Palin no panic pick: WaPo

posted at 8:37 am on August 31, 2008 by Ed Morrissey

Democrats offered a little projection over the weekend and claimed that John McCain’s choice of Sarah Palin as his running mate exposed his panic during their convention, a claim that only made sense if one hadn’t endured it on television.  Unfortunately for them, the meme of panic doesn’t apply, nor did it make sense any, given McCain’s position in the polls.  The Washington Post reports that McCain favored Palin for months, and that it reflects a deliberate focus on reform and change:

Their first encounter was last February at the National Governors Association meeting in Washington. Sarah Palin was one of several governors who met privately with Sen. John McCain, by then well on his way to capturing the Republican presidential nomination, and her directness and knowledge were impressive.

Later that day, at a largely social gathering organized by his campaign, McCain spent 15 minutes in private conversation with the first-term Alaska governor. “I remember him talking about her when he came back,” a McCain adviser said. “He said she was an impressive woman. He liked her.” …

Far from being a last-minute tactical move or a second choice when better known alternatives were eliminated, Palin was very much in McCain’s thinking from the beginning of the selection process, according to McCain’s advisers. The 44-year-old governor made every cut as the first list of candidates assembled last spring was slowly winnowed. The more McCain learned about her, the more attracted he was to her as someone who shared his maverick, anti-establishment instincts.

The media saw the dispatch of Tim Pawlenty and Mitt Romney as an audition for the role of running mate, but that turned out to be hogwash. As one McCain aide told Dan Balz and Robert Barnes, that speculation filled air time but was completely inaccurate.  Pawlenty and Romney went to Denver because they’re good and experienced surrogates.  In the end, they had Pawlenty leave Denver because of the wild speculation that he was auditioning for VP.

By the time the Democrats began gathering in Denver, McCain had focused on Palin.  Last Sunday, he invited her to Arizona for another meeting, and she traveled to Sedona through Flagstaff on Wednesday.  After an hour-long meeting and consulting with Cindy McCain privately, he offered Palin the spot, which she accepted.  Palin did not fly from Alaska to Dayton on Thursday afternoon; she came straight from Arizona.  The private plane on the Anchorage-to-Dayton flight delivered Palin’s family, which found out at the last minute of the decision.

What of Lieberman, Ridge, and Romney?  The first two did get serious consideration as options, McCain’s aides say.  Romney got vetted but never considered himself a serious candidate, and apparently neither did McCain.  Their relationship has improved considerably since the primaries, but in the end, Romney didn’t fit the reform message.  Neither did Ridge, and Lieberman may have sent the wrong kind of reform message to the Republican base.

Far from being some sort of panic attack, McCain’s selection of Palin was a deliberate effort to craft a specific message for the general election and for his Presidency, should he win.  He wants to challenge his party to recall their reform roots from the Reagan Revolution and the Contract with America.  He cannot expect to have that taken seriously or effectively without having a real reformer, and not just a talker, on the ticket with him.  He needs the conservative base energized and enthusiastic to make that message effective, and Palin provides both a track record of real reform and energy for the GOP base.

As the Times said on Friday, this shouldn’t surprise anyone.  The panic seen from the Left shouldn’t surprise anyone, either.  After their so-called reformer picked a 35-year Washington insider as his running mate, the ticket of true reform is obvious to even them.


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Now that would make a great ad – McCain looking into the camera and talking about people criticizing Palin for her lack of experience. McCain could then do a quick synopsis of her experience (Mayor, governor, business owner, reformer, etc) and then admit the only thing lacking is community organizer.

PatMac on August 31, 2008 at 10:08 AM

Oh, and Palin has the evangelicals going bananas. For John McCain.

Did anyone see that happening, ever?

Pablo on August 31, 2008 at 10:08 AM

It was a panic pick. I’m panicked that he made the pick. I’m still fairly confident Obama will lose because of the racists, but not as much as before.

The Dean on August 31, 2008 at 10:09 AM

They instinctively understand that Palin, and to a lesser extent McCain, are a challenge to the status quo and will threaten the established order.

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 9:58 AM

Exactly. This is why Governor Palin is being hit from left and right.

And this is why members of the media laughed at her selection, as reported in the Hot Air headlines.

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 10:09 AM

I lifted and partially rewrote this from Damiano in another thread. He gets the credit, not me. Nevertheless, let the truth be told:

Palin is completely inexperienced and utterly incapable.

You heard me. The initial euphoria over the idea of a naughty librarian on the TV news each night for the next 4 to 8 years has worn off. Now, it back to hard, pragmatic reality and the reality is that she has no place in Washington, DC.

Want proof? Consider the following:

Only an amateur would speak off the cuff, as she usually does. Experienced politicians avoid speaking extemporaneously whenever possible. Otherwise, the electorate might find out what they really think.

If Palin had meaningful experience, she would have known that the job of Ethics Commissioner is SUPPOSED to be corrupt, thus saving her the trouble of resigning in protest and then running for the highest office in the state.

Only an amateur would attain political office by actually defeating opposing candidates at the ballot box. An experienced politician would have eliminated opposition candidates by protesting technical glitches in their nominating petitions or petitioning to change the party rules on how votes are counted in primary elections or hiring groups like ACORN to register 14 people who all, coincidentally, have the same names and reside at the same abandoned and boarded-up restaurant. Did she not once consider taking lessons from the Chicago political machine that got Obama elected? Sheesh.

Any experienced politician knows that upon assuming high office, you are supposed to demand a larger plane; not sell the useless behemoth that was recently purchased by your predecessor.

Only an amateur would implement a comprehensive energy and conservation policy shortly after taking office. A more experienced politician would have avoided the issue outright for at least 30 years while demonizing oil companies, then banning any voting on the topic followed by a recess vacation through the next election

Any experienced politician knows that once elected, you are not supposed to spend your first 20 months in office actually doing the job you were elected to do. You should be campaigning for another office – as Obama could have told her.

Sarah Palin was only supposed to TALK about government reform and utter platitudes about exiling corrupt, entrenched politicians – not actually do anything about it. She demonstrated her naivete by creating a smooth running government that included representatives of other political parties, thereby making it impossible for her to find a scapegoat if anything goes wrong.

Only a political greenhorn would thumb their nose at the environmental lobby by hunting and actually shooting moose and caribou. Worse yet, she foolishly told the truth: the proposed oil drilling site in ANWR is NOT the secret location of Eden but is, in fact, a barren wasteland.

What Sarah Palin does not seem to understand is that here in the 21st century, chief executives do not negotiate beneficial business deals for their states with foreign nations or take time to actually hang out with soldiers in Iraq. That time is better spent preening for the cameras in Berlin – something else a more seasoned and experienced politician such as Obama could have told her.

Holding oil companies accountable and successfully negotiating mutually productive agreements with them proves she does not understand their true purpose: if you work with them to the benefit of your state, you will no longer have a faceless villain to scare people into voting for you.

By creating new jobs instead of demonizing capitalism, Sarah foolishly enabled people to become more reliant on themselves and less reliant on government, hereby diminishing the dependant voter base – a classic newbie mistake. After all, if people have jobs, they will not have much need for the government and will be too busy enjoying their lives to protest the U.S., its corporations and, of course, opposing candidates.

Worse yet, Palin created a budget surplus and mailed it back to the taxpayers. Doesn’t she know that if the government generates a surplus, it’s doing something wrong? An experienced leader like Obama or Biden knows that taxpayer money belongs to the government – not to the people.

In another rankly amateurish move, she cooperated completely with government officials investigating accusations made against her. Experienced politicians know that you are supposed to stonewall, obfuscate, pressure libraries to expunge any record of unsavory political associations and ship potential witnesses off to Caribbean islands – another good reason not to sell the executive jet.

Yup, she is hopelessly inexperienced.

That is why I ♥ SARAH’CUDA and why I am voting McCain/Palin ‘08

ManlyRash on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

They have been focused on finding a way to reestablish Republican dominance in the legislature, retaining possession of the White House and ensuring that any new Supreme Court pick is as conservative and constructionist as possible. Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 9:58 AM

If a progressive and populist Republican party is what you want, then have at it. Many here profess allegiance to McCain for many reasons, and one major one is that he’ll pick good justices. You say that conservatives like myself, want the status quo. Hardly… I want less government. I want free political speech. I want protected borders. I want 0 collusion between large corporations and big government. How is that an affirmation of the status quo? Also, how does McCain-Feingold, McCain-Kennedy, Cap and Trade, Gitmo combatants’ rights, Señor Hernandez, and amnesty fit? Are those improvements on the status quo? Sounds like a whole lot of government involvement to me. I love me some strict constructionism and I love me some democratic republicanism. A progressive populism cloaked in Maverickness that attempts to jerk that around is repugnant to me.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

Dave Rywall on August 31, 2008 at 8:50 AM

I’ll give this a shot. Yes, her resume is chronologically short. Even though she has five more years in elected office than Obama, let’s call it even in the interests of being fair.

She got a B.A, Obama got a B.A. and Law Degree- 1 point to Obama.

The important questions is what did they accomplish.

Obama has few legislative accomplishments. I am not trying to be demeaning in saying this, it’s documented fact. He’s voted with his party 98% of the time over his entire career. He’s never authored a bill in the US Senate and only co-sponsored 115 in 3 years. 115 sound like a big number, but what look at it critically- the Senate passed over 1900 resolutions in this past session. Co-sponsoring means that he simply tacked his name on something, that’s it. Most senate bills are naming post offices and declaring holidays. Also consider significance of legislation and passage rates, and his records becomes even more thin. His time in IL Senate is similar, along with his 130 present votes there. There is good reason for his lack of accomplishments, however. The US Senate meets formally for about 8 full weeks per year: http://www.senate.gov/pagelayout/legislative/two_column_table/2008_Schedule.htm
Obama started announced his Presidential bid in Feb. 2006, 13 months after getting sworn in. So he had about 8-10 actually weeks experience in the US senate. Similarly, while in the IL senate, he ran 3 campaigns in 7 years- one was a failed bid for the US House. He’s never managed a budget, has zero foreign policy experience and the closest thing to executive experience he has is Chairman of a subcommittee that he never convened.

Palin, in contrast, has initiated as passed a comprehensive energy and conservation package(something that the Federal government and most other states have failed to do) that resulting in a massive budget surplus and $1200 checks to each Alaskan citizen. She gutted and rebuilt the entire AK State government from the ground up, due to long term, entrench corruption. She negotiated an international deal with Canada to create a new oil pipeline, that will impact energy transportation and availability to the entire US and create thousands of new jobs. She balanced the State budget in her first year after decades of deficit. She vetoed the pork barrel “bridge to nowhere” project back to the US Senate, saving the US taxpayers billions of dollars. She also opposed ridiculous polar bear protection laws from the US Senate that would have negatively impacted job growth and the economy, because the would have had zero impact on the thriving polar bear population, also saving billions of dollars. She managed the entire State budget for the largest and State in the US that is responsible for 15% of the US energy supply (again, not the deficit to surplus in 1 yr.). In short, she’s done more in the first 20 months of being Governor than the entire Federal government has done in decades. She is CoC of the AK National Guard and has been overseas to visit the troops, without the excuse of a campaign trip. On top of it, she’s got 14 more years of Executive experience in deal with decision making, budgets, job creation and management of people and resources.

The only people the Obama and Biden have ever managed are their campaign staff.

In short, she trumps everyone in this election by far in Executive experience. Yes, some of it is small scale, but a budget is a budget and she’s done exceptionally with small and large scale budgets.

Obama’s plan for the economy is to go over the budget line by line to figure out how to pay for hundred of billions in new spending. That is naive and ridiculous. It’s the same as saying, “I am going to by a mansion on my credit card, then get a job and figure out how to pay for it.” The US budget is over 50,000 with 250 items per page. He’s not going “line by line” for the same reason that no one else does. It would take decades.

Biden and McCain have her beat on National Security, but she still beats Obama, since she’s responsible for the National Guard budgets and deployment. He’s had pictures taken with people one week.

Yes, there are tons of people who have longer resumes, but that does not change the fact that Obama’s resume is still more thin than her’s, he’s accomplish almost nothing and he’s running for the top job. Palin doesn’t have to be ready from day one, but she is anyway. Obama will be entirely dependent on his advisors with absolutely no capacity to make the types of decisions he will be responsible for. Palin has been making executive decisions for 16 years. The only difference is scale.

I’ve tried to be fair in writing this and respectful to Obama. He’s a tremendous speaker, and intelligent guy and motivated as hell. He runs a spectacular campaign, but even in that, he’s got 300 people working for him on foreign policy alone (twice the size of Presidential staff) and he still needs at least 3 tries to get his statements right.

It’s 10 AM. A phone is ringing in Obama’s campaign headquarters. Gov. Palin has just been announced as the opposing VP candidate… and he flubbed even something that simple and had to retract it. Why? Because his campaign has a “hair trigger”. Is that the type of decision making you want in the White House? Imagine that was a call to President Obama’s White House. Iran just bombed Israel. Is he going to call Ahmeblahblahlah 4 hours later and apologize that his staff called him an “Inexperienced leader of a small inconsequential country with bad ideas”? Yeah… that will work.

Damiano on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

Before Palin: The only reason Obama/Biden will lose is because of The Racist Vote.

After Palin: The only reason McCain/palin will lose is because of The Elitist Vote.

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 10:13 AM

We need to keep our eyes peeled for clips & transcripts from Meet The Press this morning.

Tom Brokaw brought up the contrasting responses to the Palin pick by the Obama campaign and then asked David Gregory if they don’t have a problem — she’s a difficult candidate to attack. Gregory said he’d spoken to a senior Obama adviser who said they don’t plan to attack Palin. They expect the media do that. All the talking heads assembled just nodded in assention.

It made my blood boil.

Purple Fury on August 31, 2008 at 10:14 AM

It made my blood boil. – Purple Fury on August 31, 2008 at 10:14 AM

It made my blood turn cold. At least they are becoming more forthright about their bias.

ManlyRash on August 31, 2008 at 10:16 AM

I just wanted to point this out: the fact that the media was almost universally surprised and shocked–or downright amused–by the Palin pick absolutely proves that they don’t even bother to have anyone check in on conservative blogs, ever.

DaveS on August 31, 2008 at 10:16 AM

Damiano on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

Excellent detail, Damiano. I hope my repost of your earlier post did not give you offense as none was intended.

ManlyRash on August 31, 2008 at 10:18 AM

We need to keep our eyes peeled for clips & transcripts from Meet The Press this morning.

Tom Brokaw brought up the contrasting responses to the Palin pick by the Obama campaign and then asked David Gregory if they don’t have a problem — she’s a difficult candidate to attack. Gregory said he’d spoken to a senior Obama adviser who said they don’t plan to attack Palin. They expect the media do that. All the talking heads assembled just nodded in assention.

It made my blood boil.

Purple Fury on August 31, 2008 at 10:14 AM

Obama would be a buffoon to attack Palin directly. His only tack should be the economy. Follow in the footsteps of the first black president and focus solely on the economy. What will be great theater is to see if he can resist any further bites at the apple.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 10:18 AM

Somewhat interesting (no depth) Time magazine interview (Friday 8/29) with Palin here: Link.

This jumped out at me:

Q. Did being younger and being a woman gives you a better perspective on politics and government than a more traditional politician?

A. What’s more of a challenge for me over the years being in elected office has been more the age issue rather than a gender issue. I’ve totally ignored the issues that have potentially been affecting me when it comes to gender because I was raised in a family where, you know, gender wasn’t going to be an issue. The girls did what the boys did. Apparently in Alaska that’s quite commonplace. You’re out there hunting and fishing. My parents were coaches, so I was involved in sports all my life. So I knew that as woman I could do whatever the men were doing. Also that’s just part of Alaskan life.

But the age issue I think was more significant in my career than the gender issue. Your resume not being as fat as your opponent’s in a race, perhaps [but] being able to capitalize on that… being able to to use that in campaigns — I don’t have 30 years of political experience under my belt … that’s a good thing, that’s a healthy thing. That means my perspective is fresher, more in touch with the people I will be serving. I would use that as an advantage. I’ve certainly never been part of a good old boy club. That I would use in a campaign. And that’s been good.

Fresher perspective because she doesn’t have the 30 years of experience?

What say you Senator McCain? (tongue in cheek)

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:19 AM

Sorry, my error: the above was from August 14, two weeks before she was selected, and not the 29th.

I think it’s already been linked by AP or Ed.

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:21 AM

DaveS on August 31, 2008 at 10:16 AM
Palin/Jindal or any variant thereof was thread-posted only several hundred times. Al Gore should take a little time and write some better scripts to check up on us bitter clingers.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 10:21 AM

Damiano on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

He cleared the bases. Another home run.

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 10:22 AM

After reading Dan Balz’s article in the Washington Post today I couldn’t help but reflect on all the media coverage leading up to McCain’s announcement of his Vice Presidential pick. And boy were they wrong.

They weren’t just wrong. They were spectacularly wrong. I mean on a scale from one to ten…well, they were so wrong, so off the mark, so focused on the exact wrong people, a scale analogy is being too kind.

Put it like this, in hind sight every article, every newscast, every commentary should have began with, “Amid pure, unadulterated, speculation…” Even if they did that it doesn’t excuse the fact that they were marvelously,…extravagantly,…and exorbitantly WRONG!

coffee260 on August 31, 2008 at 10:24 AM

I don’t know if it has any real impact, but I’ve been e-mailing the advertisers on various news programs and letting them know that I don’t appreciate their connection to the nasty obvious bias. The board of directors at G.E. hear from me almost everyday! The only thing that might ever get corporate attention is to slap them in their profits. I despise NBC.

anniekc on August 31, 2008 at 10:25 AM

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:19 AM

No more apologies. Some things need repeating. Thanks.

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 10:25 AM

coffee260 on August 31, 2008 at 10:24 AM
That is a delicious by-product of this. Most professional bosses would fire people for being this far out of the loop. I guess state-run media outlets don’t operate the same.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 10:27 AM

For us Palin sceptics, this is impressive: Palin on energy.

Powerful, in command of the facts, assertive.

If she can repeat this on other issues, she’s a homerun.

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:28 AM

What defines Qualified? Is it a certain number of excruciatingly difficult “Present” votes? Or As Maureen Dowd says “Is it the number of times you have been on Meet the Press? Or the amazing abiltity to solve the world’s energy with but a simple tire gage. Give me a break.

The libs like Ms. Dowd and Eleanor “whatshername” are getting drunk on their own gleeful snobbish dismissal of Sarah Palin…and I believe …they are doing so at their own elitist risk. The qualifications they allege that she lacks, are the very reasons I am voting for her.

I would love to “chart” Palin’s accomplishments verses the resume of the anointed one.

Uncle Fred

deedtrader on August 31, 2008 at 10:30 AM

Obama is better suited to live in a van down by the river.

Can she speak with any credibility on any issue other than energy…that is experience.

tomas on August 31, 2008 at 10:33 AM

I have been thinking about how much fun it will be to watch Sarah Palin mop the floor with Uncle Joe. But after reading the above, I am hoping she will warm up by wiping the smirk off the front of a few talking heads first.

Heard about the surprise Fall blockbuster movie?

OBAMA 13 ~ Chicago, we have a problem.

drunyan8315 on August 31, 2008 at 10:34 AM

The consideration of Lieberman and Ridge, but not Romney or Jindal is telling. What this says to me is that McCain is not only running against the democrats, but against the business wing of the republicans. Add his potential picks to his carbon tax, global warming position, and generally anti-drilling stance and you see his mavericky position. This is not only tied to Obama’s weakness among women in Pennsylvania and other rust belt states, but also to the future of the republican party. McCain has not only insulated himself against the ‘groundbreaking minority candidate’ this year, but against the glass ceiling candidate in 2012 if it succeeds this fall. Unfortunately, it also builds a barricade against the business side of the republican party, by attempting to supplant the business republicans in the next primary, which does not bode well for the future. Note well that both candidates have railed against ‘big business’ and ‘big oil’ in their recent speeches. Winning an election is one thing, and being socially conservative is great, but if we end up spending a fortune to combat global warming, and punishing business in the process, the glass quickly goes from being half-full to half-empty quickly.

Vashta.Nerada on August 31, 2008 at 10:35 AM

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:28 AM

I’ve tried twice and for whatever reason CNBC link isn’t taking here.

But if you want to see the full 11+ min interview, it’s on CNBC’s site. It’s great.

Spirit of 1776 on August 31, 2008 at 10:35 AM

ColdSteel said:

If a progressive and populist Republican party is what you want, then have at it. Many here profess allegiance to McCain for many reasons, and one major one is that he’ll pick good justices. You say that conservatives like myself, want the status quo. Hardly… I want less government. I want free political speech. I want protected borders. I want 0 collusion between large corporations and big government. How is that an affirmation of the status quo? Also, how does McCain-Feingold, McCain-Kennedy, Cap and Trade, Gitmo combatants’ rights, Señor Hernandez, and amnesty fit? Are those improvements on the status quo? Sounds like a whole lot of government involvement to me. I love me some strict constructionism and I love me some democratic republicanism. A progressive populism cloaked in Maverickness that attempts to jerk that around is repugnant to me.

I assume by your knee-jerk defensiveness that you are one who is “wired-in” to the machine? If not, then you’re making my argument for me.

Most grass roots Republicans recognize that “the system” in Washington is engineered to preserve incumbants and enrich them over a period of decades. They spend our money to ensure their political success. They don’t raise taxes, but they spend without constraint, which is the same thing. A deficit is a tax hike in another form. Pay me now or pay me later, but you’re going to pay me.

If you don’t agree that the current system is broken and needs to be fixed to dramatically reduce spending and undue influence, then you are what I consider to be part of the problem. Remember that the last Republican majority in Congress was tossed out simply because they could not restrain their pork swilling. Protecting that attitude will not regain the legislature for us, but it’s amazing how many people pretend that it doesn’t matter.

So, Cold, if I seemed to paint with too broad a brush and insinuate that all conservatives who have reservations about Palin are therefore suspect and corruption-enablers, and I apologize. I recognize that you and everyone else has a legitimate case to argue that (or any other) point, to the extent that you can argue it.

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 10:36 AM

She’s not a panic pick, but she’s certainly a longer than log shot.

You can rationalize all you want about how amazing her tiny resume is and you can avoid answering the question by trying to change the subject to Obama’s resume but you’re all doing a pi*s poor job of making a case that she was a smart choice for the country.

She is a smart choice because she appears to have some key character qualities that high office needs: courage, integrity, resilience/toughness.

She is a smart choice because the smart choice is not defined by some absolute standard of excellence but by what is needed and who is available. Mr McCain has picked from the available candidates, the one who he considers best suited to the job to be done. That is a smart way to choose.

She is a smart choice because she doesn’t appear to be a group thinker and therefore she will likely be less suceptible to the fad of the moment and peer pressure, more likely to be able to think independently, to see things positively and to be able to seek (and find) wise advisors rather than merely fashionable ones.

She is a smart choice because she doesn’t seem to have a chip on her shoulder. The world is so tired of whiny, aggrieved minority groups who can’t understand that life really is tough and often hurts, and who drain social resources with their pathetic attempts to gain recognition for their ‘special’ needs.

She is a smart choice because she seems likely to inspire other people and the role model she seems likely to provide is a wholesome, constructive one.

She is a smart choice for the country because her selection has livened up the election and has got people even more interested in governance and what it entails. Since the success of a democracy depends on participation (not merely voting) that is a good thing for the country even if Mr McCain and Ms Palin subsequently lose the election.

She is a smart choice because even though she is an inexperienced candidate and I fully expect her to fall flat on her face from time to time she will at least be moving in the right direction when she falls, and when she picks herself up from the floor I expect her to continue moving in the right direction.

YiZhangZhe on August 31, 2008 at 10:38 AM

The wife was watching the morning shows this AM, steam coming out of her ears. What are they saying, that a woman can’t do what men can do? She went on, “just because she has never done something does not mean she can’t” — This is not going to end well for the misogyny party.

tarpon on August 31, 2008 at 10:38 AM

I’ve tried twice and for whatever reason CNBC link isn’t taking here.

But if you want to see the full 11+ min interview, it’s on CNBC’s site. It’s great.

I think if one just goes to Youtube and then searches for “Sarah Palin”, the interview (and others) would come up.

There’s also her appearance on Kudlow’s show and Glen Beck.

It’s easy to see how McCain would be impressed.

SteveMG on August 31, 2008 at 10:42 AM

The Dean on August 31, 2008 at 10:09 AM

scumbag race-baiting moby

funky chicken on August 31, 2008 at 10:42 AM

We need to keep our eyes peeled for clips & transcripts from Meet The Press this morning.

Tom Brokaw brought up the contrasting responses to the Palin pick by the Obama campaign and then asked David Gregory if they don’t have a problem — she’s a difficult candidate to attack. Gregory said he’d spoken to a senior Obama adviser who said they don’t plan to attack Palin. They expect the media do that. All the talking heads assembled just nodded in assention.

It made my blood boil.

Purple Fury on August 31, 2008 at 10:14 AM

I hope lots of women watched MTP this morning.

funky chicken on August 31, 2008 at 10:50 AM

Barrack Obama and Joe Biden are examples of men who have embraced the machine and mastered it. John McCain and Sarah Palin are people who have earned a reputation for bucking establishment and following principle–sometimes at significant political risk.

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 9:58 AM

+1.

YiZhangZhe on August 31, 2008 at 10:51 AM

Can she speak with any credibility on any issue other than energy…that is experience.

tomas on August 31, 2008 at 10:33 AM

I’d say trimming budget fat, and having the guts to take out corrupt establishment figures, even of her own party, may fall into her area of expertise. She is a reform candidate who happens to be a women. We’ve all bitched for years about having to vote for the lesser of two evils because we had no other choice. Well, now we do.

a capella on August 31, 2008 at 10:53 AM

She is a smart choice . . .

YiZhangZhe on August 31, 2008 at 10:38 AM

Very well written. A+

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 11:01 AM

If Barack Obama has proven anything, it is that Americans – and especially Democrats – are always willing to take a look at a fresh face who seems to be saying and doing new things. He’s the same guy that Gary Hart was in 1984 before blowing himself up with the Donna Rice affair. If Hart had kept his pants on he would have won the Democratic nomination. Look at the following John Edwards had within the Democratic party, for no reason other than he was a fresh face. Hillary’s big liability was that she was anything but a fresh face.

McCain was not going to make the mistake of leaving that field wide open, when he knew the GOP had a similar fresh face with a compelling story that happened to completely sync with the message he was preparing for the general election. He knew he would eventually lose if all he had to say was “I’m more experienced.” He had to change the subject and change the message. No better way to do it than with his VP pick.

rockmom on August 31, 2008 at 11:06 AM

Palin is a gov. All Govs and Senators are considered qualified for prez, whether they are or not. That’s the only thing saving Obama’s bacon. If he hadn’t had so many accummulated milliseconds working as a US Senator, his sham of a candidacy wouldn’t be possible.

Paul-Cincy on August 31, 2008 at 11:07 AM

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 9:58 AM

+100. That’s what he likes about her. He’s taking a risk that other people will like that too. With congress’s low approval ratings, and even GW Bush’s somewhat low approval ratings, it’s a risk worth taking, I think.

Plus, this isn’t a picture of somebody who is in panic mode:

http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/slideshow/photo//080831/480/39fe6c5638584bdd926ce2f1f005283c/#photoViewer=/080831/photos_wl_afp/8aae03c7b3a3d145308c54b476bfa6a3

that’s a guy who is pretty sure he just hit one out of the park.

you want pictures of a candidate in panic mode? pretty much any still of Obama from his speech at Invesco Field will work.

funky chicken on August 31, 2008 at 11:12 AM

Vashta.Nerada on August 31, 2008 at 10:35 AM

The consideration of Lieberman and Ridge, but not Romney or Jindal is telling. What this says to me is that McCain is not only running against the democrats, but against the business wing of the republicans.

I’d never thought of this before, but McCain has some of the disdain for big biz that the left has. Talks about Big Oil, unions, not uncomfortable talking about class warfare. He really attacked Romney in the debates for killing jobs as part of his last job, when I see losing jobs as a natural part of growth. Other jobs are created. I never understood why the left hates big biz, which creates some of the best jobs. I have to think it’s envy of a large, powerful entity. Maybe it’s something else but I don’t know.

Paul-Cincy on August 31, 2008 at 11:15 AM

By the way, P-J COmix at FreeRepublic is saying that a bomb is going to drop on Joe Biden in the next 24 hours.

rockmom on August 31, 2008 at 11:15 AM

Vashta.Nerada on August 31, 2008 at 10:35 AM

Oh yes, the carbon tax, and global warming position. The carbon tax will choke big business. McCain seems comfortable with that. Scary.

Paul-Cincy on August 31, 2008 at 11:18 AM

I’m still LMAOROTF. Team Obama has gone from; “What, is McCain serious?”, to “She has no experience”, to “Let’s compare our presidential pick to McCain’s VP pick”, now it’s “Let’s just ignore her and let the MSM do our dirty work”.

Yes, Palin as a VP pick has a risk. However, if she proves herself and survives the “vetting” of the MSM (something BTW that The Chosen One never was subjected to), Joe Biden will have a formidable opponent.

GarandFan on August 31, 2008 at 11:18 AM

They will reelect Ted Stevenson..they will vote for Palin.

tomas on August 31, 2008 at 11:18 AM

I didn’t watch MTP, but what I read above enrages me off.

If the press is going to cut Palin off at the knees, it’s high time that newspaper subscribers write their local metropolitan papers and threaten cancellation of subscriptions if newspapers do not immediately devote resources to investigating Obama’s associatioin with Ayers, Rezko, Wright, and too many others. This is absolutely absurd. What the h*** is the press for?

If anyone is plugged into the RNC, the RNC or some 527 should be assembling a list of names and e-mail addresses for the 50 largest papers around the country to get on this task. A number of papers should be assisting Stanley Kurtz in reviewing the truckload of material on Obama and Ayers relating to their service on a Chicago educational board. At a minimum, these papers should be reporting on the fight that Obama’s campaign has waged in the Department of Justice to shut down Kurtz’s access to those documents. And for good measure, papers should be offering the gory details of Obama’s position on partial-birth abortion.

BuckeyeSam on August 31, 2008 at 11:22 AM

Any organization takes their lead from their leader. They may even act like their leader, become their leader. These attacks so far on Palin are so very lame. It’s just the kind of attack Obama would make. They’re up there with House-gate. Attack for attack’s sake. Obama talks about new politics, but he’s as big an attack dog as you’ll ever see. And he doesn’t do it very well either.

Paul-Cincy on August 31, 2008 at 11:25 AM

rockmom on August 31, 2008 at 11:15 AM

Didn’t some on this blog think that Sen.Biden would have a vague issue that would make him leave the ticket to open the door back to Hillary? Maybe this is the beginning of that.

dish on August 31, 2008 at 11:32 AM

Didn’t some on this blog think that Sen.Biden would have a vague issue that would make him leave the ticket to open the door back to Hillary? Maybe this is the beginning of that. – dish on August 31, 2008 at 11:32 AM

Pretty much most of us did – I know I certainly did. If he keeps Plugs then he will be forced to take on all the negative baggage. If he dumps Plugs, it will look like he acted out of desperation. Either way, Obama is screwed.

ManlyRash on August 31, 2008 at 11:50 AM

BuckeyeSam on August 31, 2008 at 11:22 AM

I agree that the “media” needs to get off their butts and look into that UofC crap…in regards to Palin, I think all we have to do is let this process of the people getting to know Palin-the media will definitely underestimate her just like they are doing now-I am thouroughly impressed thus far-McCain camp should put her out there as much as possible and let her shine-high risk,but defineitely high reward!

Static21 on August 31, 2008 at 11:58 AM

BuckeyeSam on August 31, 2008 at 11:22 AM

I am not so sure I want our liberal media helping Kurtz explore the Annenberg papers. They would just be ‘pulling a Sandy Berger’ with any incriminating info they might find.

kikkimay on August 31, 2008 at 12:00 PM

It’s better than that. Governor Palin has more executive experience than McCain, Obama and Biden combined.

Loxodonta on August 31, 2008 at 8:53 AM

It’s even better than that!

Sarah Palin was a point guard on her state champion basketball team. A point guard calls the plays and leads the offense. Therefore, Palin has more executive experience during her HIGH SCHOOL YEARS than Obama/Biden have in their whole lives!

(McCain was an executive officer for his squadron, I believe.)

fred5678 on August 31, 2008 at 12:06 PM

Vashta.Nerada on August 31, 2008 at 10:35 AM

The consideration of Lieberman and Ridge, but not Romney or Jindal is telling. What this says to me is that McCain is not only running against the democrats, but against the business wing of the republicans.

I’d never thought of this before, but McCain has some of the disdain for big biz that the left has. Talks about Big Oil, unions, not uncomfortable talking about class warfare. He really attacked Romney in the debates for killing jobs as part of his last job, when I see losing jobs as a natural part of growth. Other jobs are created. I never understood why the left hates big biz, which creates some of the best jobs. I have to think it’s envy of a large, powerful entity. Maybe it’s something else but I don’t know.

Paul-Cincy on August 31, 2008 at 11:15 AM

That’s one part of the tack some of us skeptics are taking. This isn’t a knee-jerk reaction, contrary to your assertion immolate. Much of my issue with some in our party (ie. Huckabee, or even some of McCain’s position) is this undercurrent of angst against capital. Driving successful business people out of the party by marginalizing them as elitists and out of touch is counterproductive. I don’t participate in hyphenated-conservatism. Social conservatism at the expense of the economy is ill-fated. Ignoring any aspect is ill fated. Carving out niches within conservatism weakens it’s branding and appeal. Watering it down with “green,” diversity, and populism isn’t as principled.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 12:11 PM

True, Buckeye, as long as Kurtz is there and a few from our side..the point I was getting to, is there is NO national spotlight on this, as there should be….

Static21 on August 31, 2008 at 12:18 PM

The media is just pissed because they don’t like to be surprised. They like to break the story before it’s officially announced–like the Biden pick–because it justifies their existence. When something surprises them, it reminds them that they’re not really in control, and they don’t like that at all.

Eukardios on August 31, 2008 at 12:25 PM

That’s one part of the tack some of us skeptics are taking. This isn’t a knee-jerk reaction, contrary to your assertion immolate. Much of my issue with some in our party (ie. Huckabee, or even some of McCain’s position) is this undercurrent of angst against capital. Driving successful business people out of the party by marginalizing them as elitists and out of touch is counterproductive. I don’t participate in hyphenated-conservatism. Social conservatism at the expense of the economy is ill-fated. Ignoring any aspect is ill fated. Carving out niches within conservatism weakens it’s branding and appeal. Watering it down with “green,” diversity, and populism isn’t as principled.

ColdSteel… you don’t have to list McCain’s sins for me. I am well aware of them and as bothered as anyone. I was prepared to vote for him because, on balance, he was likely to create a much smaller mess compared to the alternative. Now I have a positive reason to vote for him, and that is Sarah Palin.

She may play hardball with the oil companies in Alaska, but you have to remember that she represents the people of the state, not the oil companies. If those oil companies have feathered their nest by cutting deals with the state politicians to keep their burden artificially low at the expense of Alaskans, then what anti-corruption reformer could legitimately ignore that retain their credibility? In an adversarial system, which business always is, Palin represents the people of Alaska. The oil companies can (and do) provide for their own representation. In the end, if both sides are acting with the appropriate self-interest, and within the law, then a viable balance will be struck. That’s how the system is supposed to work.

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 12:34 PM

ColdSteel… you don’t have to list McCain’s sins for me. I am well aware of them and as bothered as anyone. I was prepared to vote for him because, on balance, he was likely to create a much smaller mess compared to the alternative. Now I have a positive reason to vote for him, and that is Sarah Palin.

She may play hardball with the oil companies in Alaska, but you have to remember that she represents the people of the state, not the oil companies. If those oil companies have feathered their nest by cutting deals with the state politicians to keep their burden artificially low at the expense of Alaskans, then what anti-corruption reformer could legitimately ignore that retain their credibility? In an adversarial system, which business always is, Palin represents the people of Alaska. The oil companies can (and do) provide for their own representation. In the end, if both sides are acting with the appropriate self-interest, and within the law, then a viable balance will be struck. That’s how the system is supposed to work.

Immolate on August 31, 2008 at 12:34 PM

This is about class envy and class warfare, not an argument against checking big business. If pseudo-Repubs and wanna-be conservatives want to check big business then quit giving subsidies and incentives. Also, knock off the fad politics and stop thinking that failing sectors within the economy are the government’s responsibility. You want to get rid of lobbyists, quit giving handouts. Too easy.

Cold Steel on August 31, 2008 at 1:14 PM

Eukardios on August 31, 2008 at 12:25PM

Excellent points; I have this image of McCain grinning at them and saying “How do you like me now, friends?”

Captain Hate on August 31, 2008 at 1:17 PM

YiZhangZhe on August 31, 2008 at 10:38 AM

Damn, you’re kickin’ it today!

mr.blacksheep on August 31, 2008 at 1:19 PM

ManlyRash on August 31, 2008 at 10:12 AM

I just hope someone from the RNC and/or the McCain campaign are monitoring this site.

Purple Fury on August 31, 2008 at 1:48 PM

If Gov. Palin had been a Democrat gun-grabber, we’d already see half a dozen Hollywood blockbusters planned in her honor, with the likes of Madonna, Merril Streep, Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis clawing and scratching other to death on Rodeo drive just to play Sarah.

Mike D. on August 31, 2008 at 4:45 PM

I am a bit dubious about Romney and Pawlenty–they were vettted and considered. But the conclusion was right, it would not have worked anywhere near as well as Palin.

Palin is definitely a risk. This is going to be something she never experienced in Alaska. Alaska is a big place, but it is still a low population. Think of it as an island where people try to get along politically (to a point). The Dems have already started the lying rumor mill. The MSM will also act as Obama surrogates and are as ornery and vicious as hungry grizzly bears. I think she is up to it, but she better be ready.

Mr. Joe on August 31, 2008 at 5:22 PM

Here is the Meet the Press transcript from today.

Here are some snippets:

DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN: And I think the last thing is just a sense in which you wonder about what pressure it’s going to put on Governor Palin. You could be Einstein and not be able to answer the questions that you guys are going to put at her. And to put somebody in that position and then to think they’re going to be ready

.

Ah, the little lady just might not be up to it.

MS. ANDREA MITCHELL: Well, they, they think now that they have a story. They have a story of a working mom, she is a colorful character, an Annie Oakley, you know, Annie get your gun.

You need to see Mitchell as she says it.

. . . She is not appealing to the same women who were really voting or supporting Hillary Clinton on ideological issues, but they think that they can peel off some of these working class women, not college-educated, who–the blue collar women who were voting for Hillary Clinton and may be more conservative on social causes.

Again, you have to see Mitchell pause after the “not college-educated” line. I took it as if she realized where she was taking this.

I really loathe the elites, especially snotty media elites.

I hope they keep playing the “she can’t possibly do this” card because I think Governor Palin just might knock them on their rears while in in skirt and heels and holding a baby.

Athena on August 31, 2008 at 5:51 PM

First off, the synopsis of the VP selection process:

“Well, the voters think Republicans are corrupt and wants to throw them out.”

“Well, how ’bout a Republican that thinks Republicans are corrupt and has first-hand experience throwing them out?”

Secondly, with regard to Andrea Mitchell’s take on Clinton voters – believe me, it’s not just the women who will vote Palin. It’s every snowmobiler who looks at the Dems’ record of closing federal land to recreational access under Clinton. It’s every hunter who sees Obama’s best buddies proclaiming gun-friendliness then going out of their way to make their ammo more expensive. It’s everyone who fears what kind of energy policy and climate-change nonsense might come out of an Obama administration stuffed with cabinet undersecretaries fresh outta the enviroloony NGOs.

So we’ll vote McCain now, and grit our teeth for a few years and hope the wheels stay on the GOP bus long enough for her to get the Oval Office in her own right come 2013.

JEM on August 31, 2008 at 6:19 PM

Oh, and the fact that Ms Palin is a pilot and owns her own plane might help ameliorate the unease of private pilots for whom the words “John McCain” has long meant “that user-fee loudmouth.”

JEM on August 31, 2008 at 6:23 PM

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