes before Congress? How about George Soros? Where is the grilling over ‘Obama-1′? Are they similarly outraged by lawmakers using private jets?

Of course not. Excesses of the rich and pampered are only good for political points against a select few that they place in their sights.

Typical double standard of the left. Heinz-Kerry can own as many homes as they like and it’s no biggie. John McCain however has to defend himself against his wife’s family fortunes.

Mr Purple on November 20, 2008 at 8:50 AM

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